Fu's Subcutaneous Needling: Possible Clinical Evidence of The Subcutaneous Connective Tissue in Acupuncture

Item

Title

Fu's Subcutaneous Needling: Possible Clinical Evidence of The Subcutaneous Connective Tissue in Acupuncture

Author(s)

Journal Publication

Date

2007

volume

13(1)

pages

47-52

Research Type

RCT

Keywords

Abstract

Objectives: Recently it was reported that the loose connective tissue in the subcutaneous layer rapidly responded to mechanical forces evoked by acupuncture, massage, and normal physical movements. However, there were no clinical studies to substantiate these findings so far. Fu's Subcutaneous Needling (FSN) is the innovative needling strategy acting specifically in the subcutaneous layer. A single-blinded and randomized trial was designed to compare the immediate effects of FSN with different needling directions on myofascial trigger points (MTrP) in the neck. Design: For simplicity, we chose two mutually perpendicular needle directions in this study. In one group, the needle was along the local muscle fibers and pointed to the MTrP (Along Group). In the other group, the needle was across the local muscle fibers and also pointed to the MTrP (Across Group). Subjects: Forty-seven (47) patients were randomly divided into two groups: the Along Group (n = 22) and the Across Group (n = 25). There were no significant differences with respect to age, duration of pain, and gender between the two groups. Interventions: FSN needles were inserted and swayed in the subcutaneous layer 200 times in 2 minutes. Results: Before and after FSN treatment, patients were subjected to the assessment of the following three parameters: motion-related pain, pain under pressure, and the range of cervical movement. Three parameters were all reduced after the FSN intervention. There were no significant differences in variation of the three parameters between the two groups. Conclusion: Immediate effects of FSN on alleviating MTrP in the neck were not relevant to the needling directions

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Frequency of Treatment

N/A

Time in Treatment

N/A

has health condition studied

Neck Pain

has study population number

47

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