AcuTrials

Acupuncture for lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Item

Title

Acupuncture for lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Journal Publication

Complementary therapies in medicine

Date

2013

volume

21(5)

pages

535-556

Research Type

Systematic Review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) negatively affects patients' quality of life. No systematic review evaluating the effects and safety of acupuncture for this population is available. We aimed to evaluate evidence indicating the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for LSS. METHODS: We searched five English-language databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and AMED) and one Chinese database (CAJ) for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of needle acupuncture for LSS. CCTs were analyzed only in terms of safety and intervention-related information. RESULTS: Six RCTs (n=582) and six CCTs, which were all from China and reported in Chinese, were included. High or uncertain risk of bias and clinical heterogeneity due to different acupuncture techniques were observed. All RCTs compared different combinations or techniques of acupuncture. None of the included studies mentioned safety issues. Acupuncture combined with other interventions and/or with additional stimulation increased the number of improved patients compared with acupuncture alone or relatively simpler stimulation (n=582; relative risk, 1.16; 95% confidence interval 1.08-1.25). Pain intensity, overall symptoms, and functional outcomes related to LSS and quality of life showed significantly favourable improvement in the treatment group compared with the control group, which lasted for up to 6 months post-treatment. CONCLUSIONS: We found no conclusive evidence of the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for LSS because of high or uncertain risk of bias and the limited generalisability of the included studies. Future trials using rigorous methodology, appropriate comparisons and clinically relevant outcomes should be conducted.

doi

10.1016/j.ctim.2013.08.007

has health condition studied

Back Pain

has study population number

0

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