AcuTrials

Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture as an Adjunct to Methadone Treatment Services for Heroin Addicts: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Item

Title

Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture as an Adjunct to Methadone Treatment Services for Heroin Addicts: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Journal Publication

American Journal of Chinese Medicine

Date

2014

volume

42(3)

pages

569-586

Research Type

RCT

Keywords

Substance Abusers
Methadone -- Administration and Dosage
Neoadjuvant Therapy -- Methods
Electroacupuncture -- Utilization
Randomized Controlled Trials
Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36)
Descriptive Statistics
Data Analysis Software
Analysis of Variance
Step-Wise Multiple Regression

Abstract

Scant scientific evidence supports the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of opiate dependence. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of acupuncture for heroin addicts on methadone maintenance by measuring the daily consumption of methadone, variations in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores, and heroin craving. Sixty heroin addicts were randomly assigned to true acupuncture (electroacupuncture at the Hegu [LI4] and Zusanli [ST36] acupoints, as well as acupuncture at the Ear Shenmen) or sham acupuncture (minimal acupuncture at the Hegu and Zusanli acupoints without electrical stimulation and superficial acupuncture at the Ear Shenmen), twice weekly for 4 weeks. From week 2 onwards, the daily dose of methadone was reduced by a significantly greater amount with true acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture. True acupuncture was also associated with a greater improvement in sleep latency at follow-up. All adverse events were mild in severity. Acupuncture appears to be a useful adjunct to methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) in heroin addiction.

doi

10.1142/S0192415x14500372

pmid

Accession Number: 103951748. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140603. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Military/Uniformed Services; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Grant Information: This work was supported by grant NSC 100-2320-B-039-029-MY2 from the National Science Council, Taipei, Taiwan.. NLM UID: 7901431.

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