AcuTrials

Connectivity Study of the Neuromechanism of Acute Acupuncture Needling during fMRI in "Overweight" Subjects

Item

Title

Connectivity Study of the Neuromechanism of Acute Acupuncture Needling during fMRI in "Overweight" Subjects

Journal Publication

Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)

Date

2015

Abstract

This functional connectivity study depicts how acupoints ST 36 and SP 9 and their sham acupoints acutely act on blood glucose (GLU), core body temperature (CBT), hunger, and sensations pertaining to needling (De-qi) via the limbic system and dopamine (DA) to affect various brain areas in fasting, adult, and "overweight" Chinese males using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional connectivity (FC) analysis utilized the amygdala (AMY) and hypothalamus (HYP) as regions of interest (ROIs) in the discrete cosine transform and seed correlation analysis methods. There was a significant difference in the spatial patterns of the distinct brain regions between groups. Correlation results showed that increased HYP-hippocampus FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in CBT; increased HYP-putamen-insula FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in GLU; and increased HYP-anterior cingulate cortex FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was probably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. Decreased HYP-thalamus FC after ACU was negatively correlated or anticorrelated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was possibly associated with decreased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. No correlation was found for min SHAM. This was an important study in addressing acute acupuncture effects and neural pathways involving physiology and appetite regulation in overweight individuals.

doi

10.1155/2015/384389

pmid

Accession Number: 108824644. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; diagnostic images; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: .This studywas financially supported by the National Natural ScienceFoundation of China under Grant nos. 81271549, 61131003,and 31150110171, Chinese Academy of Sciences Fellowship forYoung International Scientists no. 2013Y1GA0004, and theFundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.. NLM UID: 101215021.

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