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Author Huang, H.; Zhong, Z.; Chen, J.; Huang, Y.; Luo, J.; Wu, J.; Liao, H.; Zhen, E.; Lin, R.; Fasmer, O.B.; Wik, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of acupuncture at HT7 on heart rate variability: an exploratory study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 30-35  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Healthy Subjects; Cardiovascular System; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non-Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; Heart Rate Variability  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of acupuncture at HT7 on heart rate variability (HRV) in healthy volunteers. METHODS: 120 subjects were divided into four groups using a random number table. The following groups of acupuncture interventions were used: HT7 verum acupuncture; HT7 non-penetrating sham acupuncture; acupuncture at a sham point; and no acupuncture. HRV was recorded 10 min before, during and after each stimulation using an Actiheart ECG recorder. RESULTS: The HT7 verum acupuncture group had higher very-low frequency, low frequency and high frequency components of HRV compared with the control groups during but not after acupuncture. The HT7 verum acupuncture group also had higher SD of normal intervals compared with the sham needling and no acupuncture control groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary study suggests, subject to limitations, that acupuncture at HT7 could affect cardiac autonomic neural regulation in healthy subjects, manifest as increased HRV, most likely via the parasympathetic system.  
  Address Dr Yong Huang, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment Condition Cardiovascular System
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25476448 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1992  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yang, J.; Zeng, F.; Fang, L.; Feng, Y.; Qin, W.; Liu, X.; Song, W.; Xie, H.; Chen, J.; Liang, F. url  openurl
  Title A PET-CT study on the specificity of acupoints through acupuncture treatment in migraine patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication (up) BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 123 Pages 1-14  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Headache Disorders; Migraine; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the field of acupuncture research, the topic of acupoint specificity has received increasing attention, but no unified conclusion has been reached on whether or not acupoint specificity exists. Furthermore, the majority of previous acupuncture neuroimaging studies have been performed using healthy subjects. In this study, patients with migraine were used to investigate acupoint specificity. METHODS: Thirty patients with migraine were enrolled and randomized into three groups: Traditional Acupuncture Group (TAG), Control Acupuncture Group (CAG), and Migraine Group (MG). The TAG was treated by acupuncture stimulation at Waiguan (TE5), Yang Lingquan (GB34), and Fengchi (GB20). The CAG was treated at Touwei (ST8), Pianli (LI6), and Zusanli (ST36). The MG received no treatment. Positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) was used to test for differences in brain activation between the TAG and CAG versus MG, respectively. RESULTS: Traditional acupuncture treatment was more effective for pain reduction than control acupuncture treatment. The TAG showed higher brain metabolism than the MG in the middle temporal cortex (MTC), orbital frontal cortex (OFC), insula, middle frontal gyrus, angular gyrus, post-cingulate cortex (PCC), the precuneus, and the middle cingulate cortex (MCC). Metabolism decreased in the parahippocampus, hippocampus, fusiform gyrus, postcentral gyrus, and cerebellum in the TAG compared with the MG. In the CAG, metabolism increased compared with the MG in the MTC, supratemporal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and MCC, whereas metabolism decreased in the cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture stimulation of different points on similar body regions in migraine patients reduced pain and induced different levels of cerebral glucose metabolism in pain-related brain regions. These findings may support the functional specificity of migraine- treatment-related acupoint.Trial registrationThe number of our clinical trial registration is: ChiCTR-TRC-11001813, and the protocol and inclusion criteria have already been registered as ChiCTR-TRC-11001813.  
  Address Acupuncture and Tuina School, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 30  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1368  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Huang, Y.; Tang, C.; Wang, S.; Lu, Y.; Shen, W.; Yang, J.; Chen, J.; Lin, R.; Cui, S.; Xiao, H.; Qu, S.; Lai, X.; Shan, B. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture regulates the glucose metabolism in cerebral functional regions in chronic stage ischemic stroke patients----a PET-CT cerebral functional imaging study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication (up) BMC neuroscience Abbreviated Journal BMC Neurosci  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 75-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Stroke; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control;  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has been applied to aid in the recovery of post-stroke patients, but its mechanism is unclear. This study aims to analyze the relationship between acupuncture and glucose metabolism in cerebral functional regions in post-stroke patients using 18 FDG PETCT techniques. Forty-three ischemic stroke patients were randomly divided into 5 groups: the Waiguan (TE5) needling group, the TE5 sham needling group, the sham point needling group, the sham point sham needling group and the non-needling group. Cerebral functional images of all patients were then acquired using PET-CT scans and processed by SPM2 software. RESULTS: Compared with the non-needling group, sham needling at TE5 and needling/sham needling at the sham point did not activate cerebral areas. However, needling at TE5 resulted in the activation of Brodmann Area (BA) 30. Needling/sham needling at TE5 and needling at the sham point did not deactivate any cerebral areas, whereas sham needling at the sham point led to deactivation in BA6. Compared with sham needling at TE5, needling at TE5 activated BA13, 19 and 47 and did not deactivate any areas. Compared with needling at the sham point, needling at TE5 had no associated activation but a deactivating effect on BA9. CONCLUSION: Needling at TE5 had a regulating effect on cerebral functional areas shown by PET-CT, and this may relate to its impact on the recovery of post-stroke patients.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture and Massage, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Email: lai1023@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 43  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 485  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tang, H.; Fan, H.; Chen, J.; Yang, M.; Yi, X.; Dai, G.; Chen, J.; Tang, L.; Rong, H.; Wu, J.; Liang, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Lateral Epicondylitis: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication (up) Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-13  
  Keywords Sprains and Strains; Tennis Elbow; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Lateral Epicondylitis; Systematic Review; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Objective. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (LE). Methods. Seven databases and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal were searched to identify relevant studies. The data were extracted and assessed by two independent authors, and Review Manager Software (V.5.3) was used for data synthesis with effect estimate presented as standard mean difference (SMD) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the level of evidence. Results. Four RCTs with 309 participants were included with poor methodological quality. Participants who received acupuncture and acupuncture plus moxibustion with material insulation were likely to have an improvement in elbow functional status and/or myodynamia. The overall quality rated by GRADE was from very low to low. Two studies reported that the needle pain would be the main reason for the dropout. Conclusion. For the small number of included studies with poor methodological quality, no firm conclusion can be drawn regarding the effect of acupuncture of elbow functional status and myodynamia for LE. This trial is registered with CRD42015016199.  
  Address Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Tennis Elbow
  Disease Category Sprains and Strains OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26843886; PMCID:PMC4710923 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2003  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, J. openurl 
  Title Effect of Needling BaiHui (DU20), Shuigou (DU26), and Shenmen(HT7) on FDG PET Cerebral Function Imaging in Vascular Dementia Patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication (up) International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 16 Issue 2 PB - Allerton Pre Pages 99-105  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Dementia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hemiplegia; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 10  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 139  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qin, S.; Wei, H.; Huang, Y.; Qiu, J.; Guo, J.; Chen, J. openurl 
  Title A Clinical Study on Treating Post-Stroke Depression by Head Matrix Acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication (up) International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 10-13  
  Keywords RCT; AcuTrials; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Nervous System Diseases; Stroke; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Other Acupuncture Style; Head Matrix Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 48  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 962  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, Y.; Qu, S.-shan; Zhang, J.-ping; Sun, Y.-ling; Liu, W.-lu; Xie, L.; Huang, Y.; Chen, J.-qi url  openurl
  Title Rapid Onset of the Effects of Combined Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Electroacupuncture on Primary Depression: A Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 1-8  
  Keywords MENTAL depression -- Treatment; SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors -- Therapeutic use; RESEARCH methodology evaluation; ALTERNATIVE medicine; COMBINED modality therapy; CONFIDENCE intervals; Electroacupuncture; EXPERIMENTAL design; HAMILTON Depression Inventory; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; PROBABILITY theory; PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; MEDICAL coding; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation; China  
  Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and electroacupuncture therapies for the early treatment of primary depression. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were analyzed to compare therapy combining SSRIs and electroacupuncture to SSRI therapy alone. The RCTs were identified by searching, among others, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chongqing VIP database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, WANFANG DATA, and the Chinese Biological Medical Literature Database. Scores from Self-Rated Depression Scale (SDS), the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Side Effect Rating Scale (SERS), and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) were analyzed and coded by two independent investigators and used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment. Statistical analyses were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results: Six RCTs were analyzed. The meta-analysis revealed that the combined therapy of SSRIs and electroacupuncture were associated with superior scores on the HAMD, SDS, and SERS measures compared with SSRIs alone after 1-4 weeks of treatment: HAMD scores, mean difference (MD)1 week, 2.32 (95% confidence interval [CI]1 week, 1.47-3.16, p1 week<0.00001); MD2 weeks, 2.65 (95% CI2 weeks, 1.81- 3.50, p2 weeks<0.00001); MD4 weeks, 2.70 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.90-3.51, p4 weeks<0.00001); SDS scores: MD1 week, 3.13 (95% CI1 week, 1.22-5.03, p1 week = 0.001); MD2 weeks, 4.05 (95% CI2 weeks, 0.22-7.87, p2 weeks = 0.04); MD4 weeks, 5.02 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.61-8.43, p4 weeks = 0.004); SERS scores: MD2 weeks, 2.20 (95% CI2 weeks, 1.43-2.96, p2 weeks<0.00001); MD4 weeks, 2.12 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.42-2.83, p4 weeks<0.00001). However, two of the aforementioned outcomes were rated as medium quality because of heterogeneity, as assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that the early treatment of primary depression using both SSRI and electroacupuncture therapies is more efficient than treatments with SSRIs alone and leads to a better and earlier control of depressive symptoms.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 112335762; Source Information: Jan2016, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p1; Subject Term: MENTAL depression -- Treatment; Subject Term: SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors -- Therapeutic use; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: COMBINED modality therapy; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: HAMILTON Depression Inventory; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; Subject Term: SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: MEDICAL coding; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 8p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 11 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2241  
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Author Ma, X.; Guo, Z.; Wang, S.; Zhang, W.; Guo, T.; Chen, J.; Sun, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, C.; Sun, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Eletroacupuncture (EA) Combined with Antidepressants on Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 5 Pages A8-A8  
  Keywords Depression -- Drug Therapy; Electroacupuncture -- Utilization; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Paroxetine -- Administration and Dosage; Symptom Distress Scale; Psychological Tests; Repeated Measures; Quality of Life  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103939556. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140512. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Instrumentation: CES-D; Symptom Distress Scale (SDS) (McCorkle and Young); HAMD-17. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103939556 Serial 2380  
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Author Qu, S. S.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Z. J.; Chen, J. Q.; Lin, R. Y.; Wang, C. Q.; Li, G. L.; Wong, H. K.; Zhao, C. H.; Pan, J. Y.; Guo, S. C.; Zhang, Y. C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A 6-week randomized controlled trial with 4-week follow-up of acupuncture combined with paroxetine in patients with major depressive disorder Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Journal of psychiatric research Abbreviated Journal J Psychiatr Res  
  Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 726-732  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder, Major; Depression; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Mental Illness  
  Abstract Acupuncture possesses the antidepressant potential. In this 6-week randomized controlled trial with 4-week follow-up, 160 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were randomly assigned to paroxetine (PRX) alone (n = 48) or combined with 18 sessions of manual acupuncture (MA, n = 54) or electrical acupuncture (EA, n = 58). Treatment outcomes were measured mainly using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), clinical response and remission rates. Average PRX dose taken and proportion of patients who required an increased PRX dose due to symptom aggravation were also obtained. Both additional MA and EA produced a significantly greater reduction from baseline in score on HAMD-17 and SDS at most measure points from week 1 through week 6 compared to PRX alone. The clinical response was markedly greater in MA (69.8%) and EA (69.6%) groups than the group treated with PRX alone (41.7%, P = 0.004). The proportion of patients who required an increase dose of PRX due to symptom aggravation was significantly lower with MA (5.7%) and EA (8.9%) than PRX alone (22.9%, P = 0.019). At 4 weeks follow-up after completion of acupuncture treatment, patients with EA, but not MA, continued to show significantly greater clinical improvement. Incidence of adverse events was not different in the three groups. Our study indicates that acupuncture can accelerate the clinical response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and prevent the aggravation of depression. Electrical acupuncture may have a long-lasting enhancement of the antidepressant effects (Trial Registration: ChiCTR-TRC-08000278).  
  Address School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, 1023 Shatai Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 18  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 160  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder, Major
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 966  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, Z.; Wang, X.; Liu, J.; Chen, J.; Liu, X.; Nie, G.; Jorgenson, K.; Sohn, K.C.; Huang, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, B.; Kong, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture treatment modulates the corticostriatal reward circuitry in major depressive disorder Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Journal of Psychiatric Research Abbreviated Journal J Psychiatr Res  
  Volume 84 Issue Pages 18-26  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Depression; Fluoxetine; Resting state functional connectivity; Reward; Striatum  
  Abstract Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common disorder with a high prevalence and significant social and economic impacts. Nevertheless, the treatment of MDD is far from satisfactory. Acupuncture treatment has emerged as a promising method for treating MDD. However, the neural mechanism by which acupuncture reduces depressive symptoms is not fully understood. Studies have shown that the corticostriatal reward circuitry is associated with the pathophysiology of MDD; thus, we investigated the corticostriatal resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) before and after real and sham acupuncture treatments combined with the antidepressant fluoxetine. Forty-six female major depressive patients were assigned to either verum acupuncture plus fluoxetine (n = 22) or sham acupuncture plus fluoxetine (n = 24) treatment for 8 weeks, and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected before the first and after the last treatment sessions. The results showed that compared with sham acupuncture, the verum acupuncture group showed: (1) significantly increased rsFC between inferior ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, ventral rostral putamen and amygdala/parahippocampus, as well as dorsal caudate and middle temporal gyrus; (2) significantly decreased rsFC between right ventral rostral putamen and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and right dorsal caudate and bilateral cerebellar tonsil. The increased rsFC between the inferior ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, ventral rostral putamen and amygdala/parahippocampus were significantly positively associated with decreased clinical scores (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Self-Rating Depression Scale scores) at the end of the eight-week treatment. Our findings suggest that acupuncture may achieve treatment effects by modulating the corticostriatal reward/motivation circuitry in MDD patients.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA. Electronic address: kongj@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27693978 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2146  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jobst, K.; Chen, J. H.; McPherson, K.; Arrowsmith, J.; Brown, V.; Efthimiou, J.; Fletcher, H. J.; Maciocia, G.; Mole, P.; Shifrin, K.; . url  openurl
  Title Controlled trial of acupuncture for disabling breathlessness Type of Study RCT
  Year 1986 Publication (up) Lancet Abbreviated Journal Lancet  
  Volume 2 Issue 8521-22 Pages 1416-1419  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Breathlessness; COPD; Moxa, Indirect; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Moxibustion; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dyspnea  
  Abstract In a randomised controlled trial, twelve matched pairs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease received traditional Chinese acupuncture or placebo acupuncture. After three weeks' treatment the traditional-acupuncture group showed significantly greater benefit in terms of subjective scores of breathlessness and six-minute walking distance. Objective measures of lung function were unchanged in either group. Whether these differences are mediated by endogenous opiate and/or peptide release remains speculative  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 13  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 26  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Dyspnea
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 530  
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Author You, X.-M.; Mo, X.-S.; Ma, L.; Zhong, J.-H.; Qin, H.-G.; Lu, Z.; Xiang, B.-D.; Wu, F.-X.; Zhao, X.-H.; Tang, J.; Pang, Y.-H.; Chen, J.; Li, L.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy of Simo Decoction and Acupuncture or Chewing Gum Alone on Postoperative Ileus in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Hepatectomy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication (up) Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 94 Issue 45 Pages e1968  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Ileus; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture Point Injection; Herbal Formula; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract To compare the efficacy of simo decoction (SMD) combined with acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint or chewing gum alone for treating postoperative ileus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy.In postoperative ileus, a frequent complication following hepatectomy, bowel function recovery is delayed, which increases length of hospital stay. Studies suggest that chewing gum may reduce postoperative ileus; SMD and acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint have long been used in China to promote bowel movement.Patients with primary HCC undergoing hepatectomy between January 2015 and August 2015 were randomized to receive SMD and acupuncture (n = 55) or chewing gum (n = 53) or no intervention (n = 54) starting on postoperative day 1 and continuing for 6 consecutive days or until flatus. Primary endpoints were occurrence of postoperative ileus and length of hospital stay; secondary endpoints were surgical complications.Groups treated with SMD and acupuncture or with chewing gum experienced significantly shorter time to first peristalsis, flatus, and defecation than the no-intervention group (all P < 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the combined SMD and acupuncture group (mean 14.0 d, SD 4.9) than in the no-intervention group (mean 16.5 d, SD 6.8; P = 0.014), while length of stay was similar between the chewing gum group (mean 14.7, SD 6.2) and the no-intervention group (P = 0.147). Incidence of grades I and II complications was slightly lower in both intervention groups than in the no-intervention group.The combination of SMD and acupuncture may reduce incidence of postoperative ileus and shorten hospital stay in HCC patients after hepatectomy. Chewing gum may also reduce incidence of ileus but does not appear to affect hospital stay. (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT02438436.).  
  Address From the Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University (XMY, XSM, LM, JHZ, HGQ, ZL, BDX, FXW, YHP, JT, XHZ, JC, LQL); and Guangxi Liver Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Engineering and Technology Research Center, Nanning, PR China (XMY, LM, JHZ, BDX, FXW, YHP, JT, XHZ, JC, LQL)  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 181  
  Time in Treatment 6 Days Condition Ileus
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26559269 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2015  
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Author Zhang, J.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Li, X.; Lai, X.; Zhang, S.; Wang, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Early filiform needle acupuncture for poststroke depression: a meta-analysis of 17 randomized controlled clinical trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Neural Regeneration Research Abbreviated Journal Neural Regen Res  
  Volume 9 Issue 7 Pages 773-784  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Stroke; Poststroke Depression; Meta-analysis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of filiform needle acupuncture for poststroke depression, and to compare acupuncture with the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant drugs. DATA RETRIEVAL: We retrieved data from the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (1979-2012), Wanfang (1980-2012), VIP (1989-2012), Chinese Biomedical Literature (1975-2012), PubMed (1966-2012), Ovid Lww (-2012), and Cochrane Library (-2012) Database using the internet. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials on filiform needle acupuncture versus antidepressant drugs for treatment of poststroke depression were included. Moreover, the included articles scored at least 4 points on the Jadad scale. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: other acupuncture therapies as treatment group, not stroke-induced depression patients, score < 4 points, non-randomized controlled trials, or animal trials. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: These were the Hamilton Depression Scale scores, clinical effective rate, Self-Rating Depression Scale scores, Side Effect Rating Scale scores, and incidence of adverse reaction and events. RESULTS: A total of 17 randomized controlled clinical trials were included. Meta-analysis results displayed that after 4 weeks of treatment, clinical effective rate was better in patients treated with filiform needle acupuncture than those treated with simple antidepressant drugs [relative risk = 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.21, P = 0.01]. At 6 weeks, clinical effective rate was similar between filiform needle acupuncture and antidepressant drug groups. At 2 weeks after filiform needle acupuncture, Hamilton Depression Scale (17 items) scores were lower than in the antidepressant drug group (mean difference = -2.34, 95%CI: -3.46 to -1.22, P < 0.000,1). At 4 weeks, Hamilton Depression Scale (24 items) scores were similar between filiform needle acupuncture and antidepressant drug groups. Self-Rating Depression Scale scores were lower in filiform needle acupuncture group than in the antidepressant drug group. Side Effect Rating Scale was used in only two articles, and no meta-analysis was conducted. Safety evaluation of the 17 articles showed that gastrointestinal tract reactions such as nausea and vomiting were very common in the antidepressant drug group. Incidence of adverse reaction and events was very low in the filiform needle acupuncture group. CONCLUSION: Early filiform needle acupuncture for poststroke depression can perfectly control depression. Filiform needle acupuncture is safe and reliable. Therapeutic effects of filiform needle acupuncture were better than those of antidepressant drugs.  
  Address Staff Room of Acupuncture, College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25206889; PMCID:PMC4146280 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2109  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Liu, J.; Chen, J.; Liu, X.; Nie, G.; Byun, J.-S.; Liang, Y.; Park, J.; Huang, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, B.; Kong, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Repeated acupuncture treatments modulate amygdala resting state functional connectivity of depressive patients Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) NeuroImage. Clinical Abbreviated Journal Neuroimage Clin  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 746-752  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Amygdala; Combination effect; Depression; Fluoxetine; Limbic system; Resting-state functional connectivity  
  Abstract As a widely-applied alternative therapy, acupuncture is gaining popularity in Western society. One challenge that remains, however, is incorporating it into mainstream medicine. One solution is to combine acupuncture with other conventional, mainstream treatments. In this study, we investigated the combination effect of acupuncture and the antidepressant fluoxetine, as well as its underlying mechanism using resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) in patients with major depressive disorders. Forty-six female depressed patients were randomized into a verum acupuncture plus fluoxetine or a sham acupuncture plus fluoxetine group for eight weeks. Resting-state fMRI data was collected before the first and last treatments. Results showed that compared with those in the sham acupuncture treatment, verum acupuncture treatment patients showed 1) greater clinical improvement as indicated by Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) scores; 2) increased rsFC between the left amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC)/preguenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC); 3) increased rsFC between the right amygdala and left parahippocampus (Para)/putamen (Pu). The strength of the amygdala-sgACC/pgACC rsFC was positively associated with corresponding clinical improvement (as indicated by a negative correlation with MADRS and SDS scores). Our findings demonstrate the additive effect of acupuncture to antidepressant treatment and suggest that this effect may be achieved through the limbic system, especially the amygdala and the ACC.  
  Address Psychiatry Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27812501; PMCID:PMC5079358 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2117  
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Author Liu, B.; Chen, J.; Wang, J.; Liu, X.; Duan, X.; Shang, X.; Long, Y.; Chen, Z.; Li, X.; Huang, Y.; He, Y. openurl 
  Title Altered small-world efficiency of brain functional networks in acupuncture at ST36: a functional MRI study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication (up) Public Library of Science One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages e39342, 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; fMRI; Functional MRI  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture in humans can produce clinical effects via the central nervous system. However, the neural substrates of acupuncture's effects remain largely unknown. RESULTS: We utilized functional MRI to investigate the topological efficiency of brain functional networks in eighteen healthy young adults who were scanned before and after acupuncture at the ST36 acupoints (ACUP) and its sham point (SHAM). Whole-brain functional networks were constructed by thresholding temporal correlations matrices of ninety brain regions, followed by a graph theory-based analysis. We showed that brain functional networks exhibited small-world attributes (high local and global efficiency) regardless of the order of acupuncture and stimulus points, a finding compatible with previous studies of brain functional networks. Furthermore, the brain networks had increased local efficiency after ACUP stimulation but there were no significant differences after SHAM, indicating a specificity of acupuncture point in coordinating local information flow over the whole brain. Moreover, significant (P<0.05, corrected by false discovery rate approach) effects of only acupuncture point were detected on nodal degree of the left hippocampus (higher nodal degree at ACUP as compared to SHAM). Using an uncorrected P<0.05, point-related effects were also observed in the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal and occipital regions while stimulation-related effects in various brain regions of frontal, parietal and occipital cortex regions. In addition, we found that several limbic and subcortical brain regions exhibited point- and stimulation-related alterations in their regional homogeneity (P<0.05, uncorrected). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that acupuncture modulates topological organization of whole-brain functional brain networks and the modulation has point specificity. These findings provide new insights into neuronal mechanism of acupuncture from the perspective of functional integration. Further studies would be interesting to apply network analysis approaches to study the effects of acupuncture treatments on brain disorders.  
  Address Department of Radiology, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangdong, China. lbgdhtcm@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 18  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Healthy Subjects
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/25/2015; Date Modified: 10/1/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Radiology, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangdong, China. lbgdhtcm@163.com; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=22761766 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1830  
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Author Chen, C. Y.; Ke, M. D.; Kuo, C. D.; Huang, C. H.; Hsueh, Y. H.; Chen, J. R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The influence of electro-acupuncture stimulation to female constipation patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication (up) The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume 41 Issue 2 Pages 301-313  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Constipation; Gastrointestinal Diseases; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Women's Health  
  Abstract This study aims to examine electro-acupuncture stimulation (EA) assisted therapy with analysis of heart rate variability to understand autonomic nervous activity variability (ANAV) and to track the changes in female patients with constipation. The average ages were 42+/-12 years old. The participants were divided by a single-blind and randomized trial into two groups: the electro-acupuncture-point group, and the non-electro-acupuncture-point group. Both of the groups had eight treatments, once a week. For the electro-acupuncture (EA) group, needles were inserted into their Zusunli (ST36), Shangiuxu (ST37), Tiensu (ST25), Shueidao (ST28), Guanyuan (CV4) and Qihai (CV6) points. For the sham electro-acupuncture (SA) group, needles were inserted into acu-points that were not the ones mentioned for the EA group. While inserting needles, needles were inserted lightly into the participants' skin and removed quickly (mock Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, TENTS). After an eight-week treatment period, the autonomic nervous system activities of the SA group did not show significant differences in their heart rate variability. However, the autonomic nervous system activities of the EA group had continuously increased after each session. The normalized high frequency powers (nHFP) of their autonomic nervous system activities were 26.79 in the first week, and they increased to 32.28 in the fourth week. In the eighth week, their nHFP had increased to 37.60 (p < 0.05). The normalized low frequency power (nLFP) was 30.81 in the first week. However, it decreased to 25.98 after three weeks of treatment. After the eight-week treatment period, the nLFP decreased to 24.84 (p < 0.05). After the eight-week treatment, the control group did not appear to undergo any physiological change, while the constipation had been improved for the experimental group. It was found that the activation of parasympathetic nervous system in the experimental group increased after the eight-week treatment. The effects of such a result on the enhancement of the activation of parasympathetic nervous system and the improvement of constipation should be further discussed.  
  Address Institute of Electronic Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Taiwan.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Constipation
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 136  
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