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Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2953
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2912
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2871
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2830
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2789
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2748
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2694
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2653
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2625
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2584
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2543
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2502
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4
Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2461
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Coyle, M.E.; Liang, H.; Wang, K.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Acupuncture plus moxibustion for herpes zoster: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Dermatologic Therapy Abbreviated Journal Dermatol Ther
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords acupuncture; herpes zoster; meta-analysis; moxibustion; review; systematic; varicella
Abstract Herpes zoster is an acute inflammatory condition which can have a significant impact on quality of life. Antiviral therapies are effective, but do not meet patients' expectations of symptomatic relief. Acupuncture and moxibustion have been used for herpes zoster; this systematic review evaluated their efficacy and safety. Nine English and Chinese databases were searched from their inceptions to March 2016. Randomized controlled trials evaluating the combination of acupuncture plus moxibustion in adult herpes zoster were included. Outcomes included pain intensity and duration, quality of life and adverse events. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan software (version 5.3). Nine studies (945 participants) were included. Studies were of low to moderate methodological quality based on risk of bias assessment. Pain intensity (visual analogue scale) was lower among those who received acupuncture plus moxibustion compared with pharmacotherapy (one study; MD -8.25 mm, 95% CI -12.36 to -4.14). The clinical significance of this result is yet to be established. Some benefits were seen for other pain and cutaneous outcomes, and global improvement in symptoms. Mild adverse events were reported in the intervention groups. Acupuncture plus moxibustion may improve pain and cutaneous outcomes, although current evidence is limited by the number of studies and methodological shortcomings.
Address Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28338265 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2199
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title Electro-acupuncture for post-stroke spasticity: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords acupuncture; meta-analysis; muscle spasticity; spasticity; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electro-acupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and AMED) and four Chinese databases (CBM, CNKI, CQVIP and Wanfang) were searched from their inception to September 2016. DATA SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with Modified Ashworth Scale in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electro-acupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function and activity of daily living were extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials met the search criteria and were included involving 1,425 participants. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in upper limb measured by MAS (SMD: -0.57[-0.84, -0.29]) and improve overall motor function measured by FMA (MD: 10.60[8.67, 12.53]) were significant. It was also found that for spasticity in lower limb, lower-limb motor function and activity of daily living, significant add-on effects of EA were also shown (SMD: -0.88[-1.42, -0.35], MD:4.42[0.06, 8.78] and MD: 6.85[3.64, 10.05] respectively), though with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA was received. CONCLUSIONS: Electro-acupuncture combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in upper and lower limb and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activity of daily living for spasticity patients within 180 days post stroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of electro-acupuncture, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for post-stroke spasticity incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.
Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2185
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Coyle, M.E.; Shergis, J.L.; Huang, E.T.-Y.; Guo, X.; Di, Y.M.; Zhang, A.; Xue, C.C.
Title Acupuncture therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2014 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med
Volume 20 Issue 6 Pages 10-23
Keywords Systematic Review; Acupuncture; COPD; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Abstract CONTEXT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and is projected to be the third leading cause of death by 2030. Acupuncture, a traditional Chinese therapy, has been used for more than 2000 years to treat respiratory conditions and may treat COPD effectively. In previous literature reviews, researchers have noted significant heterogeneity among the included studies, and none of the reviewers found convincing evidence to recommend routine use of acupuncture therapies for COPD. OBJECTIVE: This literature review examined the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapies for patients with COPD in improving lung function, increasing exercise capacity, creating positive subjective changes in symptoms, and enhancing health-related quality of life (QoL). DESIGN: The research team searched the following electronic databases from inception to April 2013: PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Embase (Elsevier), the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chongqing VIP Information Company (CQVIP), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Wanfang Data. The review included randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the benefits of acupuncture or other related therapies for treatment of COPD. Data were extracted into a predefined form; risk of bias was assessed according to the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool; and statistical analyses were made. RESULTS: In total, 16 studies were included in the review. The research team found that the acupuncture therapies used in these studies improved health-related QoL. The team's conclusions, comparing results from the interventions with placebo, were based on data from 3 questionnaires that the studies used: (1) the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), with a mean difference (MD) of -8.33 units (95% CI, -13.13 to -3.53); (2) dyspnea on the Medical Research Council's (MRC's) dyspnea scale, with an MD of -0.34 units (95% CI, -0.38 to -0.30); and (3) the Dyspnea Visual Analogue Scale (DVAS), with an MD of -8.85 mm (95% CI, -11.81 to -5.89). Compared with placebo, acupuncture therapies also increased the distance walked in 6 min (6MWT), with an MD of -28.14 (95% CI, 23.92 to 32.36) compared with placebo. No benefit was seen on measures of lung function when acupuncture therapies were compared with either placebo or drug therapy. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture therapies may result in clinically important improvements in QoL and dyspnea. Future high-quality RCTs should be undertaken to provide conclusive evidence concerning the benefits of acupuncture therapies in the treatment of COPD.
Address Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Program at the Health Innovations Research Institute and School of Health Sciences at RMIT University, Bundoora Campus, Melbourne, Australia
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score
Notes PMID:25478799 Approved yes
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2108
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shergis, J.L.; Ni, X.; Jackson, M.L.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Li, Y.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C.
Title A systematic review of acupuncture for sleep quality in people with insomnia Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2016 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med
Volume 26 Issue Pages 11-20
Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Insomnia; Acupuncture
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Acupuncture is widely used in Asia and increasingly in Western countries. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effects of acupuncture for insomnia. METHODS: We identified randomized controlled trials from English and Chinese databases. Data were extracted using a predefined form and analysed using RevMan 5.2. We included studies that compared acupuncture to sham/placebo, standard pharmacotherapy or cognitive behavioral therapy. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The primary outcome was sleep quality assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). RESULTS: A total of 30 studies involving 2363 participants were included. Acupuncture point combinations included the use of at least one of the recommended points for insomnia, HT7, GV20, SP6. Pharmacotherapy control was used in 27 studies and sham/placebo in three studies. Cognitive behavioral therapy was not used in any of the studies. Pharmacotherapies in all studies were benzodiazepine receptor agonists, except for one that used an antidepressant. Acupuncture was superior to sham/placebo in terms of PSQI (MD -0.79, 95% CI -1.38, -0.19, I(2)=49%). Acupuncture was also more effective than pharmacotherapy (MD -2.76, 95% CI -3.67, -1.85, I(2)=94%). Most studies were at risk of bias. Some mild adverse events were reported but they were not causally related to the acupuncture treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture compared to sham/placebo and pharmacotherapy showed statistically significant results. However, the evidence is limited by bias in the included studies and heterogeneity. Well-designed studies are needed to confirm the results identified in this review.
Address School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score
Notes PMID:27261976 Approved yes
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2055
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, C.; Guo, L.; Guo, X.; Li, G.; Guo, X.
Title Short and long-term efficacy of combining Fuzhengliqi mixture with acupuncture in treatment of functional constipation Type of Study RCT
Year 2013 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med
Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 51-59
Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Constipation; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Herbal Formula; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To explore the short and long-term efficacy of combining Fuzhengliqi mixture (FLM) with acupuncture in treating functional constipation (FC). METHODS: The 560 patients with confirmed diagnosis of FC were randomly assigned to four groups: FLM group, acupuncture group, combined therapy group, and control group. There were 140 cases in each group. The FLM group was administered FLM 60 mL twice a day, while the acupuncture group was treated with acupuncture at acupoints Tianshu (ST 25), Shangjuxu (ST 37), Zusanli (ST 36), Dachangshu (BL 25), and Zhigou (TE 6) twice a day, the combined therapy group with FLM and acupuncture, and the control group was administered mosapride (5 mg thrice a day) and Macrogol 4000 (10 g twice a day). The treatment lasted 6 weeks. The defecation interval, stool property, constipation symptoms, and accompanying symptoms were recorded, graded, and scored. The gastrointestinal transit time (GITT) and motilin (MTL) level in serum and life quality score were detected at three time points (pre-treatment, at the end of treatment, and 60 weeks post-treatment). Moreover, the adverse reactions were also observed. RESULTS: In the FLM group 2 cases were eliminated for not taking medication strictly according to the research plan and 1 case was lost to follow-up, while 2 cases in the acupuncture group and 2 cases in the combined therapy group were lost to follow-up. Compared with those detected pre-treatment, the defecation interval, stool property, constipation symptom grade, accompanying symptom grade, and GITT were all decreased markedly at the end of treatment in every group, while the MTL levels in serum and life quality score were increased markedly (P<0.01), the above-mentioned detecting indices were better in the combined therapy group than those in other groups (P<0.05). Compared with the end of treatment, above-mentioned detecting indices all recurred significantly in the FLM group and control group 60 weeks post-treatment (P>0.05), but these indices recurred insignificantly in the acupuncture and combined therapy groups (P>0.05). The short and long-term total effective rates in the combined therapy group were significantly different from those in other groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01). No serious adverse reactions were found in four groups. CONCLUSION: Both FLM and acupuncture can significantly shorten the defecation interval and GITT, increase MTL levels in serum, decrease the scores of stool property, constipation symptoms, and accompanying symptoms in patients with FC to increase their life quality. The combined therapy is much better in long-term efficacy and the safety is also good, worth spreading in clinical practice.
Address Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Weihui 453100, China. g75zh@yahoo.com.cn
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up 60 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 560
Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Constipation
Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1426
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Author Shi, H. F.; Xu, B.; Guo, X. C.; Qiu, X. W.; Zhang, Y. P.; Ding, X. J.
Title Effect of Gan-Pi Regulatory Needling In Treating Chloasma Type of Study RCT
Year 2010 Publication Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 66-70
Keywords Skin Diseases; Melanosis; Chloasma; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupuncture; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; No Treatment Control; AcuTrials;
Abstract
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 30
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90
Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Melanosis
Disease Category Skin Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1045
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Author Chen, M. R.; Wang, P.; Cheng, G.; Guo, X.; Wei, G. W.; Cheng, X. H.
Title The warming acupuncture for treatment of sciatica in 30 cases Type of Study RCT
Year 2009 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med
Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 50-53
Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Back Pain; Sciatica; Warming Needle; Acu Versus CAM Control; Herbal Injection; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe the relation between the pain threshold and the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for sciatica. METHODS: 90 sciatica patients were equally divided at random into the following 3 groups: a warming acupuncture group treated with the needles warmed by burning moxa, a western medicine group administered Nimesulide tablets and a point-injection group with Anisodamine injected. The pain threshold was tested before treatment and after the first, second and third treatment courses. RESULTS: The warming acupuncture therapy showed better therapeutic effects than the other two groups with significant differences in the change of pain threshold and the improvement of clinical symptoms and signs (P&lt;0.01). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture can relieve the symptoms of sciatica with the increase of pain threshold.
Address Hunan TCM Professional Training College, Zhuzhou 412012, China.
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 30
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90
Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Sciatica
Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 144
Permanent link to this record