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Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2950  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2909  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2868  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2827  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2786  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2745  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2682  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2641  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2622  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2581  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2540  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2499  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2458  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Myofascial Trigger Point; Dry Needling, With Non-Acupuncture Needle  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2417  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author You, X.-M.; Mo, X.-S.; Ma, L.; Zhong, J.-H.; Qin, H.-G.; Lu, Z.; Xiang, B.-D.; Wu, F.-X.; Zhao, X.-H.; Tang, J.; Pang, Y.-H.; Chen, J.; Li, L.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy of Simo Decoction and Acupuncture or Chewing Gum Alone on Postoperative Ileus in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Hepatectomy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 94 Issue 45 Pages e1968  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Ileus; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture Point Injection; Herbal Formula; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract To compare the efficacy of simo decoction (SMD) combined with acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint or chewing gum alone for treating postoperative ileus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy.In postoperative ileus, a frequent complication following hepatectomy, bowel function recovery is delayed, which increases length of hospital stay. Studies suggest that chewing gum may reduce postoperative ileus; SMD and acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint have long been used in China to promote bowel movement.Patients with primary HCC undergoing hepatectomy between January 2015 and August 2015 were randomized to receive SMD and acupuncture (n = 55) or chewing gum (n = 53) or no intervention (n = 54) starting on postoperative day 1 and continuing for 6 consecutive days or until flatus. Primary endpoints were occurrence of postoperative ileus and length of hospital stay; secondary endpoints were surgical complications.Groups treated with SMD and acupuncture or with chewing gum experienced significantly shorter time to first peristalsis, flatus, and defecation than the no-intervention group (all P < 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the combined SMD and acupuncture group (mean 14.0 d, SD 4.9) than in the no-intervention group (mean 16.5 d, SD 6.8; P = 0.014), while length of stay was similar between the chewing gum group (mean 14.7, SD 6.2) and the no-intervention group (P = 0.147). Incidence of grades I and II complications was slightly lower in both intervention groups than in the no-intervention group.The combination of SMD and acupuncture may reduce incidence of postoperative ileus and shorten hospital stay in HCC patients after hepatectomy. Chewing gum may also reduce incidence of ileus but does not appear to affect hospital stay. (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT02438436.).  
  Address From the Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University (XMY, XSM, LM, JHZ, HGQ, ZL, BDX, FXW, YHP, JT, XHZ, JC, LQL); and Guangxi Liver Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Engineering and Technology Research Center, Nanning, PR China (XMY, LM, JHZ, BDX, FXW, YHP, JT, XHZ, JC, LQL)  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 181  
  Time in Treatment 6 Days Condition Ileus
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26559269 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2015  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, L.; Zheng, P.; Chen, X.; Bai, Y.; Mao, M. url  openurl
  Title Clinical Study on Acupuncture and Ischemic Stroke Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 137-139  
  Keywords Stroke; Ischemic Stroke; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified  
  Abstract Objective: To study the clinical efficacy of acupuncture for ischemic stroke and its effect on ET-1 levels in IS cases. Method: The 63 cases were randomized into a treatment group (31 cases), receiving acupuncture and routine method, and control group (32 cases), receiving routine method alone. Seven days constitute a course of treatment, a 2-day interval between two courses. The clinical efficacy and ET-1 level in two groups were compared after four weeks. Result: The total effective rate in the treatment group and control group were 96.8% and 75% respectively, with a statistical significance (P.<0.05); the ET-1 level in blood plasma also with a statistical significance after the treatment (P<0.05); the pre-treatment and post-treatment ET-1 level in the treatment group showed a statistical significance (P<0.01), whereas the control group didn't. Conclusion: Acupuncture is effective for ischemic stroke and can lower the ET-1 level in ischemic stroke cases.  
  Address Chengdu No 1 People's Hospital, Sichuan 610041, P. R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 25  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 63  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/19/2015; Availability: --In File-- Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1747  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, L.; Zhang, H.; Meng, S.Q.; Qian, H.Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An updated meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for cerebral infarction Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages e114057  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Stroke; Cerebral Infarction; Nervous System Diseases; Acupuncture; Hemiplegia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Ischemic stroke is the second most common cause of death and the primary cause of disability throughout the world. Acupuncture is frequently advocated as an adjunct treatment during stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to update the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture for cerebral infarction. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials (RCT) on acupuncture treating cerebral infarction were searched from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, CMB and VIP from inception to October 2013. The data of RCTs meeting the inclusive criteria were extracted according to Cochrane methods. The meta-analyses were conducted using Rev Man 5.0 software. RESULTS: A total of 25 trials involving 2224 patients were included. The results of this meta-analysis showed that the groups receiving acupuncture (observation group) were superior to the comparison groups (control group), with significant differences in the Clinical Efficacy Rates [OR = 4.04, 95%CI (2.93, 5.57), P<0.001], Fugl-Meyer Assessment [MD = 11.22, 95%CI (7.62, 14.82), P<0.001], Barthel Index Score [MD = 12.84, 95%CI (9.85, 15.82), P<0.001], and Neurological Deficit Score [MD = -2.71, 95% CI (-3.84, -1.94), P<0.001]. Three trials reported minor adverse events. CONCLUSION: Current evidence provisionally demonstrates that acupuncture treatment is superior to either non-acupuncture or conventional therapy for cerebral infarction. Despite this conclusion, given the often low quality of the available trials, further large scale RCTs of better quality are still needed.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category New Articles to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 4/23/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Neurology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25438041 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1695  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, L. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation on Acupuncture-moxibustion Therapy in Treating Ankylosing Spondylitis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages 318-320  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Arthritis; Spondylitis, Ankylosing; RCT; Acu Versus Acu; Acu Versus CAM Control; Warming Needle; Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa; TCM Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; CAM Control; Electroacupuncture; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Objective: To compare the clinical effects of different acupuncture methods in treating ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Sixty patients in accordance with the diagnostic criteria for AS were randomly divided into an observation group (30 cases) and a control group (30 cases). Patients in the observation group were given warm needling therapy, while that in the control group were treated by electroacupuncture. The effects of the two groups were compared after treatment. Results: The curative rate of the observation group was 40.0%, and the total effective rate was 96.7%; the curative rate of the control group was 10.0%, and the total effective rate was 76.7%. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: As to acupuncture treatment for AS, warming needling moxibustion was significantly more effective than electroacupuncture.  
  Address Acupuncture Department, Kunming Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Yunnan 650011, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Spondylitis, Ankylosing
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 684  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, A.C.M.; Cheung, R. T. F.; Jiang, X.; Au-Yeung, P.; Li, L.S.W. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture of Motor-Implicated Acupoints on Subacute Stroke Patients: An fMRI Evaluation Study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct  
  Volume 21 Issue 4 Pages 233-241  
  Keywords Stroke; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Acu Versus Acu; AcuTrials  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 18  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 133  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, Sh; Liu, M.; Asplund, K.; Li, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for acute stroke Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2005 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 2 Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Stroke; AcuTrials; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture-like sensory stimulation activates multiple efferent (nerve) pathways leading to altered activity in numerous neural systems. Acupuncture is widely accepted by Chinese people and it is increasingly requested by patients and their relatives in Western countries. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in patients with acute stroke. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group trials register (last searched August 2003), the Chinese Stroke Trials Register (August 2003) and the Chinese Acupuncture Trials Register (August 2003). Electronic searches were performed in the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2003), MEDLINE (1966 to 2003), EMBASE (1980 to 2003), Alternative Medicine Database (1985 to 2003), CINAHL (1982 to 2003) and the Chinese Biological Medicine Database (1981 to 2003). Reference lists of systematic reviews and identified trials were handsearched. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of acupuncture started within 30 days of stroke onset, compared with placebo/sham acupuncture or open control in patients with acute ischaemic and/or haemorrhagic stroke. Needling into skin was required for acupuncture. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted the data independently. Authors of trials were contacted for missing data. MAIN RESULTS: Fourteen trials involving 1208 patients were included. Ten trials included patients with only ischaemic stroke. When acupuncture was compared with sham acupuncture or open control, there was a borderline significant trend towards fewer patients being dead or dependent (Odds ratio (OR) 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43 to 0.99), and significantly fewer being dead or needing institutional care (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.96) in the acupuncture group after three months or more. There was also a significant difference favouring acupuncture in the mean change of global neurological deficit score during the treatment period (standardized mean difference (SMD) 1.17, 95% CI 0.30 to 2.04). Comparison of acupuncture with sham acupuncture only showed a statistically significant difference on death or requiring institutional care (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.96), but not on death or dependency (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.12), or change of global neurological deficit score (SMD 0.01, 95% CI -0.55 to 0.57). Severe adverse events with acupuncture (dizziness, intolerable pain and infection of acupoints) were rare (6/386, 1.55%). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture appeared to be safe but without clear evidence of benefit. The number of patients is too small to be certain whether acupuncture is effective for treatment of acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Larger, methodologically-sound trials are required  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 1443  
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