toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/acutrialsocom/public_html/refbase-ocom/includes/include.inc.php on line 5275
  Records Links
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2458  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2499  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2540  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2581  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2622  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2641  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2682  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2745  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2786  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2827  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2868  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2909  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 99 Issue 1 Pages 144-152.e2  
  Keywords Combined Modality Therapy; *Complementary Therapies; Humans; Low Back Pain/complications/*therapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications/*therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Trigger Points; *Low back pain; *Meta-analysis [publication type]; *Needles; *Randomized controlled trial as topic; *Rehabilitation; *Trigger points  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2950  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Myofascial Trigger Point; Dry Needling, With Non-Acupuncture Needle  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2417  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author You, X.-M.; Mo, X.-S.; Ma, L.; Zhong, J.-H.; Qin, H.-G.; Lu, Z.; Xiang, B.-D.; Wu, F.-X.; Zhao, X.-H.; Tang, J.; Pang, Y.-H.; Chen, J.; Li, L.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy of Simo Decoction and Acupuncture or Chewing Gum Alone on Postoperative Ileus in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Hepatectomy Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2015 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 94 Issue 45 Pages e1968  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Ileus; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture Point Injection; Herbal Formula; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract To compare the efficacy of simo decoction (SMD) combined with acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint or chewing gum alone for treating postoperative ileus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy.In postoperative ileus, a frequent complication following hepatectomy, bowel function recovery is delayed, which increases length of hospital stay. Studies suggest that chewing gum may reduce postoperative ileus; SMD and acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint have long been used in China to promote bowel movement.Patients with primary HCC undergoing hepatectomy between January 2015 and August 2015 were randomized to receive SMD and acupuncture (n = 55) or chewing gum (n = 53) or no intervention (n = 54) starting on postoperative day 1 and continuing for 6 consecutive days or until flatus. Primary endpoints were occurrence of postoperative ileus and length of hospital stay; secondary endpoints were surgical complications.Groups treated with SMD and acupuncture or with chewing gum experienced significantly shorter time to first peristalsis, flatus, and defecation than the no-intervention group (all P < 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the combined SMD and acupuncture group (mean 14.0 d, SD 4.9) than in the no-intervention group (mean 16.5 d, SD 6.8; P = 0.014), while length of stay was similar between the chewing gum group (mean 14.7, SD 6.2) and the no-intervention group (P = 0.147). Incidence of grades I and II complications was slightly lower in both intervention groups than in the no-intervention group.The combination of SMD and acupuncture may reduce incidence of postoperative ileus and shorten hospital stay in HCC patients after hepatectomy. Chewing gum may also reduce incidence of ileus but does not appear to affect hospital stay. (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT02438436.).  
  Address From the Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University (XMY, XSM, LM, JHZ, HGQ, ZL, BDX, FXW, YHP, JT, XHZ, JC, LQL); and Guangxi Liver Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Engineering and Technology Research Center, Nanning, PR China (XMY, LM, JHZ, BDX, FXW, YHP, JT, XHZ, JC, LQL)  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 181  
  Time in Treatment 6 Days Condition Ileus
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26559269 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2015  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Man, S. C.; Hung, B. H.; Ng, R. M.; Yu, X. C.; Cheung, H.; Fung, M. P.; Li, L. S.; Leung, K. P.; Leung, K. P.; Tsang, K. W.; Ziea, E.; Wong, V. T.; Zhang, Z. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A pilot controlled trial of a combination of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation and body acupuncture for post-stroke depression Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue Pages 255-  
  Keywords RCT; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Pilot Study; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our previous studies have demonstrated the treatment benefits of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS), a novel brain stimulation therapy in patients with major depression, postpartum depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of DCEAS combined with body acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). METHODS: In a single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 43 patients with PSD were randomly assigned to 12 sessions of DCEAS plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 23), or sham (non-invasive cranial electroacupuncture, n-CEA) plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 20) for 3 sessions per week over 4 weeks. Treatment outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), the Clinical Global Impression – Severity scale (CGI-S) and Barthel Index (BI), a measure used to evaluate movement ability associated with daily self-caring activity. RESULTS: DCEAS produced a significantly greater reduction of both HAMD-17 and CGI-S as early as week 1 and CGI-S at endpoint compared to n-CEA, but subjects of n-CEA group exhibited a significantly greater improvement on BI at week 4 than DCEAS. Incidence of adverse events was not different in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that DCEAS could be effective in reducing stroke patients' depressive symptoms. Superficial electrical stimulation in n-CEA group may be beneficial in improving movement disability of stroke patients. A combination of DCEAS and body acupuncture can be considered a treatment option for neuropsychiatric sequelae of stroke. TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01174394.  
  Address The School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 10 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. zhangzj@hku.hk.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 43  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 812  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhu, L. B.; Chan, W. C.; Lo, K. C.; Yum, T. P.; Li, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wrist-ankle acupuncture for the treatment of pain symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acupuncture; Wrist-Ankle Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Routine acupuncture incorporates wrist-ankle acupuncture (WAA) for its analgesic effect, but WAA is not widely used in clinics due to incomplete knowledge of its effectiveness and concerns about less clinical research and because less people know it. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and possible adverse effects of WAA or WAA adjuvants in the treatment of pain symptoms. This study compared WAA or WAA adjuvant with the following therapies: western medication (WM), sham acupuncture (SA), or body acupuncture (BA). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched systematically in related electronic databases by two independent reviewers. 33 RCTs were finally included, in which 7 RCTs were selected for meta-analysis. It was found that WAA or WAA adjuvant was significantly more effective than WM, SA, or BA in pain relief. There was nothing different between WAA and SA in adverse events, but WAA was marginally significantly safer than WM. Although both WAA and WAA adjuvant appeared to be more effective than WM, SA, or BA in the treatment of pain symptoms with few side effects, further studies with better and more rigorously designed are still necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety issue of WAA due to the poor methodology and small sample size of previous studies.  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 10 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1486  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, L.; Zhang, H.; Meng, S.Q.; Qian, H.Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An updated meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for cerebral infarction Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year (down) 2014 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages e114057  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Stroke; Cerebral Infarction; Nervous System Diseases; Acupuncture; Hemiplegia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Ischemic stroke is the second most common cause of death and the primary cause of disability throughout the world. Acupuncture is frequently advocated as an adjunct treatment during stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to update the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture for cerebral infarction. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials (RCT) on acupuncture treating cerebral infarction were searched from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, CMB and VIP from inception to October 2013. The data of RCTs meeting the inclusive criteria were extracted according to Cochrane methods. The meta-analyses were conducted using Rev Man 5.0 software. RESULTS: A total of 25 trials involving 2224 patients were included. The results of this meta-analysis showed that the groups receiving acupuncture (observation group) were superior to the comparison groups (control group), with significant differences in the Clinical Efficacy Rates [OR = 4.04, 95%CI (2.93, 5.57), P<0.001], Fugl-Meyer Assessment [MD = 11.22, 95%CI (7.62, 14.82), P<0.001], Barthel Index Score [MD = 12.84, 95%CI (9.85, 15.82), P<0.001], and Neurological Deficit Score [MD = -2.71, 95% CI (-3.84, -1.94), P<0.001]. Three trials reported minor adverse events. CONCLUSION: Current evidence provisionally demonstrates that acupuncture treatment is superior to either non-acupuncture or conventional therapy for cerebral infarction. Despite this conclusion, given the often low quality of the available trials, further large scale RCTs of better quality are still needed.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category New Articles to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 4/23/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Neurology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25438041 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1695  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bai, Y. L.; Li, L.; Hu, Y. S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, P. J.; Wang, S. W.; Yang, M.; Xu, Y. M.; Zhu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial of Physiotherapy and Acupuncture on Motor Function and Daily Activities in Patients with Ischemic Stroke Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 8 Pages 684-689  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Stroke; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Physical; Motor Function  
  Abstract Abstract Objective: To assess the value of acupuncture for promoting the recovery of patients with ischemic stroke and to determine whether the outcomes of combined physiotherapy and acupuncture are superior to those with physiotherapy alone. Design: Prospective randomized controlled trial. Setting: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, P. R. China. Participants: 120 inpatients and outpatients (84 men and 36 women). Interventions: Acupuncture, physiotherapy, and physiotherapy combined with acupuncture. Main outcome measures: Motor function in the limbs was measured with the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA). The modified Barthel index (MBI) was used to rate activities of daily living. All evaluations were performed by assessors blinded to treatment group. Results: On the first day of therapy (day 0, baseline), FMA and MBI scores did not significantly differ among the treatment groups. Compared with baseline, on the 28th day of therapy the mean FMA scores of the physiotherapy, acupuncture, and combined treatment groups had increased by 65.6%, 57.7%, and 67.2%, respectively; on the 56th day, FMA scores had increased by 88.1%, 64.5%, and 88.6%, respectively (p&lt;0.05). The respective MBI scores in the three groups increased by 85.2%, 60.4%, and 63.4% at day 28 and by 108.0%, 71.2%, and 86.2% at day 56, respectively (p&lt;0.05). However, FMA scores did not significantly differ among the three treatment groups on the 28th day. By the 56th day, the FMA and MBI scores of the physiotherapy group were 46.1% and 33.2% greater, respectively, than those in the acupuncture group p&lt;0.05). No significant differences were seen between the combined treatment group and the other groups. In addition, the FMA subscores for the upper extremities did not reflect any significant improvement in any group on the 56th day. Although the FMA subscores for the upper and lower extremities and the MBI score in the combined treatment group were higher than those in the acupuncture group, the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture is less effective for the outcome measures studied than is physiotherapy. Moreover, the therapeutic effect of combining acupuncture with physiotherapy was not superior to that of physiotherapy alone. A larger-scale clinical trial is necessary to confirm these findings.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 52  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, L. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation on Acupuncture-moxibustion Therapy in Treating Ankylosing Spondylitis Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2012 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages 318-320  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Arthritis; Spondylitis, Ankylosing; RCT; Acu Versus Acu; Acu Versus CAM Control; Warming Needle; Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa; TCM Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; CAM Control; Electroacupuncture; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Objective: To compare the clinical effects of different acupuncture methods in treating ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Sixty patients in accordance with the diagnostic criteria for AS were randomly divided into an observation group (30 cases) and a control group (30 cases). Patients in the observation group were given warm needling therapy, while that in the control group were treated by electroacupuncture. The effects of the two groups were compared after treatment. Results: The curative rate of the observation group was 40.0%, and the total effective rate was 96.7%; the curative rate of the control group was 10.0%, and the total effective rate was 76.7%. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: As to acupuncture treatment for AS, warming needling moxibustion was significantly more effective than electroacupuncture.  
  Address Acupuncture Department, Kunming Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Yunnan 650011, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Spondylitis, Ankylosing
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 684  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: