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Author Liu, Z.; Yan, S.; Wu, J.; He, L.; Li, N.; Dong, G.; Fang, J.; Fu, W.; Fu, L.; Sun, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, S.; Yang, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, Z.; Ai, Y.; Zhou, K.; Liu, J.; Xu, H.; Cai, Y.; Liu, B.
Title Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized Trial Type of Study RCT
Year 2016 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med
Volume 165 Issue 11 Pages 761-769
Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Constipation; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acu Versus Sham; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control
Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used for chronic constipation, but evidence for its effectiveness remains scarce. Objective: To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). Design: Randomized, parallel, sham-controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01726504). Setting: 15 hospitals in China. Participants: Patients with CSFC and no serious underlying pathologic cause for constipation. Intervention: 28 sessions of EA at traditional acupoints or sham EA (SA) at nonacupoints over 8 weeks. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change from baseline in mean weekly complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBMs) during weeks 1 to 8. Participants were followed until week 20. Results: 1075 patients (536 and 539 in the EA and SA groups, respectively) were enrolled. The increase from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 1 to 8 was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.61 to 1.89) in the EA group and 0.87 (CI, 0.73 to 0.97) in the SA group (between-group difference, 0.90 [CI, 0.74 to 1.10]; P < 0.001). The change from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 9 to 20 was 1.96 (CI, 1.78 to 2.11) in the EA group and 0.89 (CI, 0.69 to 0.95) in the SA group (between-group difference, 1.09 [CI, 0.94 to 1.31]; P < 0.001). The proportion of patients having 3 or more mean weekly CSBMs in the EA group was 31.3% and 37.7% over the treatment and follow-up periods, respectively, compared with 12.1% and 14.1% in the SA group (P < 0.001). Acupuncture-related adverse events during treatment were infrequent in both groups, and all were mild or transient. Limitations: Longer-term follow-up was not assessed. Acupuncturists could not be blinded. Conclusion: Eight weeks of EA increases CSBMs and is safe for the treatment of CSFC. Additional study is warranted to evaluate a longer-term treatment and follow-up. Primary Funding Source: Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China through the Twelfth Five-Year National Science and Technology Pillar Program.
Address From Guang'anmen Hospital, Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Capital Medical University, Dongzhimen Hospital of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Huguosi Hospital of Chinese Medicine of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing; West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan; Yueyang Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang; Guangdong Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong; The First Affiliated Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin; Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu; Heilongjiang Province Academy of Chinese Medical Science, Ha'erbin, Heilongjiang; The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui; Wuhan Integrated Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medical Hospital, Hubei Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Wuhan, Hubei, China; and Daemen College, Physical Therapy Wound Care Clinic, Amherst, New York
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments 8
Treatment Follow-up Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 1075
Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Constipation
Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score
Notes PMID:27618593 Approved yes
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2182
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Author Liu, Z.; Yan, S.; Wu, J.; He, L.; Li, N.; Dong, G.; Fang, J.; Fu, W.; Fu, L.; Sun, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, S.; Yang, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, Z.; Ai, Y.; Zhou, K.; Liu, J.; Xu, H.; Cai, Y.; Liu, B.
Title Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used for chronic constipation, but evidence for its effectiveness remains scarce. Objective: To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). Design: Randomized, parallel, sham-controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01726504). Setting: 15 hospitals in China. Participants: Patients with CSFC and no serious underlying pathologic cause for constipation. Intervention: 28 sessions of EA at traditional acupoints or sham EA (SA) at nonacupoints over 8 weeks. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change from baseline in mean weekly complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBMs) during weeks 1 to 8. Participants were followed until week 20. Results: 1075 patients (536 and 539 in the EA and SA groups, respectively) were enrolled. The increase from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 1 to 8 was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.61 to 1.89) in the EA group and 0.87 (CI, 0.73 to 0.97) in the SA group (between-group difference, 0.90 [CI, 0.74 to 1.10]; P < 0.001). The change from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 9 to 20 was 1.96 (CI, 1.78 to 2.11) in the EA group and 0.89 (CI, 0.69 to 0.95) in the SA group (between-group difference, 1.09 [CI, 0.94 to 1.31]; P < 0.001). The proportion of patients having 3 or more mean weekly CSBMs in the EA group was 31.3% and 37.7% over the treatment and follow-up periods, respectively, compared with 12.1% and 14.1% in the SA group (P < 0.001). Acupuncture-related adverse events during treatment were infrequent in both groups, and all were mild or transient. Limitations: Longer-term follow-up was not assessed. Acupuncturists could not be blinded. Conclusion: Eight weeks of EA increases CSBMs and is safe for the treatment of CSFC. Additional study is warranted to evaluate a longer-term treatment and follow-up. Primary Funding Source: Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China through the Twelfth Five-Year National Science and Technology Pillar Program.
Address
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:27618593 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2156
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Author Xue, Q.M.; Li, N.; Liu, Z.S.; Wang, C.W.; Lu, J.Q.
Title Efficacy of electroacupuncture in the treatment of functional constipation: A randomized controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chin J Integr Med Abbreviated Journal
Volume 21 Issue 6 Pages 459-463
Keywords
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture at Tianshu (ST25) for patients with functional constipation (FC). METHODS: Ninety-six patients with FC were randomized to receive deep needling on bilateral ST25 (group A, 48 cases) or shallow needling on bilateral ST25 (group B, 48 cases) with electroacupuncture once daily for 4 weeks. The proportion of patients with four or more complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBMs) per week, and scores of constipation symptoms and satisfaction with treatment were compared between two groups. Safety was also assessed. RESULTS: The proportion of patients with four or more CSBMs per week was 52.1% in group A, significantly higher than 25.0% in group B during the 4-week treatment (P<0.05). The constipation symptom score of patients were significantly improved in group A as compared with group B at week 2-4 (P<0.05). Patients in group A were more satisfied with their treatment compared with those in group B at week 1-4 (P<0.05). Five patients in group A felt significant pain and discomfort. No other adverse reaction was observed in both groups. CONCLUSION: Using electroacupuncture at ST25 to treat patients with FC is effectively, and deep needling had more stable effect than shallow needling.
Address Department of Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, China.
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category Obtain in OCOM Library OCSI Score
Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 6/30/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, China.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=26063319 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1618
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Author Zhang, S.; Wu, B.; Liu, M.; Li, N.; Zeng, X.; Liu, H.; Yang, Q.; Han, Z.; Rao, P.; Wang, D.
Title Acupuncture efficacy on ischemic stroke recovery: multicenter randomized controlled trial in china Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Stroke Abbreviated Journal
Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 1301-1306
Keywords AcuTrials; Stroke; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Hemiplegia; Ischemic Stroke
Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Acupuncture is a frequently used complementary treatment for ischemic stroke in China but the evidence available from previous randomized trials is inconclusive. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in a more robustly designed larger scale trial. METHODS: This is a multicenter, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Eight hundred sixty-two hospitalized patients with limb paralysis between 3 to 10 days after ischemic stroke onset were allocated acupuncture plus standard care or standard care alone. The acupuncture was applied 5 times per week for 3 to 4 weeks. The primary outcomes were defined as follows: (1) death/disability according to Barthel index and (2) death/institutional care at 6 months. RESULTS: There was a tendency of fewer patients being dead or dependent in acupuncture group (80/385, 20.7%) than in control group (102/396, 25.8%) at 6 months (odds ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.05). The benefit was noted in subgroup receiving >/=10 sessions of acupuncture (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.98). There was no statistical difference in death or institutional care between the 2 groups (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.79). Severe adverse events occurred in 7.6% and 8.3% of patients in the 2 groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture seemed to be safe in the subacute phase of ischemic stroke. If the potential benefits observed are confirmed in future larger study, the health gain from wider use of the treatment could be substantial.
Address Department of Neurology (S.Z., B.W., M.L.) and Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion (N.L.), West China Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China.
Publisher (c) 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
Language Number of Treatments 18
Treatment Follow-up 27.5 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 862
Time in Treatment 3.5 Weeks Condition Stroke
Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score
Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 7/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; From the Department of Neurology (S.Z., B.W., M.L.) and Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion (N.L.), West China Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25873601 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1599
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Author Wu, J.; Liu, B.; Li, N.; Sun, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Ye, Y.; Liu, J.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z.
Title Effect and safety of deep needling and shallow needling for functional constipation: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
Year 2014 Publication Medicine (Baltimore) Abbreviated Journal
Volume 93 Issue 28 Pages
Keywords RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Constipation; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Lactulose; Usual Care Control; Bowel Function
Abstract Aupuncture is widely used for functional constipation. Effect of acupuncture might be related to the depth of needling; however, the evidence is limited. This trial aimed to evaluate the effect and safety of deep needling and shallow needling for functional constipation, and to assess if the deep needling and shallow needling are superior to lactulose. We conducted a prospective, superiority-design, 5-center, 3-arm randomized controlled trial. A total of 475 patients with functional constipation were randomized to the deep needling group (237), shallow needling group (119), and lactulose-controlled group (119) in a ratio of 2:1:1. Sessions lasted 30 minutes each time and took place 5 times a week for 4 weeks in 2 acupuncture groups. Participants in the lactulose group took lactulose orally for 16 continuous weeks. The primary outcome was the change from baseline of mean weekly spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs) during week 1 to 4 (changes from the baselines of the weekly SBMs at week 8 and week 16 in follow-up period were also assessed simultaneously). Secondary outcomes were the weekly SBMs of each assessing week, the mean score change from the baseline of constipation-related symptoms over week 1 to 4, and the time to the first SBM. Emergency drug usage and adverse effects were monitored throughout the study.SBMs and constipation-related symptoms were all improved in the 3 groups compared with baseline at each time frame (P<0.01, all). The changes in the mean weekly SBMs over week 1 to 4 were 2 (1.75) in the deep needling group, 2 (1.75) in the shallow needling group, and 2 (2) in the lactulose group (P>0.05, both compared with the lactulose group). The changes of mean weekly SBMs at week 8 and week 16 in the follow-up period were 2 (2), 2 (2.5) in the deep needling group, 2 (3), 1.5 (2.5) in the shallow needling group, and 1 (2), 1 (2) in the lactulose group (P<0.05, all compared with the lactulose group). No significant difference was observed among the 3 groups regarding the score changes of straining, incomplete evacuation, abdominal distention during spontaneous defecating, or Cleveland Clinic Scores over week 1 to 4. However, the lactulose group got better effect than other 2 acupuncture groups in improving stool consistency (P<0.01, both) and shortening the time to the first SBM (P<0.05, both). The percentage of emergency drugs used in the 2 acupuncture groups were both lower than in the lactulose group at each time frame (P<0.01, all). No obvious adverse event was observed in the deep or shallow needling group. Deep and shallow needling at Tianshu (ST25) can improve intestinal function remarkably and safely. Therapeutic effects of deep and shallow needling are not superior to that of lactulose; however, the sustained effects of deep and shallow needling after stopping the acupuncture treatments are superior to the therapeutic effect of lactulose, which might qualify the superiority of deep and shallow needling.
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 20
Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 475
Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Constipation
Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 5/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Constipation; From the Acupuncture Department of Guang'anmen Hospital (JW, YC, YY, JL, YW, ZL); Clinical Evaluation Center (BL), China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing; eng SI – ClinicalTrials.gov/N; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25526462 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1700
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Author Wang, C.; Wu, Z.; Li, N.; Zhao, Y.; Tian, F.; Zhou, X.; Wang, Z.
Title Clinical curative effect of electric acupuncture on acute cerebral infarction: a randomized controlled multicenter trial Type of Study RCT
Year 2014 Publication J Tradit Chin Med Abbreviated Journal
Volume 34 Issue 6 Pages 635-640
Keywords RCT; Stroke; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Usual Care Control; Nervous System Diseases
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine whether electric acupuncture can improve the daily life of patients with ischemic cerebral apoplexy at acute stage. METHODS: A stratified-block randomized controlled multicenter trial was designed for this study. Totally 340 patients with acute ischemic cerebral apoplexy were randomly divided into an electric acupuncture group and a control group. In the electric acupuncture group, 170 patients were treated with electric acupuncture and routine therapy, and 170 patients in the control group with routine therapy alone. Major indexes for judging curative effect were Barthel index at 3- and 6- months follow-up visits and number of re-hospitalized patients. Minor indexes for judging curative effect were change in the score for nervous dysfunction at 4 and 12 weeks follow-up visits and number of patients persisting in rehabilitation treatment with acupuncture during follow-up visit. RESULTS: Baseline data at the time of case selection between the two groups were similar. The odds ratio (OR) was 0.92, and the 95% confidence interval (CI) was 0.49-1.73 in disabled rate and 0.73 and 0.51-1.05 in the number of re-hospitalized patients in the electric acupuncture group at 6-month follow up visit compared with the control group. There was no difference in the score for nervous dysfunction at the end of 12-week follow-up visit between the two groups. The score for nervous dysfunction at the end of 4-week treatment in the electric acupuncture group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05). The number of patients discharged from hospital who persisted in rehabilitation treatment with acupuncture in the acupuncture group was significantly higher than that in the control group. CONCLUSION: Using electric acupuncture to treat patients with acute ischemic cerebral apoplexy can effectively improve the nervous dysfunction scores after 4-week treatment and their ability to deal with daily life after 6-month follow-up visit. Systematic treatment with acupuncture may also reduce the number of patients with secondary apoplexy.
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up 24 Frequency Number of Participants 340
Time in Treatment Condition Stroke
Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score
Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 6/9/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Stroke; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25618965 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1707
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Author Liu, J.; Li, N.
Title Clinical observation of a combination of acupuncture and drug administration for non-specific acute lumbar sprain Type of Study RCT
Year 2010 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 47-49
Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Acute; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical effects of a combination of acupuncture and drug administration for non-specific acute lumbar sprain. METHODS: Sixty-nine cases were randomly allocated into a combination group, an acupuncture group, and a drug group according to the visiting sequence. Patients in the acupuncture group (n=24) were treated with acupuncture daily for 5 d, 20 patients in the drug group were treated with oral Diclofenac Sodium, 50 mg per time, twice per day, for 5 d, and 25 patients in the combination group were treated with methods in both the acupuncture group and the drug group. The Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) were used to evaluate the therapeutic effects. RESULTS: All patients in the three groups got improvement in pain and movement, the combination group had the best effects (P<0.01), and there was no significant difference between the acupuncture group and the drug group. CONCLUSION: Combination of acupuncture and drug has a better effect than single acupuncture or routine treatment of Diclofenac Sodium on acute lumbar sprain.
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 5
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 69
Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Low Back Pain, Acute
Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 750
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Author Elsharkawy, T. M.; Ali, N. M.
Title Evaluation of acupuncture and occlusal splint therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders Type of Study RCT
Year 1995 Publication Egyptian dental journal Abbreviated Journal Egypt Dent J
Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 1227-1232
Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Pain; Facial Pain; RCT; Temporomandibular Joint Disorders; Stomatognathic Diseases; Acu Versus > 1 Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Physical; Occlusal Splint Therapy; TMD; TMJ
Abstract One hundred patients showed signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder, were participated in a one year follow up study. The patients were randomly divided into four groups: Acuhealth treatment (group A), occlusal splint therapy (group B), Acuhealth and occlusal splint therapy (group C), and control (group D). Each group comprised 25 patients. The patients were examined before and 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. At the three month evaluation, the patients who were not satisfied with the treatment outcome were offered additional treatment. The result showed that 87% of the patients treated by Acuhealth unit, 77.3% of the patients treated with occlusal splint therapy, and 91.3% of the patients received Acuhealth and occlusal splint therapy were improved subjectively and clinically after 3 months follow-up. The patients who responded well to treatment initially also responded well in the long run. The study showed that the Acuhealth unit proved to be an ideal early therapy for TMD, and complemented later with occlusal splint
Address Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Cairo University
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 8
Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 100
Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 288
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Author Chen, N.; Zhou, M.; He, L.; Zhou, D.; Li, N.
Title Acupuncture for Bell's palsy Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2010 Publication Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev
Volume Issue 8 Pages -
Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Bell Palsy; Acupuncture; Nervous System Diseases; Facial Paralysis; Bell's Palsy
Abstract BACKGROUND: Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. SEARCH STRATEGY: We updated the searches of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (24 May 2010), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2010), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2010), AMED (January 1985 to May 2010), LILACS (from January 1982 to May 2010) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to May 2010) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture by needle insertion in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search, extracted data and assessed quality of each trial independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. MAIN RESULTS: The literature search and handsearching identified 49 potentially relevant articles. Of these, six RCTs were included involving 537 participants with Bell's palsy. Two more possible trials were identified in the update than the previous version of this systematic review, but both were excluded because they were not real RCTs. Of the six included trials, five used acupuncture while the other one used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trial reported on the outcomes specified for this review. Harmful side effects were not reported in any of the trials. Poor quality caused by flaws in study design or reporting (including uncertain method of randomisation, allocation concealment and blinding) and clinical differences between trials prevented reliable conclusions about the efficacy of acupuncture. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The quality of the included trials was inadequate to allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture. More research with high quality trials is needed.
Address Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Wai Nan Guo Xue Xiang #37, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, 610041.
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition Bell Palsy
Disease Category Cranial Nerve Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 145
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Author Wei, M. L.; Liu, J. P.; Li, N.; Liu, M.
Title Acupuncture for slowing the progression of myopia in children and adolescents Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2011 Publication Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev
Volume 9 Issue Pages -
Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Eye Diseases; Myopia; Acupressure; Auricular Acupuncture; Acupuncture; Laser Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Near-sightedness; Short-sightedness
Abstract BACKGROUND: Myopia (near-sightedness or short-sightedness) is one of the three commonly detected refractive (focusing) errors. Acupuncture is the stimulation of acupuncture points by various methods including needle insertion and acupressure. It is often used by traditional Chinese medicine practitioners to treat myopia in children. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in slowing the progression of myopia in children and adolescents. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 7), MEDLINE (January 1950 to July 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2011), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to July 2011), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2011), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrial.gov), the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (The first issue to August 2010), the Chinese Biological Medicine Database (CBM) (1978 to April 2011), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1994 to April 2011) and VIP (1989 to April 2011). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, LILACS, mRCT and ClinicalTrials.gov were last searched on 9 July 2011. NCCAM was searched up to August 2010 and CBM, CNKI, and VIP were last searched on 6 April 2011. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that included any type of acupuncture treatment for myopia in children and adolescents. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently evaluated the search results according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two authors extracted and assessed data independently. We contacted the study investigator for missing data. MAIN RESULTS: We included two RCTs conducted in Taiwan with a total of 131 participants. We did not perform a meta-analysis as the trials were assessing different outcomes. Neither trial met our pre-defined primary outcome criteria of myopia progression defined as one diopter mean change. Only one trial reported the changes of axial length without non-significant difference among groups and both trials reported that several children experienced mild pain during acupuncture stimulation. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Two trials are included in this review but no conclusions can be drawn for the benefit of co-acupressure for slowing progress of myopia in children. Further evidence in the form of RCTs are needed before any recommendations can be made for the use of acupuncture treatment in clinical use. These trials should compare acupuncture to placebo and have large sample sizes. Other types of acupuncture (such as auricular acupuncture) should be explored further as well as compliance with treatment for at least six months or longer. Axial length elongation of the eye should be investigated for at least one year. The potential to reduce/eliminate pain from acupuncture experienced by children should also be reviewed.
Address Chinese Cochrane Centre, Chinese Evidence-Based Medicine Centre, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37, Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, 610041.
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition Myopia
Disease Category Eye Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1281
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Author Mehta, P. K.; Polk, D. M.; Zhang, X.; Li, N.; Painovich, J.; Kothawade, K.; Kirschner, J.; Qiao, Y.; Ma, X.; Chen, Y. D.; Brantman, A.; Shufelt, C.; Minissian, M.; Bairey Merz, C. N.
Title A randomized controlled trial of acupuncture in stable ischemic heart disease patients. Type of Study RCT
Year 2014 Publication International journal of cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol
Volume Issue Pages -
Keywords RCT; Cardiovascular Diseases; Myocardial Ischemia; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Wait List Control; Heart Rate Variability; Heart Disease; Ischemic Heart Disease
Abstract BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) patients and is associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). We evaluated the impact of traditional acupuncture (TA) on cardiac autonomic function measured by HRV in SIHD patients. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled study of TA, sham acupuncture (SA), and waiting control (WC) in 151 SIHD subjects. The TA group received needle insertion at acupuncture sites, the SA group received a sham at non-acupuncture sites, while the WC group received nothing. The TA and SA groups received 3 treatments/week for 12weeks. 24-Hour, mental arithmetic stress, and cold pressor (COP) HRV was collected at entry and exit, along with BP, lipids, insulin resistance, hs-CRP, salivary cortisol, peripheral endothelial function by tonometry (PAT), and psychosocial variables. RESULTS: Mean age was 63+/-10; 50% had prior myocardial infarction. Comparison of WC and SA groups demonstrated differences consistent with the unblinded WC status; therefore by design, the control groups were not merged. Exit mental stress HRV was higher in TA vs. SA for markers of parasympathetic tone (p</=0.025), including a 17% higher vagal activity (p=0.008). There were no differences in exit 24-hour or COP HRV, BP, lipids, insulin resistance, hs-CRP, salivary cortisol, PAT, or psychosocial variables. CONCLUSIONS: TA results in intermediate effects on autonomic function in SIHD patients. TA effect on HRV may be clinically relevant and should be explored further. These data document feasibility and provide sample size estimation for a clinical trial of TA in SIHD patients for the prevention of SCD. CONDENSED ABSTRACT: We conducted a randomized, single-blind trial of traditional acupuncture (TA) vs. sham acupuncture (SA) vs waiting control (WC) in stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) patients to evaluate cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability (HRV). Exit mental stress HRV was higher in the TA compared to SA group for time and frequency domain markers of parasympathetic tone (all p</=0.025), including a 17% higher vagal activity (p=0.008). These data document feasibility and provide sample size estimation for an outcome-based clinical trial of TA in SIHD patients for the prevention of sudden cardiac death.
Address Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, United States.; Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 36
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 151
Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Myocardial Ischemia
Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 847
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Author Zhou, M.; He, L.; Zhou, D.; Wu, B.; Li, N.; Kong, S.; Zhang, D.; Li, Q.; Yang, J.; Zhang, X.
Title Acupuncture for Bell's Palsy Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med
Volume Issue Pages -
Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bell Palsy; Facial Paralysis; Systematic Review; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Nervous System Diseases
Abstract Abstract Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register, MEDLINE((R)) (January 1966-April 2006), EMBASE (January 1980-April 2006), LILACS (January 1982-April 2006), and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978-April 2006) for randomized controlled trials using “Bell's palsy” and its synonyms, “idiopathic facial paralysis” or “facial palsy” as well as search terms including “acupuncture.” Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were hand searched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomized trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy, irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups, and completeness of follow-up. Two (2) review authors assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. Results: Six (6) studies including a total of 537 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five (5) of them used acupuncture while another one used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review. Harmful side-effects were not reported in any of the trials. Flaws in study design or reporting (particularly uncertain allocation concealment and substantial loss to follow-up) and clinical differences between trials prevented conclusions about the efficacy of acupuncture. Conclusions: The quality of the included trials was inadequate to allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture. More research with high-quality trials is needed
Address Neurology Department, West China Hospital, Sichuan University , Chengdu, China
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition Bell Palsy
Disease Category Cranial Nerve Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1483
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Author He, L.; Zhou, D.; Wu, B.; Li, N.; Zhou, M.
Title Acupuncture for Bell's palsy Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev
Volume 1 Issue Pages CD002914-
Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bell Palsy; Facial Paralysis; Meta-Analysis; Systematic Review; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Nervous System Diseases
Abstract BACKGROUND: Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2002), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2002), LILACS (from January 1982 to December 2002) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to December 2002) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups and completeness of follow-up. Two reviewers assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the reviewers. MAIN RESULTS: Three studies including a total of 238 patients met the inclusion criteria. Two of them used acupuncture while the third used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review.Three included studies showed that the therapeutic effect of acupuncture alone was superior to that of medication or that acupuncture combined with medication was better than medication alone. Harmful side-effects were not reported in any of the trials. Flaws in study design or reporting (particularly uncertain allocation concealment and substantial loss to follow-up) and clinical differences between trials prevented a meta-analysis. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: The quality of the included trials was inadequate to allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture. More research with high quality trials is needed
Address Department of Neurology, First University Hospital, West China University of Medical Sciences, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, CHINA
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants
Time in Treatment N/A Condition Bell Palsy
Disease Category Cranial Nerve Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 445
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