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Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2921
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2880
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2839
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2798
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2757
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2716
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2677
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2636
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2593
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2552
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2511
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language English Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2470
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Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R.
Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 30
Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine
Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.
Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
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Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2429
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Author Yin, X.; Xu, J.; Dong, B.; Ma, J.; Chen, Z.; Yin, P.; Wu, J.; Zhu, B.; Cao, Y.; Zheng, H.; Lao, L.; Xu, S.
Title Efficacy and Safety of Electroacupuncture on Treating Depression Related Sleep Disorders: Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)
Volume Issue Pages 1-7
Keywords INSOMNIA -- Treatment; SLEEP disorders -- Treatment; MENTAL depression; Electroacupuncture; HAMILTON Depression Inventory; RESEARCH -- Methodology; PATIENTS -- Safety measures; SELF-report inventories; RANDOMIZED controlled trials
Abstract Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Publishing Corporation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
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Notes Accession Number: 120459154; Source Information: 12/29/2016, p1; Subject Term: INSOMNIA -- Treatment; Subject Term: SLEEP disorders -- Treatment; Subject Term: MENTAL depression; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: HAMILTON Depression Inventory; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Methodology; Subject Term: PATIENTS -- Safety measures; Subject Term: SELF-report inventories; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 2 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2254
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Author Wu, J.-Y.; Zhang, C.; Xu, Y.-P.; Yu, Y.-Y.; Peng, L.; Leng, W.-D.; Niu, Y.-M.; Deng, M.-H.
Title Acupuncture therapy in the management of the clinical outcomes for temporomandibular disorders: A PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis Type of Study
Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)
Volume 96 Issue 9 Pages e6064
Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Humans; Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Visual Analog Scale
Abstract PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate conventional acupuncture therapy in the management of clinical outcomes for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in adults. METHODS: The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Clinical Trails.gov were searched for reports published until March 31, 2016. RESULTS: Nine eligible studies from 8 publications involving 231 patients were included in the meta-analysis. A comparison of the main outcome of visual analog scale (VAS) values of pain between the acupuncture group and control group showed a significant decrease (MD = -0.98, 95% CI [-1.62, -0.34], I=54%, P = 0.003) in the VAS following acupuncture treatment. However, subgroup analysis according to the type of sham control group indicated that there were significant differences in the results when sham acupuncture was used as the control group (MD = -1.54, 95% CI [-2.63, -0.45], I=58%, P = 0.006) as well as when sham laser treatment was used as the control group (MD = -1.29, 95% CI [-2.32, -0.27], I = 0%, P = 0.01). However, there was no significant difference when the splint treatment group was used as the control group (MD = -0.09, 95% CI [-0.69, 0.50], I = 0%, P = 0.76). Subgroup analyses of VAS for pain by the classification of diseases indicated that the myogenous TMD subgroup demonstrated a significant difference (MD = -1.49, 95% CI [-2.45, -0.53], I = 47%, P = 0.002), and TMD showed no statistically significant difference (MD = -0.42, 95% CI [-1.14, 0.30], I = 46%, P = 0.25). Subgroup analysis according to whether the subgroup penetrated the skin showed that nonpenetrating sham acupuncture as the control group showed a significant difference (MD = -1.56, 95% CI [-2.70, -0.41], I = 58%, P = 0.008) compared with the conventional acupuncture as the treatment modality, while penetrating sham acupuncture as the control group showed no significant difference (MD = -1.29, 95% CI [-3.40, 0.82], I = not applicable, P = 0.23). No publication bias was observed considering the symmetry of the funnel plots. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that conventional acupuncture therapy is effective in reducing the degree of pain in patients with TMD, especially those with myofascial pain symptoms.
Address aCenter for Evidence-Based Medicine and Clinical Research, Taihe Hospital bSchool of Stomatology cDepartment of Stomatology, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan dThe State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Ministry of Education, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, No. 237, Luoyu Road, Wuhan, China
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Notes PMID:28248862; PMCID:PMC5340435 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2216
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Author Liu, Z.; Yan, S.; Wu, J.; He, L.; Li, N.; Dong, G.; Fang, J.; Fu, W.; Fu, L.; Sun, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, S.; Yang, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, Z.; Ai, Y.; Zhou, K.; Liu, J.; Xu, H.; Cai, Y.; Liu, B.
Title Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized Trial Type of Study RCT
Year 2016 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med
Volume 165 Issue 11 Pages 761-769
Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Constipation; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acu Versus Sham; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control
Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used for chronic constipation, but evidence for its effectiveness remains scarce. Objective: To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). Design: Randomized, parallel, sham-controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01726504). Setting: 15 hospitals in China. Participants: Patients with CSFC and no serious underlying pathologic cause for constipation. Intervention: 28 sessions of EA at traditional acupoints or sham EA (SA) at nonacupoints over 8 weeks. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change from baseline in mean weekly complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBMs) during weeks 1 to 8. Participants were followed until week 20. Results: 1075 patients (536 and 539 in the EA and SA groups, respectively) were enrolled. The increase from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 1 to 8 was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.61 to 1.89) in the EA group and 0.87 (CI, 0.73 to 0.97) in the SA group (between-group difference, 0.90 [CI, 0.74 to 1.10]; P < 0.001). The change from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 9 to 20 was 1.96 (CI, 1.78 to 2.11) in the EA group and 0.89 (CI, 0.69 to 0.95) in the SA group (between-group difference, 1.09 [CI, 0.94 to 1.31]; P < 0.001). The proportion of patients having 3 or more mean weekly CSBMs in the EA group was 31.3% and 37.7% over the treatment and follow-up periods, respectively, compared with 12.1% and 14.1% in the SA group (P < 0.001). Acupuncture-related adverse events during treatment were infrequent in both groups, and all were mild or transient. Limitations: Longer-term follow-up was not assessed. Acupuncturists could not be blinded. Conclusion: Eight weeks of EA increases CSBMs and is safe for the treatment of CSFC. Additional study is warranted to evaluate a longer-term treatment and follow-up. Primary Funding Source: Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China through the Twelfth Five-Year National Science and Technology Pillar Program.
Address From Guang'anmen Hospital, Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Capital Medical University, Dongzhimen Hospital of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Huguosi Hospital of Chinese Medicine of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing; West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan; Yueyang Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang; Guangdong Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong; The First Affiliated Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin; Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu; Heilongjiang Province Academy of Chinese Medical Science, Ha'erbin, Heilongjiang; The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui; Wuhan Integrated Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medical Hospital, Hubei Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Wuhan, Hubei, China; and Daemen College, Physical Therapy Wound Care Clinic, Amherst, New York
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Language English Number of Treatments 8
Treatment Follow-up Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 1075
Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Constipation
Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score
Notes PMID:27618593 Approved yes
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2182
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Author Liu, Z.; Yan, S.; Wu, J.; He, L.; Li, N.; Dong, G.; Fang, J.; Fu, W.; Fu, L.; Sun, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, S.; Yang, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, Z.; Ai, Y.; Zhou, K.; Liu, J.; Xu, H.; Cai, Y.; Liu, B.
Title Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used for chronic constipation, but evidence for its effectiveness remains scarce. Objective: To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). Design: Randomized, parallel, sham-controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01726504). Setting: 15 hospitals in China. Participants: Patients with CSFC and no serious underlying pathologic cause for constipation. Intervention: 28 sessions of EA at traditional acupoints or sham EA (SA) at nonacupoints over 8 weeks. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change from baseline in mean weekly complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBMs) during weeks 1 to 8. Participants were followed until week 20. Results: 1075 patients (536 and 539 in the EA and SA groups, respectively) were enrolled. The increase from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 1 to 8 was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.61 to 1.89) in the EA group and 0.87 (CI, 0.73 to 0.97) in the SA group (between-group difference, 0.90 [CI, 0.74 to 1.10]; P < 0.001). The change from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 9 to 20 was 1.96 (CI, 1.78 to 2.11) in the EA group and 0.89 (CI, 0.69 to 0.95) in the SA group (between-group difference, 1.09 [CI, 0.94 to 1.31]; P < 0.001). The proportion of patients having 3 or more mean weekly CSBMs in the EA group was 31.3% and 37.7% over the treatment and follow-up periods, respectively, compared with 12.1% and 14.1% in the SA group (P < 0.001). Acupuncture-related adverse events during treatment were infrequent in both groups, and all were mild or transient. Limitations: Longer-term follow-up was not assessed. Acupuncturists could not be blinded. Conclusion: Eight weeks of EA increases CSBMs and is safe for the treatment of CSFC. Additional study is warranted to evaluate a longer-term treatment and follow-up. Primary Funding Source: Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China through the Twelfth Five-Year National Science and Technology Pillar Program.
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Notes PMID:27618593 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2156
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Author Qin, Z.; Wu, J.; Tian, J.; Zhou, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.
Title Network Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Acupuncture, Alpha-blockers and Antibiotics on Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 35737
Keywords
Abstract Alpha-blockers and antibiotics are most commonly used to treat chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) in clinical practice. Currently, increasing evidence also suggests acupuncture as an effective strategy. This network meta-analysis intended to assess the comparative efficacy and safety of acupuncture, alpha-blockers and antibiotics for CP/CPPS. Twelve trials involving 1203 participants were included. Based on decreases in the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score, a network meta-analysis indicated that electro-acupuncture (standard mean difference [SMD]: 4.29; 95% credible interval [CrI], 1.96-6.65), acupuncture (SMD: 3.69; 95% CrI, 0.27-7.17), alpha-blockers (SMD: 1.85; 95% CrI, 1.07-2.64), antibiotics (SMD: 2.66; 95% CrI, 1.57-3.76), and dual therapy (SMD: 3.20; 95% CrI, 1.95-4.42) are superior to placebo in decreasing this score. Additionally, electro-acupuncture (SMD: 2.44; 95% CrI, 0.08-4.83) and dual therapy (SMD: 1.35; 95% CrI, 0.07-2.62) were more effective than alpha-blockers in decreasing the total NIH-CPSI total score. Other network meta-analyses did not show significant differences between interventions other placebo. The incidence of adverse events of acupuncture was relatively rare (5.4%) compared with placebo (17.1%), alpha-blockers (24.9%), antibiotics (31%) and dual therapy (48.6%). Overall, rank tests and safety analyses indicate that electro-acupuncture/acupuncture may be recommended for the treatment of CP/CPPS.
Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China
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Notes PMID:27759111; PMCID:PMC5069632 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2136
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Author Qin, Z.; Zang, Z.; Wu, J.; Zhou, J.; Liu, Z.
Title Efficacy of acupuncture for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndromes: study protocol for a randomized, sham acupuncture-controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 440
Keywords Acupuncture; Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome; Efficacy; Randomized controlled trial
Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) affects many adult men worldwide. The currently available therapies offer little or no proven benefit for CP/CPPS. We designed this study to assess the efficacy of acupuncture therapy for the treatment of CP/CPPS. METHODS: This study is designed as a randomized, sham acupuncture-controlled trial. We will compare patients with CP/CPPS in an acupuncture group and a sham acupuncture group. Sixty-eight patients will be randomly allocated to receive acupuncture or sham acupuncture. The treatments will consist of 30-min sessions, three times weekly, for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure is change in the weekly mean National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) total score from baseline through the 8-week treatment period. Secondary measures include the NIH-CPSI subscale scores, the total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), patients' response rate, and patient satisfaction after treatment. We will also assess changes in the NIH-CPSI total score from baseline at the 20th and 32nd week of follow-up. DISCUSSION: This is a randomized, sham-controlled trial of acupuncture treatment for CP/CPPS. The results of this trial will provide more evidence on whether acupuncture is efficacious for treating CP/CPPS. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trials.gov NCT02588274.
Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100053, China. liuzhishun@aliyun.com
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Notes PMID:27821109; PMCID:PMC5100285 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2114
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Author Qin, Z.; Liu, X.; Wu, J.; Zhai, Y.; Liu, Z.
Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Treating Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2015 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med
Volume 2015 Issue Pages 425108
Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Sciatica; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acupuncture
Abstract This is a systematic review and meta-analysis, which aimed to assess the current evidence on the effects and safety of acupuncture for treating sciatica. In this review, a total of 11 randomized controlled trials were included. As a result, we found that the use of acupuncture may be more effective than drugs and may enhance the effect of drugs for patients with sciatica, but because of the insufficient number of relevant and rigorous studies, the evidence is limited. Future trials using rigorous methodology, appropriate comparisons, and clinically relevant outcomes should be conducted.
Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China
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Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score
Notes PMID:26576192; PMCID:PMC4631886 Approved yes
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2012
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