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Author (up) Derksen, T.M.E.; Bours, M.J.L.; Mols, F.; Weijenberg, M.P. url  openurl
  Title Lifestyle-Related Factors in the Self-Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords ALTERNATIVE medicine; ANTINEOPLASTIC agents; COLON tumors; DIETARY supplements; Exercise; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; PERIPHERAL neuropathy; ONLINE information services; QUALITY of life; RECTUM -- Tumors; HEALTH self-care; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Oxaliplatin; Lifestyles  
  Abstract Background. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy treatment in colorectal cancer (CRC), negatively affecting the daily functioning and quality of life of CRC patients. Currently, there are no established treatments to prevent or reduce CIPN. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify lifestyle-related factors that can aid in preventing or reducing CIPN, as such factors may promote self-management options for CRC patients suffering from CIPN. Methods. A literature search was conducted through PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar. Original research articles investigating oxaliplatin-related CIPN in CRC were eligible for inclusion. Results. In total, 22 articles were included, which suggested that dietary supplements, such as antioxidants and herbal extracts, as well as physical exercise and complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, may have beneficial effects on preventing or reducing CIPN symptoms. However, many of the reviewed articles presented various limitations, including small sample sizes and heterogeneity in study design and measurements of CIPN. Conclusions. No strong conclusions can be drawn regarding the role of lifestyle-related factors in the management of CIPN in CRC patients. Certain dietary supplements and physical exercise may be beneficial for the management of CIPN, but further research is warranted.  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121885369; Source Information: 3/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTINEOPLASTIC agents; Subject Term: COLON tumors; Subject Term: DIETARY supplements; Subject Term: EXERCISE; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: PERIPHERAL neuropathy; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: RECTUM -- Tumors; Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: OXALIPLATIN; Subject Term: LIFESTYLES; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 14p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 1 Chart; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2283  
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Author (up) McKeon, C.; Smith, C.; Hardy, J.; Chang, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and Acupressure for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal Aust J Acupunct Chin Med  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 2-27  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Neoplasms; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Acupuncture; Acupressure; Systematic Review; Nausea; Vomiting; Emesis; CINV; Cancer; Antineoplastic Agents  
  Abstract Background: Control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) has improved with advances in antiemetics, such as NK1antagonists. Despite these advances, patients still experience these symptoms, and expert panels encourage additional methods to reduce these symptoms. Objectives: The objective was to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupressure on acute and delayed CINV in cancer patients. Search strategy: The following databases were searched: AMED, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry, and Science Direct. The search was undertaken from the inception of the database to January 2012. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupoint stimulation by needles, electrical stimulation or acupressure (excluding laser, point injection and non-invasive electrostimulation) and assessing chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting, or both. Data collection and analysis: Data was provided by publications of original trials and pooled. Standardised mean differences with confidence incidences were calculated. Main results: Seven trials were pooled for acupuncture and six for acupressure. Acupuncture reduced the frequency of acute vomiting (mean difference [MD] -7.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] -9.07 to -5.72), but did not reduce acute nausea severity or frequency compared to control. Delayed symptoms for acupuncture were not reported. Acupuncture showed a reduction in the dose of rescue medication (MD -5.52, 95% CI -7.45 to -3.58). Acupressure showed a decrease in frequency of nausea (MD -0.32, 95% CI -0.59 to 0.06) but not acute vomiting or delayed symptoms. All trials used state-of the-art combination antiemetics, except for the early electroacupuncture trials. Authors’ conclusions: Acupuncture has demonstrated some benefit for chemotherapy-induced acute vomiting by reducing the frequency of vomiting and reducing the use of rescue medication, while acupressure has shown a decrease in the frequency of nausea. Further trials of acupuncture and acupressure for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with refractory symptoms are needed before recommendations for clinical practice can be made. Future trials must be sufficiently powered, as this remains a major flaw with the majority of studies to date.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Chemotherapy Side Effects
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 842  
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Author (up) McKeon, C.; Smith, C.A.; Gibbons, K.; Hardy, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title EA versus sham acupuncture and no acupuncture for the control of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 277-283  
  Keywords RCT; Neoplasms; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Cancer; Antineoplastic Agents; Nausea; Vomiting; Pilot Study; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of undertaking a high-quality randomised controlled study to determine whether EA gives better control of delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) than sham EA or standard antiemetic treatment alone. METHODS: Patients having their first cycle of moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy were randomised to EA, sham EA or standard care. EA was given for 30 min on day 1 at the time of chemotherapy and on day 3 using standard acupuncture points bilaterally. Sham EA was given to points adjacent to true EA points. All patients received usual care, comprising antiemetics, according to hospital guidelines. The primary outcomes related to study feasibility, and the clinical outcome measure was the change in Functional Living Index Emesis (FLIE) score captured on days 1 and 7. RESULTS: 153 participants were screened between April 2009 and May 2011. Eighteen patients did not meet the inclusion criteria, 37 declined to participate and the absence of an acupuncturist or lack of consent from the treating oncologist excluded a further 38 patients; 60 patients were recruited. The FLIE was completed on day 7 by 49 participants; 33 of 40 patients returned on day 3 for treatment. The nausea and vomiting scores were low in all three arms. Adverse events were generally mild and infrequent. CONCLUSIONS: It was feasible to undertake a randomised EA trial on a busy day oncology unit. As few patients experienced nausea with their first cycle of chemotherapy, it was not possible to determine whether EA improves CINV over standard care. An enriched enrolment strategy is indicated for future studies. A simple numerical rating scale may prove a better objective nausea measure than the FLIE. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12609001054202.  
  Address Palliative and Supportive Care, Mater Health Services, South Brisbane, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 3 Days Condition Chemotherapy Side Effects
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26018947 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1887  
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Author (up) Rithirangsriroj, K.; Manchana, T.; Akkayagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture in prevention of delayed chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in gynecologic cancer patients Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Gynecol Oncol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 136 Issue 1 Pages 82-86  
  Keywords Neoplasms; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Cancer; Antineoplastic Agents; Nausea and Vomiting; Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting; Rct; Cross-Over Design; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy between acupuncture and ondansetron in the prevention of delayed chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). METHODS: 70 patients were randomized to receive either 1) acupuncture at P6 point before chemotherapy infusion or 2) ondansetron 8 mg intravenously 30 min before chemotherapy infusion in their first cycle with cross-over of antiemetic regimen in the consecutive cycle. All patients received dexamethasone 5mg orally twice a day for 3 days. Patients were given additional does of ondansetron 4 mg orally every 12h if they experienced emesis. Emetic episode, severity of nausea score of 0-10 and adverse events were recorded. Complete response was defined as no nausea, no vomiting and no requirement of additional antiemetic drugs. FACT-G scale was used to evaluate quality of life (QOL) 7 days after each cycle of chemotherapy. RESULTS: The acupuncture group had a significantly higher rate of complete response in the prevention of delayed CINV (52.8% and 35.7%, P = 0.02). Compared to another group, the acupuncture group reported significantly lower delayed nausea (45.7% and 65.7%, P = 0.004), nausea score (P < 0.001) and fewer dosages of additional oral ondansetron (P = 0.002). Adverse effects were also significantly lower in the acupuncture group with less frequent constipation (P = 0.02) and insomnia (P = 0.01). Overall FACT-G scores were significantly higher in the acupuncture group. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture is effective in preventing delayed CINV and in promoting better QOL. With fewer adverse effects, it may be used as an alternative treatment option for CINV.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 70  
  Time in Treatment 2 Days Condition Chemotherapy side-effects
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 5/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Gynecologic Oncology Division, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; eng SI – TCTR/20131105001; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25449310 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1696  
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Author (up) Shen, Y.; Liu, L.; Chiang, J.S.; Meng, Z.; Garcia, M.K.; Chen, Z.; Peng, H.; Bei, W.; Zhao, Q.; Spelman, A.R.; Cohen, L. openurl 
  Title Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of K1 acupoint acustimulation to prevent cisplatin-induced or oxaliplatin-induced nausea Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Cancer Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 121 Issue 1 Pages 84-92  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Neoplasms; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Nausea; Cancer; Antineoplastic Agents; Liver Cancer; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation; Tens; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Sham Acupoint Control; Rct  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Greater than 70% of patients with cancer experience chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. In the current study, the authors examined the effects of electrostimulation of the K1 acupoint located on the sole of the foot because it is believed to have the potential to control chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. METHODS: In this trial, 103 patients diagnosed with primary or metastatic liver cancer were recruited before transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) of cisplatin or oxaliplatin and randomized to either group A (51 patients who were treated with the antiemetic tropisetron and acustimulation at the K1 acupoint for 20 minutes approximately 1 to 2 hours before TAI on the first day and then daily for the subsequent 5 days) or group B (52 patients who were treated with tropisetron and electrostimulation at a placebo point on the heel). The rate, intensity, and duration of nausea and vomiting were collected at baseline and then daily for 5 days after TAI. Quality of life was assessed daily using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory and the EuroQoL scale. RESULTS: No differences were found between groups A and B with regard to the incidence and degree of nausea or vomiting on day 1 or the following 5 days. Patients in group A had better EuroQoL scores compared with patients in group B (72.83 in group A vs 65.94 in group B; P =.04) on day 4 but not on the other days. No group differences were noted at any time point for MD Anderson Symptom Inventory scores. CONCLUSIONS: Electrostimulation of K1 combined with antiemetics did not result in initial prevention of cisplatin-induced or oxaliplatin-induced nausea or vomiting.  
  Address Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.  
  Publisher (c) 2014 American Cancer Society.
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 5 Days Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 103  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Chemotherapy side-effects
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 5/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25204437 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1690  
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