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Author Brown J; Farquhar C url  openurl
  Title Endometriosis: an overview of Cochrane Reviews Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages N.Pag-N.Pag  
  Keywords Endometriosis -- Therapy; Infertility -- Drug Therapy; Pain -- Drug Therapy; Treatment Outcomes; Alternative Therapies -- Classification; Antiinflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal -- Classification; Cochrane Library; Female; Gonadotropins -- Therapeutic Use; Human; Intrauterine Devices -- Utilization; Laparoscopy -- Utilization; Levonorgestrel -- Therapeutic Use; Surgery, Gynecologic -- Classification  
  Abstract This overview reports on interventions for pain relief and for subfertility in pre-menopausal women with clinically diagnosed endometriosis. The objective of this overview was to summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on treatment options for women with pain or subfertility associated with endometriosis. Published Cochrane systematic reviews reporting pain or fertility outcomes in women with clinically diagnosed endometriosis were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation (protocols and titles) for future inclusion. The reviews, protocols and titles were identified by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Archie (the Cochrane information management system) in March 2014.Pain-related outcomes of the overview were pain relief, clinical improvement or resolution and pain recurrence. Fertility-related outcomes were live birth, clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, miscarriage and adverse events.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed using the AMSTAR tool. The quality of the evidence for each outcome was assessed using GRADE methods. Review findings were summarised in the text and the data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Seventeen systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library were included. All the reviews were high quality. The quality of the evidence for specific comparisons ranged from very low to moderate. Limitations in the evidence included risk of bias in the primary studies, inconsistency between the studies, and imprecision in effect estimates. Pain relief (14 reviews) Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues One systematic review reported low quality evidence of an overall benefit for GnRH analogues compared with placebo or no treatment. Ovulation suppression Five systematic reviews reported on medical treatment using ovulation suppression. There was moderate quality evidence that the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUD) was more effective than expectant management, and very low quality evidence that danazol was more effective than placebo. There was no consistent evidence of a difference in effectiveness between oral contraceptives and goserelin, estrogen plus progestogen and placebo, or progestogens and placebo, though in all cases the relevant evidence was of low or very low quality. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)A review of NSAIDs reported inconclusive evidence of a benefit in symptom relief compared with placebo. Surgical interventions There were two reviews of surgical interventions. One reported moderate quality evidence of a benefit in pain relief following laparoscopic surgery compared to diagnostic laparoscopy only. The other reported very low quality evidence that recurrence rates of endometriomata were lower after excisional surgery than after ablative surgery. Post-surgical medical interventions Two reviews reported on post-surgical medical interventions. Neither found evidence of an effect on pain outcomes, though in both cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Alternative medicine There were two systematic reviews of alternative medicine. One reported evidence of a benefit from auricular acupuncture compared to Chinese herbal medicine, and the other reported no evidence of a difference between Chinese herbal medicine and danazol. In both cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Anti-TNF-I± drugs One review found no evidence of a difference in effectiveness between anti-TNF-I± drugs and placebo. However, the evidence was of low quality. Reviews reporting fertility outcomes (8 reviews) Medical interventions Four reviews reported on medical interventions for improving fertility in women with endometriosis. One compared three months of GnRH agonists with a control in women undergoing assisted reproduction and found very low quality evidence of an increase in clinical pregnancies in the treatment group. There was no evidence of a difference in effectiveness between the interventions in the other three reviews, which compared GnRH agonists versus antagonists, ovulation suppression versus placebo or no treatment, and pre-surgical medical therapy versus surgery alone. In all cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Surgical interventions Three reviews reported on surgical interventions. There was moderate quality evidence that both live births or ongoing pregnancy rates and clinical pregnancy rates were higher after laparoscopic surgery than after diagnostic laparoscopy alone. There was low quality evidence of no difference in effectiveness between surgery and expectant management for endometrioma. One review found low quality evidence that excisional surgery resulted in higher clinical pregnancy rates than drainage or ablation of endometriomata. Post-surgical interventions Two reviews reported on post-surgical medical interventions. They found no evidence of an effect on clinical pregnancy rates. The evidence was of low or very low quality. Alternative medicine A review of Chinese herbal medicine in comparison with gestrinone found no evidence of a difference between the groups in clinical pregnancy rates. However, the evidence was of low quality. Adverse events Reviews of GnRH analogues and of danazol reported that the interventions were associated with higher rates of adverse effects than placebo; and depot progestagens were associated with higher rates of adverse events than other treatments. Chinese herbal medicine was associated with fewer side effects than gestrinone or danazol.Three reviews reported miscarriage as an outcome. No difference was found between surgical and diagnostic laparoscopy, between GnRH agonists and antagonists, or between aspiration of endometrioma and expectant management. However, in all cases the quality of the evidence was of low quality. For women with pain and endometriosis, suppression of menstrual cycles with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUD) and danazol were beneficial interventions. Laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis and excision of endometriomata were also associated with improvements in pain. The evidence on NSAIDs was inconclusive. There was no evidence of benefit with post-surgical medical treatment.In women with endometriosis undergoing assisted reproduction, three months of treatment with GnRH agonist improved pregnancy rates. Excisional surgery improved spontaneous pregnancy rates in the nine to 12 months after surgery compared to ablative surgery. Laparoscopic surgery improved live birth and pregnancy rates compared to diagnostic laparoscopy alone. There was no evidence that medical treatment improved clinical pregnancy rates.Evidence on harms was scanty, but GnRH analogues, danazol and depot progestagens were associated with higher rates than other interventions.[CINAHL Note: The Cochrane Collaboration systematic reviews contain interactive software that allows various calculations in the MetaView.]  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107855472. Language: English. Entry Date: 20101029. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management; Women's Health. NLM UID: 100909747. Cochrane AN: CD009590. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107855472 Serial 2388  
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Author Changhe Yu; Kangshou Ji; Huijuan Cao; Ying Wang; Hwang Hye Jin; Zhe Zhang; Guanlin Yang url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bmc Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 1-22  
  Keywords Randomized Controlled Trials; Acupuncture; Angina Pectoris -- Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Descriptive Statistics; Relative Risk; Confidence Intervals; Meta Analysis; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Chi Square Test; Data Analysis Software; Middle Age; Male; Female; Adult; Aged  
  Abstract Background: The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris. Methods: Eleven electronic databases were searched until January 2013. The study included randomized controlled trials that the effectiveness of acupuncture alone was compared to anti-angina medicines (in addition to conventional treatment) and the effectiveness of a combination of acupuncture plus anti-angina medicines was compared to anti-angina medicines alone. The trial selection, data extraction, quality assessment and data analytic procedures outlined in the 2011 Cochrane Handbook were involved. Results: The study included 25 randomized controlled trials (involving 2,058 patients) that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled results showed that the number of patients with ineffectiveness of angina relief was less in the combined acupuncture-anti-angina treatment group than in the anti-angina medicines alone group (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.23-0.47, p < 0.00001, I2 = 0%). Similarly, compared to the anti-angina medicines alone group, fewer patients in the combined treatment group showed no ECG improvement (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.40-0.62, p < 0.00001, I2 = 0%). However, no differences were observed between acupuncture treatment alone and anti-angina medicines alone for both outcome measures. Only four trials mentioned adverse effects. One trial found no significant difference between acupuncture and Chinese medicine, and three reported no adverse events. The quality of the trials was found to be low. Conclusions: The findings showed very low evidence to support the use of acupuncture for improving angina symptoms and ECG of angina patients. However, the quality of the trials included in this study was low. Large and rigorously designed trials are needed to confirm the potential benefit and adverse events of acupuncture.  
  Address Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shenyang, Liaoning, China  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103807220. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150605. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101088661. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103807220 Serial 2319  
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Author Cheong, K.B.; Zhang, J.-ping; Huang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effectiveness of acupuncture in postoperative gastroparesis syndrome--a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 767-786  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Gastroparesis -- Therapy; Postoperative Complications -- Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Adult; Aged; Cochrane Library; Female; Gastroparesis -- Epidemiology; Human; Male; Meta Analysis; Middle Age; Postoperative Complications -- Epidemiology; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; PubMed; Systematic Review; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Postoperative gastroparesis syndrome (PGS) which is mainly manifested as delayed gastric emptying is often caused by upper abdominal and sometimes lower abdominal surgery. In view of the side effects of drugs therapy, the search of supplementary and alternative has been of increasing interest. OBJECTIVE: This paper included a systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of acupuncture and acupoints selection in PGS. Quality for meta-analysis was evaluated using GRADE while each trial was assessed with CONSORT and STRICTA for TCM. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with non-acupuncture treatment were identified from databases PubMed, EBSCO, Ovid, Cochrane, CNKI and Wanfangdata. Meta-analysis on eligible studies was performed using fixed-effects model with RevMan 5.2. Results were expressed as relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data, and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. RESULTS: Of the 348 studies reviewed, 16 RCTs met the inclusion criteria for review while 7 RCTs, 188 patients (intervention) and 182 patients (control) met the criteria for meta-analysis. Both acupuncture and acupuncture combined with medication showed significant higher total effective rate than control (usual care/medication); with (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13, 1.44; P<0.0001) and (RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.18, 1.58; P<0.0001) respectively. All included RCTs reported positive effect of acupuncture in PGS treatment. ST36, CV12 and PC6 seemed to be the common acupoints selected. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested acupuncture might be effective to improve PGS, however, a definite conclusion could not be drawn due to low quality of trials. Further large-scale, high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed to validate this. STUDY REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42013005485.  
  Address School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong, China. Electronic address: nanfanglihuang@163.com.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103848872. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103848872 Serial 2374  
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Author Chien, T.-J.; Liu, C.-Y.; Chang, Y.-F.; Fang, C.-J.; Hsu, C.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Treating Aromatase Inhibitor-Related Arthralgia in Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 251-260  
  Keywords Breast Neoplasms -- Drug Therapy; Aromatase Inhibitors -- Adverse Effects; Arthralgia -- Therapy; Acupuncture Analgesia; Human; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Taiwan; Female; Women's Health; Alternative Therapies; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Clinical Trials -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Arthralgia -- Etiology; Arthralgia -- Chemically Induced; Medline; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; CINAHL Database; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; Checklists; Postmenopause; Pain Measurement -- Methods; Functional Assessment; Cytokines -- Blood; Confidence Intervals; P-Value; Chi Square Test; Descriptive Statistics; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract Purpose: Acupuncture has been used as a complementary medical treatment for arthralgia and other types of pain. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of arthralgia in patients with breast cancer who were treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Methods: A literature search was performed, without language restrictions, of 10 databases from their inception through February 2014. The literature reviewed included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and clinical trials that compared real versus sham acupuncture for the treatment of AI-related musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS). The methodologic quality of these trials was assessed by using the modified Jadad Quality Scale. Meta-analytic software (RevMan 5.0) was used to analyze the data. Results: Five To compare the effects of real versus sham acupuncture, five RCTs were assessed by meta-analysis and quality analysis. Three of the RCTs reported favorable effects with regard to use of acupuncture in reducing pain and joint-related symptoms, while the other two RCTs did not. The meta-analysis showed trends toward reduced pain and stiffness in patients given acupuncture compared with those who received sham treatment ( n=82; pain, mean difference: ?2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), ?4.72 to 0.57]; p=0.12; stiffness, mean difference: ?86.10 [95% CI, ?249.11 to 76.92]; p=0.30), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture has been reported as a safe and promising treatment for AIMSS, but the present analysis indicated that the effects were not statistically significant. Other outcome measurements, such as imaging studies, would be worth including in future studies to further confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in AIMSS.  
  Address Medical Library, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103798719. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150512. Revision Date: 20160502. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care; Pain and Pain Management; Women's Health. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale [modified]. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103798719 Serial 2307  
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Author Jain, T.K.; Sharma, N.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effectiveness of physiotherapeutic interventions in treatment of frozen shoulder/adhesive capsulitis: A systematic review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal J Back Musculoskeletal Rehabil  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 247-273  
  Keywords Adhesive Capsulitis -- Therapy; Physical Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Medline; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; SportDiscus; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Male; Female; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Frozen shoulder is a common condition, yet its treatment remains challenging. In this review, the current best evidence for the use of physical therapy interventions (PTI) is evaluated.METHOD: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane, PEDro, ProQuest, Science Direct, and Sport Discus were searched for studies published in English since 2000. RESULTS: 39 articles describing the PTI were analyzed using Sackett's levels of evidence and were examined for scientific rigor. The PTI were given grades of recommendation that ranged from A to C. CONCLUSIONS: Therapeutic exercises and mobilization are strongly recommended for reducing pain, improving range of motion (ROM) and function in patients with stages 2 and 3 of frozen shoulder. Low-level laser therapy is strongly suggested for pain relief and moderately suggested for improving function but not recommended for improving ROM. Corticosteroid injections can be used for stage 1 frozen shoulder. Acupuncture with therapeutic exercises is moderately recommended for pain relief, improving ROM and function. Electro- therapy can help in providing short-term pain relief. Continuous passive motion is recommended for short-term pain relief but not for improving ROM or function. Deep heat can be used for pain relief and improving ROM. Ultrasound for pain relief, improving ROM or function is not recommended.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA  
  Publisher IOS Press
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103983309. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140902. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Biomedical; Continental Europe; Europe; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management. NLM UID: 9201340. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103983309 Serial 2375  
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Author Jing-Yu Tan; Molassiotis, A.; Tao Wang; Suen, L.K.P. url  openurl
  Title Adverse Events of Auricular Therapy: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Acupuncture, Ear -- Adverse Effects; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; Psycinfo; AMED Database; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Human  
  Abstract  
  Address The Second Affiliated People's Hospital, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 13 Hudong Road, Gulou District, Fuzhou 350003, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876630. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876630 Serial 2397  
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Author Kim TH; Lee MS; Kim KH; Kang JW; Choi TY; Ernst E url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for treating acute ankle sprains in adults Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 6 Pages N.Pag-N.Pag  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Ankle Sprain -- Therapy; Athletic Injuries; Acupuncture -- Classification; Adult; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Confidence Intervals; Embase; Human; Medicine, Herbal; Medline; Meta Analysis; Relative Risk; Systematic Review  
  Abstract An acute ankle sprain is a sudden-onset injury of one or more of the ankle ligaments. It is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries in the general population as well as in athletes. In some countries, such as China and Korea, acupuncture is frequently used in the treatment of ankle sprains, either as a single treatment or a secondary intervention accompanied by standard medical treatment. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of acupuncture for the treatment of ankle sprains in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (May 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1948 to May week 2 2013), EMBASE (1980 to May week 2 2013), China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases (1994 to August week 4 2013), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1937 to May 2013), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (1985 to May 2013), Science Links Japan (1996 to August week 4 2013), several Korean medical databases (August week 4 2013), the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (August week 4 2013), the bibliographic references of included trials and conference proceedings. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials involving adults with acute ankle sprains. We included all types of acupuncture practices, such as needle acupuncture, electroacupuncture, laser acupuncture, pharmacoacupuncture, non-penetrating acupuncture point stimulation (e.g. acupressure and magnets) and moxibustion. Acupuncture could be compared with control (no treatment or placebo) or another standard non-surgical intervention. Two review authors independently screened the search results, assessed trial eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted data from the included trials. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences for continuous outcomes. We conducted meta-analyses using the fixed-effect method or, where appropriate, the random-effects method, and used 95% confidence intervals (CI) throughout. We included a total of 20 heterogeneous studies (2012 participants with acute ankle sprains); three of which included more than one comparison. Seventeen trials were conducted in China. All of the studies had a high risk of bias due to lack of blinding. The results may also have been affected by selection bias, particularly as five studies were quasi-randomised controlled trials and 12 studies gave no information on their method of randomisation. Of our three prespecified primary outcomes, only cure rate was reported by the majority of studies. No study reported on patient-reported assessment of function and only one reported on adverse events (in which three participants receiving a control intervention experienced skin problems from over-the-counter Chinese herbal patches). The other 19 studies did not record or report on adverse events. We assessed the quality of evidence for cure rates as very low for all comparisons, which means we are very uncertain about the reliability of any of the estimates.The single study comparing acupuncture treatment with no treatment found acupuncture to be more effective with regard to cure rate at five days (31/31 versus 1/30; RR 20.34, 95% CI 4.27 to 96.68). Acupuncture plus another standard treatment versus that standard treatment alone was tested in eight studies; with cure rate data available for seven. Most of these studies reported higher cure rates in the acupuncture plus another standard treatment group than in the standard treatment alone group. However, while the results of an exploratory meta-analysis of cure rate data from eight trials testing acupuncture versus no acupuncture tended to favour acupuncture, the results were very inconsistent across the studies and the estimated effect was very imprecise (383/396 versus 272/355; RR 1.32, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.84; P value = 0.1; I(2) = 98%).Fourteen studies compared acupuncture with a variety of other non-surgical treatments, such as Chinese drug patches, hot and cold water, ice packs, oral Chinese herbal medicine and elastic bandage. Some studies found in favour of acupuncture, some in favour of the other treatment and some found a lack of evidence for a difference between the two interventions under test. The results of an exploratory meta-analysis of cure rate data from 11 trials testing acupuncture versus another non-surgical intervention tended to slightly favour acupuncture, but these were not statistically significant and the data were very heterogeneous (404/509 versus 416/497; RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.22; P value = 0.30; I(2) = 92%). The currently available evidence from a very heterogeneous group of randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials evaluating the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of acute ankle sprains does not provide reliable support for either the effectiveness or safety of acupuncture treatments, alone or in combination with other non-surgical interventions; or in comparison with other non-surgical interventions. Future rigorous randomised clinical trials with larger sample sizes will be necessary to establish robust clinical evidence concerning the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatment for acute ankle sprains.[CINAHL Note: The Cochrane Collaboration systematic reviews contain interactive software that allows various calculations in the MetaView.]  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107769235. Language: English. Entry Date: 20101029. Revision Date: 20151007. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 100909747. Cochrane AN: CD009065. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107769235 Serial 2358  
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Author Levett, K.M.; Smith, C.A.; Dahlen, H.G.; Bensoussan, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour and birth: a critical narrative review of current systematic review evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 523-540  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Analgesia; Labor Pain -- Therapy; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Embase; Female; Human; Medline; Pregnancy; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; PubMed; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Reviews of maternity services highlight the need for a reduction of medical interventions for women with low risk pregnancies and births to prevent the potential cascade of interventions and their associated risks. Complementary medicines (CM) such as acupuncture and acupressure have claimed to be effective in reducing interventions in labour; however, systematic reviews of evidence to date are conflicting. AIMS: To examine current evidence from systematic reviews on the topic of acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour and birth, and to evaluate the methodological and treatment frameworks applied to this evidence. METHODS: A search limited to systematic reviews of the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane databases was performed in December 2013 using the keywords 'CAM', 'alternative medicine', 'complementary medicine', 'complementary therapies', 'traditional medicine', 'Chinese Medicine', 'Traditional Chinese Medicine', 'acupuncture', 'acupressure', cross-referenced with 'childbirth', 'birth', labo*r', and 'delivery'. The quality of the evidence is also evaluated in the context of study design. RESULTS: The RCTs included in these systematic reviews differed in terms of study designs, research questions, treatment protocols and outcome measures, and yielded some conflicting results. It may be inappropriate to include these together in a systematic review, or pooled analysis, of acupuncture for labour with an expectation of an overall conclusion for efficacy. Trials of acupuncture and acupressure in labour show promise, but further studies are required. CONCLUSION: The use of current systematic reviews of the evidence for acupuncture and acupressure for labour and birth may be misleading. Appropriate methods and outcome measures for investigation of acupuncture and acupressure treatment should more carefully reflect the research question being asked. The use of pragmatic trials designs with woman-centred outcomes may be appropriate for evaluating the effectiveness of these therapies.  
  Address National Institute for Complementary Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: A.Bensoussan@uws.edu.au.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
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  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103834125. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103834125 Serial 2353  
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Author Liu, F.; Li, Z.-M.; Jiang, Y.-J.; Chen, L.-D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Meta-Analysis of Acupuncture Use in the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment After Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 535-544  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Cognition Disorders -- Therapy; Stroke -- Complications; Human; Alternative Therapies; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Cochrane Library; Neuropsychological Tests; Data Analysis Software; Odds Ratio; Linear Regression; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Male; Female; Adolescence; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Chi Square Test  
  Abstract Objective: This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on cognitive impairment (function) after a stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation were identified from databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Chinese Periodical Database, Wangfang Chinese Periodical Database, Chinese Bio-medicine Database, Cochrane Library, and Chinese medical literature databases) and two relevant journals ( Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion and the Journal of Shanghai Acupuncture and Moxibustion). Meta-analyses were conducted for the eligible RCTs. Results: Twenty-one trials with a total of 1421 patients met inclusion criteria. Pooled random-effects estimates of the change in the Mini-Mental State Examination were calculated for the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation. Following 4 weeks and 8 weeks of intervention with acupuncture, the merged mean difference was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.06-4.21; p<.00001) and 2.03 (95% CI, 0.26-3.80; p=0.02), respectively. For the comparison of 3-4 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the merged MD in Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination total scores was 5.63 (95% CI, 3.95-7.31; p<.00001). For the comparison of 8-12 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the P300 latency merged MD was ?12.80 (95% CI, ?21.08 to ?4.51; p<.00001), while the P300 amplitude merged MD was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p<.00001). Overall, the study quality was rated as moderate on the basis of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (part 2: 8.5). Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture had positive effects on cognitive function after stroke and supports the need for additional research on the potential benefits of this therapeutic approach.  
  Address Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103971838. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) (Folstein et al); Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination. Grant Information: This study was supported by the Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971838 Serial 2347  
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Author Liu, J.-P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can acupuncture prevent and manage dry mouth induced by radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer? Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Focus on Alternative & Complementary Therapies Abbreviated Journal Focus Altern Complement Ther  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 92-93  
  Keywords Low Back Pain -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Methods; Disabled; Xerostomia -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Head and Neck Neoplasms -- Radiotherapy; Radiotherapy -- Adverse Effects; Human; Systematic Review; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library  
  Abstract  
  Address Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 103947817. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140527. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; abstract; commentary; research; systematic review. Original Study: Zhuang L, Yang Z, Zeng X, Zhua X, Chen Z, Liu L, Meng Z. The preventive and therapeutic effect of acupuncture for radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review. Integr Cancer Ther 2013; 12: 197–205. . Integr Cancer Ther 2013; 12: 197-205. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. NLM UID: 9806970. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103947817 Serial 2361  
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Author Lixing Zhuang; Jun He; Xun Zhuang; Liming Lu url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quality of reporting on randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bmc Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Stroke -- Rehabilitation; Quality Assessment; Human; Systematic Review; Cochrane Library; Medline; Embase; CINAHL Database; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Regression; Data Analysis Software  
  Abstract Background Results from clinical studies on acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation are contradictory. The reason for the inconsistent findings especially lie in the transparency and accuracy of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reports. This study aims to analyze the quality of reporting and its correlates in RCTs on acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation. Methods Quality of reporting for included papers was assessed against a subset of criteria adapted from the CONSORT 2010 statement and STRICTA. An overall quality score (OQS) and a combined key methodological index score (MIS) was calculated for each trial. Then, factors associated with OQS and MIS were identified. Results A total of 15 RCTs were included in full text. The median OQS based on the CONSORT statement and STRICTA was 8 and 12, respectively. The significant predictors for CONSORT OQS was funding source, for STRICTA was year of publication. With regard to the MIS, no variable was associated with improved methodological quality. Conclusions Our study found that the overall quality of reporting on RCTs of acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation was general or good. But some items' reporting was found where information was insufficient or inadequate in most studies which needed substantial improvement.  
  Address Faculty of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China  
  Publisher BioMed Central
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  Notes Accession Number: 103945403. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140521. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101088661. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103945403 Serial 2382  
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Author Matthews A; Dowswell T; Haas DM; Doyle M; O'Mathúna DP url  openurl
  Title Interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages N.Pag-N.Pag  
  Keywords Nausea and Vomiting -- Therapy; Pregnancy Trimester, First; Treatment Outcomes; Acupuncture; Antiemetics; Clinical Trials; Cochrane Library; Female; Ginger; Human; Patient Safety; Pregnancy  
  Abstract Nausea, retching and vomiting are very commonly experienced by women in early pregnancy. There are considerable physical, social and psychological effects on women who experience these symptoms. This is an update of a review of interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy previously published in 2010. To assess the effectiveness and safety of all interventions for nausea, vomiting and retching in early pregnancy, up to 20 weeks' gestation. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field's Trials Register (27 April 2013). All randomised controlled trials of any intervention for nausea, vomiting and retching in early pregnancy. We excluded trials of interventions for hyperemesis gravidarum, which are covered by another Cochrane review. We also excluded quasi-randomised trials and trials using a cross-over design. Four review authors, in pairs, reviewed the eligibility of trials and independently evaluated the risk of bias and extracted the data for included trials. Thirty-seven trials involving 5049 women, met the inclusion criteria. These trials covered many interventions, including acupressure, acustimulation, acupuncture, ginger, chamomile, lemon oil, mint oil, vitamin B6 and several antiemetic drugs. We identified no studies of dietary or other lifestyle interventions. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of P6 acupressure, auricular (ear) acupressure and acustimulation of the P6 point was limited. Acupuncture (P6 or traditional) showed no significant benefit to women in pregnancy. The use of ginger products may be helpful to women, but the evidence of effectiveness was limited and not consistent, though two recent studies support ginger over placebo. There was only limited evidence from trials to support the use of pharmacological agents including vitamin B6, and anti-emetic drugs to relieve mild or moderate nausea and vomiting. There was little information on maternal and fetal adverse outcomes and on psychological, social or economic outcomes. We were unable to pool findings from studies for most outcomes due to heterogeneity in study participants, interventions, comparison groups, and outcomes measured or reported. The methodological quality of the included studies was mixed. Given the high prevalence of nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy, women and health professionals need clear guidance about effective and safe interventions, based on systematically reviewed evidence. There is a lack of high-quality evidence to support any particular intervention. This is not the same as saying that the interventions studied are ineffective, but that there is insufficient strong evidence for any one intervention. The difficulties in interpreting and pooling the results of the studies included in this review highlight the need for specific, consistent and clearly justified outcomes and approaches to measurement in research studies.[CINAHL Note: The Cochrane Collaboration systematic reviews contain interactive software that allows various calculations in the MetaView.]  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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  Notes Accession Number: 105008817. Language: English. Entry Date: 20101029. Revision Date: 20150711. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Commentary: Ernst E., Matthews A. What works for morning sickness? (FOCUS ALTERN COMPLEMENT THER) Mar2011; 16 (1): 51-52. Journal Subset: Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Obstetric Care. NLM UID: 100909747. Cochrane AN: CD007575. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 105008817 Serial 2389  
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Author Park, S.-W.; Yi, S.-H.; Lee, J.A.; Hwang, P.W.; Yoo, H.C.; Kang, K.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Spasticity After Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages 672-682  
  Keywords Stroke -- Complications; Muscle Spasticity -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Human; South Korea; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Treatment Outcomes; Cochrane Library; PubMed; CINAHL Database; Embase; Descriptive Statistics; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Measurement Issues and Assessments; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; H-Reflex; Motor Neurons  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for spasticity in patients with stroke. The available literature was reviewed in an effort to assess its efficacy in this situation. Methods: Randomized trials assessing the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of spasticity after stroke were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCO host, SCOPUS, CINAHL, EMBASE, Alternative Medicine Database, and Chinese and Korean medical literature databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, patient characteristics, and spasticity outcomes. Results: Eight trials with 399 patients met all the inclusion criteria. Compared with controls without acupuncture, acupuncture had no effect on improving clinical outcomes (as measured by validated instruments such as the Modified Ashworth Scale) or physiologic outcomes (assessed by measures such as the H-reflex/M-response [H/M] ratio at the end of the treatment period). H/M ratios did decrease significantly immediately after the first acupuncture treatment. Methodologic quality of all evaluated trials was considered inadequate. Conclusions: The effect of acupuncture for spasticity in patients with stroke remains uncertain, primarily because of the poor quality of the available studies. Larger and more methodologically sound trials are needed to definitively confirm or refute any effect of acupuncture as a treatment for spasticity after stroke.  
  Address Department of Motor & Cognitive Rehabilitation, Korea National Rehabilitation Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.; Kyungheesarang Oriental Medicine Clinic, Seoul, Korea.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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  Notes Accession Number: 103889719. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140909. Revision Date: 20150901. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This research was supported by a grant (08-B-02) from the Korea National Rehabilitation Center Research Institute.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103889719 Serial 2356  
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Author Soyeon Cheon; Xiuyu Zhang; In-Seon Lee; Seung-Hun Cho; Younbyoung Chae; Hyangsook Lee url  openurl
  Title Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Neoplasms -- Therapy; Drug Administration -- Methods; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Herbal; Iatrogenic Disease -- Therapy; Neoplasms -- Complications; Human; South Korea; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Alternative Therapies; Funding Source; Treatment Outcomes; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Descriptive Statistics; Nausea and Vomiting -- Therapy; Meta Analysis; Chemotherapy, Cancer -- Adverse Effects; Statistical Significance; Odds Ratio; Confidence Intervals; Cancer Pain -- Prevention and Control; Hiccup -- Prevention and Control; Fever -- Prevention and Control; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; CINAHL Database; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Graphics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; P-Value; Intestinal Obstruction; Gastrointestinal System -- Pathology  
  Abstract  
  Address Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Kyung Hee Dae-ro 26, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Notes Accession Number: 103876834. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. Grant Information: This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korean government (Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning) (no. 2013R1A6A6029251) and a Grant from the National R & D Program for Cancer Control, Ministry for Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (1020330).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876834 Serial 2404  
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Author Walker, J.; Sawhney, A.; Holm Hansen, C.; Ahmed, S.; Martin, P.; Symeonides, S.; Murray, G.; Sharpe, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Treatment of depression in adults with cancer: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Psychological Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychol Med  
  Volume 44 Issue 5 Pages 897-907  
  Keywords Depression -- Therapy; Cancer Patients; Depression -- Drug Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Medline; Embase; Psycinfo; Cochrane Library; Antidepressive Agents -- Therapeutic Use; Adult; Sample Size; Antidepressive Agents -- Adverse Effects; Acupuncture; Funding Source  
  Abstract Background. Depression is a leading cause of disease burden worldwide and is especially problematic in people with chronic diseases, including cancer. Although depression can be effectively treated in the general population using antidepressant medication and psychological treatments, these treatments may have different benefits and harms in cancer patients. Previous reviews have not adequately addressed this topic. We therefore aimed to determine which, if any, treatments are effective for patients with diagnoses of both cancer and depression. Method. We conducted a systematic review of relevant randomized controlled trials identified through searches of Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Results. Seven relatively small trials met the selection criteria. These provided some evidence that antidepressant medication, given alone or in combination with a psychological treatment, may be effective. We found no good evidence for psychological treatments given alone or for any other forms of treatment. Conclusions. There is very limited evidence from clinical trials to guide the treatment of cancer patients with a diagnosis of depression, especially for psychological treatments. High quality trials of treatments for depression in patients with cancer are urgently needed.  
  Address University of Edinburgh Centre for Population Health Sciences, Edinburgh, UK  
  Publisher Cambridge University Press
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  Notes Accession Number: 107899460. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140403. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Psychiatry/Psychology. Grant Information: This work was funded by the charity Cancer Research UK (grant no. C5547/A7375).. NLM UID: 1254142. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107899460 Serial 2394  
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Author Xiao Cun Yang; Tao Yin; Qian Gao; Ling Jun Kong url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Immunomodulatory Effect of Acupoint Application for Childhood Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Immune System; Asthma -- Therapy; Pediatric Care; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Herbal; Asthma -- Immunology; Human; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; China; Child; Funding Source; Data Analysis Software  
  Abstract Objective. To evaluate the evidence on the immunomodulatory effect of acupoint application for childhood asthma. Methods. Five electronic databases through October 2014 were searched. The risk of bias in eligible studies was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. Standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of random-effects model were calculated. And heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and quantified with the I² index. Results. Six studies were included in our review. The aggregated results suggested that acupoint application showed the beneficial effect for childhood asthma in improving IgA (SMD, -0.83; 95% CI -1.14 to -0.52; P < 0.00001), IgE (SMD, -0.52; 95% CI -0.76 to -0.29; P < 0.001), IgG (SMD, -1.17; 95% CI -1.61 to -0.74; P < 0.0001), IL-4 (SMD, -0.57; 95% CI -0.91 to -0.23; P = 0.0009), and IFN-? (SMD, -0.38; 95% CI -0.71 to -0.04; P = 0.03) but not IgM (SMD, -0.40; 95% CI -0.98 to 0.18; P = 0.18). And the effective dose of acupoint application may be 2-6 hours/time and a total of 3 times within 4 weeks. Conclusions. This review showed the positive evidence that acupoint application had the favorable immunomodulatory effect for childhood asthma. However, more studies with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.  
  Address Department of Tuina, Second Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210017, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
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  Notes Accession Number: 108824942. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. Grant Information: This work is supported by the Young Teacher Training Program of Education Committee of Shanghai (ZZszy12050); the Young Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (81403496); the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81273869); the Key Discipline of Tuina of the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine of China.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824942 Serial 2339  
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Author Zheng-tao Lv; Wen Song; Jing Wu; Jun Yang; Tao Wang; Cai-hua Wu; Fang Gao; Xiao-cui Yuan; Ji-hong Liu; Man Li url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Acupuncture in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes; Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Drug Therapy; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Confidence Intervals; Odds Ratio; Chi Square Test; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Human; Child, Preschool; Child; Adolescence; Young Adult; P-Value; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Background. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is recognized as a widespread health problem in young children and adolescents. Clinical researches about acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of 8 databases was performed up to June 2014; randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo treatment or pharmacological therapy were identified. A metaanalysis was conducted. Results. This review included 21 RCTs and a total of 1590 subjects. The overall methodological qualities were low. The results of meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was more effective for clinical efficacy when compared with placebo or pharmacological treatment. Adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were not documented. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy. However, the beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to low methodological qualities. Rigorous high quality RCTs are urgently needed.  
  Address Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
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  Notes Accession Number: 108824615. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This work was supported by Grants from the National NaturalScience Foundation of China (no. 81473768; no. 81101927)and Grants from Wuhan Science and Technology Bureau no.2013060602010280.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824615 Serial 2330  
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