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Author Au-Yeung, S.S.Y.; Hui-Chan, C.W.Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electrical acupoint stimulation of the affected arm in acute stroke: a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Clinical Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Clin Rehabil  
  Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 149-158  
  Keywords Stroke -- Complications; Hemiplegia -- Therapy; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Funding Source; Double-Blind Studies; Post Hoc Analysis; Clinical Assessment Tools; Grip Strength; Hong Kong; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; Analysis of Variance; Scales; Male; Female; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Publisher Sage Publications Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 104007212. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140124. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Instrumentation: Action Research Arm Test (ARAT); National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Grant Information: This work was supported by an Area of Strategic Development grant from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University to the corresponding author, CWY Hui-Chan.. NLM UID: 8802181. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 104007212 Serial 2387  
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Author Baccetti, S.; Da Frè, M.; Becorpi, A.; Faedda, M.; Guerrera, A.; Monechi, M.V.; Munizzi, R.M.; Parazzini, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine for Hot Flushes in Menopause: A Randomized Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 550-557  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Hot Flashes -- Prevention and Control; Perimenopausal Symptoms -- Prevention and Control; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Human; Italy; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Pretest-Posttest Design; Alternative Therapies; Women's Health; Female; Massage; Self Care; Diet Therapy; Combined Modality Therapy; Questionnaires; Statistical Significance; Sleep Disorders; Anger; Pain; Depression; Prospective Studies; Middle Age; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; T-Tests; Linear Regression; Paired T-Tests; Confidence Intervals  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes and other menopause-related symptoms used in an integrated system, including such therapeutic techniques as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage. Design: Randomized trial. Setting: Outpatient center. Participants: One hundred women in spontaneous menopause with at least three episodes of hot flushes daily were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (50 per group): Women in group A were given diet, self-massage training, and treatment with acupuncture, and women in group B (the control group) were given the same diet and self-massage training, but treatment with acupuncture started 6 weeks after they were enrolled into the study. Intervention: Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures: Mean change in frequency and/or intensity in menopause-related symptoms were estimated by questionnaire after treatment at week 4. Results: Treatment with acupuncture significantly reduced the occurrence of hot flushes and sudden sweating ( p<.001). Other symptoms (sleep disorders, tightness in the chest, irritability, bone pain, feeling depressed) significantly improved. Conclusions: Acupuncture in an integrated system that includes therapeutic techniques such as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage can be used to treat hot flushes and selected symptoms in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103971835. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Women's Health. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971835 Serial 2354  
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Author Chan, Y.-Y.; Lo, W.-Y.; Li, T.-C.; Shen, L.-J.; Yang, S.-N.; Chen, Y.-H.; Lin, J.-G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture as an Adjunct to Methadone Treatment Services for Heroin Addicts: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication American Journal of Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chinese Med  
  Volume 42 Issue 3 Pages 569-586  
  Keywords Substance Abusers; Heroin; Methadone -- Administration and Dosage; Neoadjuvant Therapy -- Methods; Electroacupuncture -- Utilization; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Taiwan; Chi Square Test; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Analysis of Variance; Paired T-Tests; Step-Wise Multiple Regression; Male; Adult; Female; Funding Source  
  Abstract Scant scientific evidence supports the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of opiate dependence. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of acupuncture for heroin addicts on methadone maintenance by measuring the daily consumption of methadone, variations in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores, and heroin craving. Sixty heroin addicts were randomly assigned to true acupuncture (electroacupuncture at the Hegu [LI4] and Zusanli [ST36] acupoints, as well as acupuncture at the Ear Shenmen) or sham acupuncture (minimal acupuncture at the Hegu and Zusanli acupoints without electrical stimulation and superficial acupuncture at the Ear Shenmen), twice weekly for 4 weeks. From week 2 onwards, the daily dose of methadone was reduced by a significantly greater amount with true acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture. True acupuncture was also associated with a greater improvement in sleep latency at follow-up. All adverse events were mild in severity. Acupuncture appears to be a useful adjunct to methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) in heroin addiction.  
  Address Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan  
  Publisher World Scientific Publishing Company
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103951748. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140603. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Military/Uniformed Services; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Grant Information: This work was supported by grant NSC 100-2320-B-039-029-MY2 from the National Science Council, Taipei, Taiwan.. NLM UID: 7901431. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103951748 Serial 2362  
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Author Changhe Yu; Kangshou Ji; Huijuan Cao; Ying Wang; Hwang Hye Jin; Zhe Zhang; Guanlin Yang url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bmc Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 1-22  
  Keywords Randomized Controlled Trials; Acupuncture; Angina Pectoris -- Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Descriptive Statistics; Relative Risk; Confidence Intervals; Meta Analysis; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Chi Square Test; Data Analysis Software; Middle Age; Male; Female; Adult; Aged  
  Abstract Background: The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris. Methods: Eleven electronic databases were searched until January 2013. The study included randomized controlled trials that the effectiveness of acupuncture alone was compared to anti-angina medicines (in addition to conventional treatment) and the effectiveness of a combination of acupuncture plus anti-angina medicines was compared to anti-angina medicines alone. The trial selection, data extraction, quality assessment and data analytic procedures outlined in the 2011 Cochrane Handbook were involved. Results: The study included 25 randomized controlled trials (involving 2,058 patients) that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled results showed that the number of patients with ineffectiveness of angina relief was less in the combined acupuncture-anti-angina treatment group than in the anti-angina medicines alone group (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.23-0.47, p < 0.00001, I2 = 0%). Similarly, compared to the anti-angina medicines alone group, fewer patients in the combined treatment group showed no ECG improvement (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.40-0.62, p < 0.00001, I2 = 0%). However, no differences were observed between acupuncture treatment alone and anti-angina medicines alone for both outcome measures. Only four trials mentioned adverse effects. One trial found no significant difference between acupuncture and Chinese medicine, and three reported no adverse events. The quality of the trials was found to be low. Conclusions: The findings showed very low evidence to support the use of acupuncture for improving angina symptoms and ECG of angina patients. However, the quality of the trials included in this study was low. Large and rigorously designed trials are needed to confirm the potential benefit and adverse events of acupuncture.  
  Address Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shenyang, Liaoning, China  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103807220. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150605. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101088661. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103807220 Serial 2319  
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Author Chien, T.-J.; Liu, C.-Y.; Chang, Y.-F.; Fang, C.-J.; Hsu, C.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Treating Aromatase Inhibitor-Related Arthralgia in Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 251-260  
  Keywords Breast Neoplasms -- Drug Therapy; Aromatase Inhibitors -- Adverse Effects; Arthralgia -- Therapy; Acupuncture Analgesia; Human; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Taiwan; Female; Women's Health; Alternative Therapies; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Clinical Trials -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Arthralgia -- Etiology; Arthralgia -- Chemically Induced; Medline; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; CINAHL Database; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; Checklists; Postmenopause; Pain Measurement -- Methods; Functional Assessment; Cytokines -- Blood; Confidence Intervals; P-Value; Chi Square Test; Descriptive Statistics; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract Purpose: Acupuncture has been used as a complementary medical treatment for arthralgia and other types of pain. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of arthralgia in patients with breast cancer who were treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Methods: A literature search was performed, without language restrictions, of 10 databases from their inception through February 2014. The literature reviewed included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and clinical trials that compared real versus sham acupuncture for the treatment of AI-related musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS). The methodologic quality of these trials was assessed by using the modified Jadad Quality Scale. Meta-analytic software (RevMan 5.0) was used to analyze the data. Results: Five To compare the effects of real versus sham acupuncture, five RCTs were assessed by meta-analysis and quality analysis. Three of the RCTs reported favorable effects with regard to use of acupuncture in reducing pain and joint-related symptoms, while the other two RCTs did not. The meta-analysis showed trends toward reduced pain and stiffness in patients given acupuncture compared with those who received sham treatment ( n=82; pain, mean difference: ?2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), ?4.72 to 0.57]; p=0.12; stiffness, mean difference: ?86.10 [95% CI, ?249.11 to 76.92]; p=0.30), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture has been reported as a safe and promising treatment for AIMSS, but the present analysis indicated that the effects were not statistically significant. Other outcome measurements, such as imaging studies, would be worth including in future studies to further confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in AIMSS.  
  Address Medical Library, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103798719. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150512. Revision Date: 20160502. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care; Pain and Pain Management; Women's Health. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale [modified]. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103798719 Serial 2307  
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Author Cotchett, M.P.; Munteanu, S.E.; Landorf, K.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Trigger Point Dry Needling for Plantar Heel Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal Phys Ther  
  Volume 94 Issue 8 Pages 1083-1094  
  Keywords Trigger Point; Heel Pain -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Methods; Needles -- Utilization; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Pain Measurement; Visual Analog Scaling; Scales; Treatment Outcomes; Clinical Assessment Tools; Questionnaires; Psychological Tests; Outcome Assessment; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials; Single-Blind Studies; Placebos; Confidence Intervals; Summated Rating Scaling; Data Analysis Software; P-Value; Analysis of Covariance; T-Tests; Sample Size; Adult; Female; Male; Human; Funding Source  
  Abstract Background. Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points; however, there is only poor-quality evidence supporting its use. Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Design. The study was a parallel-group, participant-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Setting. The study was conducted in a university health sciences clinic. Patients. Study participants were 84 patients with plantar heel pain of at least 1 month’s duration. Intervention. Participants were randomly assigned to receive real or sham trigger point dry needling. The intervention consisted of 1 treatment per week for 6 weeks. Participants were followed for 12 weeks. Measurements . Primary outcome measures included first-step pain, as measured with a visual analog scale (VAS), and foot pain, as measured with the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ). The primary end point for predicting the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain was 6 weeks. Results. At the primary end point, significant effects favored real dry needling over sham dry needling for pain (adjusted mean difference: VAS first-step pain= -14.4 mm, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = -23.5 to -5.2; FHSQ foot pain= 10.0 points, 95% CI=1.0 to 19-1), although the between-group difference was lower than the minimal important difference. The number needed to treat at 6 weeks was 4 (95% CI=2 to 12). The frequency of minor transitory adverse events was significantly greater in the real dry needling group (70 real dry needling appointments [32%] compared with only 1 sham dry needling appointment [<1%]). Limitations. It was not possible to blind the therapist. Conclusion. Dry needling provided statistically significant reductions in plantar heel pain, but the magnitude of this effect should be considered against the frequency of minor transitory adverse events.  
  Address Department of Podiatry and Lower Extremity and Gait Studies Program, La Trobe University  
  Publisher Oxford University Press / USA
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107870439. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140807. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Instrumentation: Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ); Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) Version 2; Credibility/Expectancy Questionnaire (CEQ); Physical Activity Recall (PAR) questionnaire. Grant Information: This study was fun ded by the Australian Podiatry Education and Research Foundation (APERF).. NLM UID: 0022623. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107870439 Serial 2366  
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Author Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi, L.; Paes da Silva, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Chinese auriculotherapy to improve quality of life of nursing team Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem Abbreviated Journal Rev Brasil Enfermagem  
  Volume 68 Issue 1 Pages 109-115  
  Keywords Auriculotherapy; Quality of Life; Stress, Occupational; Nursing Staff, Hospital -- Psychosocial Factors; Single-Blind Studies; Human; P-Value; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Randomized Controlled Trials; Confidence Intervals; Acupuncture Points; Data Analysis Software; Repeated Measures; Analysis of Variance; Post Hoc Analysis; Adult; Middle Age; Coefficient Alpha; Academic Medical Centers; Treatment Outcomes; Male; Female; Shiftwork; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Objective: to evaluated the efficacy of auriculotherapy for improving quality of life and reducing stress in nursing staff. Method: single-blind radomizad clinical trail envolving 175 subjects randomized in: Control (G1), Protocol Group (G2) and without Protocol Group (G3). They were evaluated by the Stress Symptoms List and SF36v2 at baseline, after 12 sessions and follow up (30 days), between January and July 2012. Results: both intervention groups reduced stress (p <0.05) with greater effect for G3 (d = 1.15). G3 was also higher for improving life quality especially the physical domain (p = 0.05). Conclusion: individualized auriculotherapy (G3) had greater effect compared to the protocol auriculotherapy (G2) for reducing stress and improving life quality.  
  Address Universidade de São Paulo, School of Nursing, Graduate Program in Nursing Adult Health. Sao Paulo-SP, Brazil  
  Publisher Associacao Brasileira de Enfermagem
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109798827. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150811. Revision Date: 20151008. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Mexico & Central/South America; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Instrumentation: Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) Version 2; Vasconcelos¿ Stress Symptoms List (VSSL). NLM UID: 7910105. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109798827 Serial 2341  
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Author Gang Wang; Qian Gao; Jingshan Hou; Jun Li url  openurl
  Title Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Myofascial Pain Syndromes -- Therapy; Trapezius Muscles -- Pathology; Heat; Treatment Outcomes; Human; China; Randomized Controlled Trials; Visual Analog Scaling; Pain Threshold; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Male; Female; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Needles; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876723. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Grant Information: National Natural Science Foundation Fund of China for study on quantitative evaluation system of myofascial tension band; Wu JiePing Medical Foundation (320.6750.1234).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876723 Serial 2401  
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Author Glazov, G.; Yelland, M.; Emery, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Low-dose laser acupuncture for non-specific chronic low back pain: a double-blind randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 116-123  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Methods; Laser Therapy -- Methods; Low Back Pain -- Therapy; Chronic Pain -- Therapy; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Double-Blind Studies; Australia; Random Assignment; Descriptive Statistics; Male; Female; Adult; Scales; Confidence Intervals; Prospective Studies; Summated Rating Scaling; Data Analysis Software; Analysis of Variance; Chi Square Test; Kruskal-Wallis Test; Analysis of Covariance; Middle Age; Aged; Funding Source  
  Abstract Objective To determine if infrared laser acupuncture (LA) may have a specific effect in reducing pain and disability in treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods This was a double-blind sham laser controlled trial performed in general practices in Perth, Western Australia. The participants were 144 adults with chronic non-specific LBP. They were randomised to receive eight once-weekly treatments. Laser machines (20 mW, 840 nm diode, power density 0.1 W/cm2) stimulated points in three treatment groups: sham (0 joules/ point), low dose (0.2 J/point) and high dose (0.8 joules/point). Participants were followed-up at 1 and 6 weeks, and 6 and 12 months post treatment. Primary outcomes were pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS)) and disability (Oswestry Disability Inventory (ODI)) at 6 weeks post treatment. Secondary outcomes included numerical rating scale for limitation of activity, global assessment of improvement, analgesic usage and adverse effects after treatment. Results The analysis showed no difference between sham and the laser groups at 6 weeks for pain or disability. There was a significant reduction in mean pain and disability in all groups at 6 weeks (p<0.005); NPRS: sham (-1.5 (95% CI -2.1 to – 0.8)), low dose (-1.3 (-2.0 to -0.8)), high dose (-1.1 (-1.7 to -0.5)). ODI: sham (-4.0 (-7.1 to -1.0)), low dose (-4.1, (-6.7 to -1.5)), high dose (-2.6 (-5.7 to 0.5)). All secondary outcomes also showed clinical improvement over time but with no differences between groups. Conclusions LA using energy density range (0-4 J/cm2) for the treatment of chronic nonspecific LBP resulted in clinical improvement unrelated to laser stimulation.  
  Address School of Medicine, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Meadowbank, Queensland, Australia  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103927539. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140411. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS); International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ); Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21). Grant Information: This study was funded by Commonwealth Government of Australia; PHCRED bursary awarded in 2008.. NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103927539 Serial 2381  
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Author Huanqin Li; Huilin Liu; Cunzhi Liu; Guangxia Shi; Wei Zhou; Chengmei Zhao; Tao Zhang; Xuefei Wang; Guiling Wang; Yin Zhao; Jingqing Sun; Jing Wang; Linpeng Wang url  openurl
  Title Effect of 'Deqi' during the Study of Needling 'Wang's Jiaji' Acupoints Treating Spasticity after Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Muscle Spasticity -- Drug Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Stroke -- Therapy; Stroke -- Symptoms; Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Sensation -- Evaluation; Human; Multicenter Studies; Prospective Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials; Single-Blind Studies; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Glasgow Coma Scale; Scales; NIH Stroke Scale; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Outcomes Research; Outcome Assessment; Barthel Index; Chi Square Test; Nonparametric Statistics; Fisher's Exact Test; Data Analysis Software; Two-Tailed Test  
  Abstract  
  Address Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, Fangshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 151 Chengguan South Street, Fangshan District, Beijing 102400, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876776. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Gerontologic Care. Instrumentation: NIH Stroke Scale; Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale; Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA); Barthel Index; Stroke-Specific Quality of Life scale (SSQOL); Rankin Scale; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876776 Serial 2399  
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Author Hyun-jong Lee; Jung-chul Seo; Sung-hoon Park; Min-ah Kwak; Im hee Shin; Bo-mi Min; Min-su Cho; Woon-seok Roh; Jin-yong Jung url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in Patients with a Vertebral Compression Fracture: A Protocol for a Randomized, Controlled, Pilot Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Pharmacopuncture Abbreviated Journal J Pharmacopuncture  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 79-85  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Fractures, Vertebral Compression; Steroids -- Administration and Dosage; Injections, Epidural; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Protocols; Pilot Studies; McGill Pain Questionnaire; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Visual Analog Scaling; Questionnaires; Data Analysis Software; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, School of Medicine, Catholic University, Daegu, Korea  
  Publisher Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103790494. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150421. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Asia. Instrumentation: McGill Pain Questionnaire. Grant Information: This study was supported by a grant from the Ministry of Health & Welfare, Korea, 2013.. NLM UID: 101572812. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103790494 Serial 2324  
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Author Jimin Park; Hyun Soo Kim; Seung Min Lee; Kanghyun Yoon; Woo-shik Kim; Jong Shin Woo; Sanghoon Lee; Jin-Bae Kim; Weon Kim url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Antiarrhythmic Effects on Drug Refractory Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: Study Protocol for a Randomized, Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-6  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Methods; Atrial Fibrillation -- Prevention and Control; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Prospective Studies; Random Assignment; Atrial Fibrillation -- Drug Therapy; Antiarrhythmia Agents -- Therapeutic Use; Echocardiography, Transesophageal; Multicenter Studies; South Korea; Risk Assessment; Electrocardiography; Sample Size; Descriptive Statistics; T-Tests; Mann-Whitney U Test; Chi Square Test; Fisher's Exact Test; Kaplan-Meier Estimator; Cox Proportional Hazards Model; Regression; Data Analysis Software; Clinical Assessment Tools; Funding Source  
  Abstract Background. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common form of arrhythmia. Several trials have suggested that acupuncture may prevent AF. However, the efficacy of acupuncture for AF prevention has not been well investigated. Therefore, we designed a prospective, two-parallel-armed, participant and assessor blinded, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trial to investigate acupuncture in persistent AF (ACU-AF). Methods. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to active acupuncture or sham acupuncture groups in a 1 : 1 ratio. Both groups will take the same antiarrhythmic medication during the study period. Patients will receive 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment once a week for 10 weeks. The primary endpoint is AF recurrence rate. Secondary endpoints are left atrium (LA) and left atrial appendage (LAA) changes in function and volume, and inflammatory biomarker changes. Ethics. This study protocol was approved by the institutional review boards (IRBs) of Kyung Hee University Hospital (number 1335-04). This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT02110537.  
  Address Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824781. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: This study is supported by grants from the Korean Government(Ministry of Health) (no. HI13C0580).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824781 Serial 2323  
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Author Kim, D.; Ham, O.K.; Kang, C.; Jun, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Auricular Acupressure Using Sinapsis alba Seeds on Obesity and Self-Efficacy in Female College Students Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 4 Pages 258-264  
  Keywords Students, College; Acupressure -- Methods; Seeds -- Utilization; Obesity -- Therapy; Self-Efficacy; Human; South Korea; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Female; Women's Health; Alternative Therapies; Body Mass Index -- Evaluation; Ear; Acupuncture Points; Self Care; Body Weights and Measures; Body Composition -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes -- Evaluation; Waist-Hip Ratio -- Evaluation; Scales; Statistical Significance; Plants, Medicinal; Pretest-Posttest Design; Power Analysis; Effect Size; Electric Impedance; Summated Rating Scaling; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; T-Tests; Paired T-Tests; Fisher's Exact Test; Young Adult; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Objectives : To examine the effects of auricular acupressure with Sinapsis alba seeds on obesity and self-efficacy. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Settings: College settings located in metropolitan areas of Korea. Participants: A total of 49 female college students who were overweight or obese (body-mass index [BMI] ?25.0 kg/m2) were recruited and randomly assigned to the experimental group ( n=25) or the control group ( n=24). Interventions: The experimental group applied three S. alba seeds to each of five auricular points (Shenmen, mouth, stomach, endocrine, and small intestine points). These participants were asked to stimulate those points 10 times at a rate of two times per second 30 minutes before mealtime, three times daily, for 1 month. They performed the procedure for each earlobe for alternating weeks (a total of 2 weeks' treatment for each ear). Outcome Measures: The obesity index included weight (kg), BMI (kg/m2), percentage body fat, and waist-to-hip ratio. Self-efficacy was measured by using a self-efficacy scale. Results: Female students in the experimental group showed significant decreases in weight ( t=10.76; p<0.001) and BMI ( t=9.60; p<0.001) and significant improvement in self-efficacy ( t=1.85; p<0.05) compared with those in the control group. However, percentage body fat ( t=1.27; p>0.05) and waist-to-hip ratio ( t=0.60; p>0.05) changes did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest that auricular acupressure using S. alba seeds may be an effective intervention for decreasing weight and BMI and increasing self-efficacy of overweight and obese individuals.  
  Address Department of Nursing Science, Dong-eui University, Busan, Republic of Korea.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103928992. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140418. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Psychiatry/Psychology; Women's Health. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103928992 Serial 2386  
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Author Liu, C.-Z.; Xie, J.-P.; Wang, L.-P.; Liu, Y.-Q.; Song, J.-S.; Chen, Y.-Y.; Shi, G.-X.; Zhou, W.; Gao, S.-Z.; Li, S.-L.; Xing, J.-M.; Ma, L.-X.; Wang, Y.-X.; Zhu, J.; Liu, J.-P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Randomized Controlled Trial of Single Point Acupuncture in Primary Dysmenorrhea Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Pain Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 6 Pages 910-920  
  Keywords Dysmenorrhea -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes; Randomized Controlled Trials; Multicenter Studies; China; Academic Medical Centers; Adolescence; Adult; Descriptive Statistics; Visual Analog Scaling; Human; Female; One-Way Analysis of Variance; Repeated Measures; Post Hoc Analysis; Models, Statistical; Chi Square Test; Confidence Intervals; Data Analysis Software; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Dongzhimen Hospital affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine  
  Publisher Oxford University Press / USA
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103966751. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140629. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Pain and Pain Management. Grant Information: The study was funded by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, reference number: 2012CB518506).. NLM UID: 100894201. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103966751 Serial 2349  
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Author Liu, F.; Li, Z.-M.; Jiang, Y.-J.; Chen, L.-D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Meta-Analysis of Acupuncture Use in the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment After Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 535-544  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Cognition Disorders -- Therapy; Stroke -- Complications; Human; Alternative Therapies; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Cochrane Library; Neuropsychological Tests; Data Analysis Software; Odds Ratio; Linear Regression; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Male; Female; Adolescence; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Chi Square Test  
  Abstract Objective: This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on cognitive impairment (function) after a stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation were identified from databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Chinese Periodical Database, Wangfang Chinese Periodical Database, Chinese Bio-medicine Database, Cochrane Library, and Chinese medical literature databases) and two relevant journals ( Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion and the Journal of Shanghai Acupuncture and Moxibustion). Meta-analyses were conducted for the eligible RCTs. Results: Twenty-one trials with a total of 1421 patients met inclusion criteria. Pooled random-effects estimates of the change in the Mini-Mental State Examination were calculated for the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation. Following 4 weeks and 8 weeks of intervention with acupuncture, the merged mean difference was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.06-4.21; p<.00001) and 2.03 (95% CI, 0.26-3.80; p=0.02), respectively. For the comparison of 3-4 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the merged MD in Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination total scores was 5.63 (95% CI, 3.95-7.31; p<.00001). For the comparison of 8-12 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the P300 latency merged MD was ?12.80 (95% CI, ?21.08 to ?4.51; p<.00001), while the P300 amplitude merged MD was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p<.00001). Overall, the study quality was rated as moderate on the basis of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (part 2: 8.5). Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture had positive effects on cognitive function after stroke and supports the need for additional research on the potential benefits of this therapeutic approach.  
  Address Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103971838. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) (Folstein et al); Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination. Grant Information: This study was supported by the Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971838 Serial 2347  
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Author Lixing Zhuang; Jun He; Xun Zhuang; Liming Lu url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quality of reporting on randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bmc Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Stroke -- Rehabilitation; Quality Assessment; Human; Systematic Review; Cochrane Library; Medline; Embase; CINAHL Database; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Regression; Data Analysis Software  
  Abstract Background Results from clinical studies on acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation are contradictory. The reason for the inconsistent findings especially lie in the transparency and accuracy of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reports. This study aims to analyze the quality of reporting and its correlates in RCTs on acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation. Methods Quality of reporting for included papers was assessed against a subset of criteria adapted from the CONSORT 2010 statement and STRICTA. An overall quality score (OQS) and a combined key methodological index score (MIS) was calculated for each trial. Then, factors associated with OQS and MIS were identified. Results A total of 15 RCTs were included in full text. The median OQS based on the CONSORT statement and STRICTA was 8 and 12, respectively. The significant predictors for CONSORT OQS was funding source, for STRICTA was year of publication. With regard to the MIS, no variable was associated with improved methodological quality. Conclusions Our study found that the overall quality of reporting on RCTs of acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation was general or good. But some items' reporting was found where information was insufficient or inadequate in most studies which needed substantial improvement.  
  Address Faculty of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 103945403. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140521. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101088661. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103945403 Serial 2382  
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Author Llamas-Ramos, R.; Pecos-Martin, D.; Gallego-Izquierdo, T.; Llamas-Ramos, I.É.S.; Plaza-Manzano, G.; Ortega-Santiago, R.; Cleland, J.; FernÁNdez-De-Las-PeÑAs, C.É.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of the Short-Term Outcomes Between Trigger Point Dry Needling and Trigger Point Manual Therapy for the Management of Chronic Mechanical Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Sports Phys Ther  
  Volume 44 Issue 11 Pages 852-861  
  Keywords Trigger Point -- Therapy; Needles -- Utilization; Manual Therapy; Pain Threshold; Functional Status; Range of Motion; Neck Pain -- Therapy; Human; Spain; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Pretest-Posttest Design; Alternative Therapies; Chronic Pain -- Therapy; Adult; Male; Female; Pain Measurement; Scales; Questionnaires; Functional Assessment; Analysis of Variance; Repeated Measures; Confidence Intervals; Summated Rating Scaling; Self Report; Interrater Reliability; Intrarater Reliability; Algometry; Biophysical Instruments; Power Analysis; Two-Tailed Test; Data Analysis Software; P-Value; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN; Randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of trigger point (TrP) dry needling (DN) and TrP manual therapy (MT) on pain, function, pressure pain sensitivity, and cervical range of motion in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain. BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that TrP DN could be effective in the treatment of neck pain. However, no studies have directly compared the outcomes of TrP DN and TrP MT in this population. METHODS: Ninety-four patients (mean ± SD age, 31 ± 3 years; 66% female) were randomized into a TrP DN group (n = 47) or a TrP MT group (n = 47). Neck pain intensity (11-point numeric pain rating scale), cervical range of motion, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over the spinous process of C7 were measured at baseline, postintervention, and at follow-ups of 1 week and 2 weeks after treatment. The Spanish version of the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire was used to measure disability/function at baseline and the 2-week follow-up. Mixed-model, repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to determine if a time-by-group interaction existed on the effects of the treatment on each outcome variable, with time as the within-subject variable and group as the between-subject variable. RESULTS: The ANOVA revealed that participants who received TrP DN had outcomes similar to those who received TrP MT in terms of pain, function, and cervical range of motion. The 4-by-2 mixed-model ANOVA also revealed a significant time-by-group interaction (P<.001) for PPT: patients who received TrP DN experienced a greater increase in PPT (decreased pressure sensitivity) than those who received TrP MT at all follow-up periods (between-group differences: posttreatment, 59.0 kPa; 95% confidence interval [Cl]: 40.0, 69.2; 1- week follow-up, 69.2 kPa; 95% Cl: 49.5, 79.1; 2- week follow-up, 78.9 kPa; 95% Cl: 49.5, 89.0). CONCLUSION: The results of this clinical trial suggest that 2 sessions of TrP DN and TrP MT resulted in similar outcomes in terms of pain, disability, and cervical range of motion. Those in the TrP DN group experienced greater improvements in PPT over the cervical spine. Future trials are needed to examine the effects of TrP DN and TrP MT over long-term follow-up periods,  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, Franklin Pierce University, Concord, NH; Rehabilitation Services, Concord Hospital, Concord, NH; Manual Therapy Fellowship Program, Regis University, Denver, CO  
  Publisher American Physical Therapy Association, Orthopaedic Section
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 107807283. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141120. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Commentary: Ware John W., Llamas-Ramos Rocio, Pecos-Martín Daniel, Gallego-Izquierdo Tomás, Llamas-Ramos Inés, Plaza-Manzano Gustavo, et al. MISREPORT OF TRIGGER POINT DIAGNOSIS RELIABILITY. (J ORTHOP SPORTS PHYS THER) Feb2015; 45 (2): 144-146. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Pain and Pain Management; Physical Therapy; Sports Medicine. Instrumentation: Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS); Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire [Spanish version]. NLM UID: 7908150. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107807283 Serial 2342  
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Author Ntritsou, V.; Mavrommatis, C.; Kostoglou, C.; Dimitriadis, G.; Tziris, N.; Zagka, P.; Vasilakos, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of perioperative electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy on postoperative analgesia with tramadol and ketamine in prostatectomy: a randomised sham-controlled single-blind trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 3 Pages 215-222  
  Keywords Prostatectomy, Radical -- Methods; Perioperative Care; Postoperative Pain; Analgesia -- Methods; Combined Modality Therapy; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Tramadol -- Administration and Dosage; Ketamine -- Administration and Dosage; Outcome Assessment; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Patient Satisfaction; Adverse Drug Event; Double-Blind Studies; Placebos; Descriptive Statistics; Random Assignment; McGill Pain Questionnaire; Questionnaires; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; Male; Middle Age; Aged; Power Analysis; Chi Square Test; Confidence Intervals; Data Analysis Software; Summated Rating Scaling  
  Abstract Objectives: To study the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) as perioperative adjunctive therapy added to a systemic analgesic strategy (including tramadol and ketamine) for postoperative pain, opioid-related side effects and patient satisfaction. Methods: In a sham-controlled participant- and observer-blinded trial, 75 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to two groups: (1) EA (n=37; tramadol+ketamine +EA) and (2) control (n=38; tramadol+ketamine). EA (100 Hz frequency) was applied at LI4 bilaterally during the closure of the abdominal walls and EA (4 Hz) was applied at ST36 and LI4 bilaterally immediately after extubation. The control group had sham acupuncture without penetration or stimulation. The following outcomes were evaluated: postoperative pain using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and McGill Scale (SFMPQ), mechanical pain thresholds using algometer application close to the wound, cortisol measurements, rescue analgesia, Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI Y-6 item), patient satisfaction and opioid side effects. Results: Pain scores on the NRS and SFMPQ were significantly lower and electronic pressure algometer measurements were significantly higher in the EA group than in the control group (p<0.001) at all assessments. In the EA group a significant decrease in rescue analgesia was observed at 45 min (p<0.001) and a significant decrease in cortisol levels was also observed (p<0.05). Patients expressed satisfaction with the analgesia, especially in the EA group (p<0.01). Significant delays in the start of bowel movements were observed in the control group at 45 min (p<0.001) and 2 h (p<0.05). Conclusions: Adding EA perioperatively should be considered an option as part of a multimodal analgesic strategy.  
  Address Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Thessaloniki “Ahepa”, Thessaloniki, Greece  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
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  Notes Accession Number: 103977176. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140725. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Commentary: Usichenko T. I., Streitberger K. Perioperative acupuncture: why are we not using it? (ACUPUNCTURE MED) Jun2014; 32 (3): 212-214. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) (Spielberger); Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS); McGill Pain Questionnaire; Present Pain Intensity Scale (PPI). NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103977176 Serial 2365  
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Author Ortiz, M.; Witt, C.M.; Binting, S.; Helmreich, C.; Hummelsberger, J.; Pfab, F.; Wullinger, M.; Irnich, D.; Linde, K.; Niggemann, B.; Willich, S.N.; Brinkhaus, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A randomised multicentre trial of acupuncture in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis – trial intervention including physician and treatment characteristics Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bmc Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 1-19  
  Keywords Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal -- Prevention and Control; Acupuncture -- Utilization; Human; Multicenter Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials; Questionnaires; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Male; Middle Age; Adult; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Data Analysis Software; Acupuncture Points; Physicians; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pneumonology and Immunology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 103934197. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140423. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Grant Information: This study was funded by a grant from the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) Grant No. WI 957/16-1.. NLM UID: 101088661. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103934197 Serial 2384  
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Author Park, S.-W.; Yi, S.-H.; Lee, J.A.; Hwang, P.W.; Yoo, H.C.; Kang, K.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Spasticity After Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages 672-682  
  Keywords Stroke -- Complications; Muscle Spasticity -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Human; South Korea; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Treatment Outcomes; Cochrane Library; PubMed; CINAHL Database; Embase; Descriptive Statistics; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Measurement Issues and Assessments; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; H-Reflex; Motor Neurons  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for spasticity in patients with stroke. The available literature was reviewed in an effort to assess its efficacy in this situation. Methods: Randomized trials assessing the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of spasticity after stroke were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCO host, SCOPUS, CINAHL, EMBASE, Alternative Medicine Database, and Chinese and Korean medical literature databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, patient characteristics, and spasticity outcomes. Results: Eight trials with 399 patients met all the inclusion criteria. Compared with controls without acupuncture, acupuncture had no effect on improving clinical outcomes (as measured by validated instruments such as the Modified Ashworth Scale) or physiologic outcomes (assessed by measures such as the H-reflex/M-response [H/M] ratio at the end of the treatment period). H/M ratios did decrease significantly immediately after the first acupuncture treatment. Methodologic quality of all evaluated trials was considered inadequate. Conclusions: The effect of acupuncture for spasticity in patients with stroke remains uncertain, primarily because of the poor quality of the available studies. Larger and more methodologically sound trials are needed to definitively confirm or refute any effect of acupuncture as a treatment for spasticity after stroke.  
  Address Department of Motor & Cognitive Rehabilitation, Korea National Rehabilitation Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.; Kyungheesarang Oriental Medicine Clinic, Seoul, Korea.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103889719. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140909. Revision Date: 20150901. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This research was supported by a grant (08-B-02) from the Korea National Rehabilitation Center Research Institute.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103889719 Serial 2356  
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