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Author (up) Chien, T.-J.; Liu, C.-Y.; Chang, Y.-F.; Fang, C.-J.; Hsu, C.-H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Treating Aromatase Inhibitor-Related Arthralgia in Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 251-260  
  Keywords CLINICAL trials -- Evaluation; RESEARCH methodology evaluation; ARTHRALGIA -- Treatment; ALTERNATIVE medicine; BREAST tumors; CHI-squared test; CINAHL (Information retrieval system); CONFIDENCE intervals; Cytokines; EXPERIMENTAL design; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; PHYSICAL therapy; PROBABILITY theory; WOMEN -- Health; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; PAIN measurement; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; Postmenopause; AROMATASE inhibitors; DATA analysis -- Software; FUNCTIONAL assessment; Arthralgia; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ACUPUNCTURE analgesia; Evaluation; Taiwan  
  Abstract Purpose: Acupuncture has been used as a complementary medical treatment for arthralgia and other types of pain. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of arthralgia in patients with breast cancer who were treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Methods: A literature search was performed, without language restrictions, of 10 databases from their inception through February 2014. The literature reviewed included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and clinical trials that compared real versus sham acupuncture for the treatment of AI-related musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS). The methodologic quality of these trials was assessed by using the modified Jadad Quality Scale. Meta-analytic software (RevMan 5.0) was used to analyze the data. Results: Five To compare the effects of real versus sham acupuncture, five RCTs were assessed by meta-analysis and quality analysis. Three of the RCTs reported favorable effects with regard to use of acupuncture in reducing pain and joint-related symptoms, while the other two RCTs did not. The meta-analysis showed trends toward reduced pain and stiffness in patients given acupuncture compared with those who received sham treatment ( n=82; pain, mean difference: ?2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), ?4.72 to 0.57]; p=0.12; stiffness, mean difference: ?86.10 [95% CI, ?249.11 to 76.92]; p=0.30), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture has been reported as a safe and promising treatment for AIMSS, but the present analysis indicated that the effects were not statistically significant. Other outcome measurements, such as imaging studies, would be worth including in future studies to further confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in AIMSS.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 102579991; Source Information: May2015, Vol. 21 Issue 5, p251; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials -- Evaluation; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: ARTHRALGIA -- Treatment; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: BREAST tumors; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CINAHL (Information retrieval system); Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: CYTOKINES; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: PHYSICAL therapy; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: PAIN measurement; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: POSTMENOPAUSE; Subject Term: AROMATASE inhibitors; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: FUNCTIONAL assessment; Subject Term: ARTHRALGIA; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE analgesia; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: TAIWAN; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2265  
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Author (up) Gadau, M.; Zhang, S.-P.; Yip, H.-Y.; Yeung, W.-F.; Bian, Z.-X.; Lu, A.-P.; Zaslawski, C. url  openurl
  Title Pattern Differentiation of Lateral Elbow Pain in Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 22 Issue 11 Pages 921-935  
  Keywords TENNIS elbow -- Treatment; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; CHINESE medicine; Medline; ONLINE information services; RESEARCH -- Finance; TENNIS elbow; Textbooks; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; AMED (Information retrieval system); Symptoms  
  Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that acupuncture is beneficial to patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), but the mechanism underlying its therapeutic effects remains unclear. To identify the mechanism by which acupuncture treats CD, the balance between Th17 and Treg cells was assessed in CD patients. In this study, Ninety-two CD patients were randomly and equally assigned to a treatment group that were treated with herb-partitioned moxibustion and acupuncture or a control group with wheat bran-partitioned moxibustion and superficial acupuncture. The effect of these treatments on Th17 and Treg cells and their related molecular markers in the intestinal mucosa were detected before (week 0) and after (week 12) treatment. The results suggested that the ratio of Th17 and Treg cells was significantly decreased after treatment and that the levels of IL-17 and ROR?t in the intestinal mucosa were obviously reduced, while the expression of FOXP3 was increased after treatment in both groups. In the treatment group, the expression of these molecules was more markedly regulated than the control group. In conclusion, moxibustion and acupuncture have been shown to regulate the ratio of Th17 and Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients and restore the balance between these immune cell subsets.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 119498026; Source Information: Nov2016, Vol. 22 Issue 11, p921; Subject Term: TENNIS elbow -- Treatment; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: CHINESE medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: TENNIS elbow; Subject Term: TEXTBOOKS; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: AMED (Information retrieval system); Subject Term: SYMPTOMS; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 15p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2286  
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Author (up) Ma, C.; Sivamani, R.K. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as a Treatment Modality in Dermatology: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 21 Issue 9 Pages 520-529  
  Keywords RESEARCH methodology evaluation; FACE -- Physiology; SKIN diseases -- Treatment; Acupuncture; ALTERNATIVE medicine; ATOPIC dermatitis; BREAST diseases; CUTANEOUS manifestations of general diseases; Elasticity; EXPERIMENTAL design; Hyperhidrosis; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Itching; Medline; Melanosis; Rosacea; SKIN diseases; Urticaria; Warts; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation; California  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture is a form of Traditional Chinese Medicine that has been used to treat a broad range of medical conditions, including dermatologic disorders. This systematic review aims to synthesize the evidence on the use of acupuncture as a primary treatment modality for dermatologic conditions. Methods: A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register was performed. Studies were limited to clinical trials, controlled studies, case reports, comparative studies, and systematic reviews published in the English language. Studies involving moxibustion, electroacupuncture, or blood-letting were excluded. Results: Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Among these, 16 were randomized controlled trials, 6 were prospective observational studies, and 2 were case reports. Acupuncture was used to treat atopic dermatitis, urticaria, pruritus, acne, chloasma, neurodermatitis, dermatitis herpetiformis, hyperhidrosis, human papillomavirus wart, breast inflammation, and facial elasticity. In 17 of 24 studies, acupuncture showed statistically significant improvements in outcome measurements compared with placebo acupuncture, alternative treatment options, and no intervention. Conclusions: Acupuncture improves outcome measures in the treatment of dermatitis, chloasma, pruritus, urticaria, hyperhidrosis, and facial elasticity. Future studies should ideally be double-blinded and standardize the control intervention.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109251687; Source Information: Sep2015, Vol. 21 Issue 9, p520; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: FACE -- Physiology; Subject Term: SKIN diseases -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ATOPIC dermatitis; Subject Term: BREAST diseases; Subject Term: CUTANEOUS manifestations of general diseases; Subject Term: ELASTICITY; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: HYPERHIDROSIS; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: ITCHING; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: MELANOSIS; Subject Term: ROSACEA; Subject Term: SKIN diseases; Subject Term: URTICARIA; Subject Term: WARTS; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CALIFORNIA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 1 Chart; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2230  
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Author (up) Zhang, Y.; Qu, S.-shan; Zhang, J.-ping; Sun, Y.-ling; Liu, W.-lu; Xie, L.; Huang, Y.; Chen, J.-qi url  openurl
  Title Rapid Onset of the Effects of Combined Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Electroacupuncture on Primary Depression: A Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 1-8  
  Keywords MENTAL depression -- Treatment; SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors -- Therapeutic use; RESEARCH methodology evaluation; ALTERNATIVE medicine; COMBINED modality therapy; CONFIDENCE intervals; Electroacupuncture; EXPERIMENTAL design; HAMILTON Depression Inventory; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; PROBABILITY theory; PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; MEDICAL coding; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation; China  
  Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and electroacupuncture therapies for the early treatment of primary depression. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were analyzed to compare therapy combining SSRIs and electroacupuncture to SSRI therapy alone. The RCTs were identified by searching, among others, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chongqing VIP database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, WANFANG DATA, and the Chinese Biological Medical Literature Database. Scores from Self-Rated Depression Scale (SDS), the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Side Effect Rating Scale (SERS), and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) were analyzed and coded by two independent investigators and used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment. Statistical analyses were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results: Six RCTs were analyzed. The meta-analysis revealed that the combined therapy of SSRIs and electroacupuncture were associated with superior scores on the HAMD, SDS, and SERS measures compared with SSRIs alone after 1-4 weeks of treatment: HAMD scores, mean difference (MD)1 week, 2.32 (95% confidence interval [CI]1 week, 1.47-3.16, p1 week<0.00001); MD2 weeks, 2.65 (95% CI2 weeks, 1.81- 3.50, p2 weeks<0.00001); MD4 weeks, 2.70 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.90-3.51, p4 weeks<0.00001); SDS scores: MD1 week, 3.13 (95% CI1 week, 1.22-5.03, p1 week = 0.001); MD2 weeks, 4.05 (95% CI2 weeks, 0.22-7.87, p2 weeks = 0.04); MD4 weeks, 5.02 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.61-8.43, p4 weeks = 0.004); SERS scores: MD2 weeks, 2.20 (95% CI2 weeks, 1.43-2.96, p2 weeks<0.00001); MD4 weeks, 2.12 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.42-2.83, p4 weeks<0.00001). However, two of the aforementioned outcomes were rated as medium quality because of heterogeneity, as assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that the early treatment of primary depression using both SSRI and electroacupuncture therapies is more efficient than treatments with SSRIs alone and leads to a better and earlier control of depressive symptoms.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 112335762; Source Information: Jan2016, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p1; Subject Term: MENTAL depression -- Treatment; Subject Term: SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors -- Therapeutic use; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: COMBINED modality therapy; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: HAMILTON Depression Inventory; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; Subject Term: SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: MEDICAL coding; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 8p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 11 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2241  
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