toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/acutrialsocom/public_html/refbase-ocom/includes/include.inc.php on line 5275
  Records Links
Author Johansson, J.; Redman, L.; Veldhuis, P. P.; Sazonova, A.; Labrie, F.; Holm, G.; Johannsson, G.; Stener-Victorin, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for ovulation induction in polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Genital Diseases, Female; Acu Versus Attention Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Ovulation Induction; Electroacupuncture; Attention Control; Women's Health  
  Abstract Acupuncture has been demonstrated to improve menstrual frequency and to decrease circulating testosterone in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Our aim was to investigate whether acupuncture affects ovulation frequency and to understand the underlying mechanisms of any such effect by analyzing luteinizing hormone (LH) and sex steroid secretion in women with PCOS. This prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted between June 2009 and September 2010. Thirty-two women with PCOS were randomized to receive either acupuncture in combination with manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation or to meetings with a physical therapist twice a week for 10-13 weeks. Main outcome measures were changes in LH secretion patterns from baseline to after 10-13 weeks of treatment and ovulation frequency during the treatment period. Secondary outcomes were changes in the secretion of sex steroids, anti-Mullerian hormone, inhibin B, and serum cortisol. Ovulation frequency during treatment was higher in the acupuncture group compared with the control group. After 10-13 weeks of intervention, circulating levels of estrone, estrone sulfate, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, testosterone, free-testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, androsterone glucuronide, androstane-3alpha, 17beta-diol-3glucuronide, and androstane-3alpha, 17beta-diol-17glucuronide decreased within the acupuncture group and were significantly lower than in the control group for all of these except androstenedione. We conclude that repeated acupuncture treatments resulted in higher ovulation frequency in lean/overweight women with PCOS and were more effective than just meeting with the therapist. Ovarian and adrenal sex steroid serum levels were reduced with no effect on LH secretion.  
  Address Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 32  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 533  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Junyoung Jo; Yoon Jae Lee; Hyangsook Lee url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Primary Ovarian Insufficiency: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Female; Primary Ovarian Insufficiency; Women's Health; Gynecology; POI; Acupuncture; Moxibustion; Moxa  
  Abstract Objective. This systematic review aimed to assess current evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of acupuncture for patients with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). Methods. We searched twelve databases to identify relevant studies published before July 2014. The outcomes were serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels and resumption of menstruation. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane's tool, extracted the results, and evaluated the overall level of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Results. Eight RCTs were selected. Acupuncture significantly lowered serum FSH levels and more women receiving acupuncture reported resumption of menses. However, the results should be interpreted with caution due to a small number of participants, high risk of bias for blinding, and likely publication bias. The level of evidence for FSH level and resumption of menses were assessed as “low” using GRADE. Conclusion. The current evidence on acupuncture for POI is insufficient to draw a firm conclusion due to scarcity of studies with a low risk of bias and likely publication bias. Further rigorously designed and conducted studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in patients with POI.  
  Address Department of Korean Gynecology, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-702, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Primary Ovarian Insufficiency
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2329  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Leonhardt, H.; Hellstrom, M.; Gull, B.; Lind, A.-K.; Nilsson, L.; Janson, P.O.; Stener-Victorin, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Serum anti-Mullerian hormone and ovarian morphology assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in response to acupuncture and exercise in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: secondary analyses of a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand  
  Volume 94 Issue 3 Pages 279-287  
  Keywords Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Women's Health; Gynecology; PCOS; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; Usual Care Control, Physical  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether electro-acupuncture or physical exercise influence serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), antral follicle count (AFC) or ovarian volume in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). DESIGN: Secondary analyses of a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial. SETTING: University Hospital, Sweden. PATIENTS: Seventy-four women with PCOS recruited from the general population. INTERVENTIONS: Women with PCOS were randomized to 16 weeks of electro-acupuncture (14 treatments), exercise (at least three times/week), or no intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum AMH recorded at baseline, after 16 weeks of intervention, and at follow up at 32 weeks. AFC, and ovarian volume assessed by magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and at follow up at 32 weeks. RESULTS: After 16 weeks of intervention, serum levels of AMH were significantly decreased in the electro-acupuncture group by 17.5% (p < 0.001), and differed from the change in the exercise group. AMH remained decreased by 15% (p = 0.004) also at follow up at 32 weeks, but did not differ from the exercise or the no intervention groups. There was a decrease by 8.5% (p = 0.015) in ovarian volume between baseline and follow up in the electro-acupuncture group, and by 11.7% (p = 0.01) in AFC in the physical exercise group. No other variables were affected. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to demonstrate that acupuncture reduces serum AMH levels and ovarian volume. Physical exercise did not influence circulating AMH or ovarian volume. Despite a within-group decrease in AFC, exercise did not lead to a between-group difference.  
  Address Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up 32 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 74  
  Time in Treatment 16 Weeks Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25545309 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1989  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lim, C.E.D.; Ng, R.W.C.; Xu, K.; Cheng, N.C.L.; Xue, C.C.L.; Liu, J.P.; Chen, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for polycystic ovarian syndrome Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 5 Pages Cd007689  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Women's Health; Gynecology; PCOS; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterised by the clinical signs of oligo-amenorrhoea, infertility and hirsutism. Conventional treatment of PCOS includes a range of oral pharmacological agents, lifestyle changes and surgical modalities. Beta-endorphin presents in the follicular fluid of both normal and polycystic ovaries. It was demonstrated that the beta-endorphin levels in ovarian follicular fluid of otherwise healthy women who were undergoing ovulation were much higher than the levels measured in plasma. Given that acupuncture has an impact on beta-endorphin production, which may affect gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, it is postulated that acupuncture may have a role in ovulation induction and fertility. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatment of oligo/anovulatory women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). SEARCH METHODS: We identified relevant studies from databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CNKI and trial registries. The data are current to 19 October 2015. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that studied the efficacy of acupuncture treatment for oligo/anovulatory women with PCOS. We excluded quasi- or pseudo-RCTs. Primary outcomes were live birth and ovulation (primary outcomes), and secondary outcomes were clinical pregnancy, restoration of menstruation, multiple pregnancy, miscarriage and adverse events. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE methods. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected the studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We calculated Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios (ORs) and mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). MAIN RESULTS: We included five RCTs with 413 women. They compared true acupuncture versus sham acupuncture (two RCTs), true acupuncture versus relaxation (one RCT), true acupuncture versus clomiphene (one RCT) and electroacupuncture versus physical exercise (one RCT). Four of the studies were at high risk of bias in at least one domain.No study reported live birth rate. Two studies reported clinical pregnancy and found no evidence of a difference between true acupuncture and sham acupuncture (OR 2.72, 95% CI 0.69 to 10.77, two RCTs, 191 women, very low quality evidence).Three studies reported ovulation. One RCT reported number of women who had three ovulations during three months of treatment but not ovulation rate. One RCT found no evidence of a difference in mean ovulation rate between true and sham acupuncture (MD -0.03, 95% CI -0.14 to 0.08, one RCT, 84 women, very low quality evidence). However, one other RCT reported very low quality evidence to suggest that true acupuncture might be associated with higher ovulation frequency than relaxation (MD 0.35, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.56, one RCT, 28 women).Two studies reported menstrual frequency. One RCT reported true acupuncture reduced days between menstruation more than sham acupuncture (MD 220.35, 95% CI 252.85 to 187.85, 146 women). One RCT reported electroacupuncture increased menstrual frequency more than no intervention (0.37, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.53, 31 women).There was no evidence of a difference between the groups in adverse events. Evidence was very low quality with very wide CIs and very low event rates.Overall evidence was low or very low quality. The main limitations were failure to report important clinical outcomes and very serious imprecision. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Thus far, only a limited number of RCTs have been reported. At present, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of acupuncture for treatment of ovulation disorders in women with PCOS.  
  Address Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney, C/O Earlwood Medical Centre,, 356 Homer Street, Earlwood, New South Wales, Australia, 2206  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27136291 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2060  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lund, I.; Lundeberg, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is acupuncture effective in the treatment of pain in endometriosis? Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Pain Research Abbreviated Journal J Pain Res  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 157-165  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Female; Endometriosis; Acupuncture; Women's Health; Gynecology; Pelvic Pain; Pain  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, estrogen-dependent, inflammatory gynecological condition – often with long-lasting visceral pelvic pain of different origin, and infertility among women. Current management options for patients' are often inadequate, with side effects for many for whom acupuncture techniques could be an alternative. Earlier studies have discussed the efficacy of acupuncture, but not its methodological aspects. OBJECTIVES: To summarize the documented clinical effects of acupuncture on rated visceral pelvic endometriosis-related pain, and associated variables among individuals, within and between studied groups, and to discuss the methodological treatment aspects. METHODS: Published full text clinical studies, case reports, and observational studies with abstracts written in English were searched by using the keywords “Acupuncture and Endometriosis” in databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL. The reporting guidelines, Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture was used for the methodological report. RESULTS: Three studies were found including 99 women, 13-40 years old, with diagnosed endometriosis. The studies were different in research design, needle stimulation techniques, and evaluation instruments. Methodological similarities were seven to 12 needle insertions per subject/session, and 15-25 minutes of needle retention time. The needles were placed in lower back/pelvic-abdominal area, in the shank, feet, and hands. Treatment numbers varied from nine to 16 and patients received one to two treatments per week. Similarity in reported treatment effects in the quoted studies, irrespective of research design or treatment technique, was reported decrease of rated pain intensity. DISCUSSION: Meta-analysis is the standard procedure for the evaluation of evidence of treatment effects, i.e., on a group level, usually without analysis of the individual responses even with obvious spread in the results leading to lack of guidance for treatment of the individual patient. By conceptualizing pain as subjective, the individual aspect should serve as the basis for the analysis to allow clinical recommendations. From a physiological and a Western medical perspective, acupuncture can be regarded as a type of sensory stimulation that induces changes in the function of the central nervous system that partly can explain the decrease of perceived pain in response to acupuncture treatment irrespective of the technique. CONCLUSION: Endometriosis is often painful, although with various origin, where standard treatments may be insufficient or involve side effects. Based on the reported studies, acupuncture could be tried as a complement as it is an overall safe treatment. In the future, studies designed for evaluating effectiveness between treatment strategies rather than efficacy design would be preferred as the analyses of treatment effects in the individual patients.  
  Address Rehabilitation Medicine University Clinic Stockholm, Danderyds Hospital AB, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Endometriosis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27069371; PMCID:PMC4818044 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2063  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mi, X.; Lin, H. openurl 
  Title Clinical Study on Combined Acupuncture with Chinese Medicine for Infertility Due to Hydrosalpinx Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 92-95  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Genital Diseases, Female; Salpingitis; Hydrosalpinx; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; Herbal Formula; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clincial effect of combined electroacupuncture with Chinese medicine for infertility due to hydrosalpinx. Methods: A total of 114 cases were randomly allocated into 3 groups, an observation group of 38 cases treated by combined electroacupuncture with oral administration of Chinese medicine and medicinal fumigation, a combined acupuncture and Chinese medicine group of 38 cases treated by elecro acupuncture and oral administration of Chinese medicine, and a Chinese medicine group of 38 cases treated by oral administration of Chinese medicine and medicinal fumigation. The cases were treated for 1-3 sessions. After each session of treatment, conduct ultrasound examination after menstruation to observe the condition of hydrosalpinx, and continue with the next session for those with hydrosalpinx retention. Results: The therapeutic efficacy of the observation group was significantly different from that of the combined acupuncture with Chinese medicine group and the Chinese medicine group (P<0.01). However, there was no statistical differce between the latter two groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: Combined acupuncture with Chinese medicine can obtain obvious effect in treating hydrosalpinx.  
  Address Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen 518036, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 18  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 114  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Salpingitis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 865  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rashidi, B. H.; Tehrani, E. S.; Hamedani, N. A.; Pirzadeh, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture on the outcome of in vitro fertilisation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 31 Issue Pages 151-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Genital Diseases, Female; Infertility, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; In Vitro Fertilization; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Fertilization In Vitro  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Different mechanisms have been described for the effects of acupuncture on fertility. Acupuncture may mediate neurotransmitter release, which results in the stimulation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone secretion. The production of neurotransmitters such as endogenous opioids may also inhibit central nervous system outflow and biological stress response. Acupuncture may also stimulate blood flow to the uterus by inhibiting uterine central sympathetic nerve activity. Despite some evidence suggesting beneficial effects of acupuncture on in vitro fertilisation (IVF) success rates, recent clinical trials could not duplicate these effects, especially in patients who are infertile with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) who are undergoing IVF. METHODS: A total of 62 women with PCOS undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) at Shayamehr IVF Clinic in Tehran (Iran) participated in a randomised, controlled trial. Participants were randomly allocated to one of two groups: there were 31 women each in the acupuncture (group I) and control groups (group II). Acupuncture based on traditional Chinese medicine was performed in group I versus no adjunctive treatment in group II. All acupuncture procedures were performed in five sessions: start of downregulation, start of stimulation, 2 days before ovum pick-up, and immediately before and after embryo transfer. We measured the rate of oocytes in metaphase II, the fertilisation rate and the quality of embryos. RESULTS: Our results showed a statistically higher mean of good quality embryos in group I compared with group II (p=0.044). However, the mean number of metaphase II oocytes retrieved and fertilisation rate were similar between the two groups. We also could not find any significant differences among clinical, biochemical or ongoing pregnancy rates. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture at an early stage of oocyte recruitment may have a beneficial effect on embryo quality. However, it seems to have no significant effect on other IVF/ICSI outcomes of women with PCOS. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: (IRCT ID: 201011275181N4).  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vali-e-Asr Reproductive Health Research Centre, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, , Tehran, Iran.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up 18 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 62  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 974  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ren, L.-N.; Guo, L.-H.; Ma, W.-Z.; Zhang, R. url  openurl
  Title [A meta-analysis on acupuncture treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome] Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication Zhen ci yan jiu = Acupuncture Research / [Zhongguo yi xue ke xue Yuan Yi xue Qing bao yan jiu suo Bian ji] Abbreviated Journal Zhen Ci Yan Jiu  
  Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 238-246  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Meta-analysis; PCOS; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Women's Health; Gynecology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect and safety of acupuncture treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by using systematic review in view of evidence-based medicine (EBM). METHODS: Original articles about acupuncture treatment of PCOS published from the database-established year to November of 2013 were searched from the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI), Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database (VIP), Chinese Biomedical Library (CBM), Wanfang Data, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library and the associated references-indicated papers by using keywords of polycystic ovary syndrome, randomization, acupoint, acupuncture, acupuncture plus moxibustion, acupuncture plus acupoint-embedment of catgut, and acupuncture plus otopoint application. Those articles about treatment of PCOS with simple abdominal acupuncture, simple acupoint-embedment of catgut, simple otopoint-pellet-pressure, and simple moxibustion treatment, and simple abstracts were excluded. If the articles re-published in both Chinese and English and in academic conferences and journals, one of them with higher quality was included. Two independent reviewers extracted data from located articles in a pre-defined structured way, and the Meta-analysis was conducted using software RevMan 5.2, otherwise using the qualitative analysis. RESULTS: A total of 31 articles (28 in Chinese, 3 in English) containing 2,321 cases of PCOS patients met the included criteria. Meta-analysis showed that the clinical efficacy of simple acupuncture was the same as that of western medicine, and the efficacy of acupuncture combined with Chinese herbal medicine interventions was obviously higher than that of western medicine (P < 0.05). In addition, simple acupuncture intervention and acupuncture combined with Chinese herbal medicines or with moxibustion treatment have advantages in reducing serum luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone (LH/FSH), insulin resistance (IR), testosterone (T), and body mass index (BMI). However, the quality of the collected articles is generally lower due to unclear bias, no sample quantity estimation, incorrect randomization methods, no follow-up survey, etc. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture therapy may be effective for PCOS, but needs to be confirmed further by larger sample randomized controlled trials.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Chinese Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25069203 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2106  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schlaeger, J.M.; Xu, N.; Mejta, C.L.; Park, C.G.; Wilkie, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the treatment of vulvodynia: a randomized wait-list controlled pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication The Journal of Sexual Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Sex Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages 1019-1027  
  Keywords Genital Diseases, Female; Vulvodynia; Women's Health; Gynecology; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Wait List; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Wait List Control  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The incidence of vulvodynia in American women has been reported to be between 8.3% and 16%. However, there is no consistently effective standardized treatment for vulvodynia. AIM: To determine the feasibility and potential effects of using a standardized acupuncture protocol for the treatment of women with vulvodynia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was vulvar pain, and sexual function was the secondary outcome. Pain was assessed by the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and function was measured by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). METHODS: Thirty-six women with vulvodynia met inclusion criteria. The women were randomly assigned either to the acupuncture group or to the wait-list control group. The 18 subjects assigned to the acupuncture group received acupuncture two times per week for 5 weeks for a total of 10 sessions. RESULTS: Reports of vulvar pain and dyspareunia were significantly reduced, whereas changes in the aggregate FSFI scores suggest significant improvement in sexual functioning in those receiving acupuncture vs. those who did not. Acupuncture did not significantly increase sexual desire, sexual arousal, lubrication, ability to orgasm or sexual satisfaction in women with vulvodynia. CONCLUSION: This was the first randomized controlled pilot study to examine the use of acupuncture for the treatment of vulvodynia. The acupuncture protocol was feasible and in this small sample appeared to reduce vulvar pain and dyspareunia with an increase in overall sexual function for women with vulvodynia. This study should be replicated in a larger double-blinded randomized controlled trial.  
  Address Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 5 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Vulvodynia
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25639289 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1985  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Teng, H.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J.; Xie, Y. openurl 
  Title Therapeutic Efficacy Observation on Electroacupuncture for Ovulatory Dysfunctional Infertility Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 81-84  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Genital Diseases, Female; Infertility, Female; Women's Health; Gynecology; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical effect of electroacupuncture for ovulatory dysfunctional infertility by ovulation stimulation. Methods: A total of 65 patients were randomly allocated into a treatment group (38 cases) and a control group (27 cases). Acupuncture plus electric stimulation was employed in the treatment group, whereas oral Clomifene Citrate Tablets in the control group, 50 mg per day. Results: After six months (2 sessions) of treatment, the cure rate in the treatment group was 76.3%, versus 48.1% in the control group, showing a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: Electroacupuncture can obtain better cure rate than oral Clomifene Citrate Tablets for infertility via ovulation stimulation.  
  Address Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shenzhen Maternal and Child Healthcare Hospital, Guangdong 518032, P. R. China. ftfy21cn@21cn.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 65  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Infertility, Female
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1154  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tian, X. openurl 
  Title Effect of Acupuncture and Tradtitional Chinese Herbal Medicine in Treating Endometriosis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages 145-150  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bloodletting; Endometriosis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Formula; Moxa, Indirect; Moxa Box; Moxibustion; Plum-Blossom; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Genital Diseases, Female  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 27  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 78  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Endometriosis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score 60  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1164  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xia, D.; Chen, T. openurl 
  Title A Clinical Observation on Treating Urinary Retention Following Cervical Carcinoma Radical Operation by Acupuncture of “Warming Waterways” Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 50-52  
  Keywords RCT; AcuTrials; Urinary Retention; Urologic Diseases; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Other Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Heat Lamp; CAM Control; Neoplasms; Genital Diseases, Female; Uterine Cervical Neoplasms; Cervical Carcinoma; Cervical Cancer; Cancer  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 68  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Urinary Retention
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1338  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xiang, D. F.; Situ, Y.; Liang, X. F. openurl 
  Title Ear Acupuncture Therapy for 37 Cases of Dysmenorrhea Due to Endometriosis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 282-285  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Dysmenorrhea; Endometriosis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Formula; Herbal Formula; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Genital Diseases, Female; Endometriosis  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 67  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Endometriosis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1340  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yang, M.; Mao, X.; Wang, P. openurl 
  Title Clinical observation of combined acupuncture and herbs in treating chronic pelvic inflammation Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 339-342  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Genital Diseases, Female; Pelvic Inflammatory Disease; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Herbal Formula; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical efficacy of combined acupuncture and herbs in the treatment of chronic pelvic inflammation. METHODS: Eighty-eight cases of chronic pelvic inflammation were randomized into two groups. Treatment group (45 cases) was treated by combined acupuncture and herbs, control goup (43 cases) was treated by Fu Ke Qian Jin Jiao Nang (Female Herbal Capsule). RESULTS: After 3 menstrual cycles of treatments, in treatment group, 28 cases were cured, 9 cases got marked effect, 4 cases got effect, 4 cases were failure, and the total effective rate was 91.1%; in control group, 7 cases were cured, 8 cases got marked effectiveness, 15 cases got effectiveness, 13 cases were failure, and the total effective rate was 69.8%. The total effective rate was higher in treatment group than in control group (P<0.05); in the six-month survey, the relapse rate was lower in the treatment group than in control group (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Combined acupuncture and herbs is effective for chronic pelvic inflammation, with fewer relapses.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 45  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 88  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1370  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, X.; Yan, X.; Shen, Y. openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect observation on combined acupuncture and medication for ovulation Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 77-80  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Genital Diseases, Female; Infertility, Female  
  Abstract Objective: To obsere the curative effect of acupuncture plus medicine in treating ovulatory dysfunctional infertility. Method: All 36 cases with anovulatory infertility were randomly allocated into a control group (19 cases) and an observation group (17 cases). The cases in the control group were treated with 50 mg of oral administration Clomiphene once a day for 5 d, and 50 menstrual cycles were observed. The cases in the observation group were treated with combined acupuncture and the same medication as those in the control group and 45 menstrual cycles were observed. During the treatment sessions, the follicular development, ovulation, thickness of the endometrium, cervical mucus and pelvic fluid were observed and recorded. Results: The cases in the observation group showed significantly highter ovulation and pregnancy rates, along with thickening of the endometrium. In addition, no luteinized unruptured follicle syndrome (LUFS) occurred in the obsservation group. Conclusion: Acupuncture coupled with oral administration Clomiphene can obstain higher ovulation and conception rates than oral Clomiphene alone.  
  Address Linshan Hospital of Yuyao City, Zhenjiang 315400, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment Condition Infertility, Female
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1404  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, Y.; Peng, W.; Clarke, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for uterine fibroids Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 1 Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Neoplasms; Uterine Fibroids; Leiomyoma; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Genital Diseases, Female; Cancer; Women's Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Uterine fibroids (UFs) are benign growths within the uterine muscle and are present in 30% of women during their reproductive years. With the exception of hysterectomy, there are no effective medical and surgical treatments for women with uterine fibroids . Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese method which has been used for both the prevention and treatment of diseases for over three thousand years. There are many types of acupuncture used to manage UFs, with body acupuncture being the most commonly used. The literature reporting the benefits or harms of acupuncture for the management of UFs has not yet been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of acupuncture in women with uterine fibroids SEARCH STRATEGY: The following electronic databases were searched 21st May 2009: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; AMED; the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group's Specialised Register of Trials; Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM); Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS); Chinese Medical Current Contents (CMCC) and China National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKI). Citation lists, experts in the field and grey literature were also referred to. No restrictions such as language were applied. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture management with placebo acupuncture, no management, Chinese medication, Western medication or other managements of uterine fibroids were considered for inclusion. Acupuncture management included either traditional acupuncture or contemporary acupuncture, regardless of the source of stimulation (for example, body, electro, scalp, elongated, fire, hand, fine needle, moxibustion). Acupuncture management without needling was excluded. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors assessed trial risk of bias according to our a priori criteria. No trials were included in this version of the review, therefore no data was collected. MAIN RESULTS: No randomized double-blind controlled trials met the inclusion criteria . AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of acupuncture for the management of uterine fibroids remains uncertain. More evidence is required to establish the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for uterine fibroids.There is a continued need for well designed RCTs with long term follow up.  
  Address The Department of Acupuncture, Beijing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Capital Medical University, No.23 Back Road of ArtGallery, Dongcheng District, Beijing, Beijing, China, 100010.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Leiomyoma
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 1448  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zheng, Y. H.; Wang, X. H.; Lai, M. H.; Yao, H.; Liu, H.; Ma, H. X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of abdominal acupuncture for patients with obesity-type polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 9 Pages 740-745  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Abstract Objective: To assess the effectiveness of abdominal acupuncture at the endocrine and metabolic level in patients with obesity-type polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: Eighty-six women from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College with a diagnosis of PCOS (body-mass index [BMI] >/=25 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive 6 months of abdominal acupuncture (once a day) or oral metformin (250 mg three times daily in the first week, followed by 500 mg three times daily thereafter). BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), ovarian volume, menstrual frequency, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and Ferriman-Gallwey score were measured at the beginning of the study and after 6 months of treatment. Luteotrophic hormone (LH), testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), fasting blood glucose, 2-hour Postprandial blood glucose, fasting insulin, 2-hour postprandial blood insulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were also assessed. Results: According to the results at baseline and 6 months, BMI, WHR, Ferriman-Gallwey score, ovarian volume, luteotrophic hormone, ratio of luteotrophic hormone to follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, LDL-C, triglycerides, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, 2-hour postprandial blood glucose, fasting insulin, 2-hour postprandial blood insulin, and HOMA-IR were reduced significantly in the two groups (p<0.05). Menstrual frequency and HDL-C (p<0.05) increased significantly in both groups; follicle-stimulating hormone also increased in both groups, but the change was not significant (p>0.05). The acupuncture group showed considerable advantages over the metformin group in terms of reduced BMI and WHR and increases in menstrual frequency (p<0.05). Conclusion: Abdominal acupuncture and metformin improved the endocrine and metabolic function of patients with obesity-type PCOS. Abdominal acupuncture may be more effective in improving menstrual frequency, BMI, and WHR, with few adverse effects.  
  Address First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College , Guangzhou, China .  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 48  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 86  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1476  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhu, X.; Hamilton, K. D.; McNicol, E. D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for pain in endometriosis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2011 Publication Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 9 Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Endometriosis; Genital Diseases, Female; Acupuncture; Women's Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a prevalent gynaecological condition, significantly affecting women's lives. Clinical presentations may vary from absence of symptoms to complaints of chronic pelvic pain, most notably dysmenorrhoea. The management of pain in endometriosis is currently inadequate. Acupuncture has been studied in gynaecological disorders but its effectiveness for pain in endometriosis is uncertain. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for pain in endometriosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MSDG) Specialised Register of controlled trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO, CNKI and TCMDS (from inception to 2010) and reference lists of retrieved articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised single or double-blind controlled trials enrolling women of reproductive age with a laparoscopically confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis and comparing acupuncture (body, scalp or auricular) to either placebo or sham, no treatment, conventional therapies or Chinese herbal medicine. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data; we contacted study authors for additional information. Meta-analyses were not performed as only one study was included. The primary outcome measure was decrease in pain from endometriosis. Secondary outcome measures included improvement in quality of life scores, pregnancy rate, adverse effects and rate of endometriosis recurrence. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-four studies were identified that involved acupuncture for endometriosis; however only one trial, enrolling 67 participants, met all the inclusion criteria. The single included trial defined pain scores and cure rates according to the Guideline for Clinical Research on New Chinese Medicine. Dysmenorrhoea scores were lower in the acupuncture group (mean difference -4.81 points, 95% confidence interval -6.25 to -3.37, P &lt; 0.00001) using the 15-point Guideline for Clinical Research on New Chinese Medicine for Treatment of Pelvic Endometriosis scale. The total effective rate ('cured', 'significantly effective' or 'effective') for auricular acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine was 91.9% and 60%, respectively (risk ratio 3.04, 95% confidence interval 1.65 to 5.62, P = 0.0004). The improvement rate did not differ significantly between auricular acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine for cases of mild to moderate dysmenorrhoea, whereas auricular acupuncture did significantly reduce pain in cases of severe dysmenorrhoea. Data were not available for secondary outcomes measures. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The evidence to support the effectiveness of acupuncture for pain in endometriosis is limited, based on the results of only a single study that was included in this review. This review highlights the necessity for developing future studies that are well-designed, double-blinded, randomised controlled trials that assess various types of acupuncture in comparison to conventional therapies.  
  Address Center for Complementary Medicine Research, School of Biomedical and Health Science, University of Western Sydney, Building 24, Campbelltown Campus, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1797.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Endometriosis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 1491  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: