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Author Kotani, N.; Hashimoto, H.; Sato, Y.; Sessler, D. I.; Yoshioka, H.; Kitayama, M.; Yasuda, T.; Matsuki, A. url  openurl
  Title Preoperative intradermal acupuncture reduces postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting, analgesic requirement, and sympathoadrenal responses Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal Anesthesiology  
  Volume 95 Issue 2 Pages 349-356  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Nausea; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Verum Acupoint Control; Vomiting; Anesthesia and Analgesia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In a controlled and double-blind study, the authors tested the hypothesis that preoperative insertion of intradermal needles at acupoints 2.5 cm from the spinal vertebrae (bladder meridian) provide satisfactory postoperative analgesia. METHODS: The authors enrolled patients scheduled for elective upper and lower abdominal surgery. Before anesthesia, patients undergoing each type of surgery were randomly assigned to one of two groups: acupuncture (n = 50 and n = 39 for upper and lower abdominal surgery, respectively) or control (n = 48 and n = 38 for upper and lower abdominal surgery, respectively). In the acupuncture group, intradermal needles were inserted to the left and right of bladder meridian 18-24 and 20-26 in upper and lower abdominal surgery before induction of anesthesia, respectively. Postoperative analgesia was maintained with epidural morphine and bolus doses of intravenous morphine. Consumption of intravenous morphine was recorded. Incisional pain at rest and during coughing and deep visceral pain were recorded during recovery and for 4 days thereafter on a four-point verbal rating scale. We also evaluated time-dependent changes in plasma concentrations of cortisol and catecholamines. RESULTS: Starting from the recovery room, intradermal acupuncture increased the fraction of patients with good pain relief as compared with the control (P < 0.05). Consumption of supplemental intravenous morphine was reduced 50%, and the incidence of postoperative nausea was reduced 20-30% in the acupuncture patients who had undergone either upper or lower abdominal surgery (P < 0.01). Plasma cortisol and epinephrine concentrations were reduced 30-50% in the acupuncture group during recovery and on the first postoperative day (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Preoperative insertion of intradermal needles reduces postoperative pain, the analgesic requirement, and opioid-related side effects after both upper and lower abdominal surgery. Acupuncture analgesia also reduces the activation of the sympathoadrenal system that normally accompanies surgery  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, University of Hirosaki School of Medicine, Japan. nao@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 107  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Pain (General)
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 602  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Painovich, J.; Herman, P. M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in the inpatient acute care setting: a pragmatic, randomized control trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2012 Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Miscellaneous; Acupuncture; Acu Versus Usual Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Other Acupuncture Style; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; No Treatment Control; Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract Purpose. To evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of acupuncture in a hospital setting. Methods. This 18-month pragmatic randomized controlled trial used a two-tiered consent process for all patients admitted to the acute care unit by study physician groups. The primary study comparison was between those randomized (using biased-coin randomization after initial consent) to be offered acupuncture or not. The primary outcome was length of stay (LOS). Other measures include costs, self-reported anxiety, depression, health status, and patient satisfaction. Results. Of the 383 patients consented to the study, 253 were randomized to be offered acupuncture, and 130 were not offered acupuncture. Of those offered acupuncture, 173 (69%) accepted and received daily acupuncture. On average, patients offered acupuncture had longer LOSs (4.9 versus 4.1 days) than those not offered acupuncture (P = .047). Adjustment for diagnosis and severity mix reduced this difference and its significance (P = .108). No other significant differences in outcomes were found. Patients who were more anxious (P = .000) or depressed (P = .017) at admission tended to more often accept acupuncture when offered. Conclusion. Acupuncture is accepted by a majority of hospitalized acute care patients. However, it did not reduce LOS in this already short-stay population.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 383  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Miscellaneous
  Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 924  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wayne, P. M.; Kerr, C. E.; Schnyer, R. N.; Legedza, A. T.; Savetsky-German, J.; Shields, M. H.; Buring, J. E.; Davis, R. B.; Conboy, L. A.; Highfield, E.; Parton, B.; Thomas, P.; Laufer, M. R. url  openurl
  Title Japanese-style acupuncture for endometriosis-related pelvic pain in adolescents and young women: results of a randomized sham-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 247-257  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Endometritis; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pelvic Pain; RCT; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Women's Health; Genital Diseases, Female; Endometriosis  
  Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess feasibility, and collect preliminary data for a subsequent randomized, sham-controlled trial to evaluate Japanese-style acupuncture for reducing chronic pelvic pain and improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescents with endometriosis. DESIGN: Randomized, sham-controlled trial. SETTINGS: Tertiary-referral hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen young women (13-22y) with laparoscopically-diagnosed endometriosis-related chronic pelvic pain. INTERVENTIONS: A Japanese style of acupuncture and a sham acupuncture control. Sixteen treatments were administered over 8 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Protocol feasibility, recruitment numbers, pain not associated with menses or intercourse, and multiple HRQOL instruments including Endometriosis Health Profile, Pediatric Quality of Life, Perceived Stress, and Activity Limitation. RESULTS: Fourteen participants (out of 18 randomized) completed the study per protocol. Participants in the active acupuncture group (n = 9) experienced an average 4.8 (SD = 2.4) point reduction on a 11 point scale (62%) in pain after 4 weeks, which differed significantly from the control group's (n = 5) average reduction of 1.4 (SD = 2.1) points (P = 0.004). Reduction in pain in the active group persisted through a 6-month assessment; however, after 4 weeks, differences between the active and control group decreased and were not statistically significant. All HRQOL measures indicated greater improvements in the active acupuncture group compared to the control; however, the majority of these trends were not statistically significant. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: Preliminary estimates indicate that Japanese-style acupuncture may be an effective, safe, and well-tolerated adjunct therapy for endometriosis-related pelvic pain in adolescents. A more definitive trial evaluating Japanese-style acupuncture in this population is both feasible and warranted  
  Address Harvard Medical School, Osher Research Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. peter_wayne@hms.harvard.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 18  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Endometriosis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1277  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahn, A. C.; Bennani, T.; Freeman, R.; Hamdy, O.; Kaptchuk, T. J. url  openurl
  Title Two styles of acupuncture for treating painful diabetic neuropathy--a pilot randomised control trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 1-2 Pages 11-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Diabetes Mellitus; Diabetic Neuropathies; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Neuropathy; Pain; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract In a pilot study, we evaluated the clinical and mechanistic effects of two styles of acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Japanese acupuncture, for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Out of seven patients enrolled, three received Traditional Chinese acupuncture while four received Japanese style acupuncture. Treatments were delivered once a week for 10 weeks. Acupuncturists were permitted to select the needle interventions. Substantial differences in diagnostic techniques, choice of acupuncture points, and needle manipulation were observed between TCM and Japanese acupuncturists. Clinically, patients allocated to Japanese acupuncture reported decreased neuropathy-associated pain according to the daily pain severity score, while the group allocated to the TCM acupuncture reported minimal effects. Both acupuncture styles, however, lowered pain according to the McGill Short Form Pain Score. The TCM style improved nerve sensation according to quantitative sensory testing while the Japanese style had a more equivocal effect. No evident changes were observed in glucose control or heart rate variability in either group  
  Address Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. aahn@hms.harvard.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 7  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Diabetic Neuropathies
  Disease Category Diabetes Mellitus OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 5  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Birch, S.; Jamison, R. N. url  openurl
  Title Controlled trial of Japanese acupuncture for chronic myofascial neck pain: assessment of specific and nonspecific effects of treatment Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication The Clinical journal of pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages 248-255  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Ion Pumping Cords; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Neck Pain; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Heat Lamp  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This article examines the specific and nonspecific effects of Japanese acupuncture on chronic myofascial neck pain in a randomized single-blind trial. DESIGN: Forty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive relevant acupuncture, irrelevant acupuncture, or no-acupuncture control treatment consisting of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication. The two acupuncture groups underwent comparable light shallow needling. The irrelevant acupuncture group received acupuncture at specific sites not relevant for cervical pain. OUTCOME MEASURES: The study measures included the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (SF-MPQ), the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), medication diary, and physiologic measures. The factors examined as predictors of outcome pain ratings were experience with, beliefs about, and knowledge of acupuncture before treatment; perceived efficacy, credibility, and logic of acupuncture; perceived competence of the acupuncturist; and painfulness of acupuncture. RESULTS: No differences were found among the three groups at baseline, except that the relevant acupuncture group reported having had more previous acupuncture treatments. No significant differences in terms of perceived credibility or perceived effectiveness of treatment were found between the two acupuncture groups. The relevant acupuncture group had significantly greater pre-/posttreatment differences in pain than the irrelevant acupuncture and control groups (p < .05). The nonspecific effects of confidence in the acupuncturist, willingness to try any treatment, mood, and physiologic effect of needling were not predictive of treatment outcome, whereas confidence in the treatment and past experiences with acupuncture did correlate significantly with a decrease in pain. CONCLUSIONS: Relevant acupuncture with heat contributes to modest pain reduction in persons with myofascial neck pain. Previous experience with and confidence in treatment help to predict benefit. Measurement of nonspecific effects of alternative therapy is recommended in future clinical trials  
  Address Anglo-Dutch Institute of Oriental Medicine, IJmuiden, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 46  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 58  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 75  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kawakita, K.; Shichidou, T.; Inoue, E.; Nabeta, T.; Kitakouji, H.; Aizawa, S.; Nishida, A.; Yamaguchi, N.; Takahashi, N.; Yano, T.; Tanzawa, S. url  openurl
  Title Preventive and curative effects of acupuncture on the common cold: a multicentre randomized controlled trial in Japan Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages 181-188  
  Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Common Cold; Japanese Acupuncture Style; No Treatment Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE:: To determine the preventive and curative effects of manual acupuncture on the symptoms of the common cold. METHOD:: Students and staff in five Japanese acupuncture schools (n=326) were randomly allocated to acupuncture and no-treatment control groups. A specific needling point (Y point) on the neck was used bilaterally. Fine acupuncture needles were gently manipulated for 15s, evoking de qi sensation. Acupuncture treatments were performed four times during the 2-week experimental period with a 2-week follow-up period. A common cold diary was scored daily for 4 weeks, and a common cold questionnaire was scored before each acupuncture treatment and twice at weekly intervals. A reliability test for the questionnaire was performed on the last day of recording. RESULTS:: Five of the 326 subjects who were recruited dropped out. The diary score in the acupuncture group tended to decrease after treatment, but the difference between groups was not significant (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, log rank test P=0.53, Cox regression analysis, P>0.05). Statistically significantly fewer symptoms were reported in the questionnaire by the acupuncture group than control group (P=0.024, general linear model, repeated measure). Significant inter-centre (P<0.001, general linear model) and sex (P=0.027, general linear model) differences were also detected. Reliability tests indicated that the questionnaire with 15 items was sufficiently reliable. No severe adverse event was reported. CONCLUSION:: This is the first report of a multi-centre randomized controlled trial of acupuncture for symptoms of the common cold. A significantly positive effect of acupuncture was demonstrated in the summed questionnaire data, although a highly significant inter-centre difference was observed. Needling on the neck using the Japanese fine needle manipulating technique was shown to be effective and safe. The use of acupuncture for symptoms of the common cold symptoms should be considered, although further evidence from placebo controlled RCTs is required  
  Address Japan Acupuncture and Moxibustion Center, 3-44-14 Minami otsuka, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 170-0005, Japan  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 326  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Common Cold
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score 62  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 558  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kikuchi, A.; Seki, T.; Takayama, S.; Iwasaki, K.; Ishizuka, S.; Yaegashi, N. doi  openurl
  Title Effect of press needles on swallowing reflex in older adults with cerebrovascular disease: a randomized double-blind controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication J Am Geriatr Soc Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 62 Issue 12 Pages 2438-2440  
  Keywords Pneumonia, Aspiration; Nervous System Diseases; Stroke; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Press Tacks; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Traditional Asian Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Miyagi, Japan.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 28  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 29  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Pneumonia, Aspiration
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 6/4/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Pneumonia, Aspiration; Department of Traditional Asian Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Miyagi, Japan.; eng SI – JPRN/UMIN000002133; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25516042 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1699  
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Author Miyazaki, S.; Hagihara, A.; Kanda, R.; Mukaino, Y.; Nobutomo, K. url  openurl
  Title Applicability of press needles to a double-blind trial: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication The Clinical journal of pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume 25 Issue 5 Pages 438-444  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Low Back Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Press Tacks; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Verum Acupoint Control; Back Pain  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Owing to a lack of a suitable needle procedure, it has been impossible to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture in clinical studies using double-blind testing. We evaluated the applicability of a new kind of press needle (Pyonex) to a double-blind trial by comparing the press needle with a placebo (lacking the needle element). METHODS: The purpose of the study consisted of 2 phases. In the phase 1, to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of the press needles, 90 participants who had never been treated using acupuncture were randomly assigned to receive either the press needle (n=45) or a placebo (n=45). The applicability was measured using a questionnaire regarding the perception of penetration, and efficacy was measured using a visual analog scale of low back pain (LBP). When the applicability and efficacy of the press needles were confirmed in phase 1, the mechanism of LBP relief by the press needles was examined in phase 2. RESULTS: In phase 1, intergroup comparisons showed no significant differences concerning the perception of penetration. In addition, for patients with LBP, the press needles reduced the subjective evaluation of LBP compared with the placebo (P<0.05). In phase 2, visual analog scale results indicated that LBP was reduced significantly more in the press needle group than in the local anesthesia group (P<0.05). DISCUSSION: The participants could not distinguish between the press needle and a placebo, and the data from the press needle group suggested a specific influence on patients with LBP. These findings imply that the press needle and a placebo provide an effective means of realizing a double-blind setting for clinical studies of acupuncture  
  Address Department of Health Services, Management and Policy, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 878  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nabeta, T.; Kawakita, K. url  openurl
  Title Relief of chronic neck and shoulder pain by manual acupuncture to tender points-a sham-controlled randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages 217-222  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Blunted Needle Sham; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Neck Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Shoulder Pain; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of real acupuncture to tender points for neck and shoulder pain and stiffness (Japanese: katakori) with those of sham acupuncture. DESIGN: Randomized-controlled trial. METHODS: Thirty-four volunteers from an acupuncture school with complaints of chronic pain and stiffness, who had no arm symptoms and gave informed consent, were randomly allocated to acupuncture or sham groups. Acupuncture or sham acupuncture was applied to the tender points once a week for 3 weeks. In the acupuncture group the acupuncture needle was inserted to the muscle, then the sparrow pecking technique was applied five times. Sham acupuncture was done without insertion of the needle. Dull pain and stiffness were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) before, and every 2 days after the first needling for 1 month. Pressure pain threshold on the tender points was measured before and after each treatment. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference of VAS scores between acupuncture and sham groups 9 days after the last treatment. However, the acupuncture group showed significant reduction of VAS scores immediately after and/or 1 day after the real acupuncture treatments (P<0.01). The effect tended to be prolonged after repeated treatment. Pressure pain thresholds tended to increase after real acupuncture treatment but not after sham acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture applied to tender points appears to have short-term effects on neck and shoulder pain and stiffness, but this study was unable to demonstrate any long-term superiority over sham acupuncture  
  Address Meiji School of Oriental Medicine, Osaka, Japan  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 34  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 58  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 896  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Noda, Y.; Izuno, T.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Hayasaka, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Murakami, H.; Ito, A.; Shinse, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Nakamura, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture-induced changes of vagal function in patients with depression: A preliminary sham-controlled study with press needles Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Clin Pract  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 193-200  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; NRCT; Acupuncture; Acu Versus Sham; Press Tacks; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control; Press Needles; Press Needle Acupuncture  
  Abstract To study the biological effects of acupuncture on depression, we hypothesized that acupuncture will exert its antidepressant effect through a bottom-up neuromodulation of the autonomic dysfunction in depression. The participants received press needle (PN) acupuncture for 72 h continuously in a sham-controlled design. Psychological assessments and Holter electrocardiography were performed before and after PN acupuncture. We evaluated their autonomic functions through the heart rate variability (HRV). As a result, following PN acupuncture participants showed significant improvement in the Beck's Depression Inventory scores (P = 0.031), systolic/diastolic blood pressures (P = 0.002/P = 0.011), and coefficient of variation of the R-R interval (P < 0.0001), compared to sham PN. The present findings showed PN acupuncture induced alterations in vagal function, blood pressure, and Beck's Depression Inventory scores. It was suggested that vagal stabilization effect by acupuncture may be associated with the therapeutic mechanism in depression.  
  Address Kanagawa Psychiatric Center, 2-5-1 Serigaya, Kohnan-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 233-0006, Japan. Electronic address: motoaki@motoaki.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Days Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 42  
  Time in Treatment 3 Days Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26256139 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2028  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yoshimizu, M.; Teo, A.R.; Ando, M.; Kiyohara, K.; Kawamura, T. openurl 
  Title Relief of chronic shoulder and neck pain by electro-acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nervous stimulation: a randomized crossover trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct  
  Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages 97-103  
  Keywords Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; AcuTrials; RCT; Shoulder Pain; Pain; Neck Pain; Cross-Over Design; Acu Versus CAM Control; Electroacupuncture; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; TENS  
  Abstract  
  Address Kyoto University Health Service, Kyoto Japan  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Shoulder Pain
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1394  
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