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Author Crew, K. D.; Capodice, J. L.; Greenlee, H.; Apollo, A.; Jacobson, J. S.; Raptis, G.; Blozie, K.; Sierra, A.; Hershman, D. L. url  openurl
  Title Pilot study of acupuncture for the treatment of joint symptoms related to adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Cancer S  
  Volume 1 Issue 4 Pages 283-291  
  Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy; Auricular Acupuncture; Breast Cancer; Cancer; Cross-Over Design; No Treatment Control; Pain; Pilot Study; Postmenopause; RCT; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Neoplasms; Arthritis  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have become the standard of care for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal, hormone-sensitive breast cancer. However, patients receiving AIs may experience joint symptoms, which may lead to early discontinuation of this effective therapy. We hypothesize that acupuncture is a safe and effective treatment for AI-induced arthralgias. METHODS: Postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer who had self-reported musculoskeletal pain related to adjuvant AI therapy were randomized in a crossover study to receive acupuncture twice weekly for 6 weeks followed by observation or vice-versa. The intervention included full body and auricular acupuncture, and a joint-specific point prescription. Outcome measures included the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) quality of life measure, and serum levels of inflammatory markers, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: Twenty-one women were enrolled and two discontinued early. From baseline to the end of treatment, patients reported improvement in the mean BPI-SF worst pain scores (5.3 to 3.3, p = 0.01), pain severity (3.7 to 2.5, p = 0.02), and pain-related functional interference (3.1 to 1.7, p = 0.02), as well as the WOMAC function subscale and FACT-G physical well-being (p = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). No adverse events were reported. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, acupuncture reduced AI-related joint symptoms and improved functional ability and was well-tolerated. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Musculoskeletal side effects are common among breast cancer survivors on adjuvant AI therapy, therefore, effective treatments are needed for symptom relief and to improve adherence to these life-saving medications  
  Address Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 6 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 21  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Arthritis
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 211  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author de Luca, A. C.; da Fonseca, A. M.; Lopes, C. M.; Bagnoli, V. R.; Soares, J. M.; Baracat, E. C. EC url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture-ameliorated menopausal symptoms: single-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Climacteric : the journal of the International Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Climacteric  
  Volume 13 Issue 6 Pages 140-145  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Climacteric; Menopause; RCT; Cross-Over Design; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; Hot Flashes;  
  Abstract Objectives To evaluate the effects of acupuncture and sham-acupuncture on women with menopausal symptoms as reflected in the intensity of their hot flushes and the Kupperman Menopausal Index (KMI). Method This was a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with 81 patients assigned to two groups: Group 1 received 12 months of acupuncture, then 6 months of sham-acupuncture treatment (n = 56) and Group 2 received 6 months of sham-acupuncture, then 12 months of acupuncture treatment (n = 25). The needles were inserted in a harmonic craniocaudal manner at a depth of about 2 cm, and each session lasted approximately 40 min. The efficacy of acupuncture in ameliorating the climacteric symptoms of patients in postmenopause was determined through the KMI and the intensity of hot flushes. The analysis of variance method for two factors and repeated measures was applied. Results The baseline values of the women in both groups were similar for the KMI score and number of hot flushes. At the end of 6 months, the values for the KMI and hot flushes for the women in Group 1 were lower than those of the women in Group 2 (p < 0.05). After 12 months, the KMI and hot flush data were similar in both groups. After 18 months, the values of the KMI and hot flushes for the women in Group 2 for were lower than those of the women in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Conclusion Acupuncture treatment for relieving menopausal symptoms may be effective for decreasing hot flushes and the KMI score in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Medical School of University of Sao Paulo, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sao Paulo.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 29  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 240  
  Time in Treatment 52 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 228  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, D. I.; Jeong, J. C.; Kim, K. H.; Rho, J. J.; Choi, M. S.; Yoon, S. H.; Choi, S. M.; Kang, K. W.; Ahn, H. Y.; Lee, M. S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for hot flushes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women: a randomised, sham-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Perimenopause; Postmenopause; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of acupuncture in treating hot flushes in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women. METHODS: The study was a randomised single-blind sham-controlled clinical trial. Perimenopausal or postmenopausal women with moderate or severe hot flushes were randomised to receive real or sham acupuncture. Both groups underwent a 4-week run-in period before the treatment. The real acupuncture group received 11 acupuncture treatments for 7 weeks, and the control group underwent sham acupuncture on non-acupuncture points during the same period. Both groups were followed for 8 weeks after the end of treatment period. Changes from baseline in the hot flush scores at week 7, measured by multiplying the hot flush frequency and severity, were the primary outcome. Hot flush frequency, severity and menopause-related symptoms measured with the Menopause Rating Scale Questionnaire were regarded as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: 54 participants were randomised into the real acupuncture group (n=27) and the sham acupuncture group (n=27). The mean change in hot flush scores was -6.4+/-5.2 in the real acupuncture group and -5.6+/-9.2 in the sham group at week 7 from values at the start of the acupuncture treatment (10.0+/-8.1 vs 11.7+/-12.6), respectively (p=0.0810). No serious adverse events were observed during the whole study period. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to sham acupuncture, acupuncture failed to show significantly different effects on the hot flush scores but showed partial benefits on the hot flush severity. Further consideration is needed to develop appropriate strategies for distinguishing non-specific effects from observed overall effectiveness of acupuncture for hot flushes. Whether acupuncture has point-specific effects for hot flushes should be also considered in designing future researches.  
  Address 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Traditional Korean Medicine, Dongguk University, Seoul, South Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 11  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 54  
  Time in Treatment 7 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 567  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, K. H.; Kang, K. W.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, H. J.; Yoon, H. M.; Lee, J. M.; Jeong, J. C.; Lee, M. S.; Jung, H. J.; Choi, S. M. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture on hot flashes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women-a multicenter randomized clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 269-280  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Heat Lamp; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture plus usual care for relief of hot flashes and menopause-related symptoms compared with usual care alone in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women. METHODS:: A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. Perimenopausal or postmenopausal women with average hot flash scores of 10 or higher during the week before the screening visit were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. The treatment group received 12 sessions of acupuncture and maintained usual care for 4 weeks, whereas the control group underwent usual care alone. Hot flash scores were calculated by multiplying frequency by severity of hot flashes recorded in a daily diary. The primary outcome was the mean change in the average 24-hour hot flash score at week 4 from baseline. The secondary outcome was the mean change in menopause-related symptoms as estimated by the Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire at week 4. Follow-up assessment at week 8 was conducted in the treatment group only. RESULTS:: The mean change in the average 24-hour hot flash score was -16.57 in the treatment group (n = 116) and -6.93 in the control group (n = 59), a difference of 9.64 (P < 0.0001). The total Menopause Rating Scale score, as well as the subscale scores for the psychological, somatic, and urogenital dimensions of menopause, showed significant improvement in the acupuncture group compared with the control group (P < 0.001). The mean change in the treatment group in the primary outcome was -17.58 at week 8. CONCLUSIONS:: Our results suggest that acupuncture in addition to usual care is associated with marked clinical improvement in hot flashes and menopause-related symptoms in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women.  
  Address From the 1Acupuncture, Moxibustion, and Meridian Research Center, Division of Standard Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Traditional Korean Medicine, Dongguk University, Ilsa  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 175  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 572  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lin, C. H.; Lin, Y. M.; Liu, C. F. url  openurl
  Title Electrical acupoint stimulation changes body composition and the meridian systems in postmenopausal women with obesity Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume 38 Issue 4 Pages 683-694  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Climacteric; Postmenopause; Obesity; Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases; RCT; Acu Versus No Treatment; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; Weight Loss  
  Abstract This study evaluates the effects of electrical stimulation on body composition and the meridian system in postmenopausal women with obesity. Forty-one postmenopausal women were recruited in Taiwan. The body composition was used as a screening test for obesity (percentage of body fat: &gt; 30%, waist circumference: &gt; 80 cm). The experimental group (EG, n = 20) received modulated middle-frequency electrical stimulation treatment for 20 min twice a week for 12 consecutive weeks at the Zusanli (ST36) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) acupoints. The control group (CG, n = 21) did not receive any intervention. The measurements of body composition and the meridian system were recorded for both groups in the pre- and post-study. The results showed that the data of body composition (weight, waist and hip circumference, percentage of body fat, and percentage of lean muscle mass) changed considerably in the EG (p &lt; 0.05); however, no significant difference was observed in the CG. The left triple burner meridian changed notably in both EG and CG throughout the study (p &lt; 0.05), however there was no difference between the two groups in the overall mean value, up-down ratio, qi and blood ratio, and yin-yang ratio. Our findings suggest that modulated middle-frequency electrical stimulation could help to improve body composition in postmenopausal women with obesity, potentially providing them with better care and health by integrating Western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine.  
  Address Department of Nursing, Ching Kuo Institute of Management and Health, Keelung, Taiwan.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 41  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Postmenopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 713  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nir, Y.; Huang, M. I.; Schnyer, R.; Chen, B.; Manber, R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for postmenopausal hot flashes Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Maturitas  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Hot Flashes; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Menopause; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pilot Study; RCT; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Women's Health; Climacteric; Postmenopause; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine whether individually tailored acupuncture is an effective treatment option for reducing postmenopausal hot flashes and improving quality of life. METHODS: In a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study, 29 postmenopausal participants averaging at least seven moderate to severe hot flashes per 24h, with a baseline estradiol concentration of less than 50pg/mL and a normal TSH level, were randomized to receive 7 weeks (nine treatment sessions) of either active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture (placebo needles that did not penetrate the skin at sham acupuncture points). Participants recorded hot flashes in logs that were reported daily. Global indices of the severity and frequency of hot flashes were derived from the participants' daily logs. RESULTS: Participants receiving the active treatment had a greater reduction in hot flash severity (24.5+/-30.7%) compared to those receiving placebo (4.4+/-17.1%, P=0.042). Within group repeated measures analyses of variance revealed a significant reduction in hot flash severity in the active (P=0.042), but not in the placebo treatment group (P=0.15). Although there was no significant group difference in the reduction of hot flash frequency between the active (42.4+/-32.2%) and placebo groups (32.0+/-26.5%; P>/=0.352), within group repeated measures analyses of variance revealed that the reduction was statistically significant in both groups (P</=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Standardized, individually tailored acupuncture treatment was associated with significantly greater decrease in the severity, but not the frequency, of hot flashes, in symptomatic postmenopausal women when compared to placebo acupuncture of equal duration. Future, larger scale, studies are needed  
  Address Stanford University School of Medicine, United States  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 5 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 29  
  Time in Treatment 7 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score 70  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 913  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Painovich, J. M.; Shufelt, C. L.; Azziz, R.; Yang, Y.; Goodarzi, M. O.; Braunstein, G. D.; Karlan, B. Y.; Stewart, P. M.; Merz, C. N. url  openurl
  Title A pilot randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial of traditional acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms and mechanistic pathways of menopause Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 54-61  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Climacteric; Menopause; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Wait-List Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot study for the feasibility of planning a definitive clinical trial comparing traditional acupuncture (TA) with sham acupuncture (SA) and waiting control (WC) on menopause-related vasomotor symptoms (VMS), quality of life, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. METHODS: Thirty-three perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with at least seven VMS daily were randomized to TA, SA, or WC. The TA and SA groups were given three treatments per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the number and severity of VMS, Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Instrument, Pittsburgh Quality Sleep Index, 24-hour urine cortisol and metabolites, and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing. RESULTS: Both the TA and SA groups demonstrated improved VMS trends compared with the WC group (Delta -3.5 +/- 3.00 vs -4.1 +/- 3.79 vs -1.2 +/- 2.4, respectively; P = 20) and significantly improved Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire vasomotor scores (Delta -1.5 +/- 2.02 vs -1.8 +/- 1.52 vs -0.3 +/- 0.64, respectively; P = 0.04). There were no psychosocial group differences. Exit 24-hour urinary measures were lower in the TA versus the SA or WC group in total cortisol metabolites (4,658.9 +/- 1,670.9 vs 7,735.8 +/- 3,747.9 vs 5,166.0 +/- 2,234.5, P = 0.03; respectively) and dehydroepiandrosterone (41.4 +/- 27.46, 161.2 +/- 222.77, and 252.4 +/- 385.40, respectively; P = 0.05). The response data on adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation cortisol also trended in the hypothesized direction (P = 0.17). CONCLUSIONS: Both TA and SA reduce VMS frequency and severity and improve VMS-related quality of life compared with WC; however, TA alone may impact the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This association is viewed as preliminary and hypothesis generating and should be explored in a large clinical trial.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA, USA; Departments of Endocrinology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA;  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 33  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 923  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sun, Y.; Cui, S.; Guo, S.; Xu, C. openurl 
  Title Climacteric Syndrome Treated by Combined Needling at Shu and Mu-points Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal The European Journal of Integrated Eastern and Western Medicine  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages -  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Formula; Herbal Formula; Menopause; RCT; Shu-Mu Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Climacteric  
  Abstract Objective: To observe clinical therapeutic effects of combined needling at Shu- and Mu-points on climacteric syndrome. Methods: Sixty-five cases of climacteric syndrome were randomly divided into 3 groups: an observation group treated by combined needling at Shu- and Mu-points, a conventional acupuncture group and a medication group. The therapeutic effects were compared among the 3 groups. Results: The total effective rate was respectively 93.3%, 80.0%, and 66.7%, in the observation group, conventional acupuncture group and medication group, with a significant difference among the 3 groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The therapeutic effect of combined needling at Shu- and Mu-points was significantly better than that of conventional acupuncture and medication.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 50  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 65  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1130  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tian, H.; Zhang, C. url  openurl
  Title The combined use of acupuncture and Chinese medicines for treatment of menopausal syndrome--a clinical report of 63 cases Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 3-4  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Menopause; Climacteric; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Herbal Formula  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate therapeutic effects of the combined use of acupuncture and Chinese medicines in 63 cases of menopausal syndrome. METHODS: Ninety-three cases of menopausal syndrome were randomly divided into 2 groups. Sixty-three cases of the treatment group were treated by the combined use of acupuncture and Chinese medicines. Thirty cases in the control group were only given Western medicines. RESULTS: The total effective rate was 96.83% in the treatment group, and 73.33% in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The combined use of acupuncture andChinese medicines is more effective for treating menopausal syndrome.  
  Address Shiyan Hospital of Baoan District, Shenzhen 518108, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 42  
  Treatment Follow-up 28 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 93  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1163  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Venzke, L.; Calvert, J. F., Jr.; Gilbertson, B. url  openurl
  Title A randomized trial of acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms in post-menopausal women Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages 59-66  
  Keywords Climacteric; Postmenopause; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control; AcuTrials; Hot Flashes; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine whether acupuncture would relieve the vasomotor symptoms of post-menopausal women. DESIGN: A randomized, single-blind trial. SETTING: A small city in a rural area of Eastern Oregon. INTERVENTIONS: Women were recruited into the study from the community by advertising or physician referral. All study subjects were in non-surgical menopause and medically stable. Study subjects were randomly assigned to receive 12 weeks of treatment with either Chinese Traditional Medicine (TCM) acupuncture (n=27) or shallow needle (sham) acupuncture (n=24). OUTCOME MEASURES: Study participants kept a diary recording their hot flashes each day. At baseline, study participants filled out Greene Climacteric Scales and the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. These same outcomes were also measured at week 4 of treatment and at 1 week and 12 weeks after treatment. The number of hot flashes and the numeric scores on the Climacteric Scales and the Beck inventories were compared between the verum and shallow needling groups using two-way repeated measures. RESULTS: Both groups of women showed statistically significant improvement on all study parameters. However, there was no difference between the improvement in the shallow needle and verum acupuncture groups. Study subjects were not able to guess which group they had been assigned to. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that both shallow needling and verum acupuncture were effective treatments of post-menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Study subjects were not able to distinguish shallow needling from real TCM acupuncture. Shallow needling may have therapeutic effects in itself reducing its utility as a “placebo” control for verum acupuncture. This result is consistent with other published studies.  
  Address Klamath Pain Clinic, Klamath Falls, OR 97601, USA.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 51  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Postmenopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1208  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vincent, A.; Barton, D. L.; Mandrekar, J. N.; Cha, S. S.; Zais, T.; Wahner-Roedler, D. L.; Keppler, M. A.; Kreitzer, M. J.; Loprinzi, C. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for hot flashes: a randomized, sham-controlled clinical study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 45-52  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hot Flashes; Penetrating Sham; Menopause; Sham Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Sweating; Women's Health; Climacteric  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Hot flashes are a significant problem in women going through the menopausal transition that can substantially affect quality of life. The world of estrogen therapy has been thrown into turmoil with the recent results of the Women's Health Initiative trial report. Pursuant to a growing interest in the use of alternative therapies to alleviate menopausal symptoms and a few pilot trials that suggested that acupuncture could modestly alleviate hot flashes, a prospective, randomized, single-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial was conducted in women experiencing hot flashes. DESIGN: Participants, after being randomized to medical versus sham acupuncture, received biweekly treatments for 5 weeks after a baseline assessment week. They were then followed for an additional 7 weeks. Participants completed daily hot flash questionnaires, which formed the basis for analysis. RESULTS: A total of 103 participants were randomized to medical or sham acupuncture. At week 6 the percentage of residual hot flashes was 60% in the medical acupuncture group and 62% in the sham acupuncture group. At week 12, the percentage of residual hot flashes was 73% in the medical acupuncture group and 55% in the sham acupuncture group. Participants reported no adverse effects related to the treatments. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that the used medical acupuncture was not any more effective for reducing hot flashes than was the chosen sham acupuncture  
  Address Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 7 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 103  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score 70  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1220  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wyon, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lundeberg, T. openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Climacteric Vasomotor Symptoms, Quality of Life, and Urinary Excretion of Neuropeptides amoung Postmenopausal Women Type of Study RCT
  Year 1995 Publication Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 3-12  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Climacteric; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hot Flashes; Penetrating Sham; Menopause; Night Sweats; Postmenopause; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Women's Health;  
  Abstract Most perimenopausal women suffer from vasomotor symptoms. Changes in central opioid activity have been proposed to be involved in the mechanisms of hot flushes after menopause. Because acupuncture increases central opioid activity, it may affect postmenopausal hot flushes. The aim was to study if and to what extent two different kinds of acupuncture affected postmenopausal hot flushes, urinary excretion of certain neuropeptides, and quality of life in a group of postmenopausal women. Twenty-four women with natural menopause and hot flushes were included. Twenty-one women completed the study. One group was randomized to electroacupuncture at 2 Hz, whereas the other group was treated with another form of acupuncture (i.e., superficial needle insertion) for a total of 8 weeks. All women daily registered the number and severity of flushes from 1 month before to 3 months after treatment. They completed Quality of Life questionnaires before, during, and after treatment. Twenty-four-hour urine was sampled before, during, and after treatment and analyzed for neuropeptides using radioimmunoassay methods. The number of flushes decreased significantly by >50% in both groups and remained decreased in the group receiving electroacupuncture, whereas in the superficial-needle-insertion group, the number of flushes increased again during the 3 months after treatment. The Kupperman Index decreased significantly in both groups during and after treatment. The excretion of the potent vasodilating neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity decreased significantly during treatment. Acupuncture significantly affects hot flushes and sweating episodes after menopause, with effects persisting at least 3 months after the end of treatment. Changes in calcitonin gene-related peptide, which is a very potent vasodilator, could be involved in the mechanisms behind hot flushes. (C)1995The North American Menopause Society  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 21  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Postmenopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1336  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wyon, Y.; Wijma, K.; Nedstrand, E.; Hammar, M. url  openurl
  Title A comparison of acupuncture and oral estradiol treatment of vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal Climacteric  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 153-164  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Hot Flashes; Penetrating Sham; Near Verum Acupoint Control; RCT; Relaxation Techniques; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Usual Care Control, Physical; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Climacteric; Postmenopause  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of electro-acupuncture with oral estradiol and superficial needle insertion on hot flushes in postmenopausal women. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms were randomized to electro-acupuncture, superficial needle insertion or oral estradiol treatment during 12 weeks, with 6 months' follow-up. The number and severity of flushes were registered daily and the Kupperman index and a general estimate of climacteric symptoms were completed before, during and after therapy. RESULTS: In the electro-acupuncture group, the mean number of flushes/24 h decreased from 7.3 to 3.5 (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Eleven of the 15 women had at least a 50% decrease in number of flushes (with a mean decrease of 82%). Superficial needle insertion decreased the number of flushes/24 h from 8.1 to 3.8 (p < 0.001). In seven out of 13 women, the number of flushes decreased by at least 50% (mean decrease 83%). In the estrogen group, the number of flushes decreased from 8.4 to 0.8 (p < 0.001). The decrease in number of flushes persisted during the 24-week follow-up period in all treatment groups. The Kupperman index and the general climacteric symptom score decreased, and remained unchanged 24 weeks after treatment in all groups (p < 0.001). Electro-acupuncture decreased the number of flushes/24 h significantly over time, but not to the same extent as the estrogen treatment. No significant difference in effect was found between electro-acupuncture and the superficial needle insertion. CONCLUSION: We suggest that acupuncture is a viable alternative treatment of vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women and cannot recommend superficial needle insertion as an inactive control treatment  
  Address Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 45  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score 68  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1337  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zaborowska, E.; Brynhildsen, J.; Damberg, S.; Fredriksson, M.; Lindh-Astrand, L.; Nedstrand, E.; Wyon, Y.; Hammar, M. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture, applied relaxation, estrogens and placebo on hot flushes in postmenopausal women: an analysis of two prospective, parallel, randomized studies Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Climacteric  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 38-45  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Applied Relaxation; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hot Flashes; RCT; Women's Health; Climacteric; Postmenopause; Menopause  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess if transdermal or oral estrogens, acupuncture and applied relaxation decrease the number of menopausal hot flushes/24 h and improve climacteric symptoms, as assessed by the Kupperman index, more than transdermal placebo treatment. SETTING: An outpatient clinic at a Swedish university hospital. METHODS: A total of 102 postmenopausal women were recruited to two studies performed in parallel. In Study I, the women were randomized between transdermal placebo or estrogen treatment and, in Study II, between oral estrogens, acupuncture or applied relaxation for 12 weeks. Climacteric symptoms were measured with daily logbooks on hot flushes. Women completed the assessment questionnaire for the Kupperman index at baseline and after 12 weeks. RESULTS: The number of flushes/24 h decreased significantly after 4 and 12 weeks in all groups except the placebo group. Both at 4 and 12 weeks, acupuncture decreased the number of flushes more (p<0.05; p<0.01, respectively) than placebo. At 12 weeks, applied relaxation decreased the number of flushes more (p<0.05) than placebo. The Kupperman index score decreased in all groups except the placebo group. The decrease in score was significantly greater in all treatment groups than in the placebo group (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture and applied relaxation both reduced the number of hot flushes significantly better than placebo and should be further evaluated as alternatives to hormone therapy in women with menopausal vasomotor complaints  
  Address Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 102  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score 56  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1415  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Avis, N. E.; Legault, C.; Coeytaux, R. R.; Pian-Smith, M.; Shifren, J. L.; Chen, W.; Valaskatgis, P. url  openurl
  Title A randomized, controlled pilot study of acupuncture treatment for menopausal hot flashes Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Menopause : the journal of the North American Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Hot Flashes; Penetrating Sham; Menopause; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Women's Health; Climacteric  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the feasibility of conducting a randomized trial of the effect of acupuncture in decreasing hot flashes in peri- and postmenopausal women. DESIGN:: Fifty-six women ages 44 to 55 with no menses in the past 3 months and at least four hot flashes per day were recruited from two clinical centers and randomized to one of three treatment groups: usual care (n = 19), sham acupuncture (n = 18), or Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture (n = 19). Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 8 consecutive weeks. The sham acupuncture group received shallow needling in nontherapeutic sites. The Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture group received one of four treatments based on a Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis. Usual care participants were instructed to not initiate any new treatments for hot flashes during the study. Daily diaries were used to track frequency and severity of hot flashes. The mean daily index score was based on the number of mild, moderate, and severe hot flashes. Follow-up analyses were adjusted for baseline values, clinical center, age, and body mass index. RESULTS:: There was a significant decrease in mean frequency of hot flashes between weeks 1 and 8 across all groups (P = 0.01), although the differences between the three study groups were not significant. However, the two acupuncture groups showed a significantly greater decrease than the usual care group (P < 0.05), but did not differ from each other. Results followed a similar pattern for the hot flash index score. There were no significant effects for changes in hot flash interference, sleep, mood, health-related quality of life, or psychological well-being. CONCLUSIONS:: These results suggest either that there is a strong placebo effect or that both traditional and sham acupuncture significantly reduce hot flash frequency  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 56  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 46  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baccetti, S.; Da Fre, M.; Becorpi, A.; Faedda, M.; Guerrera, A.; Monechi, M. V.; Munizzi, R. M.; Parazzini, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and traditional chinese medicine for hot flushes in menopause: a randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 550-557  
  Keywords RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause; Hot Flushes; Acu Versus CAM Control; Diet; Tuina; Chinese Massage; Self Massage; Plum Blossom; Seven Star Needles; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Whole Systems  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes and other menopause-related symptoms used in an integrated system, including such therapeutic techniques as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage. DESIGN: Randomized trial. SETTING: Outpatient center. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred women in spontaneous menopause with at least three episodes of hot flushes daily were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (50 per group): Women in group A were given diet, self-massage training, and treatment with acupuncture, and women in group B (the control group) were given the same diet and self-massage training, but treatment with acupuncture started 6 weeks after they were enrolled into the study. INTERVENTION: Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean change in frequency and/or intensity in menopause-related symptoms were estimated by questionnaire after treatment at week 4. RESULTS: Treatment with acupuncture significantly reduced the occurrence of hot flushes and sudden sweating (p<.001). Other symptoms (sleep disorders, tightness in the chest, irritability, bone pain, feeling depressed) significantly improved. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture in an integrated system that includes therapeutic techniques such as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage can be used to treat hot flushes and selected symptoms in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Referring Center for Complementary Medicine , Tuscany Region, San Donnino, Campi Bisenzio, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 50  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bezerra, A.G.; Pires, G.N.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.; Hachul, H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture to Treat Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-16  
  Keywords SLEEP disorders -- Treatment; SLEEP -- Evaluation; Acupuncture; ACUPUNCTURE points; COMPARATIVE studies; LONGITUDINAL method; CASE study (Research); Medline; ONLINE information services; RESEARCH -- Finance; SLEEP apnea syndromes; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Polysomnography; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; RESEARCH bias; Postmenopause  
  Abstract Sleep disorders are commonly observed among postmenopausal women, with negative effects on their quality of life. The search for complementary therapies for sleep disorders during postmenopausal period is of high importance, and acupuncture stands out as an appropriate possibility. The present review intended to systematically evaluate the available literature, compiling studies that have employed acupuncture as treatment to sleep disorders in postmenopausal women. A bibliographic search was performed in PubMed/Medline and Scopus. Articles which had acupuncture as intervention, sleep related measurements as outcomes, and postmenopausal women as target population were included and evaluated according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool and to the STRICTA guidelines. Out of 89 search results, 12 articles composed our final sample. A high heterogeneity was observed among these articles, which prevented us from performing a meta-analysis. Selected articles did not present high risk of bias and had a satisfactory compliance rate with STRICTA guidelines. In general, these studies presented improvements in sleep-related variables. Despite the overall positive effects, acupuncture still cannot be stated as a reliable treatment for sleep-related complaints, not due to inefficacy, but rather limited evidence. Nevertheless, results are promising and new comprehensive and controlled studies in the field are encouraged.  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109322047; Source Information: 8/23/2015, Vol. 2015, p1; Subject Term: SLEEP disorders -- Treatment; Subject Term: SLEEP -- Evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: COMPARATIVE studies; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: CASE study (Research); Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SLEEP apnea syndromes; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: POLYSOMNOGRAPHY; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: RESEARCH bias; Subject Term: POSTMENOPAUSE; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 16p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 3 Charts, 1 Graph; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2267  
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Author Bokmand, S.; Flyger, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture relieves menopausal discomfort in breast cancer patients: a prospective, double blinded, randomized study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) Abbreviated Journal Breast  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 320-323  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Climacteric; Menopause; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Breast Cancer; Neoplasms; Women's Health; Postmenopause; Hot Flashes; Cancer  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This study evaluates the effect of acupuncture on hot flashes and disturbed night sleep in patients treated for breast cancer. The effect of acupuncture was tested against a sham-acupuncture group and a no-treatment control group. Plasma estradiol was measured to rule out this as cause of effect. Side effects of the treatment were registered. METHODS: We randomized 94 women into the study: 31 had acupuncture, 29 had sham acupuncture and 34 had no treatment. FINDINGS: In the acupuncture group, 16 patients (52%) experienced a significant effect on hot flashes compared with seven patients (24%) in the sham group (p < 0.05). The effect came after the second acupuncture session and lasted for at least 12 weeks after last treatment. A statistically significant positive effect was seen on sleep in the acupuncture group compared with the sham-acupuncture and no-treatment groups. The effect was not correlated with increased levels of plasma estradiol. No side effects of acupuncture were registered. INTERPRETATION: We find that acupuncture significantly relieves hot flashes and sleep disturbances and is a good and safe treatment in women treated for breast cancer.  
  Address Department of Breast Surgery, Vejle Hospital, Denmark. sbok0003@heh.regionh.dk  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 94  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 82  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Borud, E. K.; Alraek, T.; White, A.; Fonnebo, V.; Eggen, A. E.; Hammar, M.; Astrand, L. L.; Theodorsson, E.; Grimsgaard, S. openurl 
  Title The Acupuncture on Hot Flushes Among Menopausal Women (ACUFLASH) study, a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Menopause : the journal of the North American Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 484-493  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Educational; Menopause  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE:: This study compared the effectiveness of individualized acupuncture plus self-care versus self-care alone on hot flashes and health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women. METHODS:: This study involved a multicenter, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial with two parallel arms. Participants were postmenopausal women experiencing, on average, seven or more hot flashes per 24 hours during seven consecutive days. The acupuncture group received 10 acupuncture treatment sessions and advice on self-care, and the control group received advice on self-care only. The frequency and severity (0-10 scale) of hot flashes were registered in a diary. Urine excretion of calcitonin gene-related peptide was assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean hot flash frequency from baseline to 12 weeks. The secondary endpoint was change in health-related quality of life measured by the Women's Health Questionnaire. RESULTS:: Hot flash frequency decreased by 5.8 per 24 hours in the acupuncture group (n = 134) and 3.7 per 24 hours in the control group (n = 133), a difference of 2.1 (P < 0.001). Hot flash intensity decreased by 3.2 units in the acupuncture group and 1.8 units in the control group, a difference of 1.4 (P < 0.001). The acupuncture group experienced statistically significant improvements in the vasomotor, sleep, and somatic symptoms dimensions of the Women's Health Questionnaire compared with the control group. Urine calcitonin gene-related peptide excretion remained unchanged from baseline to week 12. CONCLUSIONS:: Acupuncture plus self-care can contribute to a clinically relevant reduction in hot flashes and increased health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women  
  Address From the 1The National Research Center in Alternative and Complementary Medicine, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway; 2Department of General Practice and Primary Care, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, UK; 3Institute of  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 267  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 83  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chien, T.-J.; Hsu, C.-H.; Liu, C.-Y.; Fang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in breast cancer- A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Climacteric; Menopause; Hot Flushes; Women's Health; Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many breast cancer patients suffer from hot flush and medical menopause as side effects of treatment. Some patients undergo acupuncture, rather than hormone therapy, to relieve these symptoms, but the efficacy of acupuncture is uncertain. This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in women with breast cancer. METHODS: A literature search was performed, following the PRISMA Statement and without language restrictions, of 7 databases from inception through March 2017. All selected studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that examined the effect of needle acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer. The methodological quality of these trials was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and meta-analysis software (RevMan 5.2) was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: We examined 844 breast cancer patients (average age: 58 years-old) from 13 RCTs. The trials had medium-to-high quality, based on the modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had no significant effect on the frequency and the severity of hot flush (p = 0.34; p = 0.33), but significantly ameliorated menopause symptoms (p = 0.009). None of the studies reported severe adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture significantly alleviated menopause symptoms, but had no effect on hot flush. Breast cancer patients concerned about the adverse effects of hormone therapy should consider acupuncture. Further large-scale studies that also measure biomarkers or cytokines may help to elucidate the mechanism by which acupuncture alleviates menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer.  
  Address Medical Library, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2413  
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