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Author (up) Baccetti, S.; Da Frè, M.; Becorpi, A.; Faedda, M.; Guerrera, A.; Monechi, M.V.; Munizzi, R.M.; Parazzini, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine for Hot Flushes in Menopause: A Randomized Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 550-557  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Hot Flashes -- Prevention and Control; Perimenopausal Symptoms -- Prevention and Control; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Human; Italy; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Pretest-Posttest Design; Alternative Therapies; Women's Health; Female; Massage; Self Care; Diet Therapy; Combined Modality Therapy; Questionnaires; Statistical Significance; Sleep Disorders; Anger; Pain; Depression; Prospective Studies; Middle Age; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; T-Tests; Linear Regression; Paired T-Tests; Confidence Intervals  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes and other menopause-related symptoms used in an integrated system, including such therapeutic techniques as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage. Design: Randomized trial. Setting: Outpatient center. Participants: One hundred women in spontaneous menopause with at least three episodes of hot flushes daily were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (50 per group): Women in group A were given diet, self-massage training, and treatment with acupuncture, and women in group B (the control group) were given the same diet and self-massage training, but treatment with acupuncture started 6 weeks after they were enrolled into the study. Intervention: Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures: Mean change in frequency and/or intensity in menopause-related symptoms were estimated by questionnaire after treatment at week 4. Results: Treatment with acupuncture significantly reduced the occurrence of hot flushes and sudden sweating ( p<.001). Other symptoms (sleep disorders, tightness in the chest, irritability, bone pain, feeling depressed) significantly improved. Conclusions: Acupuncture in an integrated system that includes therapeutic techniques such as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage can be used to treat hot flushes and selected symptoms in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103971835. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Women's Health. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971835 Serial 2354  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bosch, P.; van den Noort, M.; Yeo, S.; Lim, S.; Coenen, A.; van Luijtelaar, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of acupuncture on mood and working memory in patients with depression and schizophrenia Type of Study
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 6 Pages 380-390  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; *Affect; Depression/*therapy; Female; Humans; Male; *Memory, Short-Term; Middle Aged; Schizophrenia/*therapy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In patients with depression, as well as in patients with schizophrenia, both mood and working memory performance are often impaired. Both issues can only be addressed and improved with medication to some extent. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the mood and the working memory performance in patients with depression or schizophrenia and whether acupuncture can improve these. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A pragmatic clinical trial design was used. The study was conducted in a psychiatric clinic. Fifty patients with depression and 50 with schizophrenia were randomly divided into an experimental and a waiting-list group. Additionally, 25 healthy control participants were included. Twelve weeks of individualized acupuncture treatment was used as the clinical intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All patients were tested before (T1) and after (T2) acupuncture treatment on a mood scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II), a simple working memory task (digit span), and a complex working memory task (letter-number sequencing); the healthy controls were tested at T1 only. RESULTS: Patients with depression scored worse than the others on the BDI-II, and patients with schizophrenia scored worse than the healthy controls. On the digit span, patients with schizophrenia did not differ from healthy controls whereas they scored worse of all on the letter-number sequencing. With respect to the acupuncture findings, first, the present study showed that the use of acupuncture to treat patients with schizophrenia was both practical and safe. Moreover, acupuncture had a positive effect on the BDI-II for the depression group, but acupuncture had no effect on the digit span and on the letter-number sequencing performance for the two clinical groups. CONCLUSION: The clinical improvement in patients with depression after acupuncture treatment was not accompanied by any significant change in a simple working memory task or in a more complex working memory task; the same was true for the patients with schizophrenia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register NTR3132.  
  Address Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 HR Nijmegen, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26559363 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2014  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Changhe Yu; Kangshou Ji; Huijuan Cao; Ying Wang; Hwang Hye Jin; Zhe Zhang; Guanlin Yang url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bmc Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 1-22  
  Keywords Randomized Controlled Trials; Acupuncture; Angina Pectoris -- Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Descriptive Statistics; Relative Risk; Confidence Intervals; Meta Analysis; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Chi Square Test; Data Analysis Software; Middle Age; Male; Female; Adult; Aged  
  Abstract Background: The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris. Methods: Eleven electronic databases were searched until January 2013. The study included randomized controlled trials that the effectiveness of acupuncture alone was compared to anti-angina medicines (in addition to conventional treatment) and the effectiveness of a combination of acupuncture plus anti-angina medicines was compared to anti-angina medicines alone. The trial selection, data extraction, quality assessment and data analytic procedures outlined in the 2011 Cochrane Handbook were involved. Results: The study included 25 randomized controlled trials (involving 2,058 patients) that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled results showed that the number of patients with ineffectiveness of angina relief was less in the combined acupuncture-anti-angina treatment group than in the anti-angina medicines alone group (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.23-0.47, p < 0.00001, I2 = 0%). Similarly, compared to the anti-angina medicines alone group, fewer patients in the combined treatment group showed no ECG improvement (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.40-0.62, p < 0.00001, I2 = 0%). However, no differences were observed between acupuncture treatment alone and anti-angina medicines alone for both outcome measures. Only four trials mentioned adverse effects. One trial found no significant difference between acupuncture and Chinese medicine, and three reported no adverse events. The quality of the trials was found to be low. Conclusions: The findings showed very low evidence to support the use of acupuncture for improving angina symptoms and ECG of angina patients. However, the quality of the trials included in this study was low. Large and rigorously designed trials are needed to confirm the potential benefit and adverse events of acupuncture.  
  Address Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shenyang, Liaoning, China  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103807220. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150605. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101088661. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103807220 Serial 2319  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2457  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2498  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2539  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2580  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2621  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2660  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2701  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2744  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2785  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2826  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2867  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2908  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2949  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheong, K.B.; Zhang, J.-ping; Huang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effectiveness of acupuncture in postoperative gastroparesis syndrome--a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 767-786  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Gastroparesis -- Therapy; Postoperative Complications -- Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Adult; Aged; Cochrane Library; Female; Gastroparesis -- Epidemiology; Human; Male; Meta Analysis; Middle Age; Postoperative Complications -- Epidemiology; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; PubMed; Systematic Review; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Postoperative gastroparesis syndrome (PGS) which is mainly manifested as delayed gastric emptying is often caused by upper abdominal and sometimes lower abdominal surgery. In view of the side effects of drugs therapy, the search of supplementary and alternative has been of increasing interest. OBJECTIVE: This paper included a systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of acupuncture and acupoints selection in PGS. Quality for meta-analysis was evaluated using GRADE while each trial was assessed with CONSORT and STRICTA for TCM. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with non-acupuncture treatment were identified from databases PubMed, EBSCO, Ovid, Cochrane, CNKI and Wanfangdata. Meta-analysis on eligible studies was performed using fixed-effects model with RevMan 5.2. Results were expressed as relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data, and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. RESULTS: Of the 348 studies reviewed, 16 RCTs met the inclusion criteria for review while 7 RCTs, 188 patients (intervention) and 182 patients (control) met the criteria for meta-analysis. Both acupuncture and acupuncture combined with medication showed significant higher total effective rate than control (usual care/medication); with (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13, 1.44; P<0.0001) and (RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.18, 1.58; P<0.0001) respectively. All included RCTs reported positive effect of acupuncture in PGS treatment. ST36, CV12 and PC6 seemed to be the common acupoints selected. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested acupuncture might be effective to improve PGS, however, a definite conclusion could not be drawn due to low quality of trials. Further large-scale, high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed to validate this. STUDY REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42013005485.  
  Address School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong, China. Electronic address: nanfanglihuang@163.com.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103848872. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103848872 Serial 2374  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-E.; Doo, K.-H.; Lee, J.-H.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Rhee, H.Y.; Park, H.-J.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Combined Treatment with Acupuncture and Bee Venom Acupuncture as an Adjunctive Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 25-32  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Bee Venoms/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Parkinson Disease/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Parkinson's disease; acupuncture; bee venom acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) through a sham-controlled trial. We also investigated whether there is a sustained therapeutic effect by completing follow-up assessments after treatment completion. DESIGN: A single center, double-blind, three-armed randomized controlled trial. SETTINGS/LOCATION: This study was performed at a university hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. SUBJECTS: Seventy-three (73) patients with IPD were the subjects. They were randomly assigned to the active treatment group, sham treatment group, or conventional treatment group. INTERVENTIONS: The active treatment group received acupuncture and BVA and the sham group received sham acupuncture and normal saline injections, twice a week for 12 weeks. The conventional treatment group maintained anti-parkinsonian drugs without additional intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and part III score, postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD) score, gait speed and number, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and postural stability at baseline and at 12, 16, and 20 weeks. RESULTS: Sixty-three (63) patients provided a complete data of assessments, including a final follow-up. After 12 weeks of treatment, a significant difference was observed between the active treatment group and the conventional treatment group. After the end of the treatment, the treatment effects were maintained significantly in the active treatment group only. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the combined treatment of acupuncture and BVA might be safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with IPD.  
  Address 2 Stroke and Neurological Disorders Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong , Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28753030 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2456  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-E.; Doo, K.-H.; Lee, J.-H.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Rhee, H.Y.; Park, H.-J.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Combined Treatment with Acupuncture and Bee Venom Acupuncture as an Adjunctive Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 25-32  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Bee Venoms/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Parkinson Disease/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Parkinson's disease; acupuncture; bee venom acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) through a sham-controlled trial. We also investigated whether there is a sustained therapeutic effect by completing follow-up assessments after treatment completion. DESIGN: A single center, double-blind, three-armed randomized controlled trial. SETTINGS/LOCATION: This study was performed at a university hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. SUBJECTS: Seventy-three (73) patients with IPD were the subjects. They were randomly assigned to the active treatment group, sham treatment group, or conventional treatment group. INTERVENTIONS: The active treatment group received acupuncture and BVA and the sham group received sham acupuncture and normal saline injections, twice a week for 12 weeks. The conventional treatment group maintained anti-parkinsonian drugs without additional intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and part III score, postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD) score, gait speed and number, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and postural stability at baseline and at 12, 16, and 20 weeks. RESULTS: Sixty-three (63) patients provided a complete data of assessments, including a final follow-up. After 12 weeks of treatment, a significant difference was observed between the active treatment group and the conventional treatment group. After the end of the treatment, the treatment effects were maintained significantly in the active treatment group only. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the combined treatment of acupuncture and BVA might be safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with IPD.  
  Address 2 Stroke and Neurological Disorders Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong , Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28753030 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2497  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-E.; Doo, K.-H.; Lee, J.-H.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Rhee, H.Y.; Park, H.-J.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Combined Treatment with Acupuncture and Bee Venom Acupuncture as an Adjunctive Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 25-32  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Bee Venoms/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Parkinson Disease/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Parkinson's disease; acupuncture; bee venom acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) through a sham-controlled trial. We also investigated whether there is a sustained therapeutic effect by completing follow-up assessments after treatment completion. DESIGN: A single center, double-blind, three-armed randomized controlled trial. SETTINGS/LOCATION: This study was performed at a university hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. SUBJECTS: Seventy-three (73) patients with IPD were the subjects. They were randomly assigned to the active treatment group, sham treatment group, or conventional treatment group. INTERVENTIONS: The active treatment group received acupuncture and BVA and the sham group received sham acupuncture and normal saline injections, twice a week for 12 weeks. The conventional treatment group maintained anti-parkinsonian drugs without additional intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and part III score, postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD) score, gait speed and number, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and postural stability at baseline and at 12, 16, and 20 weeks. RESULTS: Sixty-three (63) patients provided a complete data of assessments, including a final follow-up. After 12 weeks of treatment, a significant difference was observed between the active treatment group and the conventional treatment group. After the end of the treatment, the treatment effects were maintained significantly in the active treatment group only. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the combined treatment of acupuncture and BVA might be safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with IPD.  
  Address 2 Stroke and Neurological Disorders Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong , Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28753030 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2538  
Permanent link to this record
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