toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/acutrialsocom/public_html/refbase-ocom/includes/include.inc.php on line 5275
  Records Links
Author (up) Fireman, Z.; Segal, A.; Kopelman, Y.; Sternberg, A.; Carasso, R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture treatment for irritable bowel syndrome. A double-blind controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication Digestion Abbreviated Journal Digestion  
  Volume 64 Issue 2 Pages 100-103  
  Keywords Abdominal Pain; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Gastrointestinal Diseases; IBS; Penetrating Sham; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract BACKGROUND/AIM: Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western society, affecting around 15% of the population, especially young adults. The cause(s) of irritable bowel syndrome and effective treatment(s) have remained elusive. This study aimed at exploring the therapeutic value of acupuncture by comparing the responses of irritable bowel syndrome sufferers to true acupuncture versus sham acupuncture in a controlled double-blind study. METHODS: Twenty-five patients who fulfilled the Rome criteria (irritable bowel syndrome symptoms persisting for more than 1 year) comprised the final study population. They were recruited through a 'call for' bulletin sent to gastroenterologists practicing in the region of our medical center. True acupuncture was performed at LI-4 (colonic meridian, needle only) and sham acupuncture at BL-60 (urinary vesicle meridian, needle only). Patient assignment to one of the two groups was random. RESULTS: The effect of the first true acupuncture on overall symptoms and abdominal pain was a clear and significant improvement (p = 0.05). No comparable effect was seen in the second session. CONCLUSIONS: Although the true acupuncture results were consistently better, no difference was found between the two groups in the overall statistical analysis. We could not show a therapeutic benefit of this treatment modality in irritable bowel syndrome  
  Address Department of Gastroenterology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel. fireman@hillel-yaffe.health.gov.il  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 25  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score 56  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 326  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fung, K. P.; Chow, O. K.; So, S. Y. url  openurl
  Title Attenuation of exercise-induced asthma by acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 1986 Publication Lancet Abbreviated Journal Lancet  
  Volume 2 Issue 8521-22 Pages 1419-1422  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Asthma, Exercise-Induced; Cross-Over Design; Exercise; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Pediatrics; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract A prospective randomised single-blind study of the effects of real and sham acupuncture on exercise-induced asthma was conducted in nineteen children. Forced expiratory flow in 1st second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were measured throughout acupuncture and after treadmill exercise. Neither real nor sham acupuncture affected the basal bronchomotor tone but both, when applied 20 min before exercise, attenuated exercise induced asthma: mean maximum percentage falls in FEV1, FVC, and PEFR were 44.4%, 33.3%, and 49.5% without acupuncture; 23.8%, 15.8%, and 25.9% after real acupuncture; and 32.6%, 26.1%, and 34.3% after sham acupuncture. Real acupuncture provided better protection against exercise-induced asthma than did sham acupuncture (p less than 0.05)  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 19  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Asthma, Exercise-Induced
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 350  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Godfrey, C. M.; Morgan, P. url  openurl
  Title A controlled trial of the theory of acupuncture in musculoskeletal pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 1978 Publication The Journal of rheumatology Abbreviated Journal J Rheumatol  
  Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 121-124  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Bursitis; Neck Pain; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Low Back Pain; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Osteoarthritis; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tennis Elbow; Myofascial Pain Syndromes  
  Abstract We carried out a randomized trail compraing acupuncture done in theoretically correct [appropriate] and incorrect [inappropirate] locations for chronic musculoskeletal pains in various sites. Throughout the trial, neither the patient, nor the assessor, nor the acupuncturist, knew if the site of the acupuncture was appropriate to the patient's symptoms according to acupuncture theory. Although 60% had reduced pain after three treatments, there was no significant difference between the treatments. Our findings, while not disproving the value of acupuncture, do not support the theory that certain specific points must be needled to relieve specific areas of pain  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 193  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 385  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Guo, J.; Wang, L. P.; Liu, C. Z.; Zhang, J.; Wang, G. L.; Yi, J. H.; Cheng, J. L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture for primary insomnia: a randomized controlled clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2013 Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Insomnia; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Objectives. To investigate the six-week influence of acupuncture on sleep quality and daytime functioning in primary insomnia. Methods. The study was a double-dummy, single-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. A total of 180 patients with primary insomnia were randomly assigned to 3 groups: verum group underwent verum acupuncture plus placebo; estazolam group underwent estazolam plus sham acupuncture; sham group underwent sham acupuncture plus placebo. The outcome was measured by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36). Results. The three groups showed significant improvement compared with the pretreatment baseline. Compared with the other two groups, the verum group reported improved sleep quality (SQ) and vitality (VT), decreased daytime dysfunction (DD) and sleepiness (ESS score). The differences were kept from the treatment period to the end of the trial. Discussion. Verum acupuncture appeared to be more effective in increasing sleep quality and daytime functioning than sham acupuncture and estazolam. Trial Registration. The trial is registeded with ClinicalTrials.gov ISRCTN12585433.  
  Address Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 23 Meishuguanhou Street, Beijing 100010, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 21  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 180  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 406  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) He, D.; Berg, J.; Hostmark, A. openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture on smoking cessation or reduction for motivated smokers Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Preventive medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Med  
  Volume 26 Issue Pages 208-214  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Ear Seeds; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Smoking Cessation; Standard Needling Depth; Substance-Related Disorders; Tobacco Use Disorder; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract Background: This study was undertaken to examine the effects of acupuncture on smoking reduction and possibly also cessation and to examine whether some acupoints are more effective than others for somking cessation.

Methods.A total of 46 healthy men and women, 39 ñ 9 years of age (mean ñ SD), who smoked 20 ñ 6 cigarettes per day and had smoked for 23 ñ 8 years, and who wanted to quit smoking, volunteered to participate. The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups. One group was given acupuncture treatment at points previously used for anti-smoking (test group, TG). The other group was given acupuncture treatment at points assumed to have no effect for smoking cessation (control group, CG). Before each treatment and after the last treatment each subject answered questionnaires about his or her smoking habits and attitudes. In addition the concentrations of serum cotinine, serum thiocyanate, serum peroxides, and plasma fibrinogen were measured before the first and after the last acupuncture treatment.

Results.The daily cigarette consumption fell during the treatment period in both groups, but the reduction was larger for TG than for CG (P< 0.002). Altogether 31% of subjects in TG had quit smoking completely at the end of the treatment, compared with none in CG. For TG the concentrations of cotinine and thiocyanate were reduced significantly after the treatment period (P< 0.001), but no significant reductions were observed for CG. For both groups the taste of tobacco worsened during the treatment period, but the effect was more pronounced for TG than for CG (P< 0.05). The desire to smoke fell significantly in both groups after treatment, and the reduction was larger for TG than for CG (P< 0.001). No significant changes in serum peroxides and plasma fibrinogen concentrations were observed during the treatment period for either group.

Conclusions.This study suggests that acupuncture may help motivated smokers to reduce their smoking or even quit smoking completely. Different acupoints appear to have different effects for smoking cessation and reduction.
 
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 46  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 440  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Itoh, K.; Ochi, H.; Kitakoji, H. openurl 
  Title Effects of tender point acupuncture on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS)--a pragmatic trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Chin Med Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Rct; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness; Doms  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is used to reduce inflammation and decrease pain in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This study investigates the efficacy of acupuncture on the symptoms of DOMS. METHODS: Thirty subjects were assigned randomly to there groups, namely the control, non-tender point and tender point groups. Measurement of pain with full elbow flexion was used as indices of efficacy. Measurements were taken before and after exercise, immediately after treatment and seven days after treatment. RESULTS: Significant differences in visual analog scores for pain were found between the control group and tender point group immediately after treatment and three days after exercise (P<0.05, Dunnetts multiple test). CONCLUSION: The results show that tender point acupuncture relieves muscle pain of DOMS.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Chinese medicine Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 3 Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/21/2015; Date Modified: 9/17/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Department of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Meiji University of Integrative Medicine, Nantan, Kyoto 629-0392, Japan. kitoh@meiji-u.ac.jp; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&listuids=19032777 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1669  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Joos, S.; Schott, C.; Zou, H.; Daniel, V.; Martin, E. url  openurl
  Title Immunomodulatory effects of acupuncture in the treatment of allergic asthma: a randomized controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication The journal of alternative and complementary medicine : research on paradigm, practice, and policy Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 6 Issue 6 Pages 519-525  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Penetrating Sham; Lung Diseases; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Allergies  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) acupuncture is a suitable treatment for complex chronic diseases such as bronchial asthma. In a randomized, controlled study we investigated immunologic effects of Chinese acupuncture on patients with allergic asthma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The effects of acupuncture treatment given according to the principles of TCM (TCM group, n = 20) were compared with those of acupuncture treatment using points not specific for asthma (control group, n = 18). All patients were treated 12 times for 30 minutes over a time period of 4 weeks. Patients' general well-being and several peripheral blood parameters (eosinophils, lymphocyte subpopulations, cytokines, in vitro lymphocyte proliferation) were determined before and after acupuncture treatment. RESULTS: In the TCM group, significantly more patients indicated an improvement in general well-being (79% in the TCM group versus 47% in the control group; p = 0.049) after acupuncture treatment. The following changes were found in the TCM group: within the lymphocyte subpopulations the CD3+ cells (p = 0.005) and CD4+ cells (p = 0.014) increased significantly. There were also significant changes in cytokine concentrations: interleukin (IL)-6 (p = 0.026) and IL-10 (p = 0.001) decreased whereas IL-8 (p = 0.050) rose significantly. Additionally, the in vitro lymphocyte proliferation rate increased significantly (p = 0.035) while the number of eosinophils decreased from 4.4% to 3.3% after acupuncture (p > 0.05). The control group, however, showed no significant changes apart from an increase in the CD4+ cells (p = 0.012). CONCLUSION: The results imply that asthma patients benefit from acupuncture treatment given in addition to conventional therapy. Furthermore, acupuncture performed in accordance with the principles of TCM showed significant immune-modulating effects  
  Address Department of Anaesthetics, University of Heidelberg, Germany. s.joos@gmx.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Days Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 38  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score 72  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 539  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Karst, M.; Winterhalter, M.; Munte, S.; Francki, B.; Hondronikos, A.; Eckardt, A.; Hoy, L.; Buhck, H.; Bernateck, M.; Fink, M. url  openurl
  Title Auricular acupuncture for dental anxiety: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Current researches in anesthesia & analgesia Abbreviated Journal Curr Res Anesth Analg  
  Volume 104 Issue 2 Pages 295-300  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Anxiety; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Mental Disorders; No Treatment Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Psychological Disorders; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tooth Extraction  
  Abstract Auricular acupuncture can be an effective treatment for acute anxiety, but there is a lack of direct comparisons of acupuncture to proven standard drug treatments. In this study we compared the efficacy of auricular acupuncture with intranasal midazolam, placebo acupuncture, and no treatment for reducing dental anxiety. Patients having dental extractions (n = 67) were randomized to (i) auricular acupuncture, (ii) placebo acupuncture, and (iii) intranasal midazolam and compared with a no treatment group. Anxiety was assessed before the interventions, at 30 min, and after the dental extraction. Physiological variables were assessed continuously. With the no treatment group as control, the auricular acupuncture group, and the midazolam group were significantly less anxious at 30 min as compared with patients in the placebo acupuncture group (Spielberger Stait-Trait Anxiety Inventory X1, P = 0.012 and <0.001, respectively). In addition, patient compliance assessed by the dentist was significantly improved if auricular acupuncture or application of intranasal midazolam had been performed (P = 0.032 and 0.049, respectively). In conclusion, both, auricular acupuncture and intranasal midazolam were similarly effective for the treatment of dental anxiety  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Clinic, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. karst.matthias@mh-hannover.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 67  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Dental Anxiety
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 86  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 557  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kikuchi, A.; Seki, T.; Takayama, S.; Iwasaki, K.; Ishizuka, S.; Yaegashi, N. doi  openurl
  Title Effect of press needles on swallowing reflex in older adults with cerebrovascular disease: a randomized double-blind controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication J Am Geriatr Soc Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 62 Issue 12 Pages 2438-2440  
  Keywords Pneumonia, Aspiration; Nervous System Diseases; Stroke; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Press Tacks; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Traditional Asian Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Miyagi, Japan.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 28  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 29  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Pneumonia, Aspiration
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 6/4/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Pneumonia, Aspiration; Department of Traditional Asian Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Miyagi, Japan.; eng SI – JPRN/UMIN000002133; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25516042 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1699  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Korpan, M. I.; Dezu, Y.; Schneider, B.; Leitha, T.; Fialka-Moser, V. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in the treatment of posttraumatic pain syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 1999 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acta Orthop Belg  
  Volume 65 Issue 2 Pages 197-201  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Pain; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control;  
  Abstract To test the hypothesis that classical Chinese acupuncture provides an additional benefit subjectively as well as objectively in patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy, a double-blind, placebo-controlled prospective trial was performed. Fourteen patients suffering clinically and scintigraphically from acute CRPS of the upper limb lasting of more than one but less than 6 months were studied. Patients were randomly assigned to either the classical acupuncture (group A) or sham acupuncture (group S), which was applied five times a week for three weeks and required 30 minutes. Both groups received the same defined standard treatment. The current state of pain was assessed by means of a visual analogue scale. Subjective success of treatment was rated by the patients by means of a rating scale. Each patient underwent a clinical examination and was investigated by 5-phase bone scan in order to confirm the diagnosis. The current state of pain as well as clinical parameters were almost identical in patients of group A and of group S at the beginning. During therapy clinical parameters as well as pain improved in both groups and reached nearly normal levels after 6 months. Owing to the small number of patients in our study, no differences between sham and treatment group could be recognized. For a definitive statement the treatment of further patients in both groups is planned. Determinations of the effect of acupuncture on clinical parameters, based on long-term follow-ups are projected  
  Address Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Vienna, Austria  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 14  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score 40  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 601  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, C. Z.; Xie, J. P.; Wang, L. P.; Liu, Y. Q.; Song, J. S.; Chen, Y. Y.; Shi, G. X.; Zhou, W.; Gao, S. Z.; Li, S. L.; Xing, J. M.; Ma, L. X.; Wang, Y. X.; Zhu, J.; Liu, J. P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Randomized Controlled Trial of Single Point Acupuncture in Primary Dysmenorrhea Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Abbreviated Journal Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords RCT; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Acu Versus Sham; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Women's Health; Gynecology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is often used for primary dysmenorrhea. But there is no convincing evidence due to low methodological quality. We aim to assess immediate effect of acupuncture at specific acupoint compared with unrelated acupoint and nonacupoint on primary dysmenorrhea. METHODS: The Acupuncture Analgesia Effect in Primary Dysmenorrhoea-II is a multicenter controlled trial conducted in six large hospitals of China. Patients who met inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to classic acupoint (N = 167), unrelated acupoint (N = 167), or non-acupoint (N = 167) group on a 1:1:1 basis. They received three sessions with electro-acupuncture at a classic acupoint (Sanyinjiao, SP6), or an unrelated acupoint (Xuanzhong, GB39), or nonacupoint location, respectively. The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Measurements were obtained at 0, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes following the first intervention. In addition, patients scored changes of general complaints using Cox retrospective symptom scales (RSS-Cox) and 7-point verbal rating scale (VRS) during three menstrual cycles. Secondary outcomes included VAS score for average pain, pain total time, additional in-bed time, and proportion of participants using analgesics during three menstrual cycles. FINDINGS: Five hundred and one people underwent random assignment. The primary comparison of VAS scores following the first intervention demonstrated that classic acupoint group was more effective both than unrelated acupoint (-4.0 mm, 95% CI -7.1 to -0.9, P = 0.010) and nonacupoint (-4.0 mm, 95% CI -7.0 to -0.9, P = 0.012) groups. However, no significant differences were detected among the three acupuncture groups for RSS-Cox or VRS outcomes. The per-protocol analysis showed similar pattern. No serious adverse events were noted. CONCLUSION: Specific acupoint acupuncture produced a statistically, but not clinically, significant effect compared with unrelated acupoint and nonacupoint acupuncture in primary dysmenorrhea patients. Future studies should focus on effects of multiple points acupuncture on primary dysmenorrhea.  
  Address School of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China; Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 501  
  Time in Treatment 3 Days Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 740  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, C. Z.; Xie, J. P.; Wang, L. P.; Zheng, Y. Y.; Ma, Z. B.; Yang, H.; Chen, X.; Shi, G. X.; Li, S. L.; Zhao, J. P.; Han, J. X.; Li, J. D.; Wang, Y. X.; Tang, L.; Xue, X. O.; Li, M.; Wang, Y.; Sun, A. P.; Xing, J. M.; Cao, H. J.; Zhu, J.; Liu, J. P. url  openurl
  Title Immediate Analgesia Effect of Single Point Acupuncture in Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Pain Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 300-307  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Sham Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; Women's Health;  
  Abstract Background. Acupuncture is often used for primary dysmenorrhea. Objective. To assess the efficacy of a single point of acupuncture in the management of primary dysmenorrhea compared with sham acupuncture and no acupuncture. Methodology. Patients with primary dysmenorrhea were randomly assigned to acupoint group (n = 50), unrelated acupoint group (n = 50), nonacupoint group (n = 46), or no acupuncture group (n = 48). Acupuncture and sham acupuncture were administered once-daily for 3 days with electro-acupuncture at Sanyinjiao (SP6) that was specifically designed to treat primary dysmenorrhea, or an unrelated acupoint (Xuanzhong, GB39), or nonacupoint location. The primary outcome was pain intensity as measured by a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) at baseline; 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes following the start of the first intervention. Cox retrospective symptom scale (RSS), verbal rating scale (VRS), pain total time, and proportion of participants using analgesics were also recorded during three menstrual cycles. Results. The primary comparison of VAS scores demonstrated that patients receiving acupuncture (-15.56 mm, 95% CI -22.16 to -8.95, P &lt; 0.001), unrelated acupoint (-18.14 mm, 95% CI -24.81 to -11.47, P &lt; 0.001), and nonacupoint (-10.96 mm, 95% CI -17.62 to -4.30, P = 0.001) treatment presented significant improvements compared with no acupuncture group. There were no significant differences among the four groups with respect to secondary outcomes. Conclusion. Acupuncture was better than no acupuncture for relieving the pain of dysmenorrhea following a single point of acupuncture, but no differences were detected between acupoint acupuncture and unrelated acupoint acupuncture, acupoint acupuncture and nonacupoint acupuncture.  
  Address School of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing Acupuncture and Moxibust  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 196  
  Time in Treatment 3 Days Condition Dysmennorhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 741  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, Y. Q.; Ma, L. X.; Xing, J. M.; Cao, H. J.; Wang, Y. X.; Tang, L.; Li, M.; Wang, Y.; Liang, Y.; Pu, L. Y.; Yu, X. M.; Guo, L. Z.; Jin, J. L.; Wang, Z.; Ju, H. M.; Jiang, Y. M.; Liu, J. J.; Yuan, H. W.; Li, C. H.; Zhang, P.; She, Y. F.; Liu, J. P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does Traditional Chinese Medicine pattern affect acupoint specific effect? Analysis of data from a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial for primary dysmenorrhea Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 43-49  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Dysmenorrhea; Menstruation Disturbances; Acupuncture; Acu Versus > 1 Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Non Specific Acupoint Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the importance of the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) pattern on an acupoint-specific effect. DESIGN: This was a TCM pattern subdivision analysis of the first intervention data from a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial (ISRCTN24863192) (the main trial). SETTINGS: The main trial recruited participants from six hospitals in three provinces in China. SUBJECTS: Five hundred and one (501) participants diagnosed with primary dysmenorrhea (PD) were enrolled in the main trial. INTERVENTIONS: The main trial randomly and equally divided participants into three treatment groups with bilateral electroacupuncture at three sites, respectively: Sanyinjiao (SP6), Xuanzhong (GB39), and an adjacent nonacupoint. Participants were diagnosed with TCM patterns before the treatment. The intervention was carried out when the visual analogue scale (VAS) score of participant's menstrual pain was &gt;/= 40 mm on the first day of menstruation and lasted for 30 minutes. OUTCOME MEASURES: The immediate improvement of pain was measured with a 100-mm VAS before the intervention, at 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and 30 minutes during the intervention, and at 30 minutes after the completion of this intervention. RESULTS: Three (3) TCM patterns (n=320) were eligible for analysis, including Cold and Dampness Stagnation pattern (n=184), Qi and Blood Stagnation pattern (n=84), and Qi and Blood Deficiency pattern (n=52). In Cold and Dampness Stagnation pattern, the SP6 group had a significant reduction in VAS scores compared with the GB39 group (mean difference -7.6 mm) and the nonacupoint group (mean difference -8.2 mm), respectively. There was no difference between the latter two groups. There were no group differences in VAS scores in the other two patterns. CONCLUSIONS: It suggested that TCM pattern might affect acupoint specific effect on the immediate pain relief obtained for participants with PD.  
  Address School of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 30 minutes Frequency N/A Number of Participants 501  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 760  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Manber, R.; Schnyer, R. N.; Allen, J. J.; Rush, A. J.; Blasey, C. M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture: a promising treatment for depression during pregnancy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Affect Disord  
  Volume 83 Issue 1 Pages 89-95  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Massage; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Women's Health; Depression, Postpartum; Pregnancy Complications  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Few medically acceptable treatments for depression during pregnancy are available. The aim of this randomized controlled pilot study was to determine whether acupuncture holds promise as a treatment for depression during pregnancy. METHODS: Sixty-one pregnant women with major depressive disorder and a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD(17)) score >/=14 were randomly assigned to one of three treatments, delivered over 8 weeks: an active acupuncture (SPEC, N=20), an active control acupuncture (NSPEC, N=21), and massage (MSSG, N=20). Acupuncture treatments were standardized, but individually tailored, and were provided in a double-blind fashion. Responders to acute phase treatment (HRSD(17) score<14 and >/=50% reduction from baseline) continued the treatment they were initially randomized to until 10 weeks postpartum. RESULTS: Response rates at the end of the acute phase were statistically significantly higher for SPEC (69%) than for MSSG (32%), with an intermediate NSPEC response rate (47%). The SPEC group also exhibited a significantly higher average rate of reduction in BDI scores from baseline to the end of the first month of treatment than the MSSG group. Responders to the acute phase of all treatments combined had significantly lower depression scores at 10 weeks postpartum than nonresponders. LIMITATIONS: Generalizability is limited by the small sample and its relative homogeneity. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture holds promise for the treatment of depression during pregnancy  
  Address Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University. 401, Quarry Rd., Stanford, CA 94305, United States  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 61  
  Time in Treatment 16 Weeks Condition Depression, Postpartum
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score 68  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 813  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Margolin, A.; Kleber, H. D.; Avants, S. K.; Konefal, J.; Gawin, F.; Stark, E.; Sorensen, J.; Midkiff, E.; Wells, E.; Jackson, T. R.; Bullock, M.; Culliton, P. D.; Boles, S.; Vaughan, R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for the treatment of cocaine addiction: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal JAMA  
  Volume 287 Issue 1 Pages 55-63  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Relaxation Techniques; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Substance-Related Disorders; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Substance Abuse; Drug Addiction  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Auricular acupuncture is widely used to treat cocaine addiction in the United States and Europe. However, evidence from controlled studies regarding this treatment's effectiveness has been inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture as a treatment for cocaine addiction. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial conducted from November 1996 to April 1999. SETTING: Six community-based clinics in the United States: 3 hospital-affiliated clinics and 3 methadone maintenance programs. PATIENTS: Six hundred twenty cocaine-dependent adult patients (mean age, 38.8 years; 69.2% men); 412 used cocaine only and 208 used both opiates and cocaine and were receiving methadone maintenance. INTERVENTION: Patients were randomly assigned to receive auricular acupuncture (n = 222), a needle-insertion control condition (n = 203), or a relaxation control condition (n = 195). Treatments were offered 5 times weekly for 8 weeks. Concurrent drug counseling was also offered to patients in all conditions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cocaine use during treatment and at the 3- and 6-month postrandomization follow-up based on urine toxicology screens; retention in treatment. RESULTS: Intent-to-treat analysis of urine samples showed a significant overall reduction in cocaine use (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.74; P =.002) but no differences by treatment condition (P =.90 for acupuncture vs both control conditions). There were also no differences between the conditions in treatment retention (44%-46% for the full 8 weeks). Counseling sessions in all 3 conditions were poorly attended. CONCLUSIONS: Within the clinical context of this study, acupuncture was not more effective than a needle insertion or relaxation control in reducing cocaine use. Our study does not support the use of acupuncture as a stand-alone treatment for cocaine addiction or in contexts in which patients receive only minimal concurrent psychosocial treatment. Research will be needed to examine acupuncture's contribution to addiction treatment when provided in an ancillary role  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 620  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Cocaine-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score 79  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 828  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Marignan, M. doi  openurl
  Title Auriculotherapy Treatment Protocol for Low-Back Pain: A Randomized Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 154-  
  Keywords RCT; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Men's Health; Acu Versus Sham; Auricular Electroacupuncture; Nogier Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Musculoskeletal Diseases  
  Abstract Background: The author developed an auriculotherapy treatment protocol to produce efficient pain relief in people with low-back pain. This treatment protocol is based on brain plasticity and integration of postural control information that can be modulated by auriculotherapy. This treatment has been developed and taught in the United States, Europe, Canada, and South America for many years. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of verum auriculotherapy versus placebo treatment on patients with low-back pain. Methods: To demonstrate the efficacy of this protocol, the author tested it, treating a maximum of five specific auriculotherapy points that stimulated in each ear pavilion. Stimulation was produced by an electrical current. The trial included 12 male patients who had low-back pain, who were divided into two groups of 6 patients each. The effects on group 1 (treatment of points that did not correspond with affected areas; i.e., placebo) and group 2 (treatment of points corresponding with painful areas; i.e., verum treatment). Results: Group 2 (verum treatment) experienced a rapid and significant attenuation of pain in several minutes (a visual analogue score [VAS] average decrease of pain: -4.3; p-value<0.002) and an immediate increase of lumbar flexibility as evaluated by the Schöber test (an average increase of lumbar flexibility of 2 cm, p-value 0.003). There was no effect on group 1 (placebo), which had an average score of -0.6 on the VAS with a p-value>0.28 and an 0.1-cm of lumbar flexibility increase, with a p-value>0.74 during the placebo treatment. Conclusions: The length of pain relied varied among patients in group 2 and was not dependent on the purported cause of the postural syndrome. This effect could last for hours, weeks, months or longer. This auriculotherapy protocol is effective for decreasing pain and increasing lumbar flexibility in patients who have low-back pain.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 12  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 829  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Michalek-Sauberer, A.; Gusenleitner, E.; Gleiss, A.; Tepper, G.; Deusch, E. url  openurl
  Title Auricular acupuncture effectively reduces state anxiety before dental treatment-a randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Clinical oral investigations Abbreviated Journal Clin Oral Investig  
  Volume 16 Issue 6 Pages 1517-1522  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Stomatognathic Diseases; Anxiety; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Auricular Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to analyse whether auricular acupuncture, acupuncture at the outer ear, could reduce state anxiety before dental treatment. METHODS: This prospective, randomised patient-blinded study with 182 patients compared anxiety before dental treatment following auricular acupuncture at the relaxation-, tranquillizer- and master cerebral points (auricular acupuncture group) versus acupuncture at sham points (finger-, shoulder- and tonsil points; sham group) and a non-intervention control group. Anxiety was assessed using the Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (German version) before auricular acupuncture and 20 min thereafter, immediately before dental treatment. RESULTS: Auricular acupuncture reduced state anxiety score more effectively from 54.7 +/- 10.8 to 46.9 +/- 10.4 (mean +/- SD) than sham acupuncture from 51.9 +/- 10.2 to 48.4 +/- 10.0. In contrast, state anxiety in the control group increased from 51.0 +/- 11.7 to 54.0 +/- 11.6 (mean increase +3.0; CI +4.7 to +1.2). The decrease in state anxiety in both intervention groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001) when compared to the non-intervention control group. After correcting for group differences in baseline state anxiety, the reduction in anxiety was -7.3 score points (CI -9.0 to -5.6) in the auricular acupuncture group and -3.7 score points (CI -5.4 to -1.9) in the sham group (p = 0.008). CONCLUSION: Auricular acupuncture, a minimally invasive method, effectively reduces state anxiety before dental treatment. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Auricular acupuncture could be an option for patients scheduled for dental treatment, who experience an uncomfortable degree of anxiety and request an acute intervention for their anxiety.  
  Address Department of Special Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Austria, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. andrea.michalek-sauberer@meduniwien.ac.at.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 182  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Dental Anxiety
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 868  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Mitchell, P.; Wells, J. E. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Chronic Asthma: A Controlled Trial with Six Months Follow-Up Type of Study RCT
  Year 1989 Publication American journal of acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Am J Acupunct  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 5-13  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Standard Needling Depth  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 26 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 29  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 877  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Moy, I.; Milad, M. P.; Barnes, R.; Confino, E.; Kazer, R. R.; Zhang, X. url  openurl
  Title Randomized controlled trial: effects of acupuncture on pregnancy rates in women undergoing in vitro fertilization Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Fertility and sterility Abbreviated Journal Fertil Steril  
  Volume 95 Issue 2 Pages 583-587  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; In Vitro Fertilization; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Auricular Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Fertilization In Vitro; Acupuncture; Sham Acupoint Control; Pregnancy Rate; Women's Health;  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of “true” versus “sham” acupuncture on pregnancy rates (PRs) in women undergoing IVF. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial, double-blinded with independent observer. SETTING: Academic infertility clinic. PATIENT(S): One hundred sixty patients &lt;38 years old undergoing IVF with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection. INTERVENTION(S): Subjects were randomly allocated to the true or sham group and underwent acupuncture 25 minutes before and after ET. Subjects completed a McGill Pain Questionnaire regarding their clinical symptoms during ET. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Clinical PR and clinical symptoms during ET. RESULT(S): While the overall clinical PR was 51.25%, there was no significant difference between the arms of the study (true = 45.3% vs. sham = 52.7%); 33.1% of the patients had ultrasound-documented singleton pregnancy, and 15% of patients had twin gestations, while one patient in the true arm had a triplet gestation. There were significant differences in the subjective, affective, and total pain experience between both arms. The subjects in the true arm described their acupuncture session as being more “tiring” and “fearful” and experienced more “achiness” compared with their sham counterparts. CONCLUSION(S): There was no statistically significant difference in the clinical or chemical PRs between both groups. Patients undergoing true acupuncture had differing sensory experiences compared with patients in the sham arm. There were no significant adverse effects observed during the study, suggesting that acupuncture is safe for women undergoing ET.  
  Address Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. imoy004@md.northwestern.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up 6 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 160  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 890  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Otto, K. C.; Quinn, C.; Sung, Y. F. url  openurl
  Title Auricular acupuncture as an adjunctive treatment for cocaine addiction. A pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal Am J Addict  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 164-170  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Substance-Related Disorders; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Group Acupuncture Style; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract The authors conducted a single-blind study of auricular acupuncture in 36 cocaine-dependent inpatient veterans on a substance abuse treatment unit to determine whether the treatment could help reduce craving, increase treatment retention, and prevent relapse. Acupuncture was given on a predetermined schedule to both treatment and control groups, with status assessed regularly by independent, blinded raters. The study failed to show a significant difference between treatment and control groups. However, the study patients, as a whole, did remain in treatment longer than a retrospectively analyzed group who received no acupuncture  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Cocaine-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 921  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: