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Author Birch, S.; Jamison, R. N. url  openurl
  Title Controlled trial of Japanese acupuncture for chronic myofascial neck pain: assessment of specific and nonspecific effects of treatment Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication The Clinical journal of pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages 248-255  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Ion Pumping Cords; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Neck Pain; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Heat Lamp  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This article examines the specific and nonspecific effects of Japanese acupuncture on chronic myofascial neck pain in a randomized single-blind trial. DESIGN: Forty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive relevant acupuncture, irrelevant acupuncture, or no-acupuncture control treatment consisting of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication. The two acupuncture groups underwent comparable light shallow needling. The irrelevant acupuncture group received acupuncture at specific sites not relevant for cervical pain. OUTCOME MEASURES: The study measures included the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (SF-MPQ), the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), medication diary, and physiologic measures. The factors examined as predictors of outcome pain ratings were experience with, beliefs about, and knowledge of acupuncture before treatment; perceived efficacy, credibility, and logic of acupuncture; perceived competence of the acupuncturist; and painfulness of acupuncture. RESULTS: No differences were found among the three groups at baseline, except that the relevant acupuncture group reported having had more previous acupuncture treatments. No significant differences in terms of perceived credibility or perceived effectiveness of treatment were found between the two acupuncture groups. The relevant acupuncture group had significantly greater pre-/posttreatment differences in pain than the irrelevant acupuncture and control groups (p < .05). The nonspecific effects of confidence in the acupuncturist, willingness to try any treatment, mood, and physiologic effect of needling were not predictive of treatment outcome, whereas confidence in the treatment and past experiences with acupuncture did correlate significantly with a decrease in pain. CONCLUSIONS: Relevant acupuncture with heat contributes to modest pain reduction in persons with myofascial neck pain. Previous experience with and confidence in treatment help to predict benefit. Measurement of nonspecific effects of alternative therapy is recommended in future clinical trials  
  Address Anglo-Dutch Institute of Oriental Medicine, IJmuiden, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 46  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 58  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 75  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Otto, K. C.; Quinn, C.; Sung, Y. F. url  openurl
  Title Auricular acupuncture as an adjunctive treatment for cocaine addiction. A pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal Am J Addict  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 164-170  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Substance-Related Disorders; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Group Acupuncture Style; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract The authors conducted a single-blind study of auricular acupuncture in 36 cocaine-dependent inpatient veterans on a substance abuse treatment unit to determine whether the treatment could help reduce craving, increase treatment retention, and prevent relapse. Acupuncture was given on a predetermined schedule to both treatment and control groups, with status assessed regularly by independent, blinded raters. The study failed to show a significant difference between treatment and control groups. However, the study patients, as a whole, did remain in treatment longer than a retrospectively analyzed group who received no acupuncture  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Cocaine-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 921  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Washburn, A. M.; Fullilove, R. E.; Fullilove, M. T.; Keenan, P. A.; McGee, B.; Morris, K. A.; Sorensen, J. L.; Clark, W. W. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture heroin detoxification: a single-blind clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 1993 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Subst Abuse Treat  
  Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages 345-351  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupuncture; Detoxification; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Substance-Related Disorders; Heroin Dependence; Group Acupuncture Style; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract The increasing prevalence of HIV infection among injection drug users mandates the development of innovative treatments. While extensive clinical experience suggests that acupuncture detoxification is both safe and acceptable to those in withdrawal, little research has been conducted to assess its efficacy as a treatment modality. In this first controlled study of acupuncture heroin detoxification, 100 addicted persons were randomly assigned, in a single-blind design, to the standard auricular acupuncture treatment used for addiction or to a “sham” treatment that used points that were geographically close to the standard points. Attrition was high for both groups, but subjects assigned to the standard treatment attended the acupuncture clinic more days and stayed in treatment longer than those assigned to the sham condition. Additionally, attendance varied inversely with self-reports of frequency of drug use, suggesting that those with lighter habits found the treatment modality more helpful. Limitations of the study are discussed  
  Address University of California, San Francisco  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Heroin Dependence
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1276  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dias, P. L.; Subramaniam, S.; Lionel, N. D. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture in bronchial asthma: preliminary communication Type of Study RCT
  Year 1982 Publication Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine Abbreviated Journal J R Soc Med  
  Volume 75 Issue 4 Pages 245-248  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Bronchial Asthma; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Peak Expiratory Flow Rate; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Twenty patients randomly assigned to an experimental and a control group participated in a double blind study to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in bronchial asthma, using the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) as an index of bronchial patency. All patients in the control group showed a significant improvement in their PEFR while only 3 patients in the treated group showed an improvement. A subjective improvement and a reduction in drug dosages were observed in both groups. It is concluded that acupuncture has a placebo effect in bronchial asthma  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 7  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 20  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 243  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Godfrey, C. M.; Morgan, P. url  openurl
  Title A controlled trial of the theory of acupuncture in musculoskeletal pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 1978 Publication The Journal of rheumatology Abbreviated Journal J Rheumatol  
  Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 121-124  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Bursitis; Neck Pain; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Low Back Pain; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Osteoarthritis; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tennis Elbow; Myofascial Pain Syndromes  
  Abstract We carried out a randomized trail compraing acupuncture done in theoretically correct [appropriate] and incorrect [inappropirate] locations for chronic musculoskeletal pains in various sites. Throughout the trial, neither the patient, nor the assessor, nor the acupuncturist, knew if the site of the acupuncture was appropriate to the patient's symptoms according to acupuncture theory. Although 60% had reduced pain after three treatments, there was no significant difference between the treatments. Our findings, while not disproving the value of acupuncture, do not support the theory that certain specific points must be needled to relieve specific areas of pain  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 193  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 385  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chow, O. K.; So, S. Y.; Lam, W. K.; Yu, D. Y.; Yeung, C. Y. url  openurl
  Title Effect of acupuncture on exercise-induced asthma Type of Study RCT
  Year 1983 Publication Lung Abbreviated Journal Lung  
  Volume 161 Issue 6 Pages 321-326  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; AcuTrials; Asthma; Asthma, Exercise-Induced; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 16  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 189  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fung, K. P.; Chow, O. K.; So, S. Y. url  openurl
  Title Attenuation of exercise-induced asthma by acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 1986 Publication Lancet Abbreviated Journal Lancet  
  Volume 2 Issue 8521-22 Pages 1419-1422  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Asthma, Exercise-Induced; Cross-Over Design; Exercise; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Pediatrics; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract A prospective randomised single-blind study of the effects of real and sham acupuncture on exercise-induced asthma was conducted in nineteen children. Forced expiratory flow in 1st second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were measured throughout acupuncture and after treadmill exercise. Neither real nor sham acupuncture affected the basal bronchomotor tone but both, when applied 20 min before exercise, attenuated exercise induced asthma: mean maximum percentage falls in FEV1, FVC, and PEFR were 44.4%, 33.3%, and 49.5% without acupuncture; 23.8%, 15.8%, and 25.9% after real acupuncture; and 32.6%, 26.1%, and 34.3% after sham acupuncture. Real acupuncture provided better protection against exercise-induced asthma than did sham acupuncture (p less than 0.05)  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 19  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Asthma, Exercise-Induced
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 350  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schroeder, S.; Burnis, J.; Denton, A.; Krasnow, A.; Raghu, T.S.; Mathis, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture Therapy on Stress in a Large Urban College Population Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 165-170  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Stress, Psychological; Pilot; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Auricular Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control  
  Abstract This study is a randomized controlled clinical trial to study the effectiveness of acupuncture on the perception of stress in patients who study or work on a large, urban college campus. The hypothesis was that verum acupuncture would demonstrate a significant positive impact on perceived stress as compared to sham acupuncture. This study included 111 participants with high self-reported stress levels who either studied or worked at a large, urban public university in the southwestern United States. However, only 62 participants completed the study. The participants were randomized into a verum acupuncture or sham acupuncture group. Both the groups received treatment once a week for 12 weeks. The Cohen's global measure of perceived stress scale (PSS-14) was completed by each participant prior to treatment, at 6 weeks, at 12 weeks, and 6 weeks and 12 weeks post-treatment completion. While participants of both the groups showed a substantial initial decrease in perceived stress scores, at 12 weeks post treatment, the verum acupuncture group showed a significantly greater treatment effect than the sham acupuncture group. This study indicates that acupuncture may be successful in decreasing the perception of stress in students and staff at a large urban university, and this effect persists for at least 3 months after the completion of treatment.  
  Address Arizona State University, Health Services, Post-office Box 872104, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 111  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Stress, Psychological
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28712475 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2415  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tandon, M. K.; Soh, P. F. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of real and placebo acupuncture in histamine-induced asthma. A double-blind crossover study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1989 Publication Abbreviated Journal Chest  
  Volume 96 Issue 1 Pages 102-105  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Bronchial Asthma; Bronchial Hyperreactivity; Bronchial Provocation Tests; Cross-Over Design; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract A double-blind crossover study of the effects of real and placebo acupuncture on bronchial reactivity to histamine was carried out on 16 patients with moderately severe asthma. Treatment with real or placebo acupuncture failed to modulate the bronchial hyperreactivity to histamine. These results suggest that a single treatment with acupuncture is unlikely to provide improvement in the management of acute bronchial asthma  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 16  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1146  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Toosizadeh, N.; Lei, H.; Schwenk, M.; Sherman, S.J.; Sternberg, E.; Mohler, J.; Najafi, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does integrative medicine enhance balance in aging adults? Proof of concept for the benefit of electroacupuncture therapy in Parkinson's disease Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Gerontology  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 3-14  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Nervous System Diseases; Parkinson Disease; Parkinson's Disease; Pilot; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture + Other; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Postural balance and potentially fall risk increases among older adults living with neurological diseases, especially Parkinson's disease (PD). Since conventional therapies such as levodopa or deep brain stimulation may fail to alleviate or may even worsen balance, interest is growing in evaluating alternative PD therapies. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the current study was to assess improvement in postural balance in PD patients following electroacupuncture (EA) as an alternative therapy. METHODS: 15 aging adults (71.2 +/- 6.3 years) with idiopathic PD and 44 healthy age-matched participants (74.6 +/- 6.5 years) were recruited. The PD participants were randomly assigned (at a ratio of 2:1) to an intervention (n = 10) or to a control group (n = 5). The intervention group received a 30-min EA treatment on a weekly basis for 3 weeks, while the control group received a sham treatment. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after the final therapy. Measurements included balance assessment, specifically the ratio of medial-lateral (ML) center-of-gravity (COG) sway to anterior-posterior (AP) sway (COGML/AP) and ankle/hip sway during eyes-open, eyes-closed, and eyes-open dual-task trials, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), as well as quality of life, concerns for fall, and pain questionnaires. RESULTS: No difference was observed for the assessed parameters between the intervention and the control group at baseline. After treatment, an improvement in balance performance was observed in the intervention group. Compared with the healthy population, PD patients prior to treatment had larger COGML/AP sway with more dependency on upper-body movements for maintaining balance. Following EA therapy, COGML/AP sway was reduced by 31% and ankle/hip sway increased by 46% in the different conditions (p = 0.02 for the dual-task condition). The clinical rating revealed an overall improvement (p < 0.01) in mentation, behavior, and mood (UPDRS part I, 49%), activities of daily living (UPDRS part II, 46%), and motor examination (UPDRS part III, 40%). There was a significant reduction (p < 0.02) in the specific items regarding UPDRS fall status (67%) and rigidity (48%). Changes were small and nonsignificant in the controls (p > 0.29). CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrates improvement in rigidity and balance following EA. These preliminary results suggest EA could be a promising alternative treatment for balance disturbance in PD.  
  Address Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP) and Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA), Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz., USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 59  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1994  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, S. M.; Dezinno, P.; Lin, E. C.; Lin, H.; Yue, J. J.; Berman, M. R.; Braveman, F.; Kain, Z. N. url  openurl
  Title Auricular acupuncture as a treatment for pregnant women who have low back and posterior pelvic pain: a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication American journal of obstetrics and gynecology Abbreviated Journal Am J Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Pregnancy Complications; Women's Health; Pilot Study; Pain; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Ear Tacks; Auricular Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; No Treatment Control; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; AcuTrials; Pelvic Pain  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to examine whether 1 week of continuous auricular acupuncture could reduce low back and posterior pelvic pain associated with pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial was conducted on pregnant women who have lower back and posterior pelvic pain. These women were randomly assigned into an acupuncture group, a sham acupuncture group, or a waiting list control group. All participants were monitored for 2 weeks. RESULTS: Baseline and day 7 showed significant group differences in pain (F = 15; P < .0001) and in the disability rating index score (F = 7; P < .0001). The participants in the acupuncture group reported a significant reduction of pain and improvement of functional status as compared with those in the sham acupuncture and control groups. CONCLUSION: One week of continuous auricular acupuncture decreases the pain and disability experienced by women with pregnancy-related low back and posterior pelvic pain  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, University of California School of Medicine, Irvine, CA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency N/A Number of Participants 159  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Pelvic Pain
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1256  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stavem, K.; Rossberg, E.; Larsson, P. G. url  openurl
  Title Health-related quality of life outcomes in a trial of acupuncture, sham acupuncture and conventional treatment for chronic sinusitis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal BMC Res Notes  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 37-  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Sinusitis; Respiratory Tract Diseases  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is commonly used to treat chronic sinusitis, though there is little documentation on the effect. This study presents the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes in a trial comparing traditional Chinese acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and conventional treatment for chronic sinusitis. FINDINGS: In a three-armed single blind randomized controlled study, we recruited 65 patients with symptoms of sinusitis >3 months and signs of sinusitis on computed tomography (CT). Patients were randomized to one of three study arms: (1) 2-4 weeks of medication with antibiotics, corticosteroids, 0.9 % sodium chloride solution, and local decongestants (n=21), (2) ten treatments with traditional Chinese acupuncture (n=25), or (3) ten treatments with minimal acupuncture at non-acupoints (n=19). Change in HRQoL was assessed over 12 weeks using the Chronic Sinusitis Survey (CSS) and Short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaires. In the study, we found only a non-significant difference on the CSS symptom scale between conventional medical therapy and traditional Chinese acupuncture. On the SF-36 scale role-physical the change was larger in the conventional group than in the sham group (p=0.02), and on the mental health scale the change in the conventional therapy arm was larger than in the traditional Chinese acupuncture group (p=0.03). There was no difference in effect on HRQoL on any scale between the sham and traditional Chinese acupuncture groups. CONCLUSIONS: There was no clear evidence of the superiority of one treatment over another on short-term HRQoL outcomes, although there was a statistically non-significant advantage of conventional therapy in a few dimensions  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 66  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Sinusitis
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1100  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alecrim-Andrade, J.; Maciel-Junior, J. A.; Carne, X.; Vasconcelos, G. M.S.; Correa-Filho, H. R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in migraine prevention: a randomized sham controlled study with 6-months posttreatment follow-up Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication The Clinical journal of pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages 98-105  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Analgesia; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Migraine; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of acupuncture in migraine prophylaxis. METHODS: Thirty-seven patients with migraine were enrolled in a randomized control trial at the Headache clinic located in a University Hospital. Real and sham acupuncture groups received 16 acupuncture sessions over 3 months. Treatment was individualized in the real acupuncture group and minimal acupuncture was used in the sham group. The primary end point was the percentage of patients with a >or=50% reduction in their migraine attack frequency in the second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth (months) compared with the first one (baseline period). Primary and secondary end points were measured comparing headache diaries. RESULTS: Real acupuncture group showed improvement with significant differences compared with the sham acupuncture group in the primary efficacy end point (P=0.021) at the second month of the treatment. Differences also appeared in 2 secondary end points: number of days with migraine per month (P=0.007) in the second month and the percentage of patients with >or=40% reduction in migraine attack frequency in the first (P=0.044) and second months (P=0.004) of the treatment. These differences disappeared in the third (last) month of the treatment as a consequence of the high improvement of the sham acupuncture group. Comparisons within each group showed that several migraine parameters evaluated improved significantly in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Individualized treatment based on traditional Chinese medicine plays a role in preventing migraine attacks. Nevertheless, sham acupuncture had similar effects. Major conclusions were limited by the small sample sizes however the observed trends may contribute to design future trials  
  Address Department of Medicine, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain. jalecrim@uol.com.br  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 37  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 12  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chu, K. A.; Wu, Y. C.; Ting, Y. M.; Wang, H. C.; Lu, J. Y. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture therapy results in immediate bronchodilating effect in asthma patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of the Chinese Medical Association : JCMA Abbreviated Journal J Chin Med Assoc  
  Volume 70 Issue 7 Pages 265-268  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Cross-Over Design; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Background: According to previous data on asthma in the English literature, there are some results that show encouraging effects of acupuncture improving pulmonary function in asthma patients. We designed a prospective randomized crossover controlled study to determine the efficacy of acupuncture in asthma patients. Methods: Eighteen asthma patients with bronchodilator response >20% improvement of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were initially randomly assigned to receive 1 performance of real acupuncture (RA) or sham acupuncture (SA) in a blinded manner. After a washout period, the patients were crossed over. Spirometry was done and recorded before and after acupuncture. Results: Sixteen of 18 patients completed the study. The mean (+/-SD) FEV1 values before and after RA were 1.52 +/- 0.45L and 1.67 +/- 0.40L, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean (+/-SD) FEV1 values before and after SA were 1.49 +/- 0.40L and 1.49 +/- 0.41L, respectively (p = 0.838, not significant). The percentage change in FEV1 values after RA was better than after SA (RA, 11.57 +/- 8.11%; SA, 0.32 +/- 7.76%; p = 0.003), while the bronchodilator response of FEV1 from simple inhalation bronchodilator was better than that for RA (p < 0.001). Conclusion: In asthma patients, acupuncture treatment may result in immediate improvement of FEV1, but the degree of improvement is less than that from inhalation bronchodilator  
  Address Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 18  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 193  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Karst, M.; Winterhalter, M.; Munte, S.; Francki, B.; Hondronikos, A.; Eckardt, A.; Hoy, L.; Buhck, H.; Bernateck, M.; Fink, M. url  openurl
  Title Auricular acupuncture for dental anxiety: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Current researches in anesthesia & analgesia Abbreviated Journal Curr Res Anesth Analg  
  Volume 104 Issue 2 Pages 295-300  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Anxiety; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Mental Disorders; No Treatment Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Psychological Disorders; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tooth Extraction  
  Abstract Auricular acupuncture can be an effective treatment for acute anxiety, but there is a lack of direct comparisons of acupuncture to proven standard drug treatments. In this study we compared the efficacy of auricular acupuncture with intranasal midazolam, placebo acupuncture, and no treatment for reducing dental anxiety. Patients having dental extractions (n = 67) were randomized to (i) auricular acupuncture, (ii) placebo acupuncture, and (iii) intranasal midazolam and compared with a no treatment group. Anxiety was assessed before the interventions, at 30 min, and after the dental extraction. Physiological variables were assessed continuously. With the no treatment group as control, the auricular acupuncture group, and the midazolam group were significantly less anxious at 30 min as compared with patients in the placebo acupuncture group (Spielberger Stait-Trait Anxiety Inventory X1, P = 0.012 and <0.001, respectively). In addition, patient compliance assessed by the dentist was significantly improved if auricular acupuncture or application of intranasal midazolam had been performed (P = 0.032 and 0.049, respectively). In conclusion, both, auricular acupuncture and intranasal midazolam were similarly effective for the treatment of dental anxiety  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Clinic, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. karst.matthias@mh-hannover.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 67  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Dental Anxiety
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 86  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 557  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allen, J. J.; Schnyer, R. N.; Chambers, A. S.; Hitt, S. K.; Moreno, F. A.; Manber, R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for depression: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication The Journal of clinical psychiatry Abbreviated Journal J Clin Psychiatry  
  Volume 67 Issue 11 Pages 1665-1673  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Wait-List Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of acupuncture as an intervention for major depressive disorder (MDD). METHOD: Acupuncture was examined in 151 patients with MDD (DSM-IV) who were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. The specific intervention involved Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)-style acupuncture with manual stimulation for depression; the control conditions consisted of (1) a nonspecific intervention using a comparable number of legitimate acupuncture points not specifically targeted to depressive symptoms and (2) a waitlist condition, which involved waiting without intervention for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, all patients received the depression-specific acupuncture. Each 8-week intervention regimen consisted of 12 acupuncture sessions delivered in an acupuncturist's office in the community. The primary outcome measure was the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. The study was conducted from February 1998 to April 2002. RESULTS: Twenty patients terminated treatment before the completion of the 8-week intervention (13%) but not differentially by study group. Random regression models of the intent-to-treat sample revealed that although patients receiving acupuncture improved more than those awaiting intervention, no evidence of differential efficacy of the depression-specific over nonspecific intervention was found. Response rates in acupuncture-treated patients were relatively low after 8 weeks (22% and 39% for specific and nonspecific intervention groups, respectively), with the response rate after the entire 16-week trial reaching 50%. CONCLUSION: Although TCM manual acupuncture is a well-tolerated intervention, results fail to support its efficacy as a monotherapy for MDD. It can't be ruled out that factors unique to the implementation of acupuncture in this research study may have limited the efficacy of interventions compared to those provided in naturalistic settings. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00010517  
  Address Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721-0068, USA. jallen@u.arizona.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 151  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 77  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 20  
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Author Alecrim-Andrade, J.; iel-Junior, J.; Cladellas, X.; Correa-Filho, H.; Machado, H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in migraine prophylaxis: a randomized sham-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 520-529  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Penetrating Sham; Migraine; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract The purpose of the present trial was to evaluate semi-standardized acupuncture efficacy in migraine prophylaxis. Twenty-eight subjects with migraine were randomized to the real or sham acupuncture groups. Semi-standardized and standardized minimal acupuncture were used, respectively, in the two groups of patients. They were all treated with 16 acupuncture sessions in 12 weeks. Both groups exhibited similar reductions in: percentage of patients with reduction of migraine >/= 40% and >/= 50% regarding frequency of migraine attacks, days with migraine, frequency of migraine attacks, average duration of a migraine attack, rate of rescue medication used, average headache severity rate and other parameters compared with the baseline period. Associated symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting, also showed equal estimates in both groups. These findings showed that semi-standardized acupuncture shows no difference from sham acupuncture in preventing migraine attacks  
  Address Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Medicina Interna, Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 28  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 77  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 11  
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Author Dieterle, S.; Ying, G.; Hatzmann, W.; Neuer, A. url  openurl
  Title Effect of acupuncture on the outcome of in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection: a randomized, prospective, controlled clinical study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Fertility and sterility Abbreviated Journal Fertil Steril  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Ear Seeds; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; In Vitro Fertilization; Infertility, Female; Penetrating Sham; IVF; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fertilization In Vitro  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of luteal-phase acupuncture on the outcome of IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). DESIGN: Randomized, prospective, controlled clinical study. SETTING: University IVF center. PATIENT(S): Two hundred twenty-five infertile patients undergoing IVF/ICSI. INTERVENTION(S): In group I, 116 patients received luteal-phase acupuncture according to the principles of traditional Chinese medicine. In group II, 109 patients received placebo acupuncture. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates. RESULT(S): In group I, the clinical pregnancy rate and ongoing pregnancy rate (33.6% and 28.4%, respectively) were significantly higher than in group II (15.6% and 13.8%). CONCLUSION(S): Luteal-phase acupuncture has a positive effect on the outcome of IVF/ICSI  
  Address Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Witten/Herdecke, Dortmund, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up 36 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 225  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score 70  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 247  
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Author Assefi, N. P.; Sherman, K. J.; Jacobsen, C.; Goldberg, J.; Smith, W. R.; Buchwald, D. url  openurl
  Title A randomized clinical trial of acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture in fibromyalgia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Annals of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume 143 Issue 1 Pages 10-19  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Adverse Effects; Fibromyalgia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain condition for which patients frequently use acupuncture. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether acupuncture relieves pain in fibromyalgia. DESIGN: Randomized, sham-controlled trial in which participants, data collection staff, and data analysts were blinded to treatment group. SETTING: Private acupuncture offices in the greater Seattle, Washington, metropolitan area. PATIENTS: 100 adults with fibromyalgia. INTERVENTION: Twice-weekly treatment for 12 weeks with an acupuncture program that was specifically designed to treat fibromyalgia, or 1 of 3 sham acupuncture treatments: acupuncture for an unrelated condition, needle insertion at nonacupoint locations, or noninsertive simulated acupuncture. MEASUREMENTS: The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by a 10-cm visual analogue scale ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain ever). Measurements were obtained at baseline; 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment; and 3 and 6 months after completion of treatment. Participant blinding and adverse effects were ascertained by self-report. The primary outcomes were evaluated by pooling the 3 sham-control groups and comparing them with the group that received acupuncture to treat fibromyalgia. RESULTS: The mean subjective pain rating among patients who received acupuncture for fibromyalgia did not differ from that in the pooled sham acupuncture group (mean between-group difference, 0.5 cm [95% CI, -0.3 cm to 1.2 cm]). Participant blinding was adequate throughout the trial, and no serious adverse effects were noted. LIMITATIONS: A prescription of acupuncture at fixed points may differ from acupuncture administered in clinical settings, in which therapy is individualized and often combined with herbal supplementation and other adjunctive measures. A usual-care comparison group was not studied. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture was no better than sham acupuncture at relieving pain in fibromyalgia  
  Address The Group Health Cooperative Center for Health Studies, and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Fibromyalgia
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score 88  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 42  
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Author Emmons, S. L.; Otto, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for overactive bladder: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Obstetrics and gynecology Abbreviated Journal Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages 138-143  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urinary Bladder, Overactive; Urologic Diseases; Women's Health; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Urgency; Urinary Frequency  
  Abstract Objective: To compare acupuncture treatment for overactive bladder with urge incontinence with a placebo acupuncture treatment. Methods: Eighty-five women enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Women were randomly assigned to either receive an acupuncture treatment expected to improve their bladder symptoms, or a placebo acupuncture treatment designed to promote relaxation. They underwent cystometric testing, completed a 3-day voiding diary, and completed the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire, validated quality-of-life inventories, before and after 4 weekly acupuncture treatments. The primary endpoint was number of incontinent episodes over 3 days. Secondary endpoints included voiding frequency and urgency, cystometric bladder capacity, maximum voided volume, and the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire symptom scores. Results: Seventy-four women completed all aspects of the study. Women in both treatment and placebo groups had significant decreases in number of incontinent episodes (59% for treatment, 40% for placebo) without a significant difference in the change between the groups. Women in the treatment group had a 14% reduction in urinary frequency (P = .013), a 30% reduction in the proportion of voids associated with urgency (P = .016), and a 13% increase in both maximum voided volume and maximum cystometric capacity (P = .01). Both groups also had an improvement in the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire scores (54% decrease for treatment, 30% decrease for placebo, P < .001 for the difference in change between the groups). Conclusion: Women who received 4 weekly bladder-specific acupuncture treatments had significant improvements in bladder capacity, urgency, frequency, and quality-of-life scores as compared with women who received placebo acupuncture treatments. Level of Evidence: I  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; and Providence Continence Center, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 74  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Urinary Bladder, Overactive
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 289  
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