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Author (up) Cheong, K.B.; Zhang, J.-ping; Huang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effectiveness of acupuncture in postoperative gastroparesis syndrome--a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 767-786  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Gastroparesis -- Therapy; Postoperative Complications -- Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Adult; Aged; Cochrane Library; Female; Gastroparesis -- Epidemiology; Human; Male; Meta Analysis; Middle Age; Postoperative Complications -- Epidemiology; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; PubMed; Systematic Review; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Postoperative gastroparesis syndrome (PGS) which is mainly manifested as delayed gastric emptying is often caused by upper abdominal and sometimes lower abdominal surgery. In view of the side effects of drugs therapy, the search of supplementary and alternative has been of increasing interest. OBJECTIVE: This paper included a systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of acupuncture and acupoints selection in PGS. Quality for meta-analysis was evaluated using GRADE while each trial was assessed with CONSORT and STRICTA for TCM. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with non-acupuncture treatment were identified from databases PubMed, EBSCO, Ovid, Cochrane, CNKI and Wanfangdata. Meta-analysis on eligible studies was performed using fixed-effects model with RevMan 5.2. Results were expressed as relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data, and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. RESULTS: Of the 348 studies reviewed, 16 RCTs met the inclusion criteria for review while 7 RCTs, 188 patients (intervention) and 182 patients (control) met the criteria for meta-analysis. Both acupuncture and acupuncture combined with medication showed significant higher total effective rate than control (usual care/medication); with (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13, 1.44; P<0.0001) and (RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.18, 1.58; P<0.0001) respectively. All included RCTs reported positive effect of acupuncture in PGS treatment. ST36, CV12 and PC6 seemed to be the common acupoints selected. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested acupuncture might be effective to improve PGS, however, a definite conclusion could not be drawn due to low quality of trials. Further large-scale, high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed to validate this. STUDY REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42013005485.  
  Address School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong, China. Electronic address: nanfanglihuang@163.com.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103848872. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103848872 Serial 2374  
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Author (up) Chien, T.-J.; Liu, C.-Y.; Chang, Y.-F.; Fang, C.-J.; Hsu, C.-H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Treating Aromatase Inhibitor-Related Arthralgia in Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 251-260  
  Keywords CLINICAL trials -- Evaluation; RESEARCH methodology evaluation; ARTHRALGIA -- Treatment; ALTERNATIVE medicine; BREAST tumors; CHI-squared test; CINAHL (Information retrieval system); CONFIDENCE intervals; Cytokines; EXPERIMENTAL design; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; PHYSICAL therapy; PROBABILITY theory; WOMEN -- Health; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; PAIN measurement; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; Postmenopause; AROMATASE inhibitors; DATA analysis -- Software; FUNCTIONAL assessment; Arthralgia; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ACUPUNCTURE analgesia; Evaluation; Taiwan  
  Abstract Purpose: Acupuncture has been used as a complementary medical treatment for arthralgia and other types of pain. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of arthralgia in patients with breast cancer who were treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Methods: A literature search was performed, without language restrictions, of 10 databases from their inception through February 2014. The literature reviewed included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and clinical trials that compared real versus sham acupuncture for the treatment of AI-related musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS). The methodologic quality of these trials was assessed by using the modified Jadad Quality Scale. Meta-analytic software (RevMan 5.0) was used to analyze the data. Results: Five To compare the effects of real versus sham acupuncture, five RCTs were assessed by meta-analysis and quality analysis. Three of the RCTs reported favorable effects with regard to use of acupuncture in reducing pain and joint-related symptoms, while the other two RCTs did not. The meta-analysis showed trends toward reduced pain and stiffness in patients given acupuncture compared with those who received sham treatment ( n=82; pain, mean difference: ?2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), ?4.72 to 0.57]; p=0.12; stiffness, mean difference: ?86.10 [95% CI, ?249.11 to 76.92]; p=0.30), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture has been reported as a safe and promising treatment for AIMSS, but the present analysis indicated that the effects were not statistically significant. Other outcome measurements, such as imaging studies, would be worth including in future studies to further confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in AIMSS.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 102579991; Source Information: May2015, Vol. 21 Issue 5, p251; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials -- Evaluation; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: ARTHRALGIA -- Treatment; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: BREAST tumors; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CINAHL (Information retrieval system); Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: CYTOKINES; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: PHYSICAL therapy; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: PAIN measurement; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: POSTMENOPAUSE; Subject Term: AROMATASE inhibitors; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: FUNCTIONAL assessment; Subject Term: ARTHRALGIA; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE analgesia; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: TAIWAN; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2265  
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Author (up) Chien, T.-J.; Liu, C.-Y.; Chang, Y.-F.; Fang, C.-J.; Hsu, C.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Treating Aromatase Inhibitor-Related Arthralgia in Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 251-260  
  Keywords Breast Neoplasms -- Drug Therapy; Aromatase Inhibitors -- Adverse Effects; Arthralgia -- Therapy; Acupuncture Analgesia; Human; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Taiwan; Female; Women's Health; Alternative Therapies; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Clinical Trials -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Arthralgia -- Etiology; Arthralgia -- Chemically Induced; Medline; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; CINAHL Database; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; Checklists; Postmenopause; Pain Measurement -- Methods; Functional Assessment; Cytokines -- Blood; Confidence Intervals; P-Value; Chi Square Test; Descriptive Statistics; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract Purpose: Acupuncture has been used as a complementary medical treatment for arthralgia and other types of pain. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of arthralgia in patients with breast cancer who were treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Methods: A literature search was performed, without language restrictions, of 10 databases from their inception through February 2014. The literature reviewed included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and clinical trials that compared real versus sham acupuncture for the treatment of AI-related musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS). The methodologic quality of these trials was assessed by using the modified Jadad Quality Scale. Meta-analytic software (RevMan 5.0) was used to analyze the data. Results: Five To compare the effects of real versus sham acupuncture, five RCTs were assessed by meta-analysis and quality analysis. Three of the RCTs reported favorable effects with regard to use of acupuncture in reducing pain and joint-related symptoms, while the other two RCTs did not. The meta-analysis showed trends toward reduced pain and stiffness in patients given acupuncture compared with those who received sham treatment ( n=82; pain, mean difference: ?2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), ?4.72 to 0.57]; p=0.12; stiffness, mean difference: ?86.10 [95% CI, ?249.11 to 76.92]; p=0.30), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture has been reported as a safe and promising treatment for AIMSS, but the present analysis indicated that the effects were not statistically significant. Other outcome measurements, such as imaging studies, would be worth including in future studies to further confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in AIMSS.  
  Address Medical Library, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103798719. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150512. Revision Date: 20160502. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care; Pain and Pain Management; Women's Health. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale [modified]. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103798719 Serial 2307  
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Author (up) Gadau, M.; Zhang, S.-P.; Yip, H.-Y.; Yeung, W.-F.; Bian, Z.-X.; Lu, A.-P.; Zaslawski, C. url  openurl
  Title Pattern Differentiation of Lateral Elbow Pain in Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 22 Issue 11 Pages 921-935  
  Keywords TENNIS elbow -- Treatment; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; CHINESE medicine; Medline; ONLINE information services; RESEARCH -- Finance; TENNIS elbow; Textbooks; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; AMED (Information retrieval system); Symptoms  
  Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that acupuncture is beneficial to patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), but the mechanism underlying its therapeutic effects remains unclear. To identify the mechanism by which acupuncture treats CD, the balance between Th17 and Treg cells was assessed in CD patients. In this study, Ninety-two CD patients were randomly and equally assigned to a treatment group that were treated with herb-partitioned moxibustion and acupuncture or a control group with wheat bran-partitioned moxibustion and superficial acupuncture. The effect of these treatments on Th17 and Treg cells and their related molecular markers in the intestinal mucosa were detected before (week 0) and after (week 12) treatment. The results suggested that the ratio of Th17 and Treg cells was significantly decreased after treatment and that the levels of IL-17 and ROR?t in the intestinal mucosa were obviously reduced, while the expression of FOXP3 was increased after treatment in both groups. In the treatment group, the expression of these molecules was more markedly regulated than the control group. In conclusion, moxibustion and acupuncture have been shown to regulate the ratio of Th17 and Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients and restore the balance between these immune cell subsets.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 119498026; Source Information: Nov2016, Vol. 22 Issue 11, p921; Subject Term: TENNIS elbow -- Treatment; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: CHINESE medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: TENNIS elbow; Subject Term: TEXTBOOKS; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: AMED (Information retrieval system); Subject Term: SYMPTOMS; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 15p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2286  
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Author (up) Jakes, D.; Kirk, R.; Muir, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Qualitative Systematic Review of Patients' Experiences of Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages 663-671  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Patient Attitudes; Health Beliefs; Human; New Zealand; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Qualitative Studies -- Evaluation; Alternative Therapies; CINAHL Database; PubMed; Medline; Psycinfo; Quantitative Studies -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Scales; Thematic Analysis; Decision Making, Patient; Treatment Outcomes; Descriptive Statistics; Validity; Patient Satisfaction; Educational Status; Diagnosis -- Methods; Health Care Delivery; Communication; Professional-Patient Relations; Sensation; Quality of Life  
  Abstract Objectives: To present the results of a systematic review of studies on acupuncture patients' health beliefs and treatment experiences. Search strategy: The search was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, and PsychINFO for qualitative and mixed-methods studies expressing the voice of acupuncture patients. Reference lists of relevant articles were also searched. The review was restricted to studies published in English. Data collection and analysis: Study selection, quality appraisal, and data extraction were performed sequentially. Quality was appraised using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument, and the Dedoose mixed methods tool was used in data management and analysis. Results: Four overarching themes were identified: reasons for using acupuncture, treatment experiences, treatment outcomes, and therapeutic model. Conclusions: Patients' reasons for using acupuncture are diverse and include dissatisfaction with conventional medicine and attraction to holistic and empowering models of healthcare. Treatment is thought to relieve symptoms of the presenting concern and a range of other effects that improve well-being. This review highlights the need to improve understanding of patients' health-seeking behaviors and how individually meaningful treatment outcomes may be understood and assessed, particularly within complementary and alternative medicine.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103889722. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140909. Revision Date: 20150901. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103889722 Serial 2348  
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Author (up) Jing-Yu Tan; Molassiotis, A.; Tao Wang; Suen, L.K.P. url  openurl
  Title Adverse Events of Auricular Therapy: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Acupuncture, Ear -- Adverse Effects; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; Psycinfo; AMED Database; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Human  
  Abstract  
  Address The Second Affiliated People's Hospital, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 13 Hudong Road, Gulou District, Fuzhou 350003, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876630. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876630 Serial 2397  
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Author (up) Langevin, H.M.; Schnyer, R.; MacPherson, H.; Davis, R.; Harris, R.E.; Napadow, V.; Wayne, P.M.; Milley, R.J.; Lao, L.; Stener-Victorin, E.; Kong, J.-T.; Hammerschlag, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Manual and Electrical Needle Stimulation in Acupuncture Research: Pitfalls and Challenges of Heterogeneity Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 113-128  
  Keywords Research, Alternative Therapies; Electroacupuncture; Acupuncture; Research Methodology; Study Design; Alternative Therapies; Acupuncture -- Methods; Time Factors; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Treatment Outcomes; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Human; Medline; PubMed; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Systematic Review -- Evaluation; Meta Analysis -- Evaluation; Decision Making, Clinical  
  Abstract In the field of acupuncture research there is an implicit yet unexplored assumption that the evidence on manual and electrical stimulation techniques, derived from basic science studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, is generally interchangeable. Such interchangeability would justify a bidirectional approach to acupuncture research, where basic science studies and clinical trials each inform the other. This article examines the validity of this fundamental assumption by critically reviewing the literature and comparing manual to electrical acupuncture in basic science studies, clinical trials, and meta-analyses. The evidence from this study does not support the assumption that these techniques are interchangeable. This article also identifies endemic methodologic limitations that have impaired progress in the field. For example, basic science studies have not matched the frequency and duration of manual needle stimulation to the frequency and duration of electrical stimulation. Further, most clinical trials purporting to compare the two types of stimulation have instead tested electroacupuncture as an adjunct to manual acupuncture. The current findings reveal fundamental gaps in the understanding of the mechanisms and relative effectiveness of manual versus electrical acupuncture. Finally, future research directions are suggested to better differentiate electrical from manual simulation, and implications for clinical practice are discussed.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford Medical School, Palo Alto, CA.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103772045. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150312. Revision Date: 20160229. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103772045 Serial 2335  
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Author (up) Levett, K.M.; Smith, C.A.; Dahlen, H.G.; Bensoussan, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour and birth: a critical narrative review of current systematic review evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 523-540  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Analgesia; Labor Pain -- Therapy; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Embase; Female; Human; Medline; Pregnancy; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; PubMed; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Reviews of maternity services highlight the need for a reduction of medical interventions for women with low risk pregnancies and births to prevent the potential cascade of interventions and their associated risks. Complementary medicines (CM) such as acupuncture and acupressure have claimed to be effective in reducing interventions in labour; however, systematic reviews of evidence to date are conflicting. AIMS: To examine current evidence from systematic reviews on the topic of acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour and birth, and to evaluate the methodological and treatment frameworks applied to this evidence. METHODS: A search limited to systematic reviews of the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane databases was performed in December 2013 using the keywords 'CAM', 'alternative medicine', 'complementary medicine', 'complementary therapies', 'traditional medicine', 'Chinese Medicine', 'Traditional Chinese Medicine', 'acupuncture', 'acupressure', cross-referenced with 'childbirth', 'birth', labo*r', and 'delivery'. The quality of the evidence is also evaluated in the context of study design. RESULTS: The RCTs included in these systematic reviews differed in terms of study designs, research questions, treatment protocols and outcome measures, and yielded some conflicting results. It may be inappropriate to include these together in a systematic review, or pooled analysis, of acupuncture for labour with an expectation of an overall conclusion for efficacy. Trials of acupuncture and acupressure in labour show promise, but further studies are required. CONCLUSION: The use of current systematic reviews of the evidence for acupuncture and acupressure for labour and birth may be misleading. Appropriate methods and outcome measures for investigation of acupuncture and acupressure treatment should more carefully reflect the research question being asked. The use of pragmatic trials designs with woman-centred outcomes may be appropriate for evaluating the effectiveness of these therapies.  
  Address National Institute for Complementary Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: A.Bensoussan@uws.edu.au.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103834125. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103834125 Serial 2353  
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Author (up) Liu, F.; Li, Z.-M.; Jiang, Y.-J.; Chen, L.-D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Meta-Analysis of Acupuncture Use in the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment After Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 535-544  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Cognition Disorders -- Therapy; Stroke -- Complications; Human; Alternative Therapies; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Cochrane Library; Neuropsychological Tests; Data Analysis Software; Odds Ratio; Linear Regression; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Male; Female; Adolescence; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Chi Square Test  
  Abstract Objective: This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on cognitive impairment (function) after a stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation were identified from databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Chinese Periodical Database, Wangfang Chinese Periodical Database, Chinese Bio-medicine Database, Cochrane Library, and Chinese medical literature databases) and two relevant journals ( Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion and the Journal of Shanghai Acupuncture and Moxibustion). Meta-analyses were conducted for the eligible RCTs. Results: Twenty-one trials with a total of 1421 patients met inclusion criteria. Pooled random-effects estimates of the change in the Mini-Mental State Examination were calculated for the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation. Following 4 weeks and 8 weeks of intervention with acupuncture, the merged mean difference was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.06-4.21; p<.00001) and 2.03 (95% CI, 0.26-3.80; p=0.02), respectively. For the comparison of 3-4 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the merged MD in Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination total scores was 5.63 (95% CI, 3.95-7.31; p<.00001). For the comparison of 8-12 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the P300 latency merged MD was ?12.80 (95% CI, ?21.08 to ?4.51; p<.00001), while the P300 amplitude merged MD was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p<.00001). Overall, the study quality was rated as moderate on the basis of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (part 2: 8.5). Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture had positive effects on cognitive function after stroke and supports the need for additional research on the potential benefits of this therapeutic approach.  
  Address Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103971838. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) (Folstein et al); Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination. Grant Information: This study was supported by the Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971838 Serial 2347  
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Author (up) Ma, C.; Sivamani, R.K. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as a Treatment Modality in Dermatology: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 21 Issue 9 Pages 520-529  
  Keywords RESEARCH methodology evaluation; FACE -- Physiology; SKIN diseases -- Treatment; Acupuncture; ALTERNATIVE medicine; ATOPIC dermatitis; BREAST diseases; CUTANEOUS manifestations of general diseases; Elasticity; EXPERIMENTAL design; Hyperhidrosis; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Itching; Medline; Melanosis; Rosacea; SKIN diseases; Urticaria; Warts; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation; California  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture is a form of Traditional Chinese Medicine that has been used to treat a broad range of medical conditions, including dermatologic disorders. This systematic review aims to synthesize the evidence on the use of acupuncture as a primary treatment modality for dermatologic conditions. Methods: A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register was performed. Studies were limited to clinical trials, controlled studies, case reports, comparative studies, and systematic reviews published in the English language. Studies involving moxibustion, electroacupuncture, or blood-letting were excluded. Results: Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Among these, 16 were randomized controlled trials, 6 were prospective observational studies, and 2 were case reports. Acupuncture was used to treat atopic dermatitis, urticaria, pruritus, acne, chloasma, neurodermatitis, dermatitis herpetiformis, hyperhidrosis, human papillomavirus wart, breast inflammation, and facial elasticity. In 17 of 24 studies, acupuncture showed statistically significant improvements in outcome measurements compared with placebo acupuncture, alternative treatment options, and no intervention. Conclusions: Acupuncture improves outcome measures in the treatment of dermatitis, chloasma, pruritus, urticaria, hyperhidrosis, and facial elasticity. Future studies should ideally be double-blinded and standardize the control intervention.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109251687; Source Information: Sep2015, Vol. 21 Issue 9, p520; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: FACE -- Physiology; Subject Term: SKIN diseases -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ATOPIC dermatitis; Subject Term: BREAST diseases; Subject Term: CUTANEOUS manifestations of general diseases; Subject Term: ELASTICITY; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: HYPERHIDROSIS; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: ITCHING; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: MELANOSIS; Subject Term: ROSACEA; Subject Term: SKIN diseases; Subject Term: URTICARIA; Subject Term: WARTS; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CALIFORNIA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 1 Chart; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2230  
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Author (up) Park, S.-W.; Yi, S.-H.; Lee, J.A.; Hwang, P.W.; Yoo, H.C.; Kang, K.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Spasticity After Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages 672-682  
  Keywords Stroke -- Complications; Muscle Spasticity -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Human; South Korea; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Treatment Outcomes; Cochrane Library; PubMed; CINAHL Database; Embase; Descriptive Statistics; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Measurement Issues and Assessments; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; H-Reflex; Motor Neurons  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for spasticity in patients with stroke. The available literature was reviewed in an effort to assess its efficacy in this situation. Methods: Randomized trials assessing the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of spasticity after stroke were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCO host, SCOPUS, CINAHL, EMBASE, Alternative Medicine Database, and Chinese and Korean medical literature databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, patient characteristics, and spasticity outcomes. Results: Eight trials with 399 patients met all the inclusion criteria. Compared with controls without acupuncture, acupuncture had no effect on improving clinical outcomes (as measured by validated instruments such as the Modified Ashworth Scale) or physiologic outcomes (assessed by measures such as the H-reflex/M-response [H/M] ratio at the end of the treatment period). H/M ratios did decrease significantly immediately after the first acupuncture treatment. Methodologic quality of all evaluated trials was considered inadequate. Conclusions: The effect of acupuncture for spasticity in patients with stroke remains uncertain, primarily because of the poor quality of the available studies. Larger and more methodologically sound trials are needed to definitively confirm or refute any effect of acupuncture as a treatment for spasticity after stroke.  
  Address Department of Motor & Cognitive Rehabilitation, Korea National Rehabilitation Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.; Kyungheesarang Oriental Medicine Clinic, Seoul, Korea.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103889719. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140909. Revision Date: 20150901. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This research was supported by a grant (08-B-02) from the Korea National Rehabilitation Center Research Institute.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103889719 Serial 2356  
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Author (up) Soyeon Cheon; Xiuyu Zhang; In-Seon Lee; Seung-Hun Cho; Younbyoung Chae; Hyangsook Lee url  openurl
  Title Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Neoplasms -- Therapy; Drug Administration -- Methods; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Herbal; Iatrogenic Disease -- Therapy; Neoplasms -- Complications; Human; South Korea; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Alternative Therapies; Funding Source; Treatment Outcomes; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Descriptive Statistics; Nausea and Vomiting -- Therapy; Meta Analysis; Chemotherapy, Cancer -- Adverse Effects; Statistical Significance; Odds Ratio; Confidence Intervals; Cancer Pain -- Prevention and Control; Hiccup -- Prevention and Control; Fever -- Prevention and Control; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; CINAHL Database; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Graphics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; P-Value; Intestinal Obstruction; Gastrointestinal System -- Pathology  
  Abstract  
  Address Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Kyung Hee Dae-ro 26, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876834. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. Grant Information: This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korean government (Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning) (no. 2013R1A6A6029251) and a Grant from the National R & D Program for Cancer Control, Ministry for Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (1020330).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876834 Serial 2404  
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Author (up) Wang, Y.-Y.; Li, X.-X.; Liu, J.-P.; Luo, H.; Ma, L.-X.; Alraek, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traditional Chinese medicine for chronic fatigue syndrome: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 826-833  
  Keywords Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic -- Therapy; Medicine, Chinese Traditional -- Methods; Acupuncture; Clinical Trials; Drugs, Chinese Herbal -- Therapeutic Use; Human; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Quality of Life; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is no curative treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is widely used in the treatment of CFS in China. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TCM for CFS. METHODS: The protocol of this review is registered at PROSPERO. We searched six main databases for randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on TCM for CFS from their inception to September 2013. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality. We used RevMan 5.1 to synthesize the results. RESULTS: 23 RCTs involving 1776 participants were identified. The risk of bias of the included studies was high. The types of TCM interventions varied, including Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, qigong, moxibustion, and acupoint application. The results of meta-analyses and several individual studies showed that TCM alone or in combination with other interventions significantly alleviated fatigue symptoms as measured by Chalder's fatigue scale, fatigue severity scale, fatigue assessment instrument by Joseph E. Schwartz, Bell's fatigue scale, and guiding principle of clinical research on new drugs of TCM for fatigue symptom. There was no enough evidence that TCM could improve the quality of life for CFS patients. The included studies did not report serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: TCM appears to be effective to alleviate the fatigue symptom for people with CFS. However, due to the high risk of bias of the included studies, larger, well-designed studies are needed to confirm the potential benefit in the future.  
  Address The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: terje.alrak@uit.no.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 103841765. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103841765 Serial 2377  
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Author (up) Zhang, Y.; Qu, S.-shan; Zhang, J.-ping; Sun, Y.-ling; Liu, W.-lu; Xie, L.; Huang, Y.; Chen, J.-qi url  openurl
  Title Rapid Onset of the Effects of Combined Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Electroacupuncture on Primary Depression: A Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 1-8  
  Keywords MENTAL depression -- Treatment; SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors -- Therapeutic use; RESEARCH methodology evaluation; ALTERNATIVE medicine; COMBINED modality therapy; CONFIDENCE intervals; Electroacupuncture; EXPERIMENTAL design; HAMILTON Depression Inventory; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; PROBABILITY theory; PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; MEDICAL coding; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation; China  
  Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and electroacupuncture therapies for the early treatment of primary depression. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were analyzed to compare therapy combining SSRIs and electroacupuncture to SSRI therapy alone. The RCTs were identified by searching, among others, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chongqing VIP database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, WANFANG DATA, and the Chinese Biological Medical Literature Database. Scores from Self-Rated Depression Scale (SDS), the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Side Effect Rating Scale (SERS), and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) were analyzed and coded by two independent investigators and used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment. Statistical analyses were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results: Six RCTs were analyzed. The meta-analysis revealed that the combined therapy of SSRIs and electroacupuncture were associated with superior scores on the HAMD, SDS, and SERS measures compared with SSRIs alone after 1-4 weeks of treatment: HAMD scores, mean difference (MD)1 week, 2.32 (95% confidence interval [CI]1 week, 1.47-3.16, p1 week<0.00001); MD2 weeks, 2.65 (95% CI2 weeks, 1.81- 3.50, p2 weeks<0.00001); MD4 weeks, 2.70 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.90-3.51, p4 weeks<0.00001); SDS scores: MD1 week, 3.13 (95% CI1 week, 1.22-5.03, p1 week = 0.001); MD2 weeks, 4.05 (95% CI2 weeks, 0.22-7.87, p2 weeks = 0.04); MD4 weeks, 5.02 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.61-8.43, p4 weeks = 0.004); SERS scores: MD2 weeks, 2.20 (95% CI2 weeks, 1.43-2.96, p2 weeks<0.00001); MD4 weeks, 2.12 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.42-2.83, p4 weeks<0.00001). However, two of the aforementioned outcomes were rated as medium quality because of heterogeneity, as assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that the early treatment of primary depression using both SSRI and electroacupuncture therapies is more efficient than treatments with SSRIs alone and leads to a better and earlier control of depressive symptoms.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 112335762; Source Information: Jan2016, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p1; Subject Term: MENTAL depression -- Treatment; Subject Term: SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors -- Therapeutic use; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: COMBINED modality therapy; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: HAMILTON Depression Inventory; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; Subject Term: SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: MEDICAL coding; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 8p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 11 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2241  
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Author (up) Zheng-tao Lv; Wen Song; Jing Wu; Jun Yang; Tao Wang; Cai-hua Wu; Fang Gao; Xiao-cui Yuan; Ji-hong Liu; Man Li url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Acupuncture in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes; Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Drug Therapy; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Confidence Intervals; Odds Ratio; Chi Square Test; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Human; Child, Preschool; Child; Adolescence; Young Adult; P-Value; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Background. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is recognized as a widespread health problem in young children and adolescents. Clinical researches about acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of 8 databases was performed up to June 2014; randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo treatment or pharmacological therapy were identified. A metaanalysis was conducted. Results. This review included 21 RCTs and a total of 1590 subjects. The overall methodological qualities were low. The results of meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was more effective for clinical efficacy when compared with placebo or pharmacological treatment. Adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were not documented. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy. However, the beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to low methodological qualities. Rigorous high quality RCTs are urgently needed.  
  Address Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 108824615. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This work was supported by Grants from the National NaturalScience Foundation of China (no. 81473768; no. 81101927)and Grants from Wuhan Science and Technology Bureau no.2013060602010280.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824615 Serial 2330  
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