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Records
Author Tseng, K. L.; Liu, H. J.; Tso, K. Y.; Woung, L. C.; Su, Y. C.; Lin, J. G.
Title A Clinical Study of Acupuncture and SSP (Silver Spike Point) Electro-therapy for Dry Eye Syndrome Type of Study RCT
Year 2006 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 34 Issue 2 Pages 197-206
Keywords CAM Control; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Dry Eye Syndromes; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Silver Spike Point Electro-Therapy; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Xerophthalmia; Eye Diseases
Abstract The present study was designed as a clinical trial to assess the efficacy of acupuncture and silver spike point (SSP) electro-therapy on dry eye syndrome. A total of 43 dry eye syndrome patients participated in the present study. Subjects were divided into control, acupuncture and SSP electro-therapy groups. The three groups were all given artificial tears treatment. Patients in the treatment groups were given two 20-minute treatments of either acupuncture or SSP. Assessment was carried out using the Basal Schirmer test, tear break-up time (BUT), visual analog scale (VAS) and an overall score of eye condition. After four weeks of treatment, both the acupuncture and SSP treatment groups showed improvements over the control group, in Schirmer tests of the left eye and average tearing of both eyes. After 8 weeks of treatment, both treatment groups showed improvements over the control group both in Schirmer tests and VAS. For the right eye, treatment groups showed significant improvements in Schirmer test and VAS versus the control group averages for both eyes. There was no significant difference in BUT at any time. Comparing scores before and after treatment, the acupuncture and SSP groups showed a significant improvement compared to the control group. The acupuncture group showed a greater 8-week improvement in Schirmer tests scores compared to the SSP group. However, the SSP group patients used fewer applications of artificial tears. Acupuncture and SSP electro-therapy were effective in increasing tear secretion in patients with dry eye syndrome. The SSP electro-therapy not only alleviated dry eye syndrome, but also reduced the number of applications of artificial tears necessary
Address Graduate Institute of Integration Chinese and Western Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 16
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 43
Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Xerophthalmia
Disease Category Eye Diseases OCSI Score 56
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1184
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Author Thomas, M.; Eriksson, S. V.; Lundeberg, T.
Title A comparative study of diazepam and acupuncture in patients with osteoarthritis pain: a placebo controlled study Type of Study RCT
Year 1991 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 95-100
Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Osteoarthritis; Osteoarthritis, Spine; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control
Abstract Forty-four patients with chronic cervical osteoarthritis took part in this study. Patients were treated with acupuncture, sham-acupuncture, diazepam or placebo-diazepam in randomized order. Pain was rated on visual analogue scales before, during, and after treatment. Two scales were separately used to rate the intensity (sensory component) and the unpleasantness (affective component) of pain. The results analyzed from these trials show that diazepam, placebo-diazepam, acupuncture and sham-acupuncture have a more pronounced effect on the affective than on the sensory component of pain. Acupuncture was significantly more effective than placebo-diazepam (p less than 0.05), but not significantly more effective than diazepam or sham-acupuncture
Address Department of Physiology II, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 44
Time in Treatment N/A Condition Osteoarthritis, Spine
Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1160
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Author Sun, Y.
Title Study of the Treatment of Subcortical Arteriosclerotic Encephalopathy by Acupuncture Combined with Medicine Type of Study RCT
Year 2005 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 37-39
Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arteriosclerosis; Dementia; Encephalopathy; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Psychological Disorders; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular; Mental Disorders
Abstract
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 60
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60
Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1127
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Author Paraskeva, A.; Melemeni, A.; Petropoulos, G.; Siafaka, I.; Fassoulaki, A.
Title Needling of the extra 1 point decreases BIS values and preoperative anxiety Type of Study RCT
Year 2004 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages 789-794
Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Anxiety; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Stress, Psychological; TCM Acupuncture Style; Mental Disorders; Preoperative Anxiety
Abstract Acupuncture has anxiolytic effects. We investigated the effect of acupuncture on the Bispectral Index (BIS) values and anxiety. Fifty patients were randomly assigned to group A to receive acupuncture for 15 minutes on the extra 1 point (yintang) or to group C, where they received the same treatment on a control point located 2 cm lateral to the end of the right eyebrow. BIS values were recorded before acupuncture; during acupuncture every 30 seconds for 15 minutes and every 30 seconds for 90 seconds when the acupuncture treatment was accomplished. Anxiety level was assessed before and after acupuncture by a verbal score scale (VSS) (0 = no anxiety, 10 = worst anxiety). BIS values were significantly decreased during acupuncture when applied on the extra 1 point (p = 0.0001) but not on the control point. Acupuncture application significantly decreased the VSS values within the A group (p = 0.027) and in the C group (p = 0.0001), when compared to the baseline (pre-acupuncture) VSS values. However, no differences were found between the two groups regarding BIS or VSS values. In conclusion, needling the extra 1 point preoperatively significantly decreases the BIS values and the VSS for anxiety but needling of a control point decrease only VSS values
Address Department of Anesthesiology, St Savas Hospital, Athens, Greece
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 50
Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Preoperative Anxiety
Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 48
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 930
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Author Moon, S. K.; Whang, Y. K.; Park, S. U.; Ko, C. N.; Kim, Y. S.; Bae, H. S.; Cho, K. H.
Title Antispastic effect of electroacupuncture and moxibustion in stroke patients Type of Study RCT
Year 2003 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 31 Issue 3 Pages 467-474
Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Moxa, Direct; Electroacupuncture; Exercise; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Moxibustion; Muscle Spasticity; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Physical; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style; Nervous System Diseases
Abstract Spasticity is a frequently observed motor impairment that develops after stroke. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) and moxibustion (Mox) on spasticity due to stroke. The subjects consisted of 35 stroke patients with elbow spasticity whose mean duration of stroke was 2.97 months. Fifteen patients were randomized to the EA group, ten to Mox, and ten to control. Every other day, 30 minutes of electrical stimulation with a frequency of 50 Hz was given through four needles on the Ch'u-Ch'ih-San-Li (LI-11-LI-10) and Wai-Kuan-Ho-Ku (TB-5-LI-4) points of the paretic side. Direct Mox was applied to Ch'u-Ch'ih (LI-11), San-Li (LI-10), Wai-Kuan (TB-5) and Ho-Ku (LI-4) points three times a day every other day. The control group was given only the routine acupuncture therapy for stroke and range of motion (ROM) exercise, which were also applied to the EA and Mox groups. The efficacy of treatment was measured before, immediately, 1 hour, 3 hours, 1 day, 5 days, 10 days and 15 days after the start of treatment using a modified Ashworth scale (MAS). In the EA group, spasticity was significantly reduced immediately, 1 hour and 3 hours after treatment (p < 0.05). Reductions were significant on the 5th day and thereafter (p < 0.05). In the Mox group, there was no significant change in the MAS scores after the first treatment. In the Mox and control group, there was no significant change in MAS scores. This study suggests that EA can temporarily reduce spasticity due to stroke, and if applied repeatedly it can maintain reduced spasticity
Address Department of Cardiovascular and Neurologic Diseases, College of Oriental Medicine, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul, Korea. m919k523@unitel.co.kr
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 8
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 35
Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Muscle Spasticity
Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 887
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Author Magnusson, A. L.; Svensson, R. E.; Leirvik, C.; Gunnarsson, R. K.
Title The effect of acupuncture on allergic rhinitis: a randomized controlled clinical trial Type of Study RCT
Year 2004 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 105-115
Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Allergies; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Near Verum Acupoint Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Rhinitis, Allergic
Abstract Allergic rhinitis is a common health problem usually treated with drug therapy. Some patients experience side effects of drug therapy while others fear the use of drugs. Acupuncture is an interesting alternative to traditional treatment. The few studies evaluating acupuncture indicate a possible clinical effect on allergic rhinitis. This study compared active versus sham acupuncture in 40 consecutive patients with a history of allergic rhinitis and a positive skin test. Patients were randomized and assessed prior to treatment and then reassessed after 12 months. Improvements in symptoms using visual analogue scales, reduction in skin test reactions and levels of specific immunoglobin E (IgE) were used to compare the effect of treatment. For one allergen, mugwort, a greater reduction in levels of specific IgE (p = 0.019, 0.039) and skin test reaction (p = 0.004) was seen in the group receiving active acupuncture compared to the group receiving sham acupuncture. However, this finding might be an artifact. No differences in clinical symptoms were seen between active versus sham acupuncture, thus the conclusion being that the effect of acupuncture on allergic rhinitis should be further evaluated in larger randomized studies
Address Bollebygd's Primary Health Care Center, Bollebygd, Sweden. anna-lena.magnusson@vgregion.se
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 12
Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 40
Time in Treatment 16 Weeks Condition Rhinitis, Allergic
Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score 58
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 807
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Author Ma, T.; Kao, M. J.; Lin, I. H.; Chiu, Y. L.; Chien, C.; Ho, T. J.; Chu, B. C.; Chang, Y. H.
Title A study on the clinical effects of physical therapy and acupuncture to treat spontaneous frozen shoulder Type of Study RCT
Year 2006 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 34 Issue 5 Pages 759-775
Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Adjunctive Care; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Frozen Shoulder; Pain; Physical Therapy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Shoulder Pain; Usual Care Control, Physical; TCM Acupuncture Style
Abstract The integration of traditional Chinese and Western medicine and their clinical effects have been widely evaluated. Many studies have shown that using a combination of these two remedies has resulted in better outcomes than using only one of them. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical technique, which plays an important role in enforcing pain control, prevention and functional improvement. In 1979, the World Health Organization (WHO) journal introduced acupuncture as a remedy for 43 diseases, including frozen shoulder. This study aims to assess the therapeutic outcomes of combining acupuncture and physical therapy to treat frozen shoulder, and hopes to establish an evidence-based study of the integration of acupuncture and western medicine in the future. A total of 75 frozen shoulder patients treated in a medical center were recruited for the study between January 2002 and December 2002. The average age of these patients was 54.8 years. The average duration of the condition was 25.8 weeks before treatment. Of the 75 patients, 30 were treated by physical therapy, 30 by acupuncture and 15 by both remedies. Before the treatment began, all patients were evaluated by assessing static pain scale, motion pain scale, active and passive ROM (range of motion) and quality of life scale sheet SF-36 (Short Form-36). The outcome was evaluated by follow-up assessments conducted at the 2nd week and 4th week of treatment sessions. All patients showed improvement in quality of life (Short Form-36). Pain was controlled better by acupuncture while ROM improved following physical therapy. However, patients treated by both methods had the best outcome. The integration of acupuncture and physical therapy to treat frozen shoulder leads to a better outcome than using only one method. The author suggests that an evidence-based foundation of the integration of Chinese and Western medicine should be established in the future, to encourage the integration of Chinese and Western medicine
Address Department of Health Service Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 8
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 75
Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Frozen Shoulder
Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score 56
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 791
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Author Liu, S. Y.; Hsieh, C. L.; Wei, T. S.; Liu, P. T.; Chang, Y. J.; Li, T. C.
Title Acupuncture stimulation improves balance function in stroke patients: a single-blinded controlled, randomized study Type of Study RCT
Year 2009 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 483-494
Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Balance; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Motor Function; Muscle Strength; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style
Abstract The disturbance of balance function is one of main etiology resulting in falling down in stroke patients. A number of studies report that acupuncture may improve the motor function of stroke patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of acupuncture on balance function. We designed a single-blinded, controlled, randomized study. A total of 30 stroke patients were randomized into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups received acupuncture treatment accompanied by the manual twisting of needles and obtaining of qi (the subjects experienced sensations of soreness, numbness, swelling and heaviness, while the acupuncturist experienced a sensation of needle resistance), whereas the control group did not receive manual twisting of needles and without obtaining of qi. All of the subjects were first-time stroke patients; infarction location was limited to either the left or right hemisphere, and all subjects were able to walk for at least 6 meters. Acupuncture stimulation (AS) was applied to Baihui (GV 20) acupoint as well as to 4 spirit acupoints (1.5 cun anterior, posterior, left and right laterals from Baihui acupoint, respectively) for 20 min. Balance function outcome measures were: (1) the displacement area of the patient's center of gravity; (2) the time taken for a patient to stand vertically from a seated position; (3) the time taken for a patient to walk a distance of 6 meters; (4) muscle strength of both lower extremities. Results indicated that the displacement area from the center of gravity decreased in the experimental group, but not in the control group. There was greater reduction in the displacement area in the experimental group than in the control group. Following AS, the time taken to reach a standing position from a seated position, as well as the time taken to walk 6 meters was decreased equally in both the experimental and control groups. The muscle strength of the hip flexor and knee extensor were increased in the paralyzed and non-paralyzed sides of patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. The results of the present study suggest that acupuncture stimulation may induce an immediate effect that improves balance function in stroke patients
Address Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 30
Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postural Balance
Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 755
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Author Lin, Z. P.; Lan, L. W.; He, T. Y.; Lin, S. P.; Lin, J. G.; Jang, T. R.; Ho, T. J.
Title Effects of acupuncture stimulation on recovery ability of male elite basketball athletes Type of Study RCT
Year 2009 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 471-481
Keywords Athletic Performance; Sports Medicine; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; AcuTrials; Athletes; Exercise
Abstract Developing effective methods for helping athletes recover from muscle fatigue is deemed essential, particularly on the eves' important competitions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on athletes' recovery abilities. Subjects were selected from 30 male elite university basketball players who were randomly assigned to 3 groups: acupuncture group, sham group, and normal (control) group, each containing 10 subjects. Acupuncture was carried out on each athlete in acupuncture group at the Neiguan (PC6) and Zusanli (ST36) acupoints, beginning at 15 min prior to exercise and continuing until exhaustion of the subject. Similar acupuncture was also carried out on each athlete in the sham group but the positions were 1 cm away from the PC6 and ST36 acupoints. No acupuncture was conducted on the athletes in the normal group. During the experiments, each subject performed separate runs on the treadmill. The data of heart rate (HR(max)), oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), and blood lactic acid were measured during the rest period and at 3 recovery points of time (5th, 30th and 60th min) post-exercise. The results showed that the acupuncture group (PC6 and ST36) has significantly lower HR(max), VO(2max) and blood lactic acid than both the sham and normal groups at the 30th min post-exercise. Blood lactic acid of the acupuncture group was also significantly lower than that of the other two groups in the 60th min post-exercise. Our findings have shed some light on the development of effective acupuncture schemes to enhance the recovery ability for elite basketball athletes
Address Department of Holistic Wellness, MingDao University, Taiwan
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 30
Time in Treatment N/A Condition Athletic Performance
Disease Category Sports Medicine OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 722
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Author Kwon, Y. B.; Kim, J. H.; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, J. D.; Han, H. J.; Mar, W. C.; Beitz, A. J.; Lee, J. H.
Title The analgesic efficacy of bee venom acupuncture for knee osteoarthritis: a comparative study with needle acupuncture Type of Study RCT
Year 2001 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 187-199
Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupoint Injection; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Bee Venom; Osteoarthritis; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection
Abstract The aim of this investigation was to determine whether bee venom (BV) administered directly into an acupoint was a clinically effective and safe method for relieving the pain of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as compared to traditional needle acupuncture. We evaluated the efficacy of BV acupuncture using both pain relief scores and computerized infrared thermography (IRT) following 4 weeks of BV acupuncture treatment. We observed that a significantly higher proportion of subjects receiving BV acupuncture reported substantial pain relief as compared with those receiving traditional needle acupuncture therapy. Furthermore, the IRT score was significantly improved and paralleled the level of pain relief
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 8
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60
Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 612
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Author Kurono, Y.; Egawa, M.; Yano, T.; Shimoo, K.
Title The effect of acupuncture on the coronary arteries as evaluated by coronary angiography: a preliminary report Type of Study RCT
Year 2002 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 30 Issue 2-3 Pages 387-396
Keywords Acupuncture; Angina Pectoris; Cardiovascular Diseases; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; AcuTrials
Abstract The Neiguan acupuncture point (EH-6) of the heart meridian is often used for circulatory disorders. To clarify this effect, we measured coronary diameters in patients with angina pectoris following acupuncture stimulation using cardioangiography. Two kinds of acupuncture stimulation, the leaving needle (LN) and the sparrow pecking method (SPM), were employed for this study. No significant differences were found between LN and SPM. Concerning the pattern of coronary reaction, coronary constriction following acupuncture showed a relationship to patients with vasospastic angina. Coronary dilation following acupuncture showed a relationship to patients with Syndrome X. The mean dilatation with acupuncture was 68.8% of that caused by isosorbide dinitrate. These findings may help to clarify the mechanism of acupuncture treatment
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 16
Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Angina Pectoris
Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 606
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Author Kim, Y.; Kim, C. W.; Kim, K. S.
Title Clinical observations on postoperative vomiting treated by auricular acupuncture Type of Study RCT
Year 2003 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 31 Issue 3 Pages 475-480
Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hysterectomy; Nausea; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Women's Health; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; Vomiting
Abstract We studied the effect of auricular acupuncture on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). One hundred female patients undergoing transabdominal hysterectomy were entered into the study. The patients were divided into two groups (auricular acupuncture treatment group and non-treatment group) in order to test the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture. There was no significant difference in age, weight, height or duration of anesthesia among the two groups of patients. There was a significant difference between the control and auricular acupuncture treatment groups in the incidence of vomiting 12 hours after surgery (68% and 30%, respectively, p < 0.01). No noteworthy side effects from treatment were observed. Auricular acupuncture is effective in reducing vomiting following transabdominal hysterectomy in female patients
Address Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, College of Oriental Medicine, KyungHee University, #1 Hoegi-dong Dongdaemoon-gu, Seoul 130-702, South Korea. ackys@hosanna.net
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 100
Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score 42
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 585
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Author Cabrini, L.; Gioia, L.; Gemma, M.; Melloni, G.; Carretta, A.; Ciriaco, P.; Puglisi, A.
Title Acupuncture for diagnostic fiberoptic bronchoscopy: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study Type of Study RCT
Year 2006 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 409-415
Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Preoperative Anxiety; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Lung Diseases; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Respiratory Disorders; Mental Disorders
Abstract Patients usually fear fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FBS) and they report a low level of satisfaction after this examination. We evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture in decreasing patient anxiety before diagnostic FBS and in improving tolerance to the examination. In a prospective double-blind study, we enrolled 48 patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic FBS. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group A (16 patients): standard FBS, with airway topic anesthesia; Group B (16 patients): standard FBS, with airway topic anesthesia and acupuncture treatment; Group C (16 patients): standard FBS, with airway topic anesthesia and sham acupuncture. EKG, non-invasive arterial pressure, and pulse oximetry were monitored on a routine basis. We evaluated patient anxiety before and after acupuncture and, at the end of FBS, the discomfort suffered during the examination by a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Patient satisfaction in Group A was 50% worse than in Group B (p = 0.04). We observed a strong, even if not statistically significant, tendency toward a lower pre-FBS anxiety in Group B. Patients in group C had values very close to those recorded in group A. We observed no adverse event and no differences in cardio-respiratory parameters in these three groups; in particular, we did not observe a respiratory depression in Group B. Acupuncture seems an effective resource for a Thoracic Endoscopic Room to improve patient tolerance to FBS
Address Servizio di Anestesia e Rianimazione, Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Italy. cabrini.luca@hsr.it
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 48
Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Preoperative Anxiety
Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 69
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 101
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Author Kim, Y. S.; Lee, S. H.; Jung, W. S.; Park, S. U.; Moon, S. K.; Ko, C. N.; Cho, K. H.; Bae, H. S.
Title Intradermal acupuncture on shen-men and nei-kuan acupoints in patients with insomnia after stroke Type of Study RCT
Year 2004 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med
Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages 771-778
Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Insomnia; Intradermal Needles; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Sleep Disorders; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
Abstract This is the first study that focuses on the effects of intradermal acupuncture on insomnia after stroke. We enrolled hospitalized stroke patients with insomnia and assigned them into a real intradermal acupuncture group (RA group) or a sham acupuncture group (SA group) by randomization. The RA group received intradermal acupuncture on shen-men (He-7) and nei-kuan (EH-6) for 2 days, and the SA group received sham acupuncture on the same points. The effectiveness was measured by the Morning Questionnaire (MQ), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS). These scales were examined by an independent, blinded neurologist before, and 1 and 2 days after treatment, repeatedly. Thirty subjects (15 in the RA group and 15 in the SA group) were included in the final analysis. The RA group showed more improvement on insomnia than the SA group. Repeated measures analysis detected that there were significant between-subjects effects in the MQ, the ISI and the AIS. In conclusion, we suggest that intradermal acupuncture on shen-men and nei-kuan is a useful treatment for post stroke-onset insomnia
Address Department of Cardiovascular and Neurologic Diseases (Stroke Center), College of Oriental Medicine, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul, Korea
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 30
Time in Treatment 2 Days Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score 60
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 584
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Author Yeh, C. H.; Chien, L. C.; Albers, K.M.; Ren, D.; Huang, L. C.; Cheng, B.; Margolis, L.; Liu, R.; Suen, L. K.
Title Function of Auricular Point Acupressure in Inducing Changes in Inflammatory Cytokines During Chronic Low-Back Pain: A Pilot Study Type of Study RCT
Year 2014 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct
Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 31-39
Keywords Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Musculoskeletal Diseases; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Sham; Acupressure; Ear Seeds; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Cytokine
Abstract Background: Auricular therapy is a promising treatment for pain. However, the physiologic mechanisms of analgesic effects are not well-understood, which limits the scientific credibility of auricular therapy for pain management. Objectives: This prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT) was conducted to determine whether or not the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines change in response to auricular point acupressure (APA) for chronic low-back pain (CLBP). Methods: Blood samples (10 mL) were collected in a vacutainer, based on standard phlebotomy procedures. Blood was drawn at the following timepoints: before APA treatment to measure the baseline; 30 minutes after the first APA treatment; weekly for 4 weeks; and within 1 month of a follow-up visit (a total of seven timepoints) for each subject). Results: Participants with CLBP reported a mean 70% reduction of pain intensity at the completion of the 4-week APA regimen. The participants also had changes in serum pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In particular, interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-4, and IL-10 were decreased. IL-2, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? were increased. In contrast, the participants who were in the sham APA group, with a 29% pain reduction, had a different profile. In particular, I-L2, IL-4, and TNF-? were decreased. IL-1?, IL-6, and IL-10 were increased. IL-1?, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were associated with the worst pain intensity score, suggesting that these cytokines had an important role in mediating the APA effect on CLBP. Conclusions: The changes in cytokine levels in response to APA treatment suggested that APA could influence the level of circulating cytokines in patients with CLBP.
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 4
Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 19
Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1378
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Author von Deneen, K. M.; Wei, Q.; Peng, L.; Hao, D.M.; Peng, C.; Xie, H.; Tian, J.; Gold, M.S.; Liu, Y.
Title Randomized fMRI trial of the central effects of acute acupuncture on glucose levels and core body temperature in “overweight” males Type of Study RCT
Year 2011 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct
Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 165-173
Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases; Obesity; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Verum Acupoint Control
Abstract
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 19
Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Obesity
Disease Category Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1223
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Author Torktorabi, S.; Ghassemi, P.
Title Acupuncture as a palliative adjunctive Therapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
Year 2006 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct
Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 42-44
Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Cerebral Palsy; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Nervous System Diseases; No Treatment Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style
Abstract
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 32
Treatment Follow-up 26 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40
Time in Treatment 16 Weeks Condition Cerebral Palsy
Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score 48
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1174
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Author Shen, Y.
Title Functional MRI and Acupuncture (Large Intestine 4 Acupoint) in Patients With Myofascial Pain of the Jaw Muscles: A Pilot Randomized Trial Type of Study RCT
Year 2009 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct
Volume 21 Issue 4 Pages 263-268
Keywords Stomatognathic Diseases; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; RCT; Acupuncture; Acu Versus Sham; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; AcuTrials; Temporomandibular Joint Disorders; TMD; TMJ
Abstract Background: Myofascial pain of the jaw is a frequently encountered chronic pain syndrome. Recent trends have shown that alternative medicine, such as acupuncture, is becoming a popular treatment modality for this syndrome; however, little is known about the physiology behind acupuncture. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used with wide success in the mapping of human brain functions to better understand treatment and disease. Objective: To examine the effects of acupuncture at LI 4 on brain activations through fMRI on patients with chronic myofascial pain. Intervention: Manual stimulation of LI 4 with dry needling acupunture or sham acupuncture after clenching for 2 minutes while undergoing fMRI. Main Outcome Measures: All blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD)-related signal contrasts were made between the rest period after clenching and the first 5 minutes of acupuncture treatment. Results: Acupuncture induced significant activation of the primary sensory cortex and significant deactivation of the limbic system. Conclusions: Acupuncture performed at LI4 deactivated the limbic system, suggesting that acupuncture decreases the activity of brain sites related to pain.
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Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 12
Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1038
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Author Prisco, M.K.; Jecmen, M.C.; Bloeser, K.J.; McCarron, K.K.; Akhter, J.E.; Duncan, A.D.; Balish, M.S.; Amdur, R.L.; Reinhard, M.
Title Group Auricular Acupuncture for PTSD-Related Insomnia in Veterans: A Randomized Trial Type of Study RCT
Year 2013 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct
Volume 25 Issue 6 Pages 407-422
Keywords AcuTrials; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; PTSD; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Auricular Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Group Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Wait List Control
Abstract Objectives: This study examined how group auricular acupuncture may influence sleep quality, sleep patterns, and hypnotic medication use associated with PTSD-related insomnia in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans. Design: This study was a randomized controlled trial with sham acupuncture and wait-list controls. Setting: This study took place at the Washington, DC, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Medical Center. Subjects: Thirty-five subjects were randomized to participate in the study, but only 25 subjects completed the study. Interventions: Subjects were randomized to one of three groups: (1) true group auricular acupuncture; (2) sham auricular acupuncture; or (3) wait-list control. Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measure was perceived sleep quality (as measured by Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) questionnaires and Morin Sleep Diaries [MSDs]). Secondary outcome measures were total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency, sleep latency, naps (as measured by MSD and wrist actigraphs [WAs]), hypnotic medication use, veteran satisfaction, and attrition rates. Results: Subjects in the true auricular acupuncture group had a statistically significant improvement ( p = 0.0165) in sleep quality as measured by the ISI at time (t) = 1 month. This group had a trend toward lower MSD TST at t = 2 months ( p = 0.078), lower WA TST at t =1 month (p = 0.0893), and toward higher MSD nap times than the other two groups post treatment ( p = 0.0666). No statistically significant association between group assignment and hypnotic medication use and satisfaction scores were noted. Conclusions: Acupuncturists should consider incorporating sleep hygiene education into their clinical practices and/or collaborate with insomnia health care professionals when working with individuals with insomnia. This study also supports the finding that perceived sleep quality and objective WA measurements are not significantly correlated.
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 16
Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 35
Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 960
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Author Millea, P. J.; Reed, B.
Title Acupuncture in the treatment of alzheimer disease complicated by agitation: A randomized controlled pilot study Type of Study RCT
Year 2004 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct
Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages 19-23
Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Alzheimer Disease; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pilot Study; Psychological Disorders; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Mental Disorders
Abstract
Address
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Language Number of Treatments 4
Treatment Follow-up 3 Days Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 10
Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Alzheimer Disease
Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 64
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 871
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