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Author (up) Armour, M.; Dahlen, H.G.; Zhu, X.; Farquhar, C.; Smith, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of treatment timing and mode of stimulation in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea with acupuncture: An exploratory randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages 1-20  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology; Acu Versus Acu; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: We examined the effect of changing treatment timing and the use of manual, electro acupuncture on the symptoms of primary dysmenorrhea. METHODS: A randomised controlled trial was performed with four arms, low frequency manual acupuncture (LF-MA), high frequency manual acupuncture (HF-MA), low frequency electro acupuncture (LF-EA) and high frequency electro acupuncture (HF-EA). A manualised trial protocol was used to allow differentiation and individualized treatment over three months. A total of 74 women were randomly assigned to one of the four groups (LF-MA n = 19, HF-MA n = 18, LF-EA n = 18, HF-EA n = 19). Twelve treatments were performed over three menstrual cycles, either once per week (LF groups) or three times in the week prior to menses (HF groups). All groups received a treatment in the first 48 hours of menses. The primary outcome was the reduction in peak menstrual pain at 12 months from trial entry. RESULTS: During the treatment period and nine month follow-up all groups showed statistically significant (p < .001) reductions in peak and average menstrual pain compared to baseline but there were no differences between groups (p > 0.05). Health related quality of life increased significantly in six domains in groups having high frequency of treatment compared to two domains in low frequency groups. Manual acupuncture groups required less analgesic medication than electro-acupuncture groups (p = 0.02). HF-MA was most effective in reducing secondary menstrual symptoms compared to both-EA groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture treatment reduced menstrual pain intensity and duration after three months of treatment and this was sustained for up to one year after trial entry. The effect of changing mode of stimulation or frequency of treatment on menstrual pain was not significant. This may be due to a lack of power. The role of acupuncture stimulation on menstrual pain needs to be investigated in appropriately powered randomised controlled trials.  
  Address The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 74  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2416  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chien, T.-J.; Hsu, C.-H.; Liu, C.-Y.; Fang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in breast cancer- A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Climacteric; Menopause; Hot Flushes; Women's Health; Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many breast cancer patients suffer from hot flush and medical menopause as side effects of treatment. Some patients undergo acupuncture, rather than hormone therapy, to relieve these symptoms, but the efficacy of acupuncture is uncertain. This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in women with breast cancer. METHODS: A literature search was performed, following the PRISMA Statement and without language restrictions, of 7 databases from inception through March 2017. All selected studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that examined the effect of needle acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer. The methodological quality of these trials was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and meta-analysis software (RevMan 5.2) was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: We examined 844 breast cancer patients (average age: 58 years-old) from 13 RCTs. The trials had medium-to-high quality, based on the modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had no significant effect on the frequency and the severity of hot flush (p = 0.34; p = 0.33), but significantly ameliorated menopause symptoms (p = 0.009). None of the studies reported severe adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture significantly alleviated menopause symptoms, but had no effect on hot flush. Breast cancer patients concerned about the adverse effects of hormone therapy should consider acupuncture. Further large-scale studies that also measure biomarkers or cytokines may help to elucidate the mechanism by which acupuncture alleviates menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer.  
  Address Medical Library, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2413  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Choi, T.-Y.; Lee, M.S.; Kim, J.I.; Zaslawski, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Moxibustion for the treatment of osteoarthritis: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Maturitas Abbreviated Journal Maturitas  
  Volume 100 Issue Pages 33-48  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Pain; OA; Moxibustion; Direct Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to update previous reviews and examine recent evidence from randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of the use of moxibustion for osteoarthritis (OA). Twelve databases were searched from inception through to September 2016 with no language limits applied. Data extraction and risk-of-bias assessments were performed by two independent reviewers. A total of 19 RCTs met all inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Three RCTs compared the effects of moxibustion with those of sham moxibustion in patients with knee OA (KOA) and found favourable effects of moxibustion on pain reduction (n=305; SMD, -0.46; 95% CI: -0.86 to -0.06, P=0.02, I2=65%), including at follow-up (n=305; SMD, -0.36; 95% CI: -0.70 to -0.01, P=0.04, I2=54%). Eleven RCTs compared the effects of moxibustion with those of conventional oral drug therapies. Eight RCTs reported a total symptom score and the meta-analysis showed superior effects of moxibustion compared with drug therapies for this measure (n=691; SMD, -0.24; 95% CI: -0.78 to 0.29; P=0.37, I2=91%) and response rate (n=758 knees; RR, 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05-1.16, P <0.0001, I2=0%). Three RCTs found superior or equivalent effects of moxibustion on symptom score compared with intra-articular injection or topical drug therapy. The existing trial evidence is sufficiently convincing to suggest that moxibustion, compared with sham moxibustion and oral drugs, is effective for pain reduction and symptom management in KOA. The level of evidence is moderate, given the high risk of bias and small sample size.  
  Address Clinical Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 34054, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Osteoarthritis
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28539175 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2420  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cohen, M.M.; Smit, D.V.; Andrianopoulos, N.; Ben-Meir, M.; Taylor, D.M.D.; Parker, S.J.; Xue, C.C.; Cameron, P.A. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for analgesia in the emergency department: a multicentre, randomised, equivalence and non-inferiority trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication The Medical Journal of Australia Abbreviated Journal Med J Aust  
  Volume 206 Issue 11 Pages 494-499  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adult; Analgesia/*methods; Ankle Injuries/therapy; Emergency Medical Services/*methods; Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Humans; Low Back Pain/therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Migraine Disorders/therapy; Pain Measurement; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess analgesia provided by acupuncture, alone or in combination with pharmacotherapy, to patients presenting to emergency departments with acute low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. DESIGN: A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised, assessor-blinded, equivalence and non-inferiority trial of analgesia, comparing acupuncture alone, acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy, and pharmacotherapy alone for alleviating pain in the emergency department. Setting, participants: Patients presenting to emergency departments in one of four tertiary hospitals in Melbourne with acute low back pain, migraine, or ankle sprain, and with a pain score on a 10-point verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) of at least 4. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was pain at one hour (T1). Clinically relevant pain relief was defined as achieving a VNRS score below 4, and statistically relevant pain relief as a reduction in VNRS score of greater than 2 units. RESULTS: 1964 patients were assessed between January 2010 and December 2011; 528 patients with acute low back pain (270 patients), migraine (92) or ankle sprain (166) were randomised to acupuncture alone (177 patients), acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy (178) or pharmacotherapy alone (173). Equivalence and non-inferiority of treatment groups was found overall and for the low back pain and ankle sprain groups in both intention-to-treat and per protocol (PP) analyses, except in the PP equivalence testing of the ankle sprain group. 15.6% of patients had clinically relevant pain relief and 36.9% had statistically relevant pain relief at T1; there were no between-group differences. CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of acupuncture in providing acute analgesia for patients with back pain and ankle sprain was comparable with that of pharmacotherapy. Acupuncture is a safe and acceptable form of analgesia, but none of the examined therapies provided optimal acute analgesia. More effective options are needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12609000989246.  
  Address The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28918732 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2408  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Jo, J.; Lee, Y.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 162-170  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Women's Health; Gynecology; PCOS; Infertility, Female  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review was to assess the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). METHODS: We searched a total of 15 databases through October 2015. The participants were women with PCOS (diagnosed using the Rotterdam criteria) undergoing IVF or ICSI. Eligible trials were those with intervention groups receiving manual acupuncture (MA) or electroacupuncture (EA), and control groups receiving sham acupuncture, no treatment or other treatments. Outcomes included the clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), live birth rate (LBR), ongoing pregnancy rate (OPR) and incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and adverse events (AEs). For statistical pooling, the risk ratio (RR) and its 95% (confidence interval) CI was calculated using a random effects model. RESULTS: Four RCTs including 430 participants were selected. All trials compared acupuncture (MA/EA) against no treatment. Acupuncture significantly increased the CPR (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.71) and OPR (RR 2.03, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.81) and decreased the risk of OHSS (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.94); however, there was no significant difference in the LBR (RR 1.61, 95% CI 0.73 to 3.58). None of the RCTs reported on AEs. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture may increase the CPR and OPR and decrease the risk of OHSS in women with PCOS undergoing IVF or ICSI. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy and safety of acupuncture as an adjunct to assisted reproductive technology in this particular population.  
  Address Department of Korean Gynecology, Jaseng Hospital of Korean Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Genital Diseases, Female Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28077366 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2175  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Jo, J.; Lee, Y.J.; Lee, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for polycystic ovarian syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 23 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Women's Health; Gynecology; PCOS; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This systematic review aimed at summarizing and evaluating the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using acupuncture to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), specifically focusing on ovulation rate, menstrual rate, and related hormones. METHODS: Fifteen databases were searched electronically through February 2016. Our review included RCTs of women with PCOS; these RCTs compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, medication, or no treatment. Two reviewers independently extracted data. Data were pooled and expressed as mean differences (MDs) for continuous outcomes and risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects model. RESULTS: We found a low level of evidence that acupuncture is more likely to improve ovulation rate (MD 0.35, 95% CI: 0.14-0.56) and menstruation rate (MD 0.50, 95% CI: 0.32-0.68) compared with no acupuncture. We found statistically significant pooled benefits of acupuncture treatment as an adjunct to medication in luteinizing hormone (LH), LH/follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio, testosterone, fasting insulin, and pregnancy rates, but the level of evidence was low/very low. CONCLUSION: There is limited evidence to judge the efficacy and safety of acupuncture on key reproductive outcomes in women with PCOS. Large-scale, long-term RCTs with rigorous methodological input are needed.  
  Address Department of Korean Gynecology, Conmaul Hospital of Korean Medicine  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2419  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kumar, R.; Mooventhan, A.; Manjunath, N.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Immediate Effect of Needling at CV-12 (Zhongwan) Acupuncture Point on Blood Glucose Level in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Pilot Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages 240-244  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Diabetes Mellitus; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases; Pilot; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem. Needling at CV-12 has reduced blood glucose level in diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of needling at CV-12 (Zhongwan) on blood glucose level in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty T2DM patients were recruited and randomized into either the acupuncture group or placebo control group. The participants in the acupuncture group were needled at CV-12 (4 cun above the center of the umbilicus), and those in the placebo control group were needled at a placebo point on the right side of the abdomen (1 cun beside the CV-12). For both groups, the needle was retained for 30 minutes. Assessments were performed prior to and after the intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in random blood glucose level in the acupuncture group compared to baseline. No such significant change was observed in the placebo control group. CONCLUSION: The result of this study suggests that 30 minutes of needling at CV-12 might be useful in reducing blood glucose level in patients with T2DM.  
  Address Department of Yoga and Naturopathy, S-VYASA University, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
  Disease Category Diabetes Mellitus OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28889840 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2410  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Landgren, K.; Hallstrom, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of minimal acupuncture for infantile colic: a multicentre, three-armed, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (ACU-COL) Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 171-179  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Pain; Colic; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom-Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Infantile Colic; Pediatrics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating infantile colic with acupuncture is contradictory. AIM: To evaluate and compare the effect of two types of acupuncture versus no acupuncture in infants with colic in public child health centres (CHCs). METHODS: A multicentre, randomised controlled, single-blind, three-armed trial (ACU-COL) comparing two styles of acupuncture with no acupuncture, as an adjunct to standard care, was conducted. Among 426 infants whose parents sought help for colic and registered their child's fussing/crying in a diary, 157 fulfilled the criteria for colic and 147 started the intervention. All infants received usual care plus four extra visits to CHCs with advice/support (twice a week for 2 weeks), comprising gold standard care. The infants were randomly allocated to three groups: (A) standardised minimal acupuncture at LI4; (B) semi-standardised individual acupuncture inspired by Traditional Chinese Medicine; and (C) no acupuncture. The CHC nurses and parents were blinded. Acupuncture was given by nurses with extensive experience of acupuncture. RESULTS: The effect of the two types of acupuncture was similar and both were superior to gold standard care alone. Relative to baseline, there was a greater relative reduction in time spent crying and colicky crying by the second intervention week (p=0.050) and follow-up period (p=0.031), respectively, in infants receiving either type of acupuncture. More infants receiving acupuncture cried <3 hours/day, and thereby no longer fulfilled criteria for colic, in the first (p=0.040) and second (p=0.006) intervention weeks. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture appears to reduce crying in infants with colic safely. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01761331; Results.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, Lund SE-22100, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 157  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Colic
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28093383 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2174  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lee, J.-S.; Kim, S.-G.; Jung, T.-G.; Jung, W.; Kim, S.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Zhubin (KI9) acupuncture in reducing alcohol craving in patients with alcohol dependence: A randomized placebo-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Chinese J Integr Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 4 Pages 307-311  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Substance-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Alcoholism; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham; Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Objective: To examine the effect of acupuncture on Zhubin (KI9) in reducing alcohol craving in alcohol-dependent patients. Methods: Twenty male alcohol-dependent patients were randomly assigned to two groups, a treatment group (10 cases, age 43.0±6.8 years) and a placebo group (10 cases, age 44.5±7.9 years). The treatment group was treated with real needle acupuncture on Zhubin (KI9) twice a week for 4 weeks, and the control group was treated with placebo needle acupuncture. Both groups were given acupuncture treatment using Park Sham Device (PSD). Alcohol craving was measured by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before treatment to establish a baseline, and after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of treatment. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine the main and interaction effects of time and on the outcome measure (VAS). Results: There was a significant effect of time on VAS score (df=3, F=13.3, P<0.01). Main effect of group on VAS score was significant (df=1, F=10.9, P<0.01) and the time×group interaction was also significant (df=3, F=4.7, P<0.01). Conclusions: Real-needle acupuncture therapy on Zhubin (KI9) showed effectiveness in reducing alcohol craving. These results strongly suggest the usefulness of acupuncture therapy on Zhubin (KI9) in preventing a relapse in alcohol dependent patients.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Gyeongnam (626-770), South Korea  
  Publisher Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 20  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2317  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lee, S.M.K.; Kim, H.S.; Park, J.; Woo, J.S.; Leem, J.; Park, J.H.; Lee, S.; Chung, H.; Lee, J.M.; Kim, J.-B.; Kim, W.-S.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture prevents endothelial dysfunction induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury via a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent mechanism: A randomized controlled crossover trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Cardiovascular Diseases; Reperfusion Injury; Vascular Diseases; Pilot Study; Cross-Over Design; Acu Versus Sham; Acu Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Exploring clinically effective methods to reduce ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in humans is critical. Several drugs have shown protective effects, but studies using other interventions have been rare. Electroacupuncture (EA) has induced similar protection in several animal studies but no study has investigated how the effects could be translated and reproduced in humans. This study aimed to explore the potential effect and mechanisms of EA in IR-induced endothelial dysfunction in humans. METHODS: This is a prospective, randomized, crossover, sham-controlled trial consisting of two protocols. Protocol 1 was a crossover study to investigate the effect of EA on IR-induced endothelial dysfunction. Twenty healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to EA or sham EA (sham). Flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery (BA), nitroglycerin-mediated endothelial independent dilation, blood pressure before and after IR were measured. In protocol 2, seven volunteers were administered COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (200 mg orally twice daily) for five days. After consumption, volunteers underwent FMD before and after IR identical to protocol 1. RESULTS: In protocol 1, baseline BA diameter, Pre-IR BA diameter and FMD were similar between the two groups (p = NS). After IR, sham group showed significantly blunted FMD (Pre-IR: 11.41 +/- 3.10%, Post-IR: 4.49 +/- 2.04%, p < 0.001). However, EA protected this blunted FMD (Pre-IR: 10.96 +/- 5.30%, Post-IR: 9.47 +/- 5.23%, p = NS, p < 0.05 compared with sham EA after IR). In protocol 2, this protective effect was completely abolished by pre-treatment with celecoxib (Pre-IR: 11.05 +/- 3.27%; Post-IR: 4.20 +/- 1.68%, p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: EA may prevent IR-induced endothelial dysfunction via a COX-2 dependent mechanism.  
  Address Department of Clinical Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 20  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Reperfusion Injury
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28591155; PMCID:PMC5462401 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2418  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Myofascial Trigger Point; Dry Needling, With Non-Acupuncture Needle  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2417  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Noh, H.; Kwon, S.; Cho, S.-Y.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 86-103  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Parkinson Disease; Parkinson's Disease; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: English, Chinese, and Korean electronic databases were searched up to June 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible. The methodological quality was assessed using Cochrane's risk of bias tool. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3. RESULTS: In total, 42 studies involving 2625 participants were systematically reviewed. Participants treated using combined acupuncture and conventional medication (CM) showed significant improvements in total Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS), UPDRS I, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, and the Webster scale compared to those treated using CM alone. The combination of electroacupuncture and CM was significantly superior to CM alone in total UPDRS, UPDRS I, UPDRS II, and UPDRS IV. Similarly, the combination of scalp electroacupuncture, acupuncture, and CM was significantly more effective than CM alone in total UPDRS. However, our meta-analysis showed that the combination of electroacupuncture and CM was not significantly more effective than CM alone in UPDRS III, the Webster, and the Tension Assessment Scale. The results also failed to show that acupuncture was significantly more effective than placebo acupuncture in total UPDRS. Overall, the methodological quality of the RCTs was low. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: We found that acupuncture might be a safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with PD. However, because of methodological flaws in the included studies, conclusive evidence is still lacking. More rigorous and well-designed placebo-controlled trials should be conducted.  
  Address Department of Clinical Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2409  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Schroeder, S.; Burnis, J.; Denton, A.; Krasnow, A.; Raghu, T.S.; Mathis, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture Therapy on Stress in a Large Urban College Population Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 165-170  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Stress, Psychological; Pilot; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Auricular Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control  
  Abstract This study is a randomized controlled clinical trial to study the effectiveness of acupuncture on the perception of stress in patients who study or work on a large, urban college campus. The hypothesis was that verum acupuncture would demonstrate a significant positive impact on perceived stress as compared to sham acupuncture. This study included 111 participants with high self-reported stress levels who either studied or worked at a large, urban public university in the southwestern United States. However, only 62 participants completed the study. The participants were randomized into a verum acupuncture or sham acupuncture group. Both the groups received treatment once a week for 12 weeks. The Cohen's global measure of perceived stress scale (PSS-14) was completed by each participant prior to treatment, at 6 weeks, at 12 weeks, and 6 weeks and 12 weeks post-treatment completion. While participants of both the groups showed a substantial initial decrease in perceived stress scores, at 12 weeks post treatment, the verum acupuncture group showed a significantly greater treatment effect than the sham acupuncture group. This study indicates that acupuncture may be successful in decreasing the perception of stress in students and staff at a large urban university, and this effect persists for at least 3 months after the completion of treatment.  
  Address Arizona State University, Health Services, Post-office Box 872104, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 111  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Stress, Psychological
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28712475 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2415  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Smith, C.A.; Armour, M.; Dahlen, H.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture or acupressure for induction of labour Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 2017 Issue 10 Pages 1-126  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Labor, Obstetric; Labor, Induced; Women's Health; Labor Induction; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Acupressure  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This is one of a series of reviews of methods of cervical ripening and labour induction. The use of complementary therapies is increasing. Women may look to complementary therapies during pregnancy and childbirth to be used alongside conventional medical practice. Acupuncture involves the insertion of very fine needles into specific points of the body. Acupressure is using the thumbs or fingers to apply pressure to specific points. The limited observational studies to date suggest acupuncture for induction of labour has no known adverse effects to the fetus, and may be effective. However, the evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness of this technique is limited. OBJECTIVES: To determine, from the best available evidence, the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture and acupressure for third trimester cervical ripening or induction of labour. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 November 2016), PubMed (1966 to 25 November 2016), ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (25 November 2016), CINAHL (25 November 2016), Embase (25 November 2016), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Portal (ICTRP) (3 October 2016), and bibliographies of relevant papers. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture or acupressure, used for third trimester cervical ripening or labour induction, with placebo/no treatment or other methods on a predefined list of labour induction methods. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data, and checked them for accuracy. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review includes 22 trials, reporting on 3456 women. The trials using manual or electro-acupuncture were compared with usual care (eight trials, 760 women), sweeping of membranes (one trial, 207 women), or sham controls (seven trials, 729 women). Trials using acupressure were compared with usual care (two trials, 151 women) or sham controls (two trials, 239 women). Many studies had a moderate risk of bias.Overall, few trials reported on primary outcomes. No trial reported vaginal delivery not achieved within 24 hours and uterine hyperstimulation with fetal heart rate (FHR) changes. Serious maternal and neonatal death or morbidity were only reported under acupuncture versus sham control. Acupuncture versus sham control There was no clear difference in caesarean sections between groups (average risk ratio (RR) 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56 to 1.15, eight trials, 789 women; high-quality evidence). There were no reports of maternal death or perinatal death in the one trial that reported this outcome. There was evidence of a benefit from acupuncture in improving cervical readiness for labour (mean difference (MD) 0.40, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.69, one trial, 125 women), as measured by cervical maturity within 24 hours using Bishop's score. There was no evidence of a difference between groups for oxytocin augmentation, epidural analgesia, instrumental vaginal birth, meconium-stained liquor, Apgar score < 7 at five minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, maternal infection, postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL, time from the trial to time of birth, use of induction methods, length of labour, and spontaneous vaginal birth. Acupuncture versus usual care There was no clear difference in caesarean sections between groups (average RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.17, eight trials, 760 women; low-quality evidence). There was an increase in cervical maturation for the acupuncture (electro) group compared with control (MD 1.30, 95% CI 0.11 to 2.49, one trial, 67 women) and a shorter length of labour (minutes) in the usual care group compared to electro-acupuncture (MD 124.00, 95% CI 37.39 to 210.61, one trial, 67 women).There appeared be a differential effect according to type of acupuncture based on subgroup analysis. Electro-acupuncture appeared to have more of an effect than manual acupuncture for the outcomes caesarean section (CS), and instrumental vaginal and spontaneous vaginal birth. It decreased the rate of CS (average RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.80, 3 trials, 327 women), increased the rate of instrumental vaginal birth (average RR 2.30, 95%CI 1.15 to 4.60, two trials, 271 women), and increased the rate of spontaneous vaginal birth (average RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.20 to 3.56, one trial, 72 women). However, subgroup analyses are observational in nature and so results should be interpreted with caution.There were no clear differences between groups for other outcomes: oxytocin augmentation, use of epidural analgesia, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, maternal infection, perineal tear, fetal infection, maternal satisfaction, use of other induction methods, and postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL. Acupuncture versus sweeping if fetal membranes One trial of acupuncture versus sweeping of fetal membranes showed no clear differences between groups in caesarean sections (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.22, one trial, 207 women, moderate-quality evidence), need for augmentation, epidural analgesia, instrumental vaginal birth, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, and postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL. Acupressure versus sham control There was no evidence of benefit from acupressure in reducing caesarean sections compared to control (RR, 0.94, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.30, two trials, 239 women, moderate-quality evidence). There was no evidence of a clear benefit in reduced oxytocin augmentation, instrumental vaginal birth, meconium-stained liquor, time from trial intervention to birth of the baby, and spontaneous vaginal birth. Acupressure versus usual care There was no evidence of benefit from acupressure in reducing caesarean sections compared to usual care (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.53, two trials, 151 women, moderate-quality evidence). There was no evidence of a clear benefit in reduced epidural analgesia, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, admission to neonatal intensive care, time from trial intervention to birth of the baby, use of other induction methods, and spontaneous vaginal birth. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there was no clear benefit from acupuncture or acupressure in reducing caesarean section rate. The quality of the evidence varied between low to high. Few trials reported on neonatal morbidity or maternal mortality outcomes. Acupuncture showed some benefit in improving cervical maturity, however, more well-designed trials are needed. Future trials could include clinically relevant safety outcomes.  
  Address National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM),Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Sydney, New South Wales, 2751, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Labor, Induced
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29036756 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2406  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Swanson, B.; Keithley, J.K.; Johnson, A.; Fogg, L.; Adeyemi, O.; Sha, B.E.; Snell, K.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-6  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; HIV Infections; Human Immunodeficiency Virus; HIV; Inflammation; Pilot; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham; Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP), a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of pro inflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n = 12, control group n = 13). No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations.  
  Address Rush University College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL 60612, USA  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Human Immunodeficiency Virus
  Disease Category HIV Infections OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2325  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Tong Lin; Lan Gong; Xiaoxu Liu; Xiaopeng Ma url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for Monitoring the Lower Tear Meniscus in Dry Eye after Acupuncture Treatment Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Eye Diseases; Dry Eye Syndromes; Lipid Tear Deficiency; Sjogren Syndrome; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control; Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Dry eye is highly prevalent and has a significant impact on quality of life. Acupuncture was found to be effective to treat dry eye. However, little was known about the effect of acupuncture on different subtypes of dry eye. The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of tear meniscus assessment by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography in the evaluation of acupuncture treatment response in dry eye patients and to explore the effect of acupuncture on different subtypes of dry eye compared with artificial tear treatment. A total of 108 dry eye patients were randomized into acupuncture or artificial tear group. Each group was divided into three subgroups including lipid tear deficiency (LTD), Sj¨ogren syndrome dry eye (SSDE), and non-Sj¨ogren syndrome dry eye (Non-SSDE) for data analysis. After 4-week treatment, the low tear meniscus parameters including tear meniscus height (TMH), tear meniscus depth (TMD), and tear meniscus area (TMA) in the acupuncture group increased significantly for the LTD and Non-SSDE subgroups compared with both the baseline and the control groups (all P values < 0.05), but not for the SSDE. Acupuncture provided a measurable improvement of the tear meniscus dimensions for the Non-SSDE and LTD patients, but not for the SSDE patients.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Eye & ENT Hospital of Fudan University, No. 83 Fenyang Road, Shanghai 200031, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 6 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 108  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Dry Eye Syndromes
  Disease Category Eye Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2332  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Toosizadeh, N.; Lei, H.; Schwenk, M.; Sherman, S.J.; Sternberg, E.; Mohler, J.; Najafi, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does integrative medicine enhance balance in aging adults? Proof of concept for the benefit of electroacupuncture therapy in Parkinson's disease Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Gerontology  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 3-14  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Nervous System Diseases; Parkinson Disease; Parkinson's Disease; Pilot; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture + Other; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Postural balance and potentially fall risk increases among older adults living with neurological diseases, especially Parkinson's disease (PD). Since conventional therapies such as levodopa or deep brain stimulation may fail to alleviate or may even worsen balance, interest is growing in evaluating alternative PD therapies. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the current study was to assess improvement in postural balance in PD patients following electroacupuncture (EA) as an alternative therapy. METHODS: 15 aging adults (71.2 +/- 6.3 years) with idiopathic PD and 44 healthy age-matched participants (74.6 +/- 6.5 years) were recruited. The PD participants were randomly assigned (at a ratio of 2:1) to an intervention (n = 10) or to a control group (n = 5). The intervention group received a 30-min EA treatment on a weekly basis for 3 weeks, while the control group received a sham treatment. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after the final therapy. Measurements included balance assessment, specifically the ratio of medial-lateral (ML) center-of-gravity (COG) sway to anterior-posterior (AP) sway (COGML/AP) and ankle/hip sway during eyes-open, eyes-closed, and eyes-open dual-task trials, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), as well as quality of life, concerns for fall, and pain questionnaires. RESULTS: No difference was observed for the assessed parameters between the intervention and the control group at baseline. After treatment, an improvement in balance performance was observed in the intervention group. Compared with the healthy population, PD patients prior to treatment had larger COGML/AP sway with more dependency on upper-body movements for maintaining balance. Following EA therapy, COGML/AP sway was reduced by 31% and ankle/hip sway increased by 46% in the different conditions (p = 0.02 for the dual-task condition). The clinical rating revealed an overall improvement (p < 0.01) in mentation, behavior, and mood (UPDRS part I, 49%), activities of daily living (UPDRS part II, 46%), and motor examination (UPDRS part III, 40%). There was a significant reduction (p < 0.02) in the specific items regarding UPDRS fall status (67%) and rigidity (48%). Changes were small and nonsignificant in the controls (p > 0.29). CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrates improvement in rigidity and balance following EA. These preliminary results suggest EA could be a promising alternative treatment for balance disturbance in PD.  
  Address Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP) and Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA), Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz., USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 59  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1994  
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Author (up) Vados, L.; Ferreira, A.; ShouFa Zhao; Vercelino, R.; Shu Wang url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture combined with rehabilitation for treatment of acute or subacute stroke: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 2015 Issue 33 Pages 180-187  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Stroke; Ischaemic Stroke; Haemorrhagic Stroke; Acupuncture; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care  
  Abstract Objectives To determine whether the combination of acupuncture and rehabilitation produces better results in the treatment of acute or subacute stroke sequelae than rehabilitation alone. Methods A systematic review was carried out. A search was conducted in March 2014 using PubMed, Medline, the Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database (CNKI) and Wanfang databases. English and Chinese language articles published within 10 years of the search were reviewed for inclusion. Randomised control trials comparing combined treatment with acupuncture and rehabilitation and rehabilitation alone in patients with acute or subacute stroke (onset until 3 months after stroke) were included in this review. Three review authors independently checked the titles and abstracts of trials for inclusion based on selection criteria. Studies measuring changes of motor function, activities of daily living, neurological deficit or spasticity/range of motion during the treatment period and at the end of follow-up were included. Results 17 trials met the inclusion criteria, of which five were of good quality. 14 trials had results favourable to acupuncture combined with rehabilitation, compared with conventional rehabilitation treatment alone. Conclusions Acupuncture in combination with rehabilitation may have benefits for the treatment of acute and subacute stroke sequelae in comparison with rehabilitation alone. However, many of the studies were at risk of bias. Future studies should focus on reaching a consensus about the most appropriate modality of acupuncture intervention, and the appropriate length of treatment for both interventions, to maximise the potential synergistic outcomes.  
  Address Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 88 YuQuan Lu, TianZhong BinGuan Room 1124, Tianjin 300193, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2272  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Vixner, L.; Schytt, E.; Martensson, L.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Associations between maternal characteristics and women's responses to acupuncture during labour: a secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 3 Pages 180-188  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Analgesia; Adult; Age Factors; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Labor Pain/*therapy; Labor, Obstetric; Pregnancy; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult; Acupuncture; Obstetrics; Pain Management  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Patient characteristics are modulators of pain experience after acupuncture treatment for chronic pain. Whether this also applies to labour pain is unknown. AIM: To examine for associations between maternal characteristics and response to acupuncture in terms of labour pain intensity in close proximity to the treatment (within 60 min) and over a longer time period (up to 240 min), and whether or not epidural analgesia is used, before and after adjustment for obstetric status upon admission to the labour ward. METHODS: Cohort study (n=253) using data collected for a randomised controlled trial. Associations were examined using linear mixed models and logistic regression analyses. Tests of interactions were also applied to investigate whether maternal characteristics were influenced by treatment group allocation. RESULTS: In close proximity to the treatment, advanced age and cervical dilation were associated with lower pain scores (mean difference (MD) -13.2, 95% CI -23.4 to -2.9; and MD -5.0, 95% CI -9.6 to -0.5, respectively). For the longer time period, labour pain was negatively associated with age (MD -11.8, 95% CI -19.6 to -3.9) and positively associated with dysmenorrhoea (MD 5.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 9.5). Previous acupuncture experience and advanced cervical dilatation were associated with higher and lower use of epidural analgesia (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.9; and OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.5, respectively). No interactions with treatment allocation were found. CONCLUSIONS: This study did not identify any maternal characteristics associated with women's responses to acupuncture during labour. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01197950; Post-results.  
  Address School of Health and Education, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27986648; PMCID:PMC5466917 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2423  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Bu, H.; Zhao, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupoint-stimulation for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea compared with NSAIDs: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 19 RCTs Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 436 Pages 1-12  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology; Acupuncture; Auricular Acupressure; Moxibustion; Direct Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa; Electroacupuncture; Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs; NSAIDs  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Primary dysmenorrhoea (PD), defined as painful menses in women with normal pelvic anatomy, is one of the most common gynaecological syndromes. Acupoint-stimulation could potentially be an effective intervention for PD. Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of acupoint-stimulation compared with Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NASIDs) in the treatment of PD. METHODS: Six databases were searched to December 2014. Sixteen studies involving 1679 PD patients were included. We included randomized controlled trials that compared acupoint-stimulation with NASIDs for the treatment of PD. The main outcomes assessed were clinical effectiveness rate, symptom score, visual analogue score, variation in peripheral blood prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) and side effects. All analyses were performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis statistical software. RESULTS: (1) The total efficacy was better than control group: odds ratio = 5.57; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 3.96, 7.83; P < 0.00001; (2) The effect of intervention was positive in relieving the severity of PD symptoms: mean difference (MD) = 2.99; 95%CI = 2.49, 3.49; P < 0.00001; (3) No statistical difference existed between two groups in terms of a reduction in the VAS: MD = 1.24; 95%CI = -3.37, 5.85; P = 0.60; (4) The effect of intervention on the variation in peripheral blood PGF2alpha between two groups was positive: MD = 7.55; 95%CI = 4.29,10.82; P < 0.00001; (5) The side effects of control groups was more than the acupoint-stimulation group: OR = 0.03; 95%CI =0.00,0.22; P = 0.0005. CONCLUSIONS: According to this article, acupoint-stimulation can relieve pain effectively in the treatment of PD and offers advantages in increasing the overall effectiveness.  
  Address Graduate School, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28859645; PMCID:PMC5580316 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2411  
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