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  Records Links
Author Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2954  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yeh, M.-L.; Ko, S.-H.; Wang, M.-H.; Chi, C.-C.; Chung, Y.-C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture-Related Techniques for Psoriasis: A Systematic Review with Pairwise and Network Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages 930-940  
  Keywords Acupressure/*methods; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Humans; Network Meta-Analysis; Psoriasis/*therapy; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data; acupoint stimulation; acupressure; acupuncture; bloodletting; catgut embedding; network meta-analysis; pairwise meta-analysis; psoriasis; systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has be a large body of evidence on the pharmacological treatments for psoriasis, but whether nonpharmacological interventions are effective in managing psoriasis remains largely unclear. This systematic review conducted pairwise and network meta-analyses to determine the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation for the treatment of psoriasis and to determine the order of effectiveness of these remedies. METHODS: This study searched the following databases from inception to March 15, 2016: Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EBSCO (including Academic Search Premier, American Doctoral Dissertations, and CINAHL), Airiti Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation as intervention for psoriasis were independently reviewed by two researchers. RESULTS: A total of 13 RCTs with 1,060 participants were included. The methodological quality of included studies was not rigorous. Acupoint stimulation, compared with nonacupoint stimulation, had a significant treatment for psoriasis. However, the most common adverse events were thirst and dry mouth. Subgroup analysis was further done to confirm that the short-term treatment effect was superior to that of the long-term effect in treating psoriasis. Network meta-analysis identified acupressure or acupoint catgut embedding, compared with medication, and had a significant effect for improving psoriasis. It was noted that acupressure was the most effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture-related techniques could be considered as an alternative or adjuvant therapy for psoriasis in short term, especially of acupressure and acupoint catgut embedding. This study recommends further well-designed, methodologically rigorous, and more head-to-head randomized trials to explore the effects of acupuncture-related techniques for treating psoriasis.  
  Address 5 Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology , Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28628749 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2952  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-E.; Doo, K.-H.; Lee, J.-H.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Rhee, H.Y.; Park, H.-J.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Combined Treatment with Acupuncture and Bee Venom Acupuncture as an Adjunctive Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 25-32  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Bee Venoms/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Parkinson Disease/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Parkinson's disease; acupuncture; bee venom acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) through a sham-controlled trial. We also investigated whether there is a sustained therapeutic effect by completing follow-up assessments after treatment completion. DESIGN: A single center, double-blind, three-armed randomized controlled trial. SETTINGS/LOCATION: This study was performed at a university hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. SUBJECTS: Seventy-three (73) patients with IPD were the subjects. They were randomly assigned to the active treatment group, sham treatment group, or conventional treatment group. INTERVENTIONS: The active treatment group received acupuncture and BVA and the sham group received sham acupuncture and normal saline injections, twice a week for 12 weeks. The conventional treatment group maintained anti-parkinsonian drugs without additional intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and part III score, postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD) score, gait speed and number, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and postural stability at baseline and at 12, 16, and 20 weeks. RESULTS: Sixty-three (63) patients provided a complete data of assessments, including a final follow-up. After 12 weeks of treatment, a significant difference was observed between the active treatment group and the conventional treatment group. After the end of the treatment, the treatment effects were maintained significantly in the active treatment group only. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the combined treatment of acupuncture and BVA might be safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with IPD.  
  Address 2 Stroke and Neurological Disorders Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong , Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28753030 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2948  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, B.; Zhu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Bai, Y.; Wu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acupoint Stimulation on Motor Functions and Self-Care Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 55-61  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Points; Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology/*therapy; Child, Preschool; Female; Humans; Male; Motor Skills/*physiology; Self Care/*methods; *Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; cerebral palsy; motor function; self-care; transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To observe the effects of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) in improving motor functions and self-care abilities in children with cerebral palsy in their early childhood. DESIGN: A preliminary, prospective, cohort study. SETTINGS/LOCATION: Multicenter. SUBJECTS: Children aged 2-6 years old. INTERVENTIONS: Twenty-three children were included in the study and randomly assigned to a control group ([CG] N = 11) or a therapeutic group ([TG] N = 12). In the TG, children were treated with TEAS (Shousanli [LI10] and Waiguan [SJ5]) plus the exercise therapy, while in the control group, they were treated with sham TEAS plus exercise therapy. Therapies were performed five days per week for eight weeks. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Functional Independent Measurement for children (WeeFIM) were used to evaluate motor functions and self-care abilities before and after the therapies. RESULTS: Greater improvements were observed in the TG concerning all the measurements, although without statistical differences. The increments of the GMFM score and the WeeFIM motor, self-care and total scores were 36.08 +/- 18.34 (26%), 16.17 +/- 8.21 (33%), 7.67 +/- 3.42 (40%) and 20.33 +/- 10.08 (28%) in the TG, while 22.73 +/- 16.54 (17%), 9.09 +/- 9.43 (19%), 5.64 +/- 6.73 (29%) and 12.82 +/- 11.77 (18%) in the CG, respectively. No statistically significant correlations were shown between functional improvements and the demographics in the TG or the CG. The GMFM improvement was not statistically correlated with the improvements of the WeeFIM motor, self-care or total scores. However, the WeeFIM motor, self-care and total score were significantly positively correlated with one another in both groups (P < 0.01). No adverse effect was recorded during the study. CONCLUSION: TEAS may be effective in improving motor functions and self-care abilities in children with cerebral palsy, in addition to conventional exercise therapy. Larger samples are required to confirm the efficacies.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University , Shanghai, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28767271 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2947  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2935  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2913  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yeh, M.-L.; Ko, S.-H.; Wang, M.-H.; Chi, C.-C.; Chung, Y.-C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture-Related Techniques for Psoriasis: A Systematic Review with Pairwise and Network Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages 930-940  
  Keywords Acupressure/*methods; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Humans; Network Meta-Analysis; Psoriasis/*therapy; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data; acupoint stimulation; acupressure; acupuncture; bloodletting; catgut embedding; network meta-analysis; pairwise meta-analysis; psoriasis; systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has be a large body of evidence on the pharmacological treatments for psoriasis, but whether nonpharmacological interventions are effective in managing psoriasis remains largely unclear. This systematic review conducted pairwise and network meta-analyses to determine the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation for the treatment of psoriasis and to determine the order of effectiveness of these remedies. METHODS: This study searched the following databases from inception to March 15, 2016: Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EBSCO (including Academic Search Premier, American Doctoral Dissertations, and CINAHL), Airiti Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation as intervention for psoriasis were independently reviewed by two researchers. RESULTS: A total of 13 RCTs with 1,060 participants were included. The methodological quality of included studies was not rigorous. Acupoint stimulation, compared with nonacupoint stimulation, had a significant treatment for psoriasis. However, the most common adverse events were thirst and dry mouth. Subgroup analysis was further done to confirm that the short-term treatment effect was superior to that of the long-term effect in treating psoriasis. Network meta-analysis identified acupressure or acupoint catgut embedding, compared with medication, and had a significant effect for improving psoriasis. It was noted that acupressure was the most effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture-related techniques could be considered as an alternative or adjuvant therapy for psoriasis in short term, especially of acupressure and acupoint catgut embedding. This study recommends further well-designed, methodologically rigorous, and more head-to-head randomized trials to explore the effects of acupuncture-related techniques for treating psoriasis.  
  Address 5 Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology , Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28628749 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2911  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-E.; Doo, K.-H.; Lee, J.-H.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Rhee, H.Y.; Park, H.-J.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Combined Treatment with Acupuncture and Bee Venom Acupuncture as an Adjunctive Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 25-32  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Bee Venoms/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Parkinson Disease/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Parkinson's disease; acupuncture; bee venom acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) through a sham-controlled trial. We also investigated whether there is a sustained therapeutic effect by completing follow-up assessments after treatment completion. DESIGN: A single center, double-blind, three-armed randomized controlled trial. SETTINGS/LOCATION: This study was performed at a university hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. SUBJECTS: Seventy-three (73) patients with IPD were the subjects. They were randomly assigned to the active treatment group, sham treatment group, or conventional treatment group. INTERVENTIONS: The active treatment group received acupuncture and BVA and the sham group received sham acupuncture and normal saline injections, twice a week for 12 weeks. The conventional treatment group maintained anti-parkinsonian drugs without additional intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and part III score, postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD) score, gait speed and number, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and postural stability at baseline and at 12, 16, and 20 weeks. RESULTS: Sixty-three (63) patients provided a complete data of assessments, including a final follow-up. After 12 weeks of treatment, a significant difference was observed between the active treatment group and the conventional treatment group. After the end of the treatment, the treatment effects were maintained significantly in the active treatment group only. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the combined treatment of acupuncture and BVA might be safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with IPD.  
  Address 2 Stroke and Neurological Disorders Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong , Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28753030 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2907  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, B.; Zhu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Bai, Y.; Wu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acupoint Stimulation on Motor Functions and Self-Care Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 55-61  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Points; Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology/*therapy; Child, Preschool; Female; Humans; Male; Motor Skills/*physiology; Self Care/*methods; *Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; cerebral palsy; motor function; self-care; transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To observe the effects of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) in improving motor functions and self-care abilities in children with cerebral palsy in their early childhood. DESIGN: A preliminary, prospective, cohort study. SETTINGS/LOCATION: Multicenter. SUBJECTS: Children aged 2-6 years old. INTERVENTIONS: Twenty-three children were included in the study and randomly assigned to a control group ([CG] N = 11) or a therapeutic group ([TG] N = 12). In the TG, children were treated with TEAS (Shousanli [LI10] and Waiguan [SJ5]) plus the exercise therapy, while in the control group, they were treated with sham TEAS plus exercise therapy. Therapies were performed five days per week for eight weeks. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Functional Independent Measurement for children (WeeFIM) were used to evaluate motor functions and self-care abilities before and after the therapies. RESULTS: Greater improvements were observed in the TG concerning all the measurements, although without statistical differences. The increments of the GMFM score and the WeeFIM motor, self-care and total scores were 36.08 +/- 18.34 (26%), 16.17 +/- 8.21 (33%), 7.67 +/- 3.42 (40%) and 20.33 +/- 10.08 (28%) in the TG, while 22.73 +/- 16.54 (17%), 9.09 +/- 9.43 (19%), 5.64 +/- 6.73 (29%) and 12.82 +/- 11.77 (18%) in the CG, respectively. No statistically significant correlations were shown between functional improvements and the demographics in the TG or the CG. The GMFM improvement was not statistically correlated with the improvements of the WeeFIM motor, self-care or total scores. However, the WeeFIM motor, self-care and total score were significantly positively correlated with one another in both groups (P < 0.01). No adverse effect was recorded during the study. CONCLUSION: TEAS may be effective in improving motor functions and self-care abilities in children with cerebral palsy, in addition to conventional exercise therapy. Larger samples are required to confirm the efficacies.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University , Shanghai, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28767271 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2906  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2894  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2872  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yeh, M.-L.; Ko, S.-H.; Wang, M.-H.; Chi, C.-C.; Chung, Y.-C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture-Related Techniques for Psoriasis: A Systematic Review with Pairwise and Network Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages 930-940  
  Keywords Acupressure/*methods; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Humans; Network Meta-Analysis; Psoriasis/*therapy; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data; acupoint stimulation; acupressure; acupuncture; bloodletting; catgut embedding; network meta-analysis; pairwise meta-analysis; psoriasis; systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has be a large body of evidence on the pharmacological treatments for psoriasis, but whether nonpharmacological interventions are effective in managing psoriasis remains largely unclear. This systematic review conducted pairwise and network meta-analyses to determine the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation for the treatment of psoriasis and to determine the order of effectiveness of these remedies. METHODS: This study searched the following databases from inception to March 15, 2016: Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EBSCO (including Academic Search Premier, American Doctoral Dissertations, and CINAHL), Airiti Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation as intervention for psoriasis were independently reviewed by two researchers. RESULTS: A total of 13 RCTs with 1,060 participants were included. The methodological quality of included studies was not rigorous. Acupoint stimulation, compared with nonacupoint stimulation, had a significant treatment for psoriasis. However, the most common adverse events were thirst and dry mouth. Subgroup analysis was further done to confirm that the short-term treatment effect was superior to that of the long-term effect in treating psoriasis. Network meta-analysis identified acupressure or acupoint catgut embedding, compared with medication, and had a significant effect for improving psoriasis. It was noted that acupressure was the most effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture-related techniques could be considered as an alternative or adjuvant therapy for psoriasis in short term, especially of acupressure and acupoint catgut embedding. This study recommends further well-designed, methodologically rigorous, and more head-to-head randomized trials to explore the effects of acupuncture-related techniques for treating psoriasis.  
  Address 5 Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology , Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28628749 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2870  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-E.; Doo, K.-H.; Lee, J.-H.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Rhee, H.Y.; Park, H.-J.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Combined Treatment with Acupuncture and Bee Venom Acupuncture as an Adjunctive Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 25-32  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Bee Venoms/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Parkinson Disease/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Parkinson's disease; acupuncture; bee venom acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) through a sham-controlled trial. We also investigated whether there is a sustained therapeutic effect by completing follow-up assessments after treatment completion. DESIGN: A single center, double-blind, three-armed randomized controlled trial. SETTINGS/LOCATION: This study was performed at a university hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. SUBJECTS: Seventy-three (73) patients with IPD were the subjects. They were randomly assigned to the active treatment group, sham treatment group, or conventional treatment group. INTERVENTIONS: The active treatment group received acupuncture and BVA and the sham group received sham acupuncture and normal saline injections, twice a week for 12 weeks. The conventional treatment group maintained anti-parkinsonian drugs without additional intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and part III score, postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD) score, gait speed and number, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and postural stability at baseline and at 12, 16, and 20 weeks. RESULTS: Sixty-three (63) patients provided a complete data of assessments, including a final follow-up. After 12 weeks of treatment, a significant difference was observed between the active treatment group and the conventional treatment group. After the end of the treatment, the treatment effects were maintained significantly in the active treatment group only. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the combined treatment of acupuncture and BVA might be safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with IPD.  
  Address 2 Stroke and Neurological Disorders Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong , Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28753030 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2866  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, B.; Zhu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Bai, Y.; Wu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acupoint Stimulation on Motor Functions and Self-Care Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 55-61  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Points; Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology/*therapy; Child, Preschool; Female; Humans; Male; Motor Skills/*physiology; Self Care/*methods; *Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; cerebral palsy; motor function; self-care; transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To observe the effects of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) in improving motor functions and self-care abilities in children with cerebral palsy in their early childhood. DESIGN: A preliminary, prospective, cohort study. SETTINGS/LOCATION: Multicenter. SUBJECTS: Children aged 2-6 years old. INTERVENTIONS: Twenty-three children were included in the study and randomly assigned to a control group ([CG] N = 11) or a therapeutic group ([TG] N = 12). In the TG, children were treated with TEAS (Shousanli [LI10] and Waiguan [SJ5]) plus the exercise therapy, while in the control group, they were treated with sham TEAS plus exercise therapy. Therapies were performed five days per week for eight weeks. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Functional Independent Measurement for children (WeeFIM) were used to evaluate motor functions and self-care abilities before and after the therapies. RESULTS: Greater improvements were observed in the TG concerning all the measurements, although without statistical differences. The increments of the GMFM score and the WeeFIM motor, self-care and total scores were 36.08 +/- 18.34 (26%), 16.17 +/- 8.21 (33%), 7.67 +/- 3.42 (40%) and 20.33 +/- 10.08 (28%) in the TG, while 22.73 +/- 16.54 (17%), 9.09 +/- 9.43 (19%), 5.64 +/- 6.73 (29%) and 12.82 +/- 11.77 (18%) in the CG, respectively. No statistically significant correlations were shown between functional improvements and the demographics in the TG or the CG. The GMFM improvement was not statistically correlated with the improvements of the WeeFIM motor, self-care or total scores. However, the WeeFIM motor, self-care and total score were significantly positively correlated with one another in both groups (P < 0.01). No adverse effect was recorded during the study. CONCLUSION: TEAS may be effective in improving motor functions and self-care abilities in children with cerebral palsy, in addition to conventional exercise therapy. Larger samples are required to confirm the efficacies.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University , Shanghai, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28767271 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2865  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2853  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2831  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yeh, M.-L.; Ko, S.-H.; Wang, M.-H.; Chi, C.-C.; Chung, Y.-C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture-Related Techniques for Psoriasis: A Systematic Review with Pairwise and Network Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages 930-940  
  Keywords Acupressure/*methods; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Humans; Network Meta-Analysis; Psoriasis/*therapy; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data; acupoint stimulation; acupressure; acupuncture; bloodletting; catgut embedding; network meta-analysis; pairwise meta-analysis; psoriasis; systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has be a large body of evidence on the pharmacological treatments for psoriasis, but whether nonpharmacological interventions are effective in managing psoriasis remains largely unclear. This systematic review conducted pairwise and network meta-analyses to determine the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation for the treatment of psoriasis and to determine the order of effectiveness of these remedies. METHODS: This study searched the following databases from inception to March 15, 2016: Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EBSCO (including Academic Search Premier, American Doctoral Dissertations, and CINAHL), Airiti Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation as intervention for psoriasis were independently reviewed by two researchers. RESULTS: A total of 13 RCTs with 1,060 participants were included. The methodological quality of included studies was not rigorous. Acupoint stimulation, compared with nonacupoint stimulation, had a significant treatment for psoriasis. However, the most common adverse events were thirst and dry mouth. Subgroup analysis was further done to confirm that the short-term treatment effect was superior to that of the long-term effect in treating psoriasis. Network meta-analysis identified acupressure or acupoint catgut embedding, compared with medication, and had a significant effect for improving psoriasis. It was noted that acupressure was the most effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture-related techniques could be considered as an alternative or adjuvant therapy for psoriasis in short term, especially of acupressure and acupoint catgut embedding. This study recommends further well-designed, methodologically rigorous, and more head-to-head randomized trials to explore the effects of acupuncture-related techniques for treating psoriasis.  
  Address 5 Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology , Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28628749 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2829  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-E.; Doo, K.-H.; Lee, J.-H.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Rhee, H.Y.; Park, H.-J.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Combined Treatment with Acupuncture and Bee Venom Acupuncture as an Adjunctive Treatment for Parkinson's Disease Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 25-32  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Bee Venoms/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Parkinson Disease/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Parkinson's disease; acupuncture; bee venom acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) through a sham-controlled trial. We also investigated whether there is a sustained therapeutic effect by completing follow-up assessments after treatment completion. DESIGN: A single center, double-blind, three-armed randomized controlled trial. SETTINGS/LOCATION: This study was performed at a university hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. SUBJECTS: Seventy-three (73) patients with IPD were the subjects. They were randomly assigned to the active treatment group, sham treatment group, or conventional treatment group. INTERVENTIONS: The active treatment group received acupuncture and BVA and the sham group received sham acupuncture and normal saline injections, twice a week for 12 weeks. The conventional treatment group maintained anti-parkinsonian drugs without additional intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and part III score, postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD) score, gait speed and number, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and postural stability at baseline and at 12, 16, and 20 weeks. RESULTS: Sixty-three (63) patients provided a complete data of assessments, including a final follow-up. After 12 weeks of treatment, a significant difference was observed between the active treatment group and the conventional treatment group. After the end of the treatment, the treatment effects were maintained significantly in the active treatment group only. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the combined treatment of acupuncture and BVA might be safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with IPD.  
  Address 2 Stroke and Neurological Disorders Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong , Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28753030 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2825  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, B.; Zhu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Bai, Y.; Wu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acupoint Stimulation on Motor Functions and Self-Care Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy Type of Study
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 55-61  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Points; Cerebral Palsy/*physiopathology/*therapy; Child, Preschool; Female; Humans; Male; Motor Skills/*physiology; Self Care/*methods; *Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; cerebral palsy; motor function; self-care; transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To observe the effects of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) in improving motor functions and self-care abilities in children with cerebral palsy in their early childhood. DESIGN: A preliminary, prospective, cohort study. SETTINGS/LOCATION: Multicenter. SUBJECTS: Children aged 2-6 years old. INTERVENTIONS: Twenty-three children were included in the study and randomly assigned to a control group ([CG] N = 11) or a therapeutic group ([TG] N = 12). In the TG, children were treated with TEAS (Shousanli [LI10] and Waiguan [SJ5]) plus the exercise therapy, while in the control group, they were treated with sham TEAS plus exercise therapy. Therapies were performed five days per week for eight weeks. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Functional Independent Measurement for children (WeeFIM) were used to evaluate motor functions and self-care abilities before and after the therapies. RESULTS: Greater improvements were observed in the TG concerning all the measurements, although without statistical differences. The increments of the GMFM score and the WeeFIM motor, self-care and total scores were 36.08 +/- 18.34 (26%), 16.17 +/- 8.21 (33%), 7.67 +/- 3.42 (40%) and 20.33 +/- 10.08 (28%) in the TG, while 22.73 +/- 16.54 (17%), 9.09 +/- 9.43 (19%), 5.64 +/- 6.73 (29%) and 12.82 +/- 11.77 (18%) in the CG, respectively. No statistically significant correlations were shown between functional improvements and the demographics in the TG or the CG. The GMFM improvement was not statistically correlated with the improvements of the WeeFIM motor, self-care or total scores. However, the WeeFIM motor, self-care and total score were significantly positively correlated with one another in both groups (P < 0.01). No adverse effect was recorded during the study. CONCLUSION: TEAS may be effective in improving motor functions and self-care abilities in children with cerebral palsy, in addition to conventional exercise therapy. Larger samples are required to confirm the efficacies.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University , Shanghai, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28767271 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2824  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2812  
Permanent link to this record
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