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Author (up) Ee, C.; French, S.D.; Xue, C.C.; Pirotta, M.; Teede, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes: clinical evidence update and its relevance to decision making Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There is conflicting evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes. This article synthesizes the best available evidence for when women are considering whether acupuncture might be useful for menopausal hot flashes. METHODS: We searched electronic databases to identify randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes. RESULTS: The overall evidence demonstrates that acupuncture is effective when compared with no treatment, but not efficacious compared with sham. Methodological challenges such as the complex nature of acupuncture treatment, the physiological effects from sham, and the significant efficacy of placebo therapy generally in treating hot flashes all impact on these considerations. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture improves menopausal hot flashes compared with no treatment; however, not compared with sham acupuncture. This is also consistent with the evidence that a range of placebo interventions improve menopausal symptoms. As clinicians play a vital role in assisting evidence-informed decisions, we need to ensure women understand the evidence and can integrate it with personal preferences. Some women may choose acupuncture for hot flashes, a potentially disabling condition without long-term adverse health consequences. Yet, women should do so understanding the evidence, and its strengths and weaknesses, around both effective medical therapies and acupuncture. Likewise, cost to the individual and the health system needs to be considered in the context of value-based health care.  
  Address 1National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia 2Department of General Practice, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia 3School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada 4School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, Australia 5Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28350757 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2218  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kim, K. H.; Kang, K. W.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, H. J.; Yoon, H. M.; Lee, J. M.; Jeong, J. C.; Lee, M. S.; Jung, H. J.; Choi, S. M. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture on hot flashes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women-a multicenter randomized clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 269-280  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Heat Lamp; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture plus usual care for relief of hot flashes and menopause-related symptoms compared with usual care alone in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women. METHODS:: A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. Perimenopausal or postmenopausal women with average hot flash scores of 10 or higher during the week before the screening visit were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. The treatment group received 12 sessions of acupuncture and maintained usual care for 4 weeks, whereas the control group underwent usual care alone. Hot flash scores were calculated by multiplying frequency by severity of hot flashes recorded in a daily diary. The primary outcome was the mean change in the average 24-hour hot flash score at week 4 from baseline. The secondary outcome was the mean change in menopause-related symptoms as estimated by the Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire at week 4. Follow-up assessment at week 8 was conducted in the treatment group only. RESULTS:: The mean change in the average 24-hour hot flash score was -16.57 in the treatment group (n = 116) and -6.93 in the control group (n = 59), a difference of 9.64 (P < 0.0001). The total Menopause Rating Scale score, as well as the subscale scores for the psychological, somatic, and urogenital dimensions of menopause, showed significant improvement in the acupuncture group compared with the control group (P < 0.001). The mean change in the treatment group in the primary outcome was -17.58 at week 8. CONCLUSIONS:: Our results suggest that acupuncture in addition to usual care is associated with marked clinical improvement in hot flashes and menopause-related symptoms in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women.  
  Address From the 1Acupuncture, Moxibustion, and Meridian Research Center, Division of Standard Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Traditional Korean Medicine, Dongguk University, Ilsa  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 175  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 572  
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Author (up) Meng, F.; Duan, P.-B.; Zhu, J.; Lou, Q.-Q.; Fang, Z.-H.; An, H.-L.; Liu, L.-Y.; Hu, Y.; Hu, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Gua sha therapy on perimenopausal syndrome: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Gua sha therapy on perimenopausal symptoms, quality of life, and serum female hormones in participants with perimenopausal syndrome. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted at the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine in China. Eighty women with perimenopausal syndrome were recruited and randomized into an intervention group or a control group. Participants in the intervention group received 15-minute Gua sha treatment sessions once a week plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks, whereas participants in the control group received conventional treatment alone. The primary outcome was the change in perimenopausal symptoms and quality of life as obtained through the modified Kupperman Index (KI) and the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life. The secondary outcome was the change of serum female hormones including estrogen, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone. RESULTS: Seventy-five out of 80 participants (93.8%) completed the study-38 in the intervention group and 37 in the control group. The baseline levels of demographic and outcome measurements were comparable between the two groups. After eight sessions of intervention, the reduction in the total modified KI score was, however, 16.32 +/- 4.38 in the intervention group and 11.46 +/- 5.96 in the control group, with a difference of 4.86 +/- 6.15 (P < 0.01) between the two groups. Also the reductions of hot flash/sweating, paresthesia, insomnia, nervousness, melancholia, fatigue, and headache were greater in the intervention group than in the control group (P < 0.05). The reduction in the total Menopause-Specific Quality of Life score was 17.87 +/- 3.84 in the intervention group and 13.62 +/- 7.40 in the control group, with a difference of 4.46 +/- 7.52 (P < 0.01) between the two groups. And the scores for vasomotor, psychosocial, and physical domains in the intervention group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in serum estrogen, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that Gua sha therapy was effective and safe in relieving perimenopausal symptoms and improving the quality of life in participants with perimenopausal syndrome. The therapy may serve as a promising, effective, nondrug treatment for perimenopausal syndrome in clinical work. Additional research is needed to better understand its effectiveness and examine its mechanism for treating perimenopausal syndrome.  
  Address 1Clinic of Gua sha Therapy, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China 2Department of Nursing, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China 3Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 4Department of Health Education, Jiangsu Province Hospital on Integration of Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing, China 5Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, China 6Clinic of Gua sha Therapy, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China 7Department of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Rehabilitation, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China 8College of Nursing, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China 9Department of Endocrinology, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27760084 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2131  
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Author (up) Nedeljkovic, M.; Tian, L.; Ji, P.; Deglon-Fischer, A.; Stute, P.; Ocon, E.; Birkhauser, M.; Ausfeld-Hafter, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine (Zhi Mu 14) on hot flushes and quality of life in postmenopausal women: results of a four-arm randomized controlled pilot trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 15-24  
  Keywords Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause; Postmenopause; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Herbal Formula; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; CAM Control; Placebo Herbal Formula  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a clinical trial investigating the effects of acupuncture (AP) and Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) on hot flushes and quality of life in postmenopausal women. METHODS: Forty postmenopausal women reporting at least 20 hot flushes per week were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. They were randomly allocated to receive traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) AP, sham AP, verum CHM, or placebo CHM for 12 weeks. Follow-up assessment was conducted 12 weeks after intervention. Primary outcome measures included hot flush frequency and severity. As a secondary outcome measure, the severity of menopausal symptoms was assessed using the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) II. RESULTS: TCM AP induced a significant decline in all outcome measures from pretreatment to posttreatment compared with sham AP (hot flush frequency, P = 0.016; hot flush severity, P = 0.013; MRS, P < 0.001). In the TCM AP group, a larger decrease in MRS scores persisted from pretreatment to follow-up (P = 0.048). No significant differences were noted between the verum CHM group and the placebo CHM group. Compared with the verum CHM group, there was a significant decrease in MRS scores (P = 0.002) and a trend toward a stronger decrease in hot flush severity (P = 0.06) in the TCM AP group from pretreatment to posttreatment. CONCLUSIONS: TCM AP is superior to sham AP and verum CHM in reducing menopausal symptoms, whereas verum CHM shows no significant improvements when compared with placebo CHM.  
  Address Institute of Complementary Medicine KIKOM, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 901  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Painovich, J. M.; Shufelt, C. L.; Azziz, R.; Yang, Y.; Goodarzi, M. O.; Braunstein, G. D.; Karlan, B. Y.; Stewart, P. M.; Merz, C. N. url  openurl
  Title A pilot randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial of traditional acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms and mechanistic pathways of menopause Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 54-61  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Climacteric; Menopause; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Wait-List Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot study for the feasibility of planning a definitive clinical trial comparing traditional acupuncture (TA) with sham acupuncture (SA) and waiting control (WC) on menopause-related vasomotor symptoms (VMS), quality of life, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. METHODS: Thirty-three perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with at least seven VMS daily were randomized to TA, SA, or WC. The TA and SA groups were given three treatments per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the number and severity of VMS, Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Instrument, Pittsburgh Quality Sleep Index, 24-hour urine cortisol and metabolites, and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing. RESULTS: Both the TA and SA groups demonstrated improved VMS trends compared with the WC group (Delta -3.5 +/- 3.00 vs -4.1 +/- 3.79 vs -1.2 +/- 2.4, respectively; P = 20) and significantly improved Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire vasomotor scores (Delta -1.5 +/- 2.02 vs -1.8 +/- 1.52 vs -0.3 +/- 0.64, respectively; P = 0.04). There were no psychosocial group differences. Exit 24-hour urinary measures were lower in the TA versus the SA or WC group in total cortisol metabolites (4,658.9 +/- 1,670.9 vs 7,735.8 +/- 3,747.9 vs 5,166.0 +/- 2,234.5, P = 0.03; respectively) and dehydroepiandrosterone (41.4 +/- 27.46, 161.2 +/- 222.77, and 252.4 +/- 385.40, respectively; P = 0.05). The response data on adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation cortisol also trended in the hypothesized direction (P = 0.17). CONCLUSIONS: Both TA and SA reduce VMS frequency and severity and improve VMS-related quality of life compared with WC; however, TA alone may impact the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This association is viewed as preliminary and hypothesis generating and should be explored in a large clinical trial.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA, USA; Departments of Endocrinology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA;  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 33  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 923  
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