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Author (up) Keller, A.; Hayden, J.; Bombardier, C.; van, Tulder M. url  openurl
  Title Effect sizes of non-surgical treatments of non-specific low-back pain Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society Abbreviated Journal Eur Spine J  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Low Back Pain, Acute; AcuTrials; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Exercise; Exercise Therapy; Low Back Pain; Pain; Systematic Review; TENS; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Back Pain  
  Abstract Numerous randomized trials have been published investigating the effectiveness of treatments for non-specific low-back pain (LBP) either by trials comparing interventions with a no-treatment group or comparing different interventions. In trials comparing two interventions, often no differences are found and it raises questions about the basic benefit of each treatment. To estimate the effect sizes of treatments for non-specific LBP compared to no-treatment comparison groups, we searched for randomized controlled trials from systematic reviews of treatment of non-specific LBP in the latest issue of the Cochrane Library, issue 2, 2005 and available databases until December 2005. Extracted data were effect sizes estimated as Standardized Mean Differences (SMD) and Relative Risk (RR) or data enabling calculation of effect sizes. For acute LBP, the effect size of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and manipulation were only modest (ES: 0.51 and 0.40, respectively) and there was no effect of exercise (ES: 0.07). For chronic LBP, acupuncture, behavioral therapy, exercise therapy, and NSAIDs had the largest effect sizes (SMD: 0.61, 0.57, and 0.52, and RR: 0.61, respectively), all with only a modest effect. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation and manipulation had small effect sizes (SMD: 0.22 and 0.35, respectively). As a conclusion, the effect of treatments for LBP is only small to moderate. Therefore, there is a dire need for developing more effective interventions  
  Address Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ulleval University Hospital, Kirkeveien 166, 0407, Oslo, Norway  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 560  
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