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Author (down) Zhu, L. B.; Chan, W. C.; Lo, K. C.; Yum, T. P.; Li, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wrist-ankle acupuncture for the treatment of pain symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acupuncture; Wrist-Ankle Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Routine acupuncture incorporates wrist-ankle acupuncture (WAA) for its analgesic effect, but WAA is not widely used in clinics due to incomplete knowledge of its effectiveness and concerns about less clinical research and because less people know it. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and possible adverse effects of WAA or WAA adjuvants in the treatment of pain symptoms. This study compared WAA or WAA adjuvant with the following therapies: western medication (WM), sham acupuncture (SA), or body acupuncture (BA). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched systematically in related electronic databases by two independent reviewers. 33 RCTs were finally included, in which 7 RCTs were selected for meta-analysis. It was found that WAA or WAA adjuvant was significantly more effective than WM, SA, or BA in pain relief. There was nothing different between WAA and SA in adverse events, but WAA was marginally significantly safer than WM. Although both WAA and WAA adjuvant appeared to be more effective than WM, SA, or BA in the treatment of pain symptoms with few side effects, further studies with better and more rigorously designed are still necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety issue of WAA due to the poor methodology and small sample size of previous studies.  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 10 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1486  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhu, B.; Shan, Y. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation on Tourette Syndrome Treated by Different Acupuncture Methods Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 233-235  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objective: To approach a better solution for enhancing the therapeutic results of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of Tourette syndrome, by observing the clinical results of combined scalp with body acupuncture and mono-body acupuncture. Methods: Fifty-seven patients were randomized into a treatment group (31 cases) and a control group (26 cases). The patients in the treatment group all received combined scalp-body acupuncture treatment, while the patients in the control group were given mono-body acupuncture treatment, for 1 month as a treatment session. At the end of the third treatment session, the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) would be compared between pre- and post-treatment. Results: In the treatment group, 2 patients were clinically cured, 4 showed markedly effective, 18 "showed effective, and 7 failed, making a total therapeutic rate of 77.4%. In the control group, 0 were clinically cured, 3 showed markedly effective, 9 showed effective, 14 failed, making a total therapeutic rate of 46.2%. There was a significant difference between the two total therapeutic rates (P<0.05). Conclusion: The combination of scalp and body acupuncture had a better therapeutic result than the mono-body acupuncture therapy in the treatment of Tourette syndrome  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 3/19/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Shanghai Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200071, P. R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1737  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhu, B.-chang; Shi-fen, X.; Shan, Y.-hua url  openurl
  Title [Clinical study on scalp acupuncture with long needle-retained duration for treatment of Tourette syndrome] Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Zhongguo Zhen jiu = Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion Abbreviated Journal Zhongguo Zhen Jiu  
  Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 115-118  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Points; *Acupuncture Therapy; Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Humans; Male; Scalp; Tourette Syndrome/*therapy  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe therapeutic effects of different needle-retained durations at scalp acupoints on Tourette syndrome (TS). METHODS: Sixty-two cases of TS were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 31 cases in each group. In the observation group, the needles were retained for 2 h and in the control group, they were retained for 30 min. The middle line of forehead, middle line of vertex and lateral line 1 of vertex were selected as main acupoints, and anterior oblique line of vertex-temporal and posterior temporal line were selected as adjuvant acupoints. They were treated for 2 months, once other day. Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) and Tourette Syndrome Global Scale (TSGS) were used for assessment of therapeutic effects and their therapeutic effects were compared. RESULTS: After treatment, YGTSS and TSGS scores had very significant changes in the two groups as compared with those before treatment (both P < 0.01), indicating an obvious improvement in kinetic Tic and vocalizing Tic. The total effective rate was 61.3% in the observation group and 67.7% in the control group with no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Scalp acupuncture therapy of both 2 h and 0.5 h retaining needle can significantly improve symptoms of TS patients, with a similar therapeutic effect.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Shanghai Hospital of TCM, Shanghai 200071, China. zhubochang@hotmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Chinese Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:19391534 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1811  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhou, Y. l. openurl 
  Title The study of yin-yang hu ci acupuncture therapy for epilepsy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal Int J Orient Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 2 Pages 84-87  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Epilepsy; Nervous System Diseases; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Yin-Yang Hu Ci Acupuncture  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 54  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Epilepsy
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1485  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhou, X.P.; Huang, C.J. openurl 
  Title Influence of Acupuncture Plus LONG's Manual Manipulations on Functional Improvement in Lumbar Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages 375-379  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Back Pain; Intervertebral Disc Displacement; Low Back Pain; Acu Versus CAM Control; Electroacupuncture; Long's Bonesetting Manipulations; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control  
  Abstract Objective: To obsere the effect of acupuncture plus LONG's manual manipulations on the functional improvement of the patients with lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion. Methods: 60 cases of the patients were randomly divided into a observation group and a control group, 30 cases in each group. The observation group was treated with acupuncture plus LONG's manual manipulations, and the control group was treated with single acupuncture. The functions of the lumber vetebrae were processed in accordance with the assessment system of Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), and the therapeutic effects were assessed by Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: After the treatments, the differences in JOA and improvement indexes were statistically significant (P<0.05) between the two groups. VAS was decreased much remarkably in the observation group (P<0.01) than before the treatments and decreased remarkably in the control group (P<0.05) than before the treatments. There was a remarkable difference in VAS between the two groups after the treatments (P<0.05). Conclusion: Acupuncture plus LONG's manual manipulations are better than single acupuncture in improving the fuctions of the patients with lumbar intervertebral disc protusion.  
  Address Department of Chinese Medicine, Liwan Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangdong 510170, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Intervertebral Disc Displacement
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1484  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhou, Q.; Wang, J.X. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation on Acupuncture for Perimenopausal Depression Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 200-202  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical effect of acupuncture for perimenopausal depression. Methods: Ninety cases were randomly allocated into treatment group (n=60) and control group (n=30) according to the visit sequence. Patients in the treatment group were treated with acupuncture, once daily, and 10 times constituted one treatment course. Patients in the control group took Premarin tablet and medroxyprogesterone acetate for 3 cycles of menses. Results: The total effective rate was 95.0% in the treatment group, and 87.7% in the control group (P<0.05). The HAMD scores were decreased in both groups, and it was lower in the treatment group than in the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion: Acupuncture has good effects on perimenopausal depression.  
  Address No. 6 People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200233, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category New Articles to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 2/12/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; No. 6 People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200233, P.R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1763  
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Author (down) Zhou, M.; He, L.; Zhou, D.; Wu, B.; Li, N.; Kong, S.; Zhang, D.; Li, Q.; Yang, J.; Zhang, X. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Bell's Palsy Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bell Palsy; Facial Paralysis; Systematic Review; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract Abstract Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register, MEDLINE((R)) (January 1966-April 2006), EMBASE (January 1980-April 2006), LILACS (January 1982-April 2006), and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978-April 2006) for randomized controlled trials using “Bell's palsy” and its synonyms, “idiopathic facial paralysis” or “facial palsy” as well as search terms including “acupuncture.” Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were hand searched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomized trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy, irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups, and completeness of follow-up. Two (2) review authors assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. Results: Six (6) studies including a total of 537 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five (5) of them used acupuncture while another one used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review. Harmful side-effects were not reported in any of the trials. Flaws in study design or reporting (particularly uncertain allocation concealment and substantial loss to follow-up) and clinical differences between trials prevented conclusions about the efficacy of acupuncture. Conclusions: The quality of the included trials was inadequate to allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture. More research with high-quality trials is needed  
  Address Neurology Department, West China Hospital, Sichuan University , Chengdu, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Bell Palsy
  Disease Category Cranial Nerve Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1483  
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Author (down) Zhou, L. openurl 
  Title Clinical Study of Acupuncture and Moxibustion for Girls with Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages 304-306  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Metrorrhagia; Menstruation Disturbances; Women's Health; Gynecology; Breakthrough Bleeding; Spotting; Adolescent; Acu Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Moxibustion; Moxa; Direct Moxibustion; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding in adolescent girls. Methods: One hundred and seventeen subjects were randomized into two groups, a treatment group in which 87 cases were treated by acupuncture and moxibustion, and a control group in which 30 cases were treated by western medication. The clinical efficacy was observed after treatment. Results: The total effective rate was 97.7% in the treatment group and 86.7% in the control group, with better efficacy in the treatment group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Acupuncture and moxibustion is quite effective for adolescent dysfunctional uterine bleeding.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion, Chenzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hu'nan 423000CE P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 117  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Metrorrhagia
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1482  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhou, J.; Wu, Z.; Chen, Z.; Zhao, X.; Hu, J.; Jiao, Y.; Li, G.; Pang, Li url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical effect of acupuncture on endemic skeletal fluorosis: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2013 Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Stomatognathic Diseases; Fluorosis, Dental; Skeletal Fluorosis; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Electroacupuncture; Arthralgia  
  Abstract Objective. To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on endemic skeletal fluorosis (ESF) through the randomized controlled trial. Methods. Ninety-nine cases were divided into the treatment group (68 cases) and the control group (31 cases) randomly. Normal acupuncture combined with electroacupuncture was used in treatment group, while Caltrate with vitamin D tablets were applied in control group. After 2 courses, the VAS, urinary fluoride, serum calcium, and serum phosphate were evaluated before and after treatment. Results. Both of these two methods could relieve pain effectively and the effect of acupuncture was better (P < 0.05). In treatment group, the content of urinary fluoride after treatment was higher than before (P < 0.05), while the content of serum calcium and phosphate was lower (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The effect of acupuncture on relieving pain and promoting discharge of urinary fluoride is better than that of western medicine. Acupuncture can reduce the content of serum calcium and phosphate.  
  Address Acupuncture and Moxibustion Institute of China Academy of Chinese Medical Science, Beijing 100700, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 99  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Fluorosis, Dental
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1481  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhou, J.; Qu, F.; Sang, X.; Wang, X.; Nan, R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and Auricular Acupressure in Relieving Menopausal Hot Flashes of Bilaterally Ovariectomized Chinese Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupressure; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hot Flashes; Menopause; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Climacteric  
  Abstract The objective of this study is to explore the effects of acupuncture and auricular acupressure in relieving menopausal hot flashes of bilaterally ovariectomized Chinese women. Between May 2006 and March 2008, 46 bilaterally ovariectomized Chinese women were randomized into an acupuncture and auricular acupressure group (n = 21) and a hormone replacement therapy (HRT) group (Tibolone, n = 25). Each patient was given a standard daily log and was required to record the frequency and severity of hot flashes and side effects of the treatment felt daily, from 1 week before the treatment started to the fourth week after the treatment ended. The serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), LH and E(2) were detected before and after the treatment. After the treatment and the follow-up, both the severity and frequency of hot flashes in the two groups were relieved significantly when compared with pre-treatment (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the severity of hot flashes between them after treatment (P > 0.05), while after the follow-up, the severity of hot flashes in the HRT group was alleviated more. After the treatment and the follow-up, the frequency of menopausal hot flashes in the HRT group was reduced more (P < 0.05). After treatment, the levels of FSH decreased significantly and the levels of E(2) increased significantly in both groups (P < 0.05), and they changed more in the HRT group (P < 0.05). Acupuncture and auricular acupressure can be used as alternative treatments to relieve menopausal hot flashes for those bilaterally ovariectomized women who are unable or unwilling to receive HRT  
  Address No. 604 Room in B Building, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 388 Yuhang Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, P. R. China. qufan43@yahoo.com.cn  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 46  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1480  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhou, J.; Peng, W.; Xu, M.; Li, W.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for patients with Alzheimer disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Medicine (Baltimore) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 94 Issue 22 Pages e933  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Alzheimer Disease; Alzheimer's Disease; Acupuncture  
  Abstract The use of acupuncture for treating Alzheimer disease (AD) has been increasing in frequency over recent years. As more studies are conducted on the use of acupuncture for treating AD, it is necessary to re-assess the effectiveness and safety of this practice. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for treating AD. Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Chinese Biomedicine Literature (CBM), Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC) and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched from their inception to June 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with AD treated by acupuncture or by acupuncture combined with 1 kind of drugs were included. Two authors extracted data independently. The continuous data were expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Weighted MD (WMD) was used instead of standardized MD (SMD) when the same scales were used. Adverse reactions related to acupuncture were also investigated. Ten randomized controlled trials with a total of 585 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The combined results of 6 trials showed that acupuncture was better than drugs at improving scores on the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale (MD 1.05, 95% CI 0.16-1.93). Evidence from the pooled results of 3 trials showed that acupuncture plus donepezil was more effective than donepezil alone at improving the MMSE scale score (MD 2.37, 95% CI 1.53-3.21). Out of 141 clinical trials, 2 trials reported the incidence of adverse reactions related to acupuncture. Seven out of 3416 patients had adverse reactions related to acupuncture during or after treatment; the reactions were described as tolerable and not severe. Acupuncture may be more effective than drugs and may enhance the effect of drugs for treating AD in terms of improving cognitive function. Acupuncture may also be more effective than drugs at improving AD patients' ability to carry out their daily lives. Moreover, acupuncture is safe for treating people with AD. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42014009619.Protocol published in BMJ-open.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences (JZ, WP, WL, ZL)  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Alzheimer Disease
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 6/30/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; From the Department of Acupuncture (JZ, WP, WL, ZL), Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences; Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (JZ, WL); and Department of Neurology (MX), Xuan Wu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Bei; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=26039131 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1617  
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Author (down) Zhou, G.; Jin, S.; Zhang, L. openurl 
  Title Comparative clinical study on the treatment of schizophrenia with electroacupuncture and reduced doses of antipsychotic drugs Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Abbreviated Journal Amer J Acupunct  
  Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 25-31  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Psychological Disorders; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Schizophrenia; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Psychiatry
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1479  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhou, C.; Cui, X.; Hu, Y.; Zeng, H.; Ni, H.; Huang, C. H.; Wu, J.; Shi, J.; Feng, M. openurl 
  Title Effect of Combined Acupuncture with Chinse Medicine on Overall Function of Patients with Post-stroke Depression Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 99-103  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Mental Disorders; Stroke; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Herbal Formula; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Objective: To explore the effect of combined acupuncture with Chinese medicine on the overall function of patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). Methods: A total of 128 cases were randomly allocated into 4 groups, namely, a Chinese medicine group, an acupuncture group, a combined acupuncture with Chinese medicine group and a Western medication group, 32 cases in each group. Other than routine treatment, patients in all 4 groups were respectively treated with Chinese medicine, acupuncture, combined acupuncture with Chinese medicine and Fluoxetine Capsule. Then the treatment effects were evaluated using Hamilton depression rating scale (HAMD), neurological impairment severity (NIS) and functional comprehensive assessment (FCA) before and after treatments. Results: After treatment, both HAMD and NIS scores were decreased (P<0.01), wheras FCA scores were increased (P<0.01). Regarding the inter-group comparison, combined acupuncture with Chinese medicine group had statistical difference when compared with the other three groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01). There were no statistical differences among the Chinese medicine group, the acupuncture group and the Western medication group. Conclusion: Each treatment protocol improves the depressive symptoms and neurological function in PSD patients and enhances their overall function. Combined acupuncture with Chinese medicine can obtain a synergistic effect.  
  Address Tianshan Hospital of Traditional Chinse Medicine, Changning District, Shanghai, Shanghai 200051, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 128  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1478  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhenzhong, L.; Xiaojun, Y.; Weijun, T.; Yuehua, C.; Jie, S.; Jimeng, Z.; Anqi, W.; Chunhui, B.; Yin, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparative effect of electroacupuncture and moxibustion on the expression of substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide in patients with irritable bowel syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung i tsa Chih Ying wen pan / Sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 402-410  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; IBS; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Colonic Mucosa; Neuropeptide Substance P; Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide; Immunohistochemistry Assay; Colonoscopy; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Moxibustion; Moxa; Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the impacts of electroacupuncture (EA) and moxibustion (Mox) on the primary gastrointestinal symptoms and the expressions of colonic mucosa-associated neuropeptide substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in patients with either diarrhea-predominant or constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D and IBS-C, respectively). METHODS: Eighty-five IBS patients were randomly allocated to the EA and Mox groups. Zusanli (ST 36) and Shangjuxu (ST 37) were selected as acupoints for electroacupuncture or warm moxibustion treatment once a day for 14 consecutive days. Before and after the treatment sessions, a Visual Analog Pain Scale and the Bristol Stool Form Scale were used to evaluate gastrointestinal symptoms. There were four dropout cases, leaving 81 participants (41 with IBS-D and 40 with IBS-C) who volunteered to undergo colonoscopy before and after the treatment sessions. During colonoscopy, sigmoid mucosa were collected to detect SP and VIP expression using immunohistochemistry assay. RESULTS: Both EA and Mox treatments were effective at relieving abdominal pain in IBS-D and IBS-C patients. However, Mox was more effective at reducing diarrhea in IBS-D patients, whereas EA was more effective at improving constipation in IBS-C patients. EA and Mox treatments both down-regulated the abnormally increased SP and VIP expression in the colonic mucosa, with no significant difference shown between the two treatments. CONCLUSION: Both EA and Mox treatments are effective at ameliorating gastrointestinal symptoms by reducing SP and VIP expression in the colonic mucosa of IBS patients.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy and Acupuncture, Jinhua Hospital of Zhejiang University, Jinhua 321000, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 85  
  Time in Treatment 2 weeks Condition Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26427109 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1923  
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Author (down) Zhenhong Shuai; Fang Lian; Pengfei Li; Wenxiu Yang url  openurl
  Title Effect of transcutaneous electrical acupuncture point stimulation on endometrial receptivity in women undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer: a single-blind prospective randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 9-15  
  Keywords ENDOMETRIUM -- Physiology; DOPPLER ultrasonography -- Methodology; ELECTROACUPUNCTURE -- Methodology; ACUPUNCTURE points; CHI-squared test; EMBRYO transplantation; FISHER exact test; HUMAN reproductive technology; Immunohistochemistry; LONGITUDINAL method; MEDICAL care -- Evaluation; Pregnancy; RESEARCH -- Finance; T-test (Statistics); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract Copyright of Acupuncture in Medicine is the property of BMJ Publishing Group and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
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  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 101101413; Source Information: Feb2015, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p9; Subject Term: ENDOMETRIUM -- Physiology; Subject Term: DOPPLER ultrasonography -- Methodology; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE -- Methodology; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: EMBRYO transplantation; Subject Term: FISHER exact test; Subject Term: HUMAN reproductive technology; Subject Term: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MEDICAL care -- Evaluation; Subject Term: PREGNANCY; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2253  
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Author (down) Zheng-tao Lv; Wen Song; Jing Wu; Jun Yang; Tao Wang; Cai-hua Wu; Fang Gao; Xiao-cui Yuan; Ji-hong Liu; Man Li url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Acupuncture in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes; Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Drug Therapy; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Confidence Intervals; Odds Ratio; Chi Square Test; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Human; Child, Preschool; Child; Adolescence; Young Adult; P-Value; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Background. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is recognized as a widespread health problem in young children and adolescents. Clinical researches about acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of 8 databases was performed up to June 2014; randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo treatment or pharmacological therapy were identified. A metaanalysis was conducted. Results. This review included 21 RCTs and a total of 1590 subjects. The overall methodological qualities were low. The results of meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was more effective for clinical efficacy when compared with placebo or pharmacological treatment. Adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were not documented. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy. However, the beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to low methodological qualities. Rigorous high quality RCTs are urgently needed.  
  Address Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 108824615. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This work was supported by Grants from the National NaturalScience Foundation of China (no. 81473768; no. 81101927)and Grants from Wuhan Science and Technology Bureau no.2013060602010280.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824615 Serial 2330  
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Author (down) Zheng, Z.; Guo, R. J.; Helme, R. D.; Muir, A.; Da, Costa C.; Xue, C. C. url  openurl
  Title The effect of electroacupuncture on opioid-like medication consumption by chronic pain patients: a pilot randomized controlled clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal Eur J Pain  
  Volume 12 Issue 5 Pages 671-676  
  Keywords Analgesia; Electroacupuncture; Pain; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Penetrating Sham; Sham Control; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Electroacupuncture; Sham Acupoint Control; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract Opioid-like medications (OLM) are commonly used by patients with various types of chronic pain, but their long-term benefit is questionable. Electroacupuncture (EA) has been previously shown beneficial in reducing post-operative acute OLM consumption. In this pilot randomized controlled trial, the effect of EA on OLM usage and associated side effects in chronic pain patients was evaluated. After a two-week baseline assessment, participants using OLM for their non-malignant chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive either real EA (REA, n=17) or sham EA (SEA, n=18) treatment twice weekly for 6 weeks before entering a 12-week follow-up. Pain, OLM consumption and their side effects were recorded daily. Participants also completed the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), SF-36 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at baseline, and at the 5th, 8th, 12th, 16th and 20th week. Nine participants withdrew during the treatment period with another three during the follow-up period. Intention to treat analysis was applied. At the end of treatment period, reductions of OLM consumption in REA and SEA were 39% and 25%, respectively (p=0.056), but this effect did not last more than 8 weeks after treatment. There was no difference between the two groups with respect to reduction of side effects and pain and the improvement of depression and quality of life. In conclusion, REA demonstrates promising short-term reduction of OLM for participants with chronic non-malignant pain, but such effect needs to be confirmed by trials with adequate sample sizes  
  Address Division of Chinese Medicine, School of Health Science, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Melbourne, Victoria 3083, Australia. Zhen.zheng@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 35  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1477  
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Author (down) Zheng, Z.; Feng, S.J.; Costa, C. d.; Li, C.G.; Lu, D.; Xue, C.C. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture analgesia for temporal summation of experimental pain: a randomised controlled study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Eur J Pain Abbreviated Journal Eur J Pain  
  Volume 14 Issue 7 Pages 725-31  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Temporal summation of pain, a phenomenon of the central nervous system (CNS), represents enhanced painful sensation or reduced pain threshold upon repeated stimulation. This pain model has been used to evaluate the analgesic effect of various medications on the CNS. AIMS: The present study aimed to evaluate the effects and characteristics of analgesia induced by electroacupuncture (EA), manual acupuncture (MA) and non-invasive sham-acupuncture (SA) in healthy humans on temporal summation of pain. METHODS: Thirsty-six pain-free volunteers were randomised into one of the three groups EA (2/100 Hz), MA or SA. Acupuncture intervention was on ST36 and ST40 on the dominant leg delivered by an acupuncturist blinded to the outcome assessment. Both subjects and the evaluator were blinded to the treatment allocation. Pain thresholds to a single pulse (single pain threshold, SPT) and repeated pulses electrical stimulation (temporal summation thresholds, TST) were measured before, 30 min after and 24h after each treatment. RESULTS: The baseline values of three groups were comparable. Compared to SA, EA significantly increased both SPT and TST immediately after the treatment on the treatment leg as well as 24h after on both the treatment and non-treatment legs (ANOVA, p<0.05). MA also increased SPT and TST, but the changes were not significantly different from those induced by SA. CONCLUSION: EA induces bilateral, segmentally distributed and prolong analgesia on both SPT and TST, indicating a non-centrally specific effect. This effect needs to be verified with heat or mechanical model and in pain patients.  
  Address Health Innovations Research Institute, School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Vic 3083, Australia. zhen.zheng@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2009 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Days Frequency N/A Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Anesthesia and Analgesia
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/22/2015; Date Modified: 10/8/2015; Priority: Normal; Health Innovations Research Institute, School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Vic 3083, Australia. zhen.zheng@rmit.edu.au; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=20045360 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1854  
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Author (down) Zheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Lan, Y.; Qu, S.; Tang, C.; Huang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Decreases Blood Pressure Related to Hypothalamus Functional Connectivity with Frontal Lobe, Cerebellum, and Insula: A Study of Instantaneous and Short-Term Acupuncture Treatment in Essential Hypertension Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2016 Issue Pages 6908710  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The therapeutic effects of acupuncture in decreasing blood pressure are ambiguous and underlying acupuncture in hypertension treatment has not been investigated. Our objective was to observe the change of quality of life and compare the differences in brain functional connectivity by investigating instantaneous and short-term acupuncture treatment in essential hypertension patients. A total of 30 patients were randomly divided into the LR3 group and sham acupoint group. Subjects received resting-state fMRI among preacupuncture, postinstantaneous, and short-term acupuncture treatment in two groups. Hypothalamus was selected as the seed point to analyze the changes in connectivity. We found three kinds of results: (1) There was statistical difference in systolic blood pressure in LR3 group after the short-term treatment and before acupuncture. (2) Compared with sham acupoint, acupuncture at LR3 instantaneous effects in the functional connectivity with seed points was more concentrated in the frontal lobe. (3) Compared with instantaneous effects, acupuncture LR3 short-term effects in the functional connectivity with seed points had more regions in frontal lobe, cerebellum, and insula. These brain areas constituted a neural network structure with specific functions that could explain the mechanism of therapy in hypertension patients by LR3 acupoint.  
  Address School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510515, China  
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  Language English Number of Treatments  
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  Notes PMID:27688791; PMCID:PMC5027048 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2147  
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Author (down) Zheng, Y. H.; Wang, X. H.; Lai, M. H.; Yao, H.; Liu, H.; Ma, H. X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of abdominal acupuncture for patients with obesity-type polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 9 Pages 740-745  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Abstract Objective: To assess the effectiveness of abdominal acupuncture at the endocrine and metabolic level in patients with obesity-type polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: Eighty-six women from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College with a diagnosis of PCOS (body-mass index [BMI] >/=25 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive 6 months of abdominal acupuncture (once a day) or oral metformin (250 mg three times daily in the first week, followed by 500 mg three times daily thereafter). BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), ovarian volume, menstrual frequency, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and Ferriman-Gallwey score were measured at the beginning of the study and after 6 months of treatment. Luteotrophic hormone (LH), testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), fasting blood glucose, 2-hour Postprandial blood glucose, fasting insulin, 2-hour postprandial blood insulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were also assessed. Results: According to the results at baseline and 6 months, BMI, WHR, Ferriman-Gallwey score, ovarian volume, luteotrophic hormone, ratio of luteotrophic hormone to follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, LDL-C, triglycerides, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, 2-hour postprandial blood glucose, fasting insulin, 2-hour postprandial blood insulin, and HOMA-IR were reduced significantly in the two groups (p<0.05). Menstrual frequency and HDL-C (p<0.05) increased significantly in both groups; follicle-stimulating hormone also increased in both groups, but the change was not significant (p>0.05). The acupuncture group showed considerable advantages over the metformin group in terms of reduced BMI and WHR and increases in menstrual frequency (p<0.05). Conclusion: Abdominal acupuncture and metformin improved the endocrine and metabolic function of patients with obesity-type PCOS. Abdominal acupuncture may be more effective in improving menstrual frequency, BMI, and WHR, with few adverse effects.  
  Address First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College , Guangzhou, China .  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 48  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 86  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1476  
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