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Author (up) Boelig, R.C.; Barton, S.J.; Saccone, G.; Kelly, A.J.; Edwards, S.J.; Berghella, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Interventions for treating hyperemesis gravidarum Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 5 Pages  
  Keywords Pregnancy Complications; Hyperemesis Gravidarum; Women's Health; Systematic Review; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Hyperemesis gravidarum is a severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy affecting 0.3% to 1.0% of pregnancies, and is one of the most common indications for hospitalization during pregnancy. While a previous Cochrane review examined interventions for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, there has not yet been a review examining the interventions for the more severe condition of hyperemesis gravidarum. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety, of all interventions for hyperemesis gravidarum in pregnancy up to 20 weeks' gestation. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field's Trials Register (20 December 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials of any intervention for hyperemesis gravidarum. Quasi-randomized trials and trials using a cross-over design were not eligible for inclusion.We excluded trials on nausea and vomiting of pregnancy that were not specifically studying the more severe condition of hyperemesis gravidarum. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently reviewed the eligibility of trials, extracted data and evaluated the risk of bias. Data were checked for accuracy. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-five trials (involving 2052 women) met the inclusion criteria but the majority of 18 different comparisons described in the review include data from single studies with small numbers of participants. The comparisons covered a range of interventions including acupressure/acupuncture, outpatient care, intravenous fluids, and various pharmaceutical interventions. The methodological quality of included studies was mixed. For selected important comparisons and outcomes, we graded the quality of the evidence and created 'Summary of findings' tables. For most outcomes the evidence was graded as low or very low quality mainly due to the imprecision of effect estimates. Comparisons included in the 'Summary of findings' tables are described below, the remaining comparisons are described in detail in the main text.No primary outcome data were available when acupuncture was compared with placebo, There was no clear evidence of differences between groups for anxiodepressive symptoms (risk ratio (RR) 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73 to 1.40; one study, 36 women, very low-quality evidence), spontaneous abortion (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.05 to 5.03; one study, 57 women, low-quality evidence), preterm birth (RR 0.12, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.26; one study, 36 women, low-quality evidence), or perinatal death (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.04 to 8.30; one study, 36 women, low-quality evidence). There was insufficient evidence to identify clear differences between acupuncture and metoclopramide in a study with 81 participants regarding reduction/cessation in nausea or vomiting (RR 1.40, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.49 and RR 1.51, 95% CI 0.92 to 2.48, respectively; very low-quality evidence). In a study with 92 participants, women taking vitamin B6 had a slightly longer hospital stay compared with placebo (mean difference (MD) 0.80 days, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.52, moderate-quality evidence). There was insufficient evidence to demonstrate a difference in other outcomes including mean number of episodes of emesis (MD 0.50, 95% CI -0.40 to 1.40, low-quality evidence) or side effects.A comparison between metoclopramide and ondansetron identified no clear difference in the severity of nausea or vomiting (MD 1.70, 95% CI -0.15 to 3.55, and MD -0.10, 95% CI -1.63 to 1.43; one study, 83 women, respectively, very low-quality evidence). However, more women taking metoclopramide complained of drowsiness and dry mouth (RR 2.40, 95% CI 1.23 to 4.69, and RR 2.38, 95% CI 1.10 to 5.11, respectively; moderate-quality evidence). There were no clear differences between groups for other side effects.In a single study with 146 participants comparing metoclopramide with promethazine, more women taking promethazine reported drowsiness, dizziness, and dystonia (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.87, RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.69, and RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.90, respectively, moderate-quality evidence). There were no clear differences between groups for other important outcomes including quality of life and other side effects.In a single trial with 30 women, those receiving ondansetron had no difference in duration of hospital admission compared to those receiving promethazine (MD 0.00, 95% CI -1.39 to 1.39, very low-quality evidence), although there was increased sedation with promethazine (RR 0.06, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.94, low-quality evidence). Regarding corticosteroids, in a study with 110 participants there was no difference in days of hospital admission compared to placebo (MD -0.30, 95% CI -0.70 to 0.10; very low-quality evidence), but there was a decreased readmission rate (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.94; four studies, 269 women). For other important outcomes including pregnancy complications, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and congenital abnormalities, there was insufficient evidence to identify differences between groups (very low-quality evidence for all outcomes). In other single studies there were no clear differences between groups for preterm birth or side effects (very low-quality evidence). For hydrocortisone compared with metoclopramide, no data were available for primary outcomes and there was no difference in the readmission rate (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.00 to 1.28; one study, 40 women). In a study with 80 women, compared to promethazine, those receiving prednisolone had increased nausea at 48 hours (RR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.72; low-quality evidence), but not at 17 days (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.15, very low-quality evidence). There was no clear difference in the number of episodes of emesis or subjective improvement in nausea/vomiting. There was insufficient evidence to identify differences between groups for stillbirth and neonatal death and preterm birth. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of this review, there is little high-quality and consistent evidence supporting any one intervention, which should be taken into account when making management decisions. There was also very limited reporting on the economic impact of hyperemesis gravidarum and the impact that interventions may have.The limitations in interpreting the results of the included studies highlights the importance of consistency in the definition of hyperemesis gravidarum, the use of validated outcome measures, and the need for larger placebo-controlled trials.  
  Address Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Thomas Jefferson University, 833 Chestnut Street, Level 1, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, PA 19107  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hyperemesis Gravidarum
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27168518 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2058  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bokmand, S.; Flyger, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture relieves menopausal discomfort in breast cancer patients: a prospective, double blinded, randomized study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) Abbreviated Journal Breast  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 320-323  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Climacteric; Menopause; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Breast Cancer; Neoplasms; Women's Health; Postmenopause; Hot Flashes; Cancer  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This study evaluates the effect of acupuncture on hot flashes and disturbed night sleep in patients treated for breast cancer. The effect of acupuncture was tested against a sham-acupuncture group and a no-treatment control group. Plasma estradiol was measured to rule out this as cause of effect. Side effects of the treatment were registered. METHODS: We randomized 94 women into the study: 31 had acupuncture, 29 had sham acupuncture and 34 had no treatment. FINDINGS: In the acupuncture group, 16 patients (52%) experienced a significant effect on hot flashes compared with seven patients (24%) in the sham group (p < 0.05). The effect came after the second acupuncture session and lasted for at least 12 weeks after last treatment. A statistically significant positive effect was seen on sleep in the acupuncture group compared with the sham-acupuncture and no-treatment groups. The effect was not correlated with increased levels of plasma estradiol. No side effects of acupuncture were registered. INTERPRETATION: We find that acupuncture significantly relieves hot flashes and sleep disturbances and is a good and safe treatment in women treated for breast cancer.  
  Address Department of Breast Surgery, Vejle Hospital, Denmark. sbok0003@heh.regionh.dk  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 94  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 82  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Borud, E. K.; Alraek, T.; White, A.; Fonnebo, V.; Eggen, A. E.; Hammar, M.; Astrand, L. L.; Theodorsson, E.; Grimsgaard, S. openurl 
  Title The Acupuncture on Hot Flushes Among Menopausal Women (ACUFLASH) study, a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Menopause : the journal of the North American Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 484-493  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Educational; Menopause  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE:: This study compared the effectiveness of individualized acupuncture plus self-care versus self-care alone on hot flashes and health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women. METHODS:: This study involved a multicenter, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial with two parallel arms. Participants were postmenopausal women experiencing, on average, seven or more hot flashes per 24 hours during seven consecutive days. The acupuncture group received 10 acupuncture treatment sessions and advice on self-care, and the control group received advice on self-care only. The frequency and severity (0-10 scale) of hot flashes were registered in a diary. Urine excretion of calcitonin gene-related peptide was assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean hot flash frequency from baseline to 12 weeks. The secondary endpoint was change in health-related quality of life measured by the Women's Health Questionnaire. RESULTS:: Hot flash frequency decreased by 5.8 per 24 hours in the acupuncture group (n = 134) and 3.7 per 24 hours in the control group (n = 133), a difference of 2.1 (P < 0.001). Hot flash intensity decreased by 3.2 units in the acupuncture group and 1.8 units in the control group, a difference of 1.4 (P < 0.001). The acupuncture group experienced statistically significant improvements in the vasomotor, sleep, and somatic symptoms dimensions of the Women's Health Questionnaire compared with the control group. Urine calcitonin gene-related peptide excretion remained unchanged from baseline to week 12. CONCLUSIONS:: Acupuncture plus self-care can contribute to a clinically relevant reduction in hot flashes and increased health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women  
  Address From the 1The National Research Center in Alternative and Complementary Medicine, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway; 2Department of General Practice and Primary Care, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, UK; 3Institute of  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 267  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 83  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Borud, E. K.; Alraek, T.; White, A.; Grimsgaard, S. url  openurl
  Title The acupuncture treatment for postmenopausal hot flushes (Acuflash) study: traditional Chinese medicine diagnoses and acupuncture points used, and their relation to the treatment response Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 101-108  
  Keywords Hot Flashes; Climacteric; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Moxibustion; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Warming Needle; Usual Care Control, Educational; AcuTrials  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The multicentre, pragmatic, randomised controlled Acuflash study evaluated the effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncture on postmenopausal vasomotor symptoms and health-related quality of life. It concluded that use of acupuncture in addition to self-care can contribute to a clinically relevant reduction of hot flushes and increased health-related quality of life. This article reports on the TCM syndrome diagnoses and acupuncture points used and their relation to the treatment response, and on treatment reactions and adverse events. METHODS: The acupuncture group (n = 134) received 10 acupuncture treatment sessions and advice on self-care; the control group (n = 133) received advice on self-care only. The study acupuncturists met the current membership criteria of the Norwegian Acupuncture Society, and had at least 3 years' experience of practising TCM acupuncture. They were free to diagnose and select acupuncture points for each participant, after initial discussion. RESULTS: Fifty per cent of the participants in the acupuncture group were diagnosed with Kidney Yin Xu as their primary TCM syndrome diagnosis. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated between the syndrome groups regarding the distribution of responders and non-responders, nor regarding the change in health-related quality of life scores. A core of common acupuncture points (SP6, HT6, KI7, KI6, CV4, LU7, LI4, and LR3) were used in all the syndromes, and in addition multiple idiosyncratic points. Core point selection and frequency of use did not differ between responders and non-responders. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: Factors other than the TCM syndrome diagnoses and the point selection may be of importance regarding the outcome of the treatment.  
  Address The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso, Norway; einar.borud@uit.no.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 267  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 84  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Borup, L.; Wurlitzer, W.; Hedegaard, M.; Kesmodel, U. S.; Hvidman, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as pain relief during delivery: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Birth Abbreviated Journal Birth  
  Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 5-12  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Auricular Acupuncture; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; TENS; Women's Health; Analgesia, Obstetrical; Labor, Obstetric; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many women need some kind of analgesic treatment to relieve pain during childbirth. The objective of our study was to compare the effect of acupuncture with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) and traditional analgesics for pain relief and relaxation during delivery with respect to pain intensity, birth experience, and obstetric outcome. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 607 healthy women in labor at term who received acupuncture, TENS, or traditional analgesics. Primary outcomes were the need for pharmacological and invasive methods, level of pain assessed by a visual analogue scale, birth experience and satisfaction with delivery, and pain relief evaluated at 2 months postpartum. Secondary obstetric outcomes were duration of labor, use of oxytocin, mode of delivery, postpartum hemorrhage, Apgar score, and umbilical cord pH value. Analysis complied with the intention-to-treat principle. RESULTS: Use of pharmacological and invasive methods was significantly lower in the acupuncture group (acupuncture vs traditional, p < 0.001; acupuncture vs TENS, p = 0.031). Pain scores were comparable. Acupuncture did not influence the duration of labor or the use of oxytocin. Mean Apgar score at 5 minutes and umbilical cord pH value were significantly higher among infants in the acupuncture group compared with infants in the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture reduced the need for pharmacological and invasive methods during delivery. Acupuncture is a good supplement to existing pain relief methods.  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 607  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Analgesia, Obstetrical
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 85  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bosch, P.; van den Noort, M.; Yeo, S.; Lim, S.; Coenen, A.; van Luijtelaar, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of acupuncture on mood and working memory in patients with depression and schizophrenia Type of Study
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 6 Pages 380-390  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; *Affect; Depression/*therapy; Female; Humans; Male; *Memory, Short-Term; Middle Aged; Schizophrenia/*therapy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In patients with depression, as well as in patients with schizophrenia, both mood and working memory performance are often impaired. Both issues can only be addressed and improved with medication to some extent. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the mood and the working memory performance in patients with depression or schizophrenia and whether acupuncture can improve these. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A pragmatic clinical trial design was used. The study was conducted in a psychiatric clinic. Fifty patients with depression and 50 with schizophrenia were randomly divided into an experimental and a waiting-list group. Additionally, 25 healthy control participants were included. Twelve weeks of individualized acupuncture treatment was used as the clinical intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All patients were tested before (T1) and after (T2) acupuncture treatment on a mood scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II), a simple working memory task (digit span), and a complex working memory task (letter-number sequencing); the healthy controls were tested at T1 only. RESULTS: Patients with depression scored worse than the others on the BDI-II, and patients with schizophrenia scored worse than the healthy controls. On the digit span, patients with schizophrenia did not differ from healthy controls whereas they scored worse of all on the letter-number sequencing. With respect to the acupuncture findings, first, the present study showed that the use of acupuncture to treat patients with schizophrenia was both practical and safe. Moreover, acupuncture had a positive effect on the BDI-II for the depression group, but acupuncture had no effect on the digit span and on the letter-number sequencing performance for the two clinical groups. CONCLUSION: The clinical improvement in patients with depression after acupuncture treatment was not accompanied by any significant change in a simple working memory task or in a more complex working memory task; the same was true for the patients with schizophrenia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register NTR3132.  
  Address Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 HR Nijmegen, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26559363 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2014  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bosch, P.; van den, N. oort M.; Staudte, H.; Lim, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Schizophrenia and Depression: A systematic Review of the Effectiveness and the Working Mechanisms Behind Acupuncture Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Explore (NY) Abbreviated Journal Explore  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 281-291  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Schizophrenia; Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This systematic review assessed clinical evidence for the use of acupuncture as an add-on treatment in patients with depression and schizophrenia and for its underlying working mechanisms. DATA SOURCES: Four databases (Medline, Scopus, ERIC, and the Cochrane Library) were searched with a cutoff date of March 31, 2014. STUDY SELECTION: Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of acupuncture treatment for depression and schizophrenia were considered for inclusion. The scarcity of acupuncture research involving schizophrenia led to the inclusion of randomized controlled trials and case studies. DATA EXTRACTION: The primary and secondary aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of acupuncture in treating patients with depression or schizophrenia and the possible working mechanisms underlying acupuncture through a systematic literature review. DATA SYNTHESIS: The overall clinical results on using acupuncture to treat depression are promising, but only limited evidence for its effectiveness in treating schizophrenia was found. Acupuncture improves the quality of life, particularly that of sleep, in psychiatric patients. Brain research has revealed that acupuncture has a modulating and normalizing effect on the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN), including the default mode network. Because the LPNN is related to sleep and emotions, this might explain the improved qualities of life and sleep after acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: From the evidence found in this study, acupuncture seems to be an effective add-on treatment in patients with depression and, to a lesser degree, in patients with schizophrenia, but large well-designed studies are needed to confirm that evidence.  
  Address Center for Cognition, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen, Postbus 9104, Montessorilaan 3, Nijmegen 6525 HR, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1611  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bosch, P.; van Luijtelaar, G.; van den, N. oort M.; Lim, S.; Egger, J.; Coenen, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep ameliorating effects of acupuncture in a psychiatric population Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2013 Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Sleep Disorders; Acu Versus Wait List; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Wait-List Control; Group Acupuncture Style; Schizophrenia; Depression; Group Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract The interest of psychiatric patients for complementary medicine, such as acupuncture, is stable, but effect studies in psychiatry remain scarce. In this pilot study, the effects of 3 months of acupuncture treatment on sleep were evaluated and compared between a group of patients with schizophrenia (n = 16) and a group with depression (n = 16). Healthy controls were included in order to establish reference values (n = 8). Patients with schizophrenia and depression were randomly assigned to either a waiting list or a treatment condition. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory was completed before and after the acupuncture treatment (individualized and according to traditional Chinese medicine principles) or the waiting list condition. Both acupuncture groups showed significant lower scores on the sleep inventory, which was not the case for the waiting list condition. Moreover, it was found that the effectiveness of the acupuncture treatment was higher in the patients with schizophrenia than in the patients with depression. Acupuncture seems able to improve sleep in this convenient sample of patients with long-lasting psychiatric problems and may be a suitable and cost-effective add-on treatment for this group, particularly if conducted group-wise.  
  Address Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, Postbus 9104, Montessorilaan 3, 6500 HR Nijmegen, The Netherlands ; LVR-Klinik Bedburg-Hau, Bahnstrasse 6, 47551 Bedburg-Hau, Germany ; Division of Acupuncture & Meridian, WHO Collaborating C  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 86  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Boutouyrie, P.; Corvisier, R.; Azizi, M.; Lemoine, D.; Laloux, B.; Hallouin, M.; Laurent, S. openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture on radial artery hemodynamics: controlled trials in sensitized and naive subjects Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 280 Issue 2 Pages H628-33  
  Keywords Healthy Subjects; Radial Artery; Pulse; Waveform; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Palpation of the radial pulses is an important technique in traditional Chinese medicine. Two double-blind randomized trials of the effects of real and sham acupuncture on radial artery hemodynamics were conducted in 19 patients regularly exposed to acupuncture (sensitized subjects) and in 8 healthy subjects devoid of previous exposure (naive subjects), respectively. Radial artery diameter and pulse waveform were measured with a high-resolution echotracking system and aplanation tonometry, respectively, before and during a 20-min acupuncture period. In sensitized patients, arterial diameter significantly increased during real acupuncture, compared with the sham group (+7.5 +/- 2.8 vs. -2.9 +/- 2.7%, respectively; P < 0.01). By contrast, in naive subjects, arterial diameter did not change during real or sham acupuncture. In both populations, no significant difference was observed between real and sham acupuncture, concerning the time course of blood pressure, radial artery distensibility, and pressure waveform. Our results demonstrate that real acupuncture is associated with an objective vasodilatation of the radial artery in patients regularly exposed to acupuncture, but not in naive subjects.  
  Address Department of Pharmacology and Unite, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale U 337, Paris, France.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category New Articles to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/21/2015; Date Modified: 8/20/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Department of Pharmacology and Unite, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale U 337, Paris, France.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=11158960 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1684  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bower, W. F.; Diao, M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as a treatment for nocturnal enuresis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Autonomic neuroscience : basic &amp; clinical Abbreviated Journal Auton Neurosci  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Nocturnal Enuresis; Urologic Diseases; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bed Wetting  
  Abstract Acupuncture can influence spinal micturition centers and parasympathetic innervation to the urinary tract and is known to modulate brain function via the descending serotonergic system. There are numerous difficulties in evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture in patients with nocturnal enuresis (NE), since the patient group is frequently heterogenous and the intervention is commonly given in association with other modalities. Until recently incomplete reporting of the quality aspects of studies has also limited evaluation of treatment effects. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate reports from both Western and Eastern medicines in which acupuncture was compared to some other treatment modality in children with nocturnal enuresis. Focusing on Chinese language sources 41 new studies of acupuncture for NE were identified, 13 of which were clinical trials that reported parameters of treatment and defined outcome measures of efficacy. A standardized data extraction form was used to evaluate outcome measures and to scrutinize the quality aspects of studies. All barr one study reported the efficacy rate of acupuncture as part of a TCM package to be higher than alarm therapy, the gold standard of Western medicine intervention for NE. Acupuncture as a monotherapy for the treatment of NE appears to be less effective than acupuncture given as part of a combined Traditional Chinese Medicine approach. Electroacupuncture enhances treatment outcomes.  
  Address Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Nocturnal Enuresis
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 87  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bower, W. F.; Diao, M.; Tang, J. L.; Yeung, C. K. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for nocturnal enuresis in children: A systematic review and exploration of rationale Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2005 Publication Neurourology and urodynamics Abbreviated Journal Neurourol Urodyn  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bed Wetting; Meta-Analysis; Nocturnal Enuresis; Pediatrics; Systematic Review; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urologic Diseases  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This review identified reports of acupuncture for childhood nocturnal enuresis, with the aim of ascertaining whether acupuncture is efficacious and or better than standard therapy for treating enuresis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Studies of children of either gender <18 years of age who received acupuncture treatment for nocturnal enuresis, were considered. The primary outcome measure was change in the mean number of wet episodes following treatment. Electronic searching was supplemented by hand searching of western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) journals along with English language alternative medicine journals. Trials were assessed for quality and sources of bias. Meta-analysis was performed and the overall weighted odds ratio (OR) and associated 95% confidence interval (CI) were computed using the fixed effect model; the Forest plot was used to demonstrate results. RESULTS: Two hundred six abstracts were identified, of which 11 studies were eligible for data extraction. All the trials were of low methodological quality. There was some evidence that acupuncture is useful for nocturnal enuresis when used in conjunction with other treatment that may also include a different form of acupuncture (OR 3.98, CI: 2.2-7.2). When one form of acupuncture is compared with another there was marked heterogeneity, implying that some forms of acupuncture are effective. CONCLUSION: This review provides tentative evidence for the efficacy of acupuncture for the treatment of childhood nocturnal enuresis. Due to the low methodological quality of studies, evidence to identify, which parameters of acupuncture work best, is lacking. More rigorous trials are clearly warranted. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc  
  Address Department of Surgery, Division of Paediatric Surgery and Paediatric Urology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Nocturnal Enuresis
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 88  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Boyuan, Z.; Yang, C.; Ke, C.; Xueyong, S.; Sheng, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture for psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 313549  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Substance-Related Disorders; Opioid-Related Disorders; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse; Mental Disorders; Psychological Symptoms; Anxiety; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Systematic Review; Meta-analysis  
  Abstract This review systematically assessed the clinical evidence for and against acupuncture as a treatment for psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. The database was accessed from MEDLINE and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database. We included all randomized clinical trials published in Chinese and English regardless of their controls. Meta-analysis was performed using the RevMan software, version 5.2. We conducted a literature search of 16 databases from their inception to January 2014. Four studies from Western countries did not report any clinical gains in the treatment of psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. 10 of 12 studies from China have reported positive findings regarding the use of acupuncture to treat the psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. The methodological quality of the included studies was poor. The meta-analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between the treatment group and the control group for anxiety and depression associated with opioid addiction, although groups did not differ on opioid craving. This review and meta-analysis could not confirm that acupuncture was an effective treatment for psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. However, considering the potential of acupuncture demonstrated in the included studies, further rigorous randomized controlled trials with long followup are warranted.  
  Address Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 200032, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Opioid-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25530779; PMCID:PMC4235186 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2110  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2443  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2484  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2525  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2566  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2607  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2661  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2702  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2730  
Permanent link to this record
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