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Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2771  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2812  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2853  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2894  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2935  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brinkhaus, B.; Hummelsberger, J.; Kohnen, R.; Seufert, J.; Hempen, C. H.; Leonhardy, H.; Nogel, R.; Joos, S.; Hahn, E.; Schuppan, D. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine in the treatment of patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized-controlled clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication European journal of allergy and clinical immunology Abbreviated Journal Allergy  
  Volume 59 Issue 9 Pages 953-960  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Herbal Formula; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Background: Patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) increasingly use complementary medicine. The aim of this study was to determine whether traditional Chinese therapy is efficacious in patients suffering from seasonal AR. Methods: Fifty-two patients between the ages of 20 and 58 who had typical symptoms of seasonal AR were assigned randomly and in a blinded fashion to (i) an active treatment group which received a semi-standardized acupuncture of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, and (ii) a control group which received acupuncture applied to non-acupuncture points in addition to a non-specific Chinese herbal formula. All patients received acupuncture treatment once per week and the respective Chinese herbal formula as a decoction three times daily for a total of 6 weeks. Assessments were performed before, during, and 1 week after treatment. The change in severity of hay fever symptoms was the primary outcome measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Compared with patients in the control group, patients in the active treatment group showed a significant after-treatment improvement on the VAS (P = 0.006) and Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (P = 0.015). Improvement on the Global Assessment of Change Scale was noted in 85% of active treatment group participants vs 40% in the control group (P = 0.048). No differences between the two groups could be detected with the Allergic Rhinitis Symptom Questionnaire. Both treatments were well-tolerated. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that traditional Chinese therapy may be an efficacious and safe treatment option for patients with seasonal AR  
  Address Department of Medicine I, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 52  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score 73  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 89  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brinkhaus, B.; Ortiz, M.; Witt, C. M.; Roll, S.; Linde, K.; Pfab, F.; Niggemann, B.; Hummelsberger, J.; Treszl, A.; Ring, J.; Zuberbier, T.; Wegscheider, K.; Willich, S. N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Annals of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume 158 Issue 4 Pages 225-234  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; RCT; Acupuncture; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Chinese translation BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is frequently used to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) despite limited scientific evidence. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of acupuncture in patients with SAR. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled multicenter trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00610584) SETTING: 46 specialized physicians in 6 hospital clinics and 32 private outpatient clinics. PATIENTS: 422 persons with SAR and IgE sensitization to birch and grass pollen. INTERVENTION: Acupuncture plus rescue medication (RM) (cetirizine) (n = 212), sham acupuncture plus RM (n = 102), or RM alone (n = 108). Twelve treatments were provided over 8 weeks in the first year. MEASUREMENTS: Changes in the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) overall score and the RM score (RMS) from baseline to weeks 7 and 8 and week 16 in the first year and week 8 in the second year after randomization, with predefined noninferiority margins of -0.5 point (RQLQ) and -1.5 points (RMS). RESULTS: Compared with sham acupuncture and with RM, acupuncture was associated with improvement in RQLQ score (sham vs. acupuncture mean difference, 0.5 point [97.5% CI, 0.2 to 0.8 point; P < 0.001]; RM vs. acupuncture mean difference, 0.7 point [97.5% CI, 0.4 to 1.0 point; P < 0.001]) and RMS (sham vs. acupuncture mean difference, 1.1 points [97.5% CI, 0.4 to 1.9 points; P < 0.001]; RM vs. acupuncture mean difference, 1.5 points [97.5% CI, 0.8 to 2.2 points; P < 0.001]). There were no differences after 16 weeks in the first year. After the 8-week follow-up phase in the second year, small improvements favoring real acupuncture over the sham procedure were noted (RQLQ mean difference, 0.3 point [95% CI, 0.03 to 0.6 point; P = 0.032]; RMS mean difference, 1.0 point [95% CI, 0.2 to 1.9 points; P = 0.018]). LIMITATION: The study was not powered to detect rare adverse events, and the RQLQ and RMS values were low at baseline. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture led to statistically significant improvements in disease-specific quality of life and antihistamine use measures after 8 weeks of treatment compared with sham acupuncture and with RM alone, but the improvements may not be clinically significant.  
  Address Charite University Medical Center and German Red Cross Hospital Westend, Berlin, Germany.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 422  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 90  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brinkhaus, B.; Witt, C. M.; Jena, S.; Liecker, B.; Wegscheider, K.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in patients with allergic rhinitis: a pragmatic randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Annals of allergy, asthma, and immunology Abbreviated Journal Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol  
  Volume 101 Issue 5 Pages 535-543  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Rhinitis, Allergic; Allergies; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Unspecified Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is widely used in patients with allergic rhinitis, but the available evidence of its effectiveness is insufficient. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in addition to routine care in patients with allergic rhinitis compared with treatment with routine care alone. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial, patients with allergic rhinitis were randomly allocated to receive up to 15 acupuncture sessions during a period of 3 months or to a control group receiving no acupuncture. Patients who did not consent to random assignment received acupuncture treatment. All patients were allowed to receive usual medical care. The Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) and general health-related quality of life (36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Of 5,237 patients (mean [SD] age, 40 [12] years; 62% women), 487 were randomly assigned to acupuncture and 494 to control, and 4,256 were included in the nonrandomized acupuncture group. At 3 months, the RQLQ improved by a mean (SE) of 1.48 (0.06) in the acupuncture group and by 0.50 (0.06) in the control group (3-month scores, 1.44 [0.06] and 2.42 [0.06], respectively; difference in improvement, 0.98 [0.08]; P < .001). Similarly, quality-of-life improvements were more pronounced in the acupuncture vs the control group (P < .001). Six-month improvements in both acupuncture groups were lower than they had been at 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this trial suggest that treating patients with allergic rhinitis in routine care with additional acupuncture leads to clinically relevant and persistent benefits. In addition, it seems that physician characteristics play a minor role in the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment, although this idea needs further investigation  
  Address Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany. benno.brinkhaus@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 981  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Rhinitis, Allergic
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 91  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brinkhaus, B.; Witt, C. M.; Jena, S.; Linde, K.; Streng, A.; Hummelsberger, J.; Irnich, D.; Hammes, M.; Pach, D.; Melchart, D.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Physician and treatment characteristics in a randomised multicentre trial of acupuncture in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages 180-189  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Auricular Acupuncture; Penetrating Sham; Osteoarthritis, Knee; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Wait-List Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to describe the treatment and physician characteristics in a randomised trial of acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the knee. DESIGN: Three-armed, randomised, controlled multicentre trial with 1-year follow-up. SETTING: Twenty-eight outpatient centres in Germany. INTERVENTIONS: A total of 294 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were randomised to 12 sessions of semi-standardised acupuncture (at least 6 local and 2 distant points needled per affected knee from a selection of predefined points, but individual choice of additional body or ear acupuncture points possible), 12 sessions of minimal acupuncture (superficial needling of at least 8 of 10 predefined, bilateral, distant non-acupuncture points) or a waiting list control (2 months no acupuncture). OUTCOME: Participating trial physicians and interventions. RESULTS: Forty-seven physicians specialised in acupuncture (mean age 43+/-8 years, 26 females) provided study interventions in 28 outpatient centres in Germany. The median duration of acupuncture training completed by participating physicians was 350h (range 140-2508). The total number of needles used was 17.4+/-4.8 in the acupuncture group compared to 12.9+/-3.3 in the minimal acupuncture group. In total, 39 physicians (83%) stated that they would have treated patients in either a similar or in exactly the same way outside of the trial, whereas 7 (15%) stated that they would have treated patients differently (1 missing). CONCLUSIONS: Our documentation of the trial interventions shows that semi-standardised acupuncture strategy represents an acceptable compromise for efficacy studies. However, a substantial minority of participating trial physicians stated that they would have treated patients differently outside of the trial  
  Address Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Center, Humboldt University of Berlin, 10098 Berlin, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 44 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 294  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 92  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brinkhaus, B.; Witt, C. M.; Jena, S.; Linde, K.; Streng, A.; Wagenpfeil, S.; Irnich, D.; Walther, H. U.; Melchart, D.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume 166 Issue 4 Pages 450-457  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Penetrating Sham; Low Back Pain; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Wait-List Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is widely used by patients with low back pain, although its effectiveness is unclear. We investigated the efficacy of acupuncture compared with minimal acupuncture and with no acupuncture in patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: Patients were randomized to treatment with acupuncture, minimal acupuncture (superficial needling at nonacupuncture points), or a waiting list control. Acupuncture and minimal acupuncture were administered by specialized acupuncture physicians in 30 outpatient centers, and consisted of 12 sessions per patient over 8 weeks. Patients completed standardized questionnaires at baseline and at 8, 26, and 52 weeks after randomization. The primary outcome variable was the change in low back pain intensity from baseline to the end of week 8, as determined on a visual analog scale (range, 0-100 mm). RESULTS: A total of 298 patients (67.8% female; mean +/- SD age, 59 +/- 9 years) were included. Between baseline and week 8, pain intensity decreased by a mean +/- SD of 28.7 +/- 30.3 mm in the acupuncture group, 23.6 +/- 31.0 mm in the minimal acupuncture group, and 6.9 +/- 22.0 mm in the waiting list group. The difference for the acupuncture vs minimal acupuncture group was 5.1 mm (95% confidence interval, -3.7 to 13.9 mm; P = .26), and the difference for the acupuncture vs waiting list group was 21.7 mm (95% confidence interval, 13.9-30.0 mm; P<.001). Also, at 26 (P=.96) and 52 (P=.61) weeks, pain did not differ significantly between the acupuncture and the minimal acupuncture groups. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture was more effective in improving pain than no acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic low back pain, whereas there were no significant differences between acupuncture and minimal acupuncture  
  Address Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite, University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany. benno.brinkhaus@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 44 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 298  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score 94  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 93  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brockhaus, A.; Elger, C.E. openurl 
  Title Hypalgesic efficacy of acupuncture on experimental pain in man. Comparison of laser acupuncture and needle acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 1990 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 181-185  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Rct; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Laser Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Laser; Verum Acupoint Control; Heat Pain  
  Abstract The analgesic effect of acupuncture on cutaneous heat stimuli of 43 degrees C has been evaluated in a controlled experimental study with healthy, informed volunteers. Laser acupuncture was administered to 39 probationers using a helium-neon laser under double-blind conditions. The point Hegu (L.I.4) and Jianqian (Extra.) on both sides were each irradiated for 1 min. Forty probationers were needled with stainless steel needles in the point Hegu (L.I.4) on both sides under single-blind conditions. Pain threshold was measured in terms of the time (in msec) that the probationers needed to perceive the cutaneous heat stimulus of 43 degrees C. The painful stimulus was generated by a computer-controlled standardized procedure. The Wilcoxon test was used for the statistical evaluation. Laser acupuncture did not change the pain threshold. Needle acupuncture did, however, increase the pain threshold compared with the initial value (alpha = 0.1%). The difference compared with the control group, where a placebo point was needled, was also significant (alpha = 5%). This controlled experimental study proves the analgesic effect of needle acupuncture on painful heat stimuli. Laser acupuncture had no effect on pain threshold in this study.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 79  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Anesthesia and Analgesia
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/21/2015; Date Modified: 7/29/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Anesthesia and Analgesia; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=2087329 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1683  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brown J; Farquhar C url  openurl
  Title Endometriosis: an overview of Cochrane Reviews Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages N.Pag-N.Pag  
  Keywords Endometriosis -- Therapy; Infertility -- Drug Therapy; Pain -- Drug Therapy; Treatment Outcomes; Alternative Therapies -- Classification; Antiinflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal -- Classification; Cochrane Library; Female; Gonadotropins -- Therapeutic Use; Human; Intrauterine Devices -- Utilization; Laparoscopy -- Utilization; Levonorgestrel -- Therapeutic Use; Surgery, Gynecologic -- Classification  
  Abstract This overview reports on interventions for pain relief and for subfertility in pre-menopausal women with clinically diagnosed endometriosis. The objective of this overview was to summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on treatment options for women with pain or subfertility associated with endometriosis. Published Cochrane systematic reviews reporting pain or fertility outcomes in women with clinically diagnosed endometriosis were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation (protocols and titles) for future inclusion. The reviews, protocols and titles were identified by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Archie (the Cochrane information management system) in March 2014.Pain-related outcomes of the overview were pain relief, clinical improvement or resolution and pain recurrence. Fertility-related outcomes were live birth, clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, miscarriage and adverse events.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed using the AMSTAR tool. The quality of the evidence for each outcome was assessed using GRADE methods. Review findings were summarised in the text and the data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Seventeen systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library were included. All the reviews were high quality. The quality of the evidence for specific comparisons ranged from very low to moderate. Limitations in the evidence included risk of bias in the primary studies, inconsistency between the studies, and imprecision in effect estimates. Pain relief (14 reviews) Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues One systematic review reported low quality evidence of an overall benefit for GnRH analogues compared with placebo or no treatment. Ovulation suppression Five systematic reviews reported on medical treatment using ovulation suppression. There was moderate quality evidence that the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUD) was more effective than expectant management, and very low quality evidence that danazol was more effective than placebo. There was no consistent evidence of a difference in effectiveness between oral contraceptives and goserelin, estrogen plus progestogen and placebo, or progestogens and placebo, though in all cases the relevant evidence was of low or very low quality. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)A review of NSAIDs reported inconclusive evidence of a benefit in symptom relief compared with placebo. Surgical interventions There were two reviews of surgical interventions. One reported moderate quality evidence of a benefit in pain relief following laparoscopic surgery compared to diagnostic laparoscopy only. The other reported very low quality evidence that recurrence rates of endometriomata were lower after excisional surgery than after ablative surgery. Post-surgical medical interventions Two reviews reported on post-surgical medical interventions. Neither found evidence of an effect on pain outcomes, though in both cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Alternative medicine There were two systematic reviews of alternative medicine. One reported evidence of a benefit from auricular acupuncture compared to Chinese herbal medicine, and the other reported no evidence of a difference between Chinese herbal medicine and danazol. In both cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Anti-TNF-I± drugs One review found no evidence of a difference in effectiveness between anti-TNF-I± drugs and placebo. However, the evidence was of low quality. Reviews reporting fertility outcomes (8 reviews) Medical interventions Four reviews reported on medical interventions for improving fertility in women with endometriosis. One compared three months of GnRH agonists with a control in women undergoing assisted reproduction and found very low quality evidence of an increase in clinical pregnancies in the treatment group. There was no evidence of a difference in effectiveness between the interventions in the other three reviews, which compared GnRH agonists versus antagonists, ovulation suppression versus placebo or no treatment, and pre-surgical medical therapy versus surgery alone. In all cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Surgical interventions Three reviews reported on surgical interventions. There was moderate quality evidence that both live births or ongoing pregnancy rates and clinical pregnancy rates were higher after laparoscopic surgery than after diagnostic laparoscopy alone. There was low quality evidence of no difference in effectiveness between surgery and expectant management for endometrioma. One review found low quality evidence that excisional surgery resulted in higher clinical pregnancy rates than drainage or ablation of endometriomata. Post-surgical interventions Two reviews reported on post-surgical medical interventions. They found no evidence of an effect on clinical pregnancy rates. The evidence was of low or very low quality. Alternative medicine A review of Chinese herbal medicine in comparison with gestrinone found no evidence of a difference between the groups in clinical pregnancy rates. However, the evidence was of low quality. Adverse events Reviews of GnRH analogues and of danazol reported that the interventions were associated with higher rates of adverse effects than placebo; and depot progestagens were associated with higher rates of adverse events than other treatments. Chinese herbal medicine was associated with fewer side effects than gestrinone or danazol.Three reviews reported miscarriage as an outcome. No difference was found between surgical and diagnostic laparoscopy, between GnRH agonists and antagonists, or between aspiration of endometrioma and expectant management. However, in all cases the quality of the evidence was of low quality. For women with pain and endometriosis, suppression of menstrual cycles with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUD) and danazol were beneficial interventions. Laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis and excision of endometriomata were also associated with improvements in pain. The evidence on NSAIDs was inconclusive. There was no evidence of benefit with post-surgical medical treatment.In women with endometriosis undergoing assisted reproduction, three months of treatment with GnRH agonist improved pregnancy rates. Excisional surgery improved spontaneous pregnancy rates in the nine to 12 months after surgery compared to ablative surgery. Laparoscopic surgery improved live birth and pregnancy rates compared to diagnostic laparoscopy alone. There was no evidence that medical treatment improved clinical pregnancy rates.Evidence on harms was scanty, but GnRH analogues, danazol and depot progestagens were associated with higher rates than other interventions.[CINAHL Note: The Cochrane Collaboration systematic reviews contain interactive software that allows various calculations in the MetaView.]  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107855472. Language: English. Entry Date: 20101029. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management; Women's Health. NLM UID: 100909747. Cochrane AN: CD009590. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107855472 Serial 2388  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bu, Y. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Combined with Massage for Treatment of Cervical Spondylosis of Vertebral Artery Type Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 4 Issue 6 Pages 44-46  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Massage; Neck Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Spondylosis;  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 96  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Spondylosis
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 48  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 94  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bu, Y.; Du, G.; Chen, S. openurl 
  Title Clinical study on the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea with preconditioning acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Chinese journal of integrative medicine Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 3 Pages 224-227  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 95  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2437  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2478  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2519  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2560  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2601  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2638  
Permanent link to this record
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