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Author Chung-Yuh Tzeng; Shih-Liang Chang; Chih-Cheng Wu; Chu-Ling Chang; Wen-Gii Chen; Kwok-Man Tong; Kui-Chou Huang; Ching-Liang Hsieh url  openurl
  Title Single-blinded, randomised preliminary study evaluating the effects of 2 Hz electroacupuncture for postoperative pain in patients with total knee arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 284-288  
  Keywords ACUPUNCTURE points; CORRELATION (Statistics); Electroacupuncture; POSTOPERATIVE pain; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); TOTAL knee replacement; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; VISUAL analog scale; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; MANN Whitney U Test; KRUSKAL-Wallis Test  
  Abstract Objective To explore the point-specific clinical effect of 2 Hz electroacupuncture (EA) in treating postoperative pain in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), Methods In a randomised, partially single-blinded preliminary study, 47patients with TKA were randomly divided into three groups: control group (CG, n=17) using only patient-controlled analgesia (PCA); EA group (EAG, n=16) with 2 Hz EA applied at ST36 ( Zusanli ) and GB34 ( Yanglingquan ) contralateral to the operated leg for 30 min on the first two postoperative days, also receiving PCA; and non-point group (NPG, n=14), with EA identical to the EAG except given 1 cm lateral to both ST36 and GB34. The Mann – Whitney test was used to show the difference between two groups and the Kruskal – Wallis test to show the difference between the three groups. Results The time until patients first required PCA in the CG was 34.1±22.0 min, which was significantly shorter than the 92.0±82.7 min in the EAG (p<0.001) and 90.7±94.8 min in the NPG (p<0.001); there was no difference between the EAG and NPG groups (p>0.05). The total dosage of PCA solution given was 4.6±0.9 mL/kg body weight in the CG, 4.2±1.0 mL/kg in the EAG and 4.5±1.0 mL/kg in the NPG; there were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the three groups. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, EA retarded the first demand for PCA in comparison with no EA. No effect was seen on the total dosage of PCA required and no point-specific effect was seen.  
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  Notes Accession Number: 109111928; Source Information: Aug2015, Vol. 33 Issue 4, p284; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CORRELATION (Statistics); Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: POSTOPERATIVE pain; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: TOTAL knee replacement; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: VISUAL analog scale; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: KRUSKAL-Wallis Test; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 5p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 2 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2242  
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Author Zhang, Y.; Qu, S.-shan; Zhang, J.-ping; Sun, Y.-ling; Liu, W.-lu; Xie, L.; Huang, Y.; Chen, J.-qi url  openurl
  Title Rapid Onset of the Effects of Combined Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Electroacupuncture on Primary Depression: A Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 1-8  
  Keywords MENTAL depression -- Treatment; SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors -- Therapeutic use; RESEARCH methodology evaluation; ALTERNATIVE medicine; COMBINED modality therapy; CONFIDENCE intervals; Electroacupuncture; EXPERIMENTAL design; HAMILTON Depression Inventory; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; PROBABILITY theory; PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; MEDICAL coding; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation; China  
  Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and electroacupuncture therapies for the early treatment of primary depression. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were analyzed to compare therapy combining SSRIs and electroacupuncture to SSRI therapy alone. The RCTs were identified by searching, among others, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chongqing VIP database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, WANFANG DATA, and the Chinese Biological Medical Literature Database. Scores from Self-Rated Depression Scale (SDS), the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Side Effect Rating Scale (SERS), and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) were analyzed and coded by two independent investigators and used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment. Statistical analyses were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results: Six RCTs were analyzed. The meta-analysis revealed that the combined therapy of SSRIs and electroacupuncture were associated with superior scores on the HAMD, SDS, and SERS measures compared with SSRIs alone after 1-4 weeks of treatment: HAMD scores, mean difference (MD)1 week, 2.32 (95% confidence interval [CI]1 week, 1.47-3.16, p1 week<0.00001); MD2 weeks, 2.65 (95% CI2 weeks, 1.81- 3.50, p2 weeks<0.00001); MD4 weeks, 2.70 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.90-3.51, p4 weeks<0.00001); SDS scores: MD1 week, 3.13 (95% CI1 week, 1.22-5.03, p1 week = 0.001); MD2 weeks, 4.05 (95% CI2 weeks, 0.22-7.87, p2 weeks = 0.04); MD4 weeks, 5.02 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.61-8.43, p4 weeks = 0.004); SERS scores: MD2 weeks, 2.20 (95% CI2 weeks, 1.43-2.96, p2 weeks<0.00001); MD4 weeks, 2.12 (95% CI4 weeks, 1.42-2.83, p4 weeks<0.00001). However, two of the aforementioned outcomes were rated as medium quality because of heterogeneity, as assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that the early treatment of primary depression using both SSRI and electroacupuncture therapies is more efficient than treatments with SSRIs alone and leads to a better and earlier control of depressive symptoms.  
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  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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  Notes Accession Number: 112335762; Source Information: Jan2016, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p1; Subject Term: MENTAL depression -- Treatment; Subject Term: SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors -- Therapeutic use; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: COMBINED modality therapy; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: HAMILTON Depression Inventory; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; Subject Term: SEROTONIN uptake inhibitors; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: MEDICAL coding; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 8p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 11 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2241  
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Author Xiao Wu; Cuihong Zheng; Xiaohu Xu; Pei Ding; Fan Xiong; Man Tian; Ying Wang; Haoxu Dong; Mingmin Zhang; Wei Wang; Shabei Xu; Minjie Xie; Guangying Huang url  openurl
  Title Electroacupuncture for Functional Constipation: A Multicenter, Randomized, Control Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords CONSTIPATION -- Treatment; Constipation; Defecation; Electroacupuncture; GASTROINTESTINAL agents; MEDICAL cooperation; ORAL medication; PATIENT satisfaction; QUALITY of life; Research; SAMPLING (Statistics); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness  
  Abstract Background and Aim. To investigate the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) with different current intensities for functional constipation (FC) and to assess whether the effects of EA with different current intensities are superior to the mosapride. Methods. Patients with FC were randomly divided into low current intensity group (LCI), high current intensity group (HCI), and mosapride group (MC). The primary outcome was three or more spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs) per week and an increase of one or more SBMs from baseline during at least 3 of the 4 weeks. Results. The primary outcome was reached by 53.45%, 66.15%, and 52.24% of the patients who received LCI, HCI, and mosapride, respectively. EA can significantly improve the weekly SBMs and stool consistency and reduce straining severity ( p < 0.0001, all). HCI improved the quality of life better than mosapride ( p < 0.05) and reduced the proportion of severe constipation more than LCI and mosapride ( p < 0.05, both). Conclusions. EA is effective and safe at both current intensities for FC; therapeutic effects of LCI and HCI are not superior to mosapride. EA is superior to mosapride in improving patients’ life quality and satisfaction level of treatment; EA has fewer adverse events than mosapride.  
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  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
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  Notes Accession Number: 121086632; Source Information: 1/31/2017, p1; Subject Term: CONSTIPATION -- Treatment; Subject Term: CONSTIPATION; Subject Term: DEFECATION; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: GASTROINTESTINAL agents; Subject Term: MEDICAL cooperation; Subject Term: ORAL medication; Subject Term: PATIENT satisfaction; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: RESEARCH; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 5 Charts, 2 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2239  
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Author Liu, A.-J.; Li, J.-H.; Li, H.-Q.; Fu, D.-L.; Lu, L.; Bian, Z.-X.; Zheng, G.-Q. url  openurl
  Title Electroacupuncture for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication American Journal of Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal American Journal of Chinese Medicine  
  Volume 43 Issue 8 Pages 1541-1566  
  Keywords CHI-squared test; CONFIDENCE intervals; Electroacupuncture; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; PATIENTS -- Safety measures; RESEARCH -- Finance; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; STROKE -- Patients -- Rehabilitation; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; AMED (Information retrieval system)  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is an extension technique of acupuncture based on traditional acupuncture combined with modern electrotherapy. Here, we conducted a systematic review specifically to assess the effectiveness and safety of EA for acute ischemic stroke. Eight databases were searched for randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of EA for acute ischemic stroke published from inception to June 2013. Ultimately, 67 studies claimed to be RCTs. Eighteen studies with 1411 individuals were selected for the analyses, which got 'yes' in the domains of Cochrane risk of bias tool. The meta-analysis showed a significant effect of EA for improving Barthel Index (), Fugl-Meyer Assessment (), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale () and Revised Scandinavian Stroke Scale () compared with western conventional treatments (WCTs). In an analysis of the total clinical efficacy rate, there was a significant difference between EA and WCTs (). Adverse effects were monitored in 6 studies, and were well tolerated in all stroke patients. According to the GRADE approach, the quality of evidence was mostly high or moderate. In conclusion, this systematic review revealed the evidence in support of the use of EA for acute ischemic stroke, although further larger sample-size and rigorously designed RCTs are required.  
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  Notes Accession Number: 112083268; Source Information: 2015, Vol. 43 Issue 8, p1541; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: PATIENTS -- Safety measures; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: STROKE -- Patients -- Rehabilitation; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: AMED (Information retrieval system); Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 26p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 10 Charts, 1 Graph; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2238  
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Author Shim, J.-W.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kim, S.-S. url  openurl
  Title Effects of Electroacupuncture for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-18  
  Keywords KNEE -- Diseases -- Treatment; OSTEOARTHRITIS -- Treatment; Electroacupuncture; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; QUALITY of life; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; AMED (Information retrieval system)  
  Abstract Purpose. This study aims to verify the effects of electroacupuncture treatment on osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, AMED, CNKI, and five Korean databases were searched by predefined search strategies to screen eligible randomized controlled studies meeting established criteria. Any risk of bias in the included studies was assessed with the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan version 5.3 software. Results. Thirty-one randomized controlled studies of 3,187 participants were included in this systematic review. Meta-analysis was conducted with eight studies including a total of 1,220 participants. The electroacupuncture treatment group showed more significant improvement in pain due to knee osteoarthritis than the control group (SMD ?1.86, 95% CI ?2.33 to ?1.39, I2 75%) and in total WOMAC score than the control group (SMD ?1.34, CI 95% ?1.85 to ?0.83, I2 73%). Compared to the control group, the electroacupuncture treatment group showed more significant improvement on the quality of life scale. Conclusion. Electroacupuncture treatment can relieve the pain of osteoarthritis of the knees and improve comprehensive aspects of knee osteoarthritis and the quality of life of patients with knee osteoarthritis.  
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  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
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  Notes Accession Number: 118760351; Source Information: 10/13/2016, p1; Subject Term: KNEE -- Diseases -- Treatment; Subject Term: OSTEOARTHRITIS -- Treatment; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: AMED (Information retrieval system); Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 18p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 10 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2237  
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Author Zhenhong Shuai; Fang Lian; Pengfei Li; Wenxiu Yang url  openurl
  Title Effect of transcutaneous electrical acupuncture point stimulation on endometrial receptivity in women undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer: a single-blind prospective randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 9-15  
  Keywords ENDOMETRIUM -- Physiology; DOPPLER ultrasonography -- Methodology; ELECTROACUPUNCTURE -- Methodology; ACUPUNCTURE points; CHI-squared test; EMBRYO transplantation; FISHER exact test; HUMAN reproductive technology; Immunohistochemistry; LONGITUDINAL method; MEDICAL care -- Evaluation; Pregnancy; RESEARCH -- Finance; T-test (Statistics); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract Objective To evaluate the effect of transcutaneous electrical acupuncture point stimulation (TEAS) on endometrial HOXA10 protein expression and three-dimensional (3D) power Doppler ultrasound parameters as markers of endometrial receptivity in women undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET). Methods A total of 68 women undergoing FET were randomised to receive TEAS or mock TEAS at acupuncture points CV3, CV4 and SP6 and Zigong bilaterally. Both groups had six sessions per cycle for three menstrual cycles prior to the scheduled FET. Each session lasted 30 min and was repeated every other day. 3D power Doppler ultrasound parameters, HOXA10 protein expression and rates of embryo implantation, clinical pregnancy and live birth were compared. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in endometrial thickness or endometrial volume. The ultrasonographic endometrial triple-line pattern was present more often in the TEAS group (p=0.002). The TEAS group had a greater endometrial and subendometrial vascularisation index (VI) than the mock TEAS group (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) on 3D ultrasound and increased endometrial HOXA10 expression (p=0.001) immediately prior to FET. Subsequently, the rates of embryo implantation, clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were all higher in the TEAS group than in the mock TEAS group (p=0.024, p=0.038 and p=0.033, respectively). Conclusions In patients undergoing FET, TEAS may have beneficial effects on endometrial HOXA10 expression and ultrasound markers of endometrial receptivity. These findings may explain the improvement in clinical outcome of FET associated with the use of TEAS.  
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  Notes Accession Number: 101101413; Source Information: Feb2015, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p9; Subject Term: ENDOMETRIUM -- Physiology; Subject Term: DOPPLER ultrasonography -- Methodology; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE -- Methodology; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: EMBRYO transplantation; Subject Term: FISHER exact test; Subject Term: HUMAN reproductive technology; Subject Term: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MEDICAL care -- Evaluation; Subject Term: PREGNANCY; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2236  
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Author Wang, F.; Sun, L.; Zhang, X.-zhe; Jia, J.; Liu, Z.; Huang, X.-yan; Yu, S.-yang; Zuo, L.-jun; Cao, C.-jie; Wang, X.-min; Zhang, W. url  openurl
  Title Effect and Potential Mechanism of Electroacupuncture Add-On Treatment in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords PARKINSON'S disease -- Drug therapy; PARKINSON'S disease -- Treatment; Dopa; ACUPUNCTURE points; BIOCHEMICAL markers; CHI-squared test; COMBINED modality therapy; Electroacupuncture; HAMILTON Depression Inventory; Neurotransmitters; NITRIC oxide; ORAL medication; PARKINSON'S disease; PLACEBOS (Medicine); PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; QUALITY of life; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); Statistics; T-test (Statistics); SAMPLE size (Statistics); PILOT projects; DATA analysis; STATISTICAL significance; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; KRUSKAL-Wallis Test; Symptoms; China  
  Abstract Objectives. To explore effectiveness and mechanisms of electroacupuncture (EA) add-on treatment in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. Methods. Fifty PD patients were randomly assigned to drug plus EA (D + EA) group and drug alone (D) group. Subjects in D + EA group received stimulation in points of bilateral fengfu, fengchi, hegu, and central dazhui. Participants were evaluated by scales for motor and nonmotor symptoms. Levels of neuroinflammatory factors and neurotransmitters in serum were detected. Results. EA add-on treatment remarkably reduced scores of Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III and its subitems of tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia and conspicuously decreased UPDRS III scores in patients with bradykinesia-rigidity and mixed types and mild severity. Depression and sleep disturbances were eased, which were reflected by decreased scores of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and elevated noradrenaline level. Effects of EA add-on treatment on motor symptoms and sleep disturbances were superior to drug alone treatment, markedly improving life quality of PD patients. EA add-on treatment decreased nitric oxide level in serum. Conclusions. EA add-on treatment is effective on most motor symptoms and some nonmotor symptoms and is particularly efficacious in PD patients at early stage. Antineuroinflammation may be a mechanism of EA add-on treatment.  
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  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
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  Notes Accession Number: 109084118; Source Information: 8/13/2015, Vol. 2015, p1; Subject Term: PARKINSON'S disease -- Drug therapy; Subject Term: PARKINSON'S disease -- Treatment; Subject Term: DOPA; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: BIOCHEMICAL markers; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: COMBINED modality therapy; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: HAMILTON Depression Inventory; Subject Term: NEUROTRANSMITTERS; Subject Term: NITRIC oxide; Subject Term: ORAL medication; Subject Term: PARKINSON'S disease; Subject Term: PLACEBOS (Medicine); Subject Term: PSYCHOLOGICAL tests; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: SAMPLE size (Statistics); Subject Term: PILOT projects; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: STATISTICAL significance; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: KRUSKAL-Wallis Test; Subject Term: SYMPTOMS; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 11p; ; Illustrations: 5 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2235  
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Author McKeon, C.; Smith, C.A.; Gibbons, K.; Hardy, J. url  openurl
  Title EA versus sham acupuncture and no acupuncture for the control of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a pilot study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 277-283  
  Keywords ACUPUNCTURE points; CHEMOTHERAPY (Cancer); Electroacupuncture; Questionnaires; RESEARCH -- Finance; PILOT projects; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; KRUSKAL-Wallis Test; Australia  
  Abstract Objective To assess the feasibility of undertaking a high-quality randomised controlled study to determine whether EA gives better control of delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) than sham EA or standard antiemetic treatment alone. Methods Patients having their first cycle of moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy were randomised to EA, sham EA or standard care. EA was given for 30 min on day 1 at the time of chemotherapy and on day 3 using standard acupuncture points bilaterally. Sham EA was given to points adjacent to true EA points. All patients received usual care, comprising antiemetics, according to hospital guidelines. The primary outcomes related to study feasibility, and the clinical outcome measure was the change in Functional Living Index Emesis (FLIE) score captured on days 1 and 7. Results 153 participants were screened between April 2009 and May 2011. Eighteen patients did not meet the inclusion criteria, 37 declined to participate and the absence of an acupuncturist or lack of consent from the treating oncologist excluded a further 38 patients; 60 patients were recruited. The FLIE was completed on day 7 by 49 participants; 33 of 40 patients returned on day 3 for treatment. The nausea and vomiting scores were low in all three arms. Adverse events were generally mild and infrequent. Conclusions It was feasible to undertake a randomised EA trial on a busy day oncology unit. As few patients experienced nausea with their first cycle of chemotherapy, it was not possible to determine whether EA improves CINV over standard care. An enriched enrolment strategy is indicated for future studies. A simple numerical rating scale may prove a better objective nausea measure than the FLIE.  
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  Notes Accession Number: 109111934; Source Information: Aug2015, Vol. 33 Issue 4, p277; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CHEMOTHERAPY (Cancer); Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: QUESTIONNAIRES; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: PILOT projects; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: KRUSKAL-Wallis Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: AUSTRALIA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 2 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2234  
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Author Pang, B.; Jiang, T.; Du, Y.-H.; Li, J.; Li, B.; Hu, Y.-C.; Cai, Q.-H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Functional Dyspepsia: What Strength Does It Have? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-17  
  Keywords INDIGESTION -- Treatment; Acupuncture; META-analysis; QUALITY of life; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness  
  Abstract Background. Although the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy on functional dyspepsia (FD) has been systematically reviewed, the available reports are still contradictive and no robust evidence has been provided to date. Objective. To assess the current evidence of high quality on the effects of acupuncture for patients with FD. Methods. A comprehensive literature database search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture therapies (including manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture) to sham acupuncture and medication use. A meta-analysis was performed following a strict methodology. Results. 16 RCTs involving 1436 participants were included. The majority of the trials were determined to be of low quality. Positive results were found for acupuncture in improving the Nepean Dyspepsia Index (NDI) and scores of the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), as well as in alleviating relevant symptoms (especially postprandial fullness and early satiation) of FD patients. Conclusion. Based on current available evidence, acupuncture therapy achieves statistically significant effect for FD in comparison with sham acupuncture and is superior to medication (prokinetic agents) in improving the symptoms and quality of life of FD patients. Nonetheless, despite stringent methodological analyses, the conclusion of our review still needs to be strengthened by additional RCTs of higher quality.  
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  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
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  Notes Accession Number: 120459157; Source Information: 12/29/2016, p1; Subject Term: INDIGESTION -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 17p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 9 Charts, 1 Graph; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2231  
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Author Ma, C.; Sivamani, R.K. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as a Treatment Modality in Dermatology: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 21 Issue 9 Pages 520-529  
  Keywords RESEARCH methodology evaluation; FACE -- Physiology; SKIN diseases -- Treatment; Acupuncture; ALTERNATIVE medicine; ATOPIC dermatitis; BREAST diseases; CUTANEOUS manifestations of general diseases; Elasticity; EXPERIMENTAL design; Hyperhidrosis; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Itching; Medline; Melanosis; Rosacea; SKIN diseases; Urticaria; Warts; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation; California  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture is a form of Traditional Chinese Medicine that has been used to treat a broad range of medical conditions, including dermatologic disorders. This systematic review aims to synthesize the evidence on the use of acupuncture as a primary treatment modality for dermatologic conditions. Methods: A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register was performed. Studies were limited to clinical trials, controlled studies, case reports, comparative studies, and systematic reviews published in the English language. Studies involving moxibustion, electroacupuncture, or blood-letting were excluded. Results: Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Among these, 16 were randomized controlled trials, 6 were prospective observational studies, and 2 were case reports. Acupuncture was used to treat atopic dermatitis, urticaria, pruritus, acne, chloasma, neurodermatitis, dermatitis herpetiformis, hyperhidrosis, human papillomavirus wart, breast inflammation, and facial elasticity. In 17 of 24 studies, acupuncture showed statistically significant improvements in outcome measurements compared with placebo acupuncture, alternative treatment options, and no intervention. Conclusions: Acupuncture improves outcome measures in the treatment of dermatitis, chloasma, pruritus, urticaria, hyperhidrosis, and facial elasticity. Future studies should ideally be double-blinded and standardize the control intervention.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109251687; Source Information: Sep2015, Vol. 21 Issue 9, p520; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: FACE -- Physiology; Subject Term: SKIN diseases -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ATOPIC dermatitis; Subject Term: BREAST diseases; Subject Term: CUTANEOUS manifestations of general diseases; Subject Term: ELASTICITY; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: HYPERHIDROSIS; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: ITCHING; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: MELANOSIS; Subject Term: ROSACEA; Subject Term: SKIN diseases; Subject Term: URTICARIA; Subject Term: WARTS; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CALIFORNIA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 1 Chart; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2230  
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Author Fang, S.; Wang, M.; Zheng, Y.; Zhou, S.; Ji, G. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and Lifestyle Modification Treatment for Obesity: A Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal American Journal of Chinese Medicine  
  Volume 45 Issue 2 Pages 239-254  
  Keywords PREVENTION of obesity; RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Acupuncture; ALTERNATIVE medicine; BEHAVIOR modification; COMBINED modality therapy; CONFIDENCE intervals; Electroacupuncture; EXPERIMENTAL design; HEALTH behavior; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; META-analysis; PROBABILITY theory; REGRESSION analysis; RESEARCH -- Finance; WEIGHT loss; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); EVIDENCE-based medicine; PROFESSIONAL practice; BODY mass index; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PUBLICATION bias; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation  
  Abstract Obesity is an epidemic health hazard associated with many medical conditions. Lifestyle interventions are foundational to the successful management of obesity. However, the body's adaptive biological responses counteract patients' desire to restrict food and energy intake, leading to weight regain. As a complementary and alternative medical approach, acupuncture therapy is widely used for weight control. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of acupuncture treatment alone and in combination with lifestyle modification. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and Chinese Biomedical Literature Databases for relevant publications available as of 24 October 2015 without language restriction. Eligible studies consisted of randomized controlled trials for acupuncture with comparative controls. A total of 23 studies were included with 1808 individuals. We performed meta-analyses of weighted mean differences based on a random effect model. Acupuncture exhibited a mean difference of body mass index reduction of 1.742kg/m2 (95% confidence interval ) and 1.904kg/m2 (95% confidence interval ) when compared with untreated or placebo control groups and when lifestyle interventions including basic therapy of both treatment and control groups. Adverse events reported were mild, and no patients withdrew because of adverse effects. Overall, our results indicate that acupuncture is an effective treatment for obesity both alone and together with lifestyle modification.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 122570741; Source Information: 2017, Vol. 45 Issue 2, p239; Subject Term: PREVENTION of obesity; Subject Term: RESEARCH methodology evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: BEHAVIOR modification; Subject Term: COMBINED modality therapy; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: HEALTH behavior; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: REGRESSION analysis; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: WEIGHT loss; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: EVIDENCE-based medicine; Subject Term: PROFESSIONAL practice; Subject Term: BODY mass index; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PUBLICATION bias; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 16p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2229  
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Author Xing Liu; Shuqin Li; Baoguo Wang; Lixin An; Xiujun Ren; Haifeng Wu url  openurl
  Title Intraoperative and postoperative anaesthetic and analgesic effect of multipoint transcutaneous electrical acupuncture stimulation combined with sufentanil anaesthesia in patients undergoing supratentorial craniotomy Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 270-276  
  Keywords PROPOFOL -- Therapeutic use; CHI-squared test; COMBINED modality therapy; Electroacupuncture; FISHER exact test; INTRAOPERATIVE care; POSTOPERATIVE care; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); SUPRATENTORIAL brain tumors; SURGICAL complications; T-test (Statistics); TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; VISUAL analog scale; SUFENTANIL (Drug); DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; China  
  Abstract Copyright of Acupuncture in Medicine is the property of BMJ Publishing Group and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109111931; Source Information: Aug2015, Vol. 33 Issue 4, p270; Subject Term: PROPOFOL -- Therapeutic use; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: COMBINED modality therapy; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: FISHER exact test; Subject Term: INTRAOPERATIVE care; Subject Term: POSTOPERATIVE care; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: SUPRATENTORIAL brain tumors; Subject Term: SURGICAL complications; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: VISUAL analog scale; Subject Term: SUFENTANIL (Drug); Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Illustrations: 3 Charts, 2 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2240  
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Author Sung Min Lim; Junghee Yoo; Euiju Lee; Hyun Jung Kim; Seungwon Shin; Gajin Han; Hyeong Sik Ahn url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Spasticity after Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords SPASTICITY -- Treatment; Acupuncture; CHI-squared test; CONFIDENCE intervals; Electroacupuncture; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; META-analysis; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; RESEARCH bias; STROKE -- Patients -- Rehabilitation; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Evaluation  
  Abstract Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824922; Source Information: 2015, p1; Subject Term: SPASTICITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: RESEARCH bias; Subject Term: STROKE -- Patients -- Rehabilitation; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: EVALUATION; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 12p; ; Document Type: journal article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2233  
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Author Lim, S.M.; Yoo, J.; Lee, E.; Kim, H.J.; Shin, S.; Han, G.; Ahn, H.S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Spasticity after Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords SPASTICITY -- Treatment; Acupuncture; CHI-squared test; CONFIDENCE intervals; Electroacupuncture; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; META-analysis; PLACEBOS (Medicine); RESEARCH -- Finance; SERIAL publications; Spasticity; Stroke; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; CONTROL groups (Research); RESEARCH bias; DISEASE complications  
  Abstract Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Publishing Corporation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109050802; Source Information: 1/5/2015, Vol. 2015, p1; Subject Term: SPASTICITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medical care; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: PLACEBOS (Medicine); Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SERIAL publications; Subject Term: SPASTICITY; Subject Term: STROKE; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: CONTROL groups (Research); Subject Term: RESEARCH bias; Subject Term: DISEASE complications; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 12p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 3 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2232  
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Author Lei, H.; Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, Z. url  openurl
  Title Effect of Electroacupuncture on Visceral and Hepatic Fat in Women with Abdominal Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Study Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 285-294  
  Keywords OBESITY -- Treatment; FATTY liver -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ADIPOSE tissues; ALTERNATIVE medicine; Anthropometry; HUMAN body composition; CLINICAL trials; Electroacupuncture; LONGITUDINAL method; MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Mathematics; PROBABILITY theory; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); Statistics; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; DATA analysis; BODY mass index; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; WAIST circumference; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract Objective: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and hepatic fat deposition are the most important risk factors for women's health. Acupuncture, including electroacupuncture (EA), is used to treat obesity throughout the world. The effect of EA is evaluated mainly by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Few studies have assessed its effect in reducing VAT volume and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) based on an exact measurement method such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aimed to resolve this issue. Methods: Thirty subjects were randomly divided into two groups. The control group ( n = 15) did not receive any intervention and maintained a normal diet and their usual exercise habits. The treatment group ( n = 15) received EA three times a week for 3 months. BMI and WC were measured using different devices. VAT and HFF were measured by MRI and calculated by related software before and after the intervention. Results: A marked difference was evident in group that received EA treatment in the following tests. The differences in BMI (U = 21.00, p < 0.001), WC (U = 40.50, p = 0.002), VAT volume (U = 13.00, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (U = 0.00, p < 0.001) before and after the intervention in the treatment group were distinct and significant compared with those of the control group. Three months later, the treatment group showed a lower BMI (W = 91.00, p = 0.001), WC ( t = 4.755, p < 0.001), VAT volume ( t = 5.164, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (W = 120.00, p = 0.001) compared with pretreatment levels. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed a lower VAT volume ( t = 60.00, p = 0.029) after 3 months of treatment. After 3 months, the control group showed higher mean HFF ( t = ?2.900, p = 0.012) and VAT volume (W = 11.50, p = 0.006) compared with their initial levels. Conclusion: Based on MRI evaluation, this randomized controlled study proved that EA treatment reduces BMI and WC as well as VAT volume and HFF in women with abdominal obesity.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 122401275; Source Information: Apr2017, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p285; Subject Term: OBESITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATTY liver -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ADIPOSE tissues; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTHROPOMETRY; Subject Term: HUMAN body composition; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Subject Term: MATHEMATICS; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: BODY mass index; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: WAIST circumference; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2228  
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Author Zhang, F.; Yu, X.; Xiao, H. url  openurl
  Title Cardioprotection of Electroacupuncture for Enhanced Recovery after Surgery on Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Replacement with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Control Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords HEART valves -- Surgery; CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; ACUPUNCTURE points; CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Electroacupuncture; CARDIAC surgery; REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); RANDOMIZED controlled trials  
  Abstract We attempted to investigate cardioprotection of electroacupuncture (EA) for enhanced recovery after surgery on patients

undergoing heart valve replacement with cardiopulmonary bypass. Forty-four patients with acquired heart valve replacement were

randomly allocated to the EA group or the control group. Patients in the EA group received EA stimulus at bilateral Neiguan

(PC6), Ximen (PC4), Shenting (GV24), and Baihui (GV20) acupoints twenty minutes before anesthesia induction to the end of

surgery.The primary end point was cardioprotection effect of electroacupuncture postoperatively and the secondary endpoints were

quality of recovery and cognitive functioning postoperatively. The present study demonstrated that electroacupuncture reduced

the occurrence of complications and played a role of cardioprotective effect on patients after heart valve replacement surgery with

cardiopulmonary bypass, and it benefits patients more comfortable and contributes to recovery after surgery.
 
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121302083; Source Information: 2/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: HEART valves -- Surgery; Subject Term: CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CARDIAC surgery; Subject Term: REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 4 Charts, 3 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2227  
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Author Torkzahrani, S.; Mahmoudikohani, F.; Saatchi, K.; Sefidkar, R.; Banaei, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of acupressure on the initiation of labor: A randomized controlled trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives Abbreviated Journal Women Birth  
  Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 46-50  
  Keywords Acupressure/*methods; Adult; Female; Humans; Labor, Induced/*methods; Labor, Obstetric; *Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Parity; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Uterine Contraction/*physiology; *Acupressure; *Initiation of labor; *Labor; *Sham acupressure; *Term pregnancy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Induction of labor is a common obstetric procedure. Acupressure is a natural method that is used for inducing uterine contractions. Nevertheless, few studies have examined the impact of acupressure on the induction of labor. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure on the initiation of labor. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, 162 nulliparous pregnant women were admitted to the hospital. They were categorized into 3 groups; acupressure, sham acupressure and control. Acupressure points SP6, BL 60 and BL 32 were pressured bilaterally. The intervention was done by the researcher every other day between 9 am and 11 am. The intervention was carried out on women in the afternoon and the following day. Subjects were examined to determine the initiation of labor symptoms48 and 96h after the start of intervention and at the time of hospitalization. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square tests (p<0.05). RESULTS: There was no significant difference among the groups for spontaneous initiation of labor within 48h (P=0.464), and 49-96h after beginning the intervention (P=0.111) and 97h after beginning the intervention to the time of hospitalization for the spontaneous initiation of labor (P=0.897). There were no significant differences in the secondary outcomes between the groups. CONCLUSION: According to the finding of this study, it seems that acupressure treatment was not effective in initiating labor as compared with the sham acupressure and the routine care groups.  
  Address Student Research Committee, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
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  Notes PMID:27444642 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2226  
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Author Salehi, A.; Marzban, M.; Zadeh, A.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for treating hot flashes in breast cancer patients: an updated meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 24 Issue 12 Pages 4895-4899  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Breast cancer; Hot flash; Systematic review and meta-analysis  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture for treatment of hot flash in women with breast cancer. METHODS: The aspects considered in this study included searching for 12 data bases until April 2015 and consulting reference lists of reviews and related articles. Additional features studied comprised all articles on human patients with breast cancer treated with needle acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation for the treatment of hot flashes. The methodological quality was assessed using the modified Jadad score. RESULT: The searches identified 12 relevant articles for inclusion. The meta-analysis without any subgroup or moderator failed to show favorable effects of acupuncture on reducing the frequency of hot flashes after intervention (n = 680, SMD = – 0.478, 95 % CI -0.397 to 0.241, P = 0.632) but exhibited marked heterogeneity of the results (Q value = 83.200, P = 0.000, I^2 = 83.17, tau^2 = 0.310). CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis used had contradictory results and yielded no convincing evidence to suggest that acupuncture was an effective treatment of hot flash in patients with breast cancer. Multi-central studies including large sample size are required to investigate the efficiency of acupuncture for treating hot flash in patients with breast cancer.  
  Address Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR, Iran  
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  Notes PMID:27497608 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2225  
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Author Thiagarajah, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How effective is acupuncture for reducing pain due to plantar fasciitis? Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Singapore Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Singapore Med J  
  Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 92-97  
  Keywords acupuncture; plantar fasciitis  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Plantar fasciitis is a commonly seen outpatient condition that has numerous treatment modalities of varying degrees of efficacy. This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in reducing pain caused by plantar fasciitis. METHODS: Online literature searches were performed on the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases for studies on the use of acupuncture for pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Studies designed as randomised controlled trials and that compared acupuncture with standard treatments or had real versus sham acupuncture arms were selected. The Delphi list was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies retrieved. RESULTS: Three studies that compared acupuncture with standard treatment and one study on real versus sham acupuncture were found. These showed that acupuncture significantly reduced pain levels in patients with plantar fasciitis, as measured on the visual analogue scale and the Plantar Fasciitis Pain/Disability Scale. These benefits were noted between four and eight weeks of treatment, with no further significant reduction in pain beyond this duration. Side effects were found to be minimal. CONCLUSION: Although acupuncture may reduce plantar fasciitis pain in the short term, there is insufficient evidence for a definitive conclusion regarding its effectiveness in the longer term. Further research is required to strengthen the acceptance of acupuncture among healthcare providers.  
  Address Queenstown Polyclinic, SingHealth Polyclinics, Singapore  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes PMID:27526703; PMCID:PMC5311890 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2224  
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Author Zhang, W.; Ma, L.; Bauer, B.A.; Liu, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0174586  
  Keywords  
  Abstract PURPOSE: This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to assess the therapeutic and adverse effects of acupuncture for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Chinese Biomedical Database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the VIP Database and the Wanfang Database. Parallel-group RCTs of acupuncture for men with symptomatic BPH were included. Data from the included trials were extracted by two independent reviewers and were analyzed with The Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager software (RevMan 5.3.5) after risk of bias judgments. The primary outcome measure of this review was a change in urological symptoms. RESULTS: Eight RCTs, which involved 661 men with BPH, were included. Follow-up varied from 4 weeks to 18 months. Pooling of the data from three trials that compared acupuncture with sham-acupuncture revealed that in the short term (4-6 weeks), acupuncture can significantly improve IPSS (MD -1.90, 95% CI -3.58 to -0.21). A sensitivity analysis of the short-term endpoint showed the same result (MD -3.01, 95% CI -5.19 to -0.84) with a borderline minimal clinical important difference (MCID). Qmax of the short-term endpoint indicated statistically positive beneficial effects of acupuncture (MD -1.78, 95%CI -3.43, -0.14). A meta-analysis after medium-term follow-up (12-18 weeks) indicated no significant effect on IPSS when the data from two trials were combined (MD -2.04, 95% CI -4.19, 0.10). CONCLUSION: Statistically significant changes were observed in favor of acupuncture in moderate to severe BPH with respect to short-term follow-up endpoints. The clinical significance of these changes needs to be tested by further studies with rigorous designs and longer follow-up times. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO CRD42014013645.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China  
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  Notes PMID:28376120; PMCID:PMC5380320 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2223  
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