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Author Shaoqing Wang; Zhaohui Chen; Ping Fu; Li Zang; Li Wang; Xi Zhai; Fang Gao; Aijing Huang; Yao Zhang url  openurl
  Title Use of Auricular Acupressure to Improve the Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients with Chronic Kidney Diseases: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords Acupuncture, Ear; Quality of Life; Diabetic Patients; Renal Insufficiency, Chronic -- Therapy; Ear; Acupuncture Points; Prospective Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Treatment Outcomes; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated -- Analysis; Glycemic Control; Glomerular Filtration Rate; China; Academic Medical Centers; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 -- Drug Therapy; Renal Insufficiency, Chronic -- Classification; Hemodialysis; Activities of Daily Living; Health Status; Social Behavior; Psychological Well-Being; Analysis of Covariance; Descriptive Statistics; Chi Square Test; P-Value; Confidence Intervals; Acupuncture, Ear -- Adverse Effects; Visual Analog Scaling; Effect Size; Self Report; Scales; Placebo Effect; Human  
  Abstract  
  Address Nephrology Department,The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu, Sichuan 610513, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876515. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Kidney Disease and Quality of Life Short-Form (KDQOL-SF). NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876515 Serial 2405  
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Author Soyeon Cheon; Xiuyu Zhang; In-Seon Lee; Seung-Hun Cho; Younbyoung Chae; Hyangsook Lee url  openurl
  Title Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Neoplasms -- Therapy; Drug Administration -- Methods; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Herbal; Iatrogenic Disease -- Therapy; Neoplasms -- Complications; Human; South Korea; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Alternative Therapies; Funding Source; Treatment Outcomes; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Descriptive Statistics; Nausea and Vomiting -- Therapy; Meta Analysis; Chemotherapy, Cancer -- Adverse Effects; Statistical Significance; Odds Ratio; Confidence Intervals; Cancer Pain -- Prevention and Control; Hiccup -- Prevention and Control; Fever -- Prevention and Control; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; CINAHL Database; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Graphics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; P-Value; Intestinal Obstruction; Gastrointestinal System -- Pathology  
  Abstract  
  Address Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Kyung Hee Dae-ro 26, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876834. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. Grant Information: This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korean government (Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning) (no. 2013R1A6A6029251) and a Grant from the National R & D Program for Cancer Control, Ministry for Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (1020330).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876834 Serial 2404  
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Author Yang, M.; Yang, J.; Zeng, F.; Liu, P.; Lai, Z.; Deng, S.; Fang, L.; Song, W.; Xie, H.; Liang, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture stimulation at sub-specific acupoint and non-acupoint induced distinct brain glucose metabolism change in migraineurs: a PET-CT study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Translational Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Transl Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 351-351  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has analgesic effect to most pain conditions. Many neuroimaging studies were conducted to explore acupoint specificity in pain and other condition, but till now there is still discrepancy. Based on our previous finding, this study investigated the brain metabolism changes of acupuncture analgesia induced by sub-specific acupoint and non-acupoint stimulation.Methods: 30 migraineurs were included and randomly assigned to 3 groups: Acupuncture Group (AG), Sham Acupuncture Group (SAG) and Migraine Group (MG). In AG, a combination sub-specific points of Shaoyang meridians, Luxi (TE19), San Yangluo (TE8), and Xi Yangguan (GB33) has been stimulated with electroacupuncture, while non-acupoints for SAG were used and MG received no treatment. Positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) was used to identify differences in brain glucose metabolism between groups.Results: In the AG, brain glucose metabolism increase compared with the MG was observed in the middle frontal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, the precuneus, parahippocampus, cerebellum and middle cingulate cortex (MCC), and decrease were observed in the left hemisphere of Middle Temporal Cortex (MTC).In the SAG, compared with MG, glucose metabolism increased in the poster cingulate cortex (PCC), insula, inferior temporal gyrus, MTC, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, fusiform, inferior parietal lobe, superior parietal lobe, supramarginal gyrus, middle occipital lobe, angular and precuneus; while, decreased in cerebellum, parahippocampus.Conclusions: Acupuncture stimulation at both sub-specific acupoint and non-acupoint yields ameliorating effect to migraine pain, but with evidently differed central mechanism as measured by PET-CT. The pattern of brain glucose metabolism change in acupoint is pertinent and targeted, while in non-acupoint that was disordered and randomized. These finding may provide new perspectives into the validation of acupoint specificity, optimizing acupuncture analgesia and revealing central mechanism of acupuncture analgesia by neuroimaging measurement.Trial Registration: This trial was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, with registration no. ChiCTR-TRC-11001813.  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109725652. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150123. Revision Date: 20160721. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101190741. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109725652 Serial 2403  
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Author Shuming Li; Tong Shen; Yongshan Liang; Ying Zhang; Bo Bai url  openurl
  Title Miniscalpel-Needle versus Steroid Injection for Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a 12-Month Follow-Up Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Plantar Fasciitis -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Methods; Needles; Randomized Controlled Trials; China; Human; Injections; Treatment Outcomes; Steroids; Acupuncture -- Equipment and Supplies; Descriptive Statistics; T-Tests; Chi Square Test; One-Way Analysis of Variance; Data Analysis Software; Male; Female; Middle Age; Adult; Aged; Visual Analog Scaling  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Orthopaedics Medicine,The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, No. 151, Yanjiang West Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510120, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876402. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876402 Serial 2402  
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Author Gang Wang; Qian Gao; Jingshan Hou; Jun Li url  openurl
  Title Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Myofascial Pain Syndromes -- Therapy; Trapezius Muscles -- Pathology; Heat; Treatment Outcomes; Human; China; Randomized Controlled Trials; Visual Analog Scaling; Pain Threshold; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Male; Female; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Needles; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876723. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Grant Information: National Natural Science Foundation Fund of China for study on quantitative evaluation system of myofascial tension band; Wu JiePing Medical Foundation (320.6750.1234).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876723 Serial 2401  
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Author Xiaochen Yang; Xingjiang Xiong; Guoyan Yang; Jie Wang url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of Stimulation of Acupoint KI 1 by Artemisia vulgaris (Moxa) for the Treatment of Essential Hypertension: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Hypertension -- Therapy; Moxibustion -- Utilization; Hypertension -- Drug Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Acupuncture -- Utilization; Human; Systematic Review; Randomized Controlled Trials; PubMed; Embase; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Meta Analysis; Chi Square Test; Confidence Intervals; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876417. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; pictorial; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, no. 2003CB517103) and the National Natural Science Foundation Project of China (no. 90209011).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876417 Serial 2400  
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Author Huanqin Li; Huilin Liu; Cunzhi Liu; Guangxia Shi; Wei Zhou; Chengmei Zhao; Tao Zhang; Xuefei Wang; Guiling Wang; Yin Zhao; Jingqing Sun; Jing Wang; Linpeng Wang url  openurl
  Title Effect of 'Deqi' during the Study of Needling 'Wang's Jiaji' Acupoints Treating Spasticity after Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Muscle Spasticity -- Drug Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Stroke -- Therapy; Stroke -- Symptoms; Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Sensation -- Evaluation; Human; Multicenter Studies; Prospective Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials; Single-Blind Studies; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Glasgow Coma Scale; Scales; NIH Stroke Scale; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Outcomes Research; Outcome Assessment; Barthel Index; Chi Square Test; Nonparametric Statistics; Fisher's Exact Test; Data Analysis Software; Two-Tailed Test  
  Abstract  
  Address Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, Fangshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 151 Chengguan South Street, Fangshan District, Beijing 102400, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876776. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Gerontologic Care. Instrumentation: NIH Stroke Scale; Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale; Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA); Barthel Index; Stroke-Specific Quality of Life scale (SSQOL); Rankin Scale; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876776 Serial 2399  
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Author Yukiko Shiro; Arai, Y.-C.P.; Tatsunori Ikemoto; Takashi Kawai; Masahiko Ikeuchi; Takahiro Ushida url  openurl
  Title Distal Traditional Acupuncture Points of the Large Intestinal Meridian and the Stomach Meridian Differently Affect Heart Rate Variability and Oxygenation of the Trapezius Muscle Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Intestine, Large -- Analysis; Stomach -- Analysis; Heart Rate Variability; Trapezius Muscles; Oxygenation; Acupressure; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Female; Hemoglobins; Single-Blind Studies; Adult; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Electrocardiography; Kruskal-Wallis Test; Friedman Test; Biological Markers; Blood Circulation  
  Abstract  
  Address Multidisciplinary Pain Centre, School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, 21 Karimata, Nagakutecho, Aichigun, Aichi 480-1195, Japan  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876481. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876481 Serial 2398  
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Author Jing-Yu Tan; Molassiotis, A.; Tao Wang; Suen, L.K.P. url  openurl
  Title Adverse Events of Auricular Therapy: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Acupuncture, Ear -- Adverse Effects; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; Psycinfo; AMED Database; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Human  
  Abstract  
  Address The Second Affiliated People's Hospital, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 13 Hudong Road, Gulou District, Fuzhou 350003, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 103876630. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876630 Serial 2397  
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Author Rong-Tsung Lin; Chung-Yuh Tzeng; Yu-Chen Lee; Chen, Y.-I.; Tai-Hao Hsu; Jaung-Geng Lin; Shih-Liang Chang url  openurl
  Title Acupoint-Specific, Frequency-Dependent, and Improved Insulin Sensitivity Hypoglycemic Effect of Electroacupuncture Applied to Drug-Combined Therapy Studied by a Randomized Control Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Electroacupuncture; Hypoglycemia; Insulin Resistance -- Therapy; Insulin Resistance -- Physiopathology; Randomized Controlled Trials; Animal Studies; Models, Biological; Rats; Insulin Resistance -- Chemically Induced; Combined Modality Therapy; Serotonin -- Metabolism; Nitric Oxide -- Metabolism; PubMed; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 -- Physiopathology; Dose-Response Relationship; Hypoglycemic Agents -- Therapeutic Use; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 -- Physiopathology  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Medicinal Botanicals and Health Application, Da-Yeh University, No. 168, University Road, Dacun, Changhua County 51591, Taiwan; School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876533. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876533 Serial 2396  
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Author Yong-Xin Sun; Yuan Wang; Xunming Ji; Xiaoguang Wu; Yong Zhao; Yuchuan Ding; Hussain, M.; Fei Yu; Wenbo Zhao; Jianping Jia url  openurl
  Title A Randomized Trial of Chinese Diaoshi Jifa on Treatment of Dizziness in Meniere's Disease Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Meniere's Disease -- Therapy; Dizziness -- Therapy; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Acupressure -- Methods; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Funding Source; China; Questionnaires; Treatment Outcomes; Descriptive Statistics; Acupuncture Points; Female; Male; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; T-Tests; One-Way Analysis of Variance; Data Analysis Software; Confidence Intervals  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Neurological Surgery,Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876640. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). Grant Information: This work was partially supported by the Traditional Chinese Medicine Project (JJT2010-22) of Capital Medical Development Foundation, Beijing Outstanding Talents Cultivation Fund (2012D005018000007), and the High-Level Health Techonology Talent Construction Programme of Beijing Municiple Health Bureau (2013-3-092).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876640 Serial 2395  
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Author Walker, J.; Sawhney, A.; Holm Hansen, C.; Ahmed, S.; Martin, P.; Symeonides, S.; Murray, G.; Sharpe, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Treatment of depression in adults with cancer: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Psychological Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychol Med  
  Volume 44 Issue 5 Pages 897-907  
  Keywords Depression -- Therapy; Cancer Patients; Depression -- Drug Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Medline; Embase; Psycinfo; Cochrane Library; Antidepressive Agents -- Therapeutic Use; Adult; Sample Size; Antidepressive Agents -- Adverse Effects; Acupuncture; Funding Source  
  Abstract Background. Depression is a leading cause of disease burden worldwide and is especially problematic in people with chronic diseases, including cancer. Although depression can be effectively treated in the general population using antidepressant medication and psychological treatments, these treatments may have different benefits and harms in cancer patients. Previous reviews have not adequately addressed this topic. We therefore aimed to determine which, if any, treatments are effective for patients with diagnoses of both cancer and depression. Method. We conducted a systematic review of relevant randomized controlled trials identified through searches of Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Results. Seven relatively small trials met the selection criteria. These provided some evidence that antidepressant medication, given alone or in combination with a psychological treatment, may be effective. We found no good evidence for psychological treatments given alone or for any other forms of treatment. Conclusions. There is very limited evidence from clinical trials to guide the treatment of cancer patients with a diagnosis of depression, especially for psychological treatments. High quality trials of treatments for depression in patients with cancer are urgently needed.  
  Address University of Edinburgh Centre for Population Health Sciences, Edinburgh, UK  
  Publisher Cambridge University Press
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  Notes Accession Number: 107899460. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140403. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Psychiatry/Psychology. Grant Information: This work was funded by the charity Cancer Research UK (grant no. C5547/A7375).. NLM UID: 1254142. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107899460 Serial 2394  
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Author Kannan, P.; Claydon, L.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Some physiotherapy treatments may relieve menstrual pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea: a systematic review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Physiotherapy (Elsevier) Abbreviated Journal J Physiother (Elsevier)  
  Volume 60 Issue 1 Pages 13-21  
  Keywords Dysmenorrhea -- Therapy; Physical Therapy; Pain; Quality of Life; Human; Physical Therapy Practice, Evidence-Based; Female; Women's Health; Systematic Review; Physical Therapy -- Methods; Meta Analysis; Statistical Significance; Acupuncture; Acupressure; Alternative Therapies; Confidence Intervals; Manipulation, Orthopedic; Spine -- Physiology; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Yoga; Therapeutic Exercise -- Methods; Heat -- Therapeutic Use; CINAHL Database; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; Embase; Medline; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Scales; Adolescence; Young Adult; Adult; Descriptive Statistics; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Allied Health and Medicine, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
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  Notes Accession Number: 103768272. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140707. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Australia & New Zealand; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management; Physical Therapy; Women's Health. Instrumentation: PEDro Scale. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103768272 Serial 2393  
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Author Sina Kim; Hye Seon Sagong; Jae Cheol Kong; Jun-Yong Choi; Myeong Soo Lee; Wieland, L.S.; Manheimer, E.; Byung-Cheul Shin url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomised clinical trials on acupuncture in the Korean literature: bibliometric analysis and methodological quality Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 160-166  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Methods; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Korea; Research Methodology; Quality Assessment; Korea; Systematic Review; Descriptive Statistics; Human; Bias (Research); Study Design; Bibliometrics; Serial Publications; Sample Size; Disease -- Classification; Funding Source  
  Abstract Objective Acupuncture systematic reviewers have increasingly searched Chinese databases and journals to identify eligible randomised clinical trials (RCTs). However, reviewers have infrequently searched for eligible RCTs in Korean databases and journals. This study aimed to identify difficult to locate acupuncture RCTs in Korean databases and journals and to assess the characteristics and quality of the identified RCTs. Methods Eleven electronic databases and seven journals were searched up to December 2012. All RCTs using needle acupuncture were considered for inclusion. Key study characteristics were extracted and risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. Results One hundred and forty-three publications met our inclusion criteria. Acupuncture RCTs in the Korean literature emerged in the mid-1990s and increased in the mid-2000s. Diverse methods of acupuncture were used, including some methods unique to Korea (eg, Saam acupuncture). The largest proportion of trials evaluated acupuncture for musculoskeletal conditions (27.3%). The mean sample size was 44.3±25.3 per trial. Random sequence generation methods were reported in 44.8% of the RCTs, whereas only 11.9% reported methods of allocation concealment. A low proportion of trials reported participant blinding (32.9%) and outcome assessment blinding (18.9%). Conclusions Korean acupuncture trials, many of which evaluate acupuncture styles unique to Korea, are typically omitted from systematic reviews of acupuncture, resulting in the potential for language bias. The development of this database of difficult to locate Korean trials, which includes English language translations of abstracts, will enable these trials of varying quality to be assessed for inclusion in future acupuncture systematic reviews.  
  Address Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
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  Notes Accession Number: 103927545. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140411. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: This study was partially funded by grant no. R24 AT001293 from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) of the US National Institutes of Health.. NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103927545 Serial 2392  
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Author Couto, C.; de Souza, I.C.C.; Torres, I.L.S.; Fregni, F.; Caumo, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Paraspinal Stimulation Combined With Trigger Point Needling and Needle Rotation for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain: A Randomized Sham-controlled Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Clinical Journal of Pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume 30 Issue 3 Pages 214-223  
  Keywords Electrotherapy; Myofascial Pain Syndromes -- Therapy; Body Regions; Acupuncture; Adult; Analgesics -- Therapeutic Use; Anesthetics, Local -- Therapeutic Use; Female; Human; Lidocaine -- Therapeutic Use; Myofascial Pain Syndromes -- Drug Therapy; Needles; Pain Measurement; Pain Threshold; Psychological Tests; Quality of Life; Rotation; Self Report; Sleep; Time Factors; Treatment Outcomes; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There are different types and parameters of dry needling (DN) that can affect its efficacy in the treatment of pain that have not been assessed properly. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that either multiple deep intramuscular stimulation therapy multiple deep intramuscular stimulation therapy (MDIMST) or TrP lidocaine injection (LTrP-I) is more effective than a placebo-sham for the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and that MDIMST is more effective than LTrP-I for improving pain relief, sleep quality, and the physical and mental state of the patient. METHODS: Seventy-eight females aged 20 to 40 who were limited in their ability to perform active and routine activities due to MPS in the previous 3 months were recruited. The participants were randomized into 1 of the 3 groups as follows: placebo-sham, LTrP-I, or MDIMST. The treatments were provided twice weekly over 4 weeks using standardized MDIMST and LTrP-I protocols. RESULTS: There was a significant interaction (time vs. group) for the main outcomes. Compared with the sham-treated group, MDIMST and LTrP-I administration improved pain scores based on a visual analog scale, the pain pressure threshold (P<0.001 for all analyses), and analgesic use (P<0.01 for all analyses). In addition, when comparing the active groups for these outcomes, MDIMST resulted in better improvement than LTrP-I (P<0.01 for all analyses). In addition, both active treatments had a clinical effect, as assessed by a sleep diary and by the SF-12 physical and mental health scores. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlighted the greater efficacy of MDIMST over the placebo-sham and LTrP-I and indicated that both active treatments are more effective than placebo-sham for MPS associated with limitations in active and routine activities.  
  Address ¶Pain and Palliative Care Service at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) tPharmacology Department, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, UFRGS, Brazil *Post Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) tLaboratory of Pain & Neuromodulation at HCPA/UFRGS §Laboratory of Neuromodulation, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation #Neurology Harvard Medical School.  
  Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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  Notes Accession Number: 107884350. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141031. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Pain and Pain Management. NLM UID: 8507389. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107884350 Serial 2391  
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Author Zi Y. Chen; Ling Lin; Huan H. Wang; Yong Zhou; Jian Q. Yan; Yi L. Huang; Qu L. Guo url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ondansetron combined with ST36 (Zusanli) acupuncture point injection for postoperative vomiting Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 124-131  
  Keywords Surgery, Laparoscopic; Postoperative Complications; Vomiting -- Prevention and Control; Ondansetron -- Administration and Dosage; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Analgesia -- Methods; Combined Modality Therapy; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Male; Data Analysis Software; T-Tests; Chi Square Test; Kruskal-Wallis Test; Confidence Intervals; Odds Ratio; China; Adult  
  Abstract Background Ondansetron, sometimes combined with acustimulation at PC6 (Neiguan), is commonly used for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting, but PC6 is not the only point that can be used for this purpose. Objectives To evaluate the combined effects of ondansetron and ST36 (Zusanli) acupuncture point injection on postoperative vomiting (POV) after laparoscopic surgery. Methods A randomised, patient and assessor-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study was conducted. One hundred and sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery were randomly assigned to one of four groups: (1) group P (placebo-control): intravenous normal saline +bilateral non-acupuncture point injection of vitamin B1 (n=40); (2) group O (ondansetron): intravenous ondansetron+bilateral ST36 sham injection (n=40); (3) group A (acupuncture point injection): intravenous normal saline+bilateral acupuncture point injection at ST36 of vitamin B1 (n=40); (4) group C (combination): intravenous ondansetron+bilateral acupuncture point injection at ST36 of vitamin B1 (n=40). Interventions were made on arrival at the postanaesthesia care unit. The primary outcome was the incidence of POV within 24 h after the operation. Secondary outcomes included severity of vomiting, incidence of rescue treatment, patients' satisfaction and the first anal exsufflation time 24 h after the operation. Results The incidence of POV within 24 h postoperative period in each group was P 33%; O 11%, A 9% and C 6%. Outcomes for all intervention groups were significantly better than that for placebo (p<0.01). For the three interventions compared with placebo, the numbers needed to treat (NNTs) were O, NNT=5; A, NNT=5 and C, NNT=4. The secondary outcomes also demonstrated greater benefits of the combined regimen, with improvement seen in all the measures. Conclusions Ondansetron, acupuncture, and ondansetron and acupuncture combined are effective prophylaxis for POV.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, PR China  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
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  Notes Accession Number: 103927533. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140411. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103927533 Serial 2390  
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Author Matthews A; Dowswell T; Haas DM; Doyle M; O'Mathúna DP url  openurl
  Title Interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages N.Pag-N.Pag  
  Keywords Nausea and Vomiting -- Therapy; Pregnancy Trimester, First; Treatment Outcomes; Acupuncture; Antiemetics; Clinical Trials; Cochrane Library; Female; Ginger; Human; Patient Safety; Pregnancy  
  Abstract Nausea, retching and vomiting are very commonly experienced by women in early pregnancy. There are considerable physical, social and psychological effects on women who experience these symptoms. This is an update of a review of interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy previously published in 2010. To assess the effectiveness and safety of all interventions for nausea, vomiting and retching in early pregnancy, up to 20 weeks' gestation. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field's Trials Register (27 April 2013). All randomised controlled trials of any intervention for nausea, vomiting and retching in early pregnancy. We excluded trials of interventions for hyperemesis gravidarum, which are covered by another Cochrane review. We also excluded quasi-randomised trials and trials using a cross-over design. Four review authors, in pairs, reviewed the eligibility of trials and independently evaluated the risk of bias and extracted the data for included trials. Thirty-seven trials involving 5049 women, met the inclusion criteria. These trials covered many interventions, including acupressure, acustimulation, acupuncture, ginger, chamomile, lemon oil, mint oil, vitamin B6 and several antiemetic drugs. We identified no studies of dietary or other lifestyle interventions. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of P6 acupressure, auricular (ear) acupressure and acustimulation of the P6 point was limited. Acupuncture (P6 or traditional) showed no significant benefit to women in pregnancy. The use of ginger products may be helpful to women, but the evidence of effectiveness was limited and not consistent, though two recent studies support ginger over placebo. There was only limited evidence from trials to support the use of pharmacological agents including vitamin B6, and anti-emetic drugs to relieve mild or moderate nausea and vomiting. There was little information on maternal and fetal adverse outcomes and on psychological, social or economic outcomes. We were unable to pool findings from studies for most outcomes due to heterogeneity in study participants, interventions, comparison groups, and outcomes measured or reported. The methodological quality of the included studies was mixed. Given the high prevalence of nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy, women and health professionals need clear guidance about effective and safe interventions, based on systematically reviewed evidence. There is a lack of high-quality evidence to support any particular intervention. This is not the same as saying that the interventions studied are ineffective, but that there is insufficient strong evidence for any one intervention. The difficulties in interpreting and pooling the results of the studies included in this review highlight the need for specific, consistent and clearly justified outcomes and approaches to measurement in research studies.[CINAHL Note: The Cochrane Collaboration systematic reviews contain interactive software that allows various calculations in the MetaView.]  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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  Notes Accession Number: 105008817. Language: English. Entry Date: 20101029. Revision Date: 20150711. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Commentary: Ernst E., Matthews A. What works for morning sickness? (FOCUS ALTERN COMPLEMENT THER) Mar2011; 16 (1): 51-52. Journal Subset: Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Obstetric Care. NLM UID: 100909747. Cochrane AN: CD007575. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 105008817 Serial 2389  
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Author Brown J; Farquhar C url  openurl
  Title Endometriosis: an overview of Cochrane Reviews Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages N.Pag-N.Pag  
  Keywords Endometriosis -- Therapy; Infertility -- Drug Therapy; Pain -- Drug Therapy; Treatment Outcomes; Alternative Therapies -- Classification; Antiinflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal -- Classification; Cochrane Library; Female; Gonadotropins -- Therapeutic Use; Human; Intrauterine Devices -- Utilization; Laparoscopy -- Utilization; Levonorgestrel -- Therapeutic Use; Surgery, Gynecologic -- Classification  
  Abstract This overview reports on interventions for pain relief and for subfertility in pre-menopausal women with clinically diagnosed endometriosis. The objective of this overview was to summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on treatment options for women with pain or subfertility associated with endometriosis. Published Cochrane systematic reviews reporting pain or fertility outcomes in women with clinically diagnosed endometriosis were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation (protocols and titles) for future inclusion. The reviews, protocols and titles were identified by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Archie (the Cochrane information management system) in March 2014.Pain-related outcomes of the overview were pain relief, clinical improvement or resolution and pain recurrence. Fertility-related outcomes were live birth, clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, miscarriage and adverse events.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed using the AMSTAR tool. The quality of the evidence for each outcome was assessed using GRADE methods. Review findings were summarised in the text and the data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Seventeen systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library were included. All the reviews were high quality. The quality of the evidence for specific comparisons ranged from very low to moderate. Limitations in the evidence included risk of bias in the primary studies, inconsistency between the studies, and imprecision in effect estimates. Pain relief (14 reviews) Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues One systematic review reported low quality evidence of an overall benefit for GnRH analogues compared with placebo or no treatment. Ovulation suppression Five systematic reviews reported on medical treatment using ovulation suppression. There was moderate quality evidence that the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUD) was more effective than expectant management, and very low quality evidence that danazol was more effective than placebo. There was no consistent evidence of a difference in effectiveness between oral contraceptives and goserelin, estrogen plus progestogen and placebo, or progestogens and placebo, though in all cases the relevant evidence was of low or very low quality. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)A review of NSAIDs reported inconclusive evidence of a benefit in symptom relief compared with placebo. Surgical interventions There were two reviews of surgical interventions. One reported moderate quality evidence of a benefit in pain relief following laparoscopic surgery compared to diagnostic laparoscopy only. The other reported very low quality evidence that recurrence rates of endometriomata were lower after excisional surgery than after ablative surgery. Post-surgical medical interventions Two reviews reported on post-surgical medical interventions. Neither found evidence of an effect on pain outcomes, though in both cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Alternative medicine There were two systematic reviews of alternative medicine. One reported evidence of a benefit from auricular acupuncture compared to Chinese herbal medicine, and the other reported no evidence of a difference between Chinese herbal medicine and danazol. In both cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Anti-TNF-I± drugs One review found no evidence of a difference in effectiveness between anti-TNF-I± drugs and placebo. However, the evidence was of low quality. Reviews reporting fertility outcomes (8 reviews) Medical interventions Four reviews reported on medical interventions for improving fertility in women with endometriosis. One compared three months of GnRH agonists with a control in women undergoing assisted reproduction and found very low quality evidence of an increase in clinical pregnancies in the treatment group. There was no evidence of a difference in effectiveness between the interventions in the other three reviews, which compared GnRH agonists versus antagonists, ovulation suppression versus placebo or no treatment, and pre-surgical medical therapy versus surgery alone. In all cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Surgical interventions Three reviews reported on surgical interventions. There was moderate quality evidence that both live births or ongoing pregnancy rates and clinical pregnancy rates were higher after laparoscopic surgery than after diagnostic laparoscopy alone. There was low quality evidence of no difference in effectiveness between surgery and expectant management for endometrioma. One review found low quality evidence that excisional surgery resulted in higher clinical pregnancy rates than drainage or ablation of endometriomata. Post-surgical interventions Two reviews reported on post-surgical medical interventions. They found no evidence of an effect on clinical pregnancy rates. The evidence was of low or very low quality. Alternative medicine A review of Chinese herbal medicine in comparison with gestrinone found no evidence of a difference between the groups in clinical pregnancy rates. However, the evidence was of low quality. Adverse events Reviews of GnRH analogues and of danazol reported that the interventions were associated with higher rates of adverse effects than placebo; and depot progestagens were associated with higher rates of adverse events than other treatments. Chinese herbal medicine was associated with fewer side effects than gestrinone or danazol.Three reviews reported miscarriage as an outcome. No difference was found between surgical and diagnostic laparoscopy, between GnRH agonists and antagonists, or between aspiration of endometrioma and expectant management. However, in all cases the quality of the evidence was of low quality. For women with pain and endometriosis, suppression of menstrual cycles with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUD) and danazol were beneficial interventions. Laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis and excision of endometriomata were also associated with improvements in pain. The evidence on NSAIDs was inconclusive. There was no evidence of benefit with post-surgical medical treatment.In women with endometriosis undergoing assisted reproduction, three months of treatment with GnRH agonist improved pregnancy rates. Excisional surgery improved spontaneous pregnancy rates in the nine to 12 months after surgery compared to ablative surgery. Laparoscopic surgery improved live birth and pregnancy rates compared to diagnostic laparoscopy alone. There was no evidence that medical treatment improved clinical pregnancy rates.Evidence on harms was scanty, but GnRH analogues, danazol and depot progestagens were associated with higher rates than other interventions.[CINAHL Note: The Cochrane Collaboration systematic reviews contain interactive software that allows various calculations in the MetaView.]  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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  Notes Accession Number: 107855472. Language: English. Entry Date: 20101029. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management; Women's Health. NLM UID: 100909747. Cochrane AN: CD009590. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107855472 Serial 2388  
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Author Au-Yeung, S.S.Y.; Hui-Chan, C.W.Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electrical acupoint stimulation of the affected arm in acute stroke: a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Clinical Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Clin Rehabil  
  Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 149-158  
  Keywords Stroke -- Complications; Hemiplegia -- Therapy; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Funding Source; Double-Blind Studies; Post Hoc Analysis; Clinical Assessment Tools; Grip Strength; Hong Kong; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; Analysis of Variance; Scales; Male; Female; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Publisher Sage Publications Inc.
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  Notes Accession Number: 104007212. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140124. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Instrumentation: Action Research Arm Test (ARAT); National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Grant Information: This work was supported by an Area of Strategic Development grant from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University to the corresponding author, CWY Hui-Chan.. NLM UID: 8802181. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 104007212 Serial 2387  
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Author Kim, D.; Ham, O.K.; Kang, C.; Jun, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Auricular Acupressure Using Sinapsis alba Seeds on Obesity and Self-Efficacy in Female College Students Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 4 Pages 258-264  
  Keywords Students, College; Acupressure -- Methods; Seeds -- Utilization; Obesity -- Therapy; Self-Efficacy; Human; South Korea; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Female; Women's Health; Alternative Therapies; Body Mass Index -- Evaluation; Ear; Acupuncture Points; Self Care; Body Weights and Measures; Body Composition -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes -- Evaluation; Waist-Hip Ratio -- Evaluation; Scales; Statistical Significance; Plants, Medicinal; Pretest-Posttest Design; Power Analysis; Effect Size; Electric Impedance; Summated Rating Scaling; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; T-Tests; Paired T-Tests; Fisher's Exact Test; Young Adult; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Objectives : To examine the effects of auricular acupressure with Sinapsis alba seeds on obesity and self-efficacy. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Settings: College settings located in metropolitan areas of Korea. Participants: A total of 49 female college students who were overweight or obese (body-mass index [BMI] ?25.0 kg/m2) were recruited and randomly assigned to the experimental group ( n=25) or the control group ( n=24). Interventions: The experimental group applied three S. alba seeds to each of five auricular points (Shenmen, mouth, stomach, endocrine, and small intestine points). These participants were asked to stimulate those points 10 times at a rate of two times per second 30 minutes before mealtime, three times daily, for 1 month. They performed the procedure for each earlobe for alternating weeks (a total of 2 weeks' treatment for each ear). Outcome Measures: The obesity index included weight (kg), BMI (kg/m2), percentage body fat, and waist-to-hip ratio. Self-efficacy was measured by using a self-efficacy scale. Results: Female students in the experimental group showed significant decreases in weight ( t=10.76; p<0.001) and BMI ( t=9.60; p<0.001) and significant improvement in self-efficacy ( t=1.85; p<0.05) compared with those in the control group. However, percentage body fat ( t=1.27; p>0.05) and waist-to-hip ratio ( t=0.60; p>0.05) changes did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest that auricular acupressure using S. alba seeds may be an effective intervention for decreasing weight and BMI and increasing self-efficacy of overweight and obese individuals.  
  Address Department of Nursing Science, Dong-eui University, Busan, Republic of Korea.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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  Notes Accession Number: 103928992. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140418. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Psychiatry/Psychology; Women's Health. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103928992 Serial 2386  
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