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Author Su, T.; Zhou, J.; Liu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, W.; Chu, H.; Luo, Q.; Lu, J.; An, J.; Liu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The efficacy of electroacupuncture for the treatment of simple female stress urinary incontinence – comparison with pelvic floor muscle training: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trials Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 45-45  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Previous research has shown that electroacupuncture therapy has a potential therapeutic effect for simple female stress urinary incontinence. In this study, pelvic floor muscle training, the first-line treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women based on meta-analysis of numerous randomized control trials and recommended by international clinical practice, is used as a control group to demonstrate whether electroacupuncture therapy is a better method for female stress urinary incontinence.Methods/design: A randomized controlled trial has been designed to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of electroacupuncture for female stress urinary incontinence compared with pelvic floor muscle training. The safety of electroacupuncture and patient compliance will also be evaluated. Untoward reaction to the electroacupuncture, including a broken needle, fainting on acupuncture, or pain during acupuncture, will be recorded and the therapy will be stopped if an untoward reaction occurs. After we have received full ethical approval and patient consent, participants will be randomized to receive a series of 24 electroacupuncture or pelvic floor muscle training interventions. The frequency and amount of leakage will be measured as the primary outcome parameters. Secondary outcome parameters include the 1-hour pad test, the short-form of the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire, patient subjective effectiveness evaluation, weekly usage of pad, and usage of specialty therapy for female stress urinary incontinence.Discussion: This trial will help to determine whether electroacupuncture is a more effective treatment than pelvic floor muscle training for patients with female stress urinary incontinence.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01940432 (12 September 2013).  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109724267. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20161223. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101263253. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109724267 Serial 2346  
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Author Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, D.-H.; Shin, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Koh, J.S.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The efficacy and safety of acupuncture for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trials Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 68-68  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a neurological disease with a high mortality rate. Several serious complications frequently arise after successful surgery for this condition. Cerebral vasospasm, one such complication, occurs in 50 to 70% of SAH patients. These patients suffer neurological symptoms known as delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND); however, the effect of treatment of vasospasm is limited. The major pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm is the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) and activation of vasoconstrictors. Acupuncture is known to increase the production and activity of vascular endothelial cell-derived NO and improve endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. A preliminary retrospective case study to investigate the ability of acupuncture to prevent the occurrence of cerebral vasospasm has been conducted. However, no randomized, controlled clinical trials have been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for cerebral vasospasm.Methods/design: This trial will be a single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, patient-assessor-blinded clinical trial. A total of 80 patients with SAH will be randomized into two groups: a study group given acupuncture, electroacupuncture, and intradermal acupuncture, and a control group given mock transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and sham intradermal acupuncture. Intervention will start within 96 h after SAH, and a total of 12 sessions will be performed during a 2-week period. The primary outcome measure will be the occurrence of DIND, and the secondary outcomes will be vasospasm as measured by cerebral angiography, transcranial Doppler, clinical symptoms, vasospasm-related infarcts, NO and endothelin-1 plasma levels, mortality, and modified Rankin Scale scores.Discussion: This trial will examine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for cerebral vasospasm after SAH. The placebo effect will be excluded and the mechanism of action of the treatments will be evaluated through blood testing.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02275949 , Registration date: 26 October 2014.  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109724256. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20161223. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101263253. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109724256 Serial 2345  
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Author Calamita, S.A.P.; Biasotto-Gonzalez, D.A.; De Melo, N.C.; Dos Santos, D.M.; de Lassa, R.; de Mendonça, F.S.; Oliveira, C.S.; Amorim, C.F.; Gonzalez, T.O.; Fumagalli, M.A.; de Gomes, C.A.F.P.; Politti, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trials Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 100-100  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Nonspecific neck pain can cause considerable suffering, possible disability and reductions in quality of life and productivity. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain.Methods/design: A total of 12 patients with nonspecific neck pain and 12 healthy subjects will be enrolled in a randomized, single-blind crossover study. Each subject will receive two forms of treatment in random order: a single session of traditional acupuncture (acupoints: triple energizer 5, 'Wai-guan' and large intestine 11, 'Qu-chi') and sham acupuncture. To eliminate carry-over treatment effects, a one-week wash-out period will be respected between sessions. Surface electromyography will be used to determine motor control in the upper trapezius muscle before and after treatment. The outcome measures in the group with neck pain will be a numerical pain rating scale (range: 0 (no pain) to 10 (maximum pain)), documentation of the pain area on a body chart and cervical range of motion. Comparisons before and after acupuncture treatment will demonstrate whether acupoints affect the activity of the upper trapezius muscle, pain and cervical range of motion.Discussion: The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain. Data will be published after the study is completed. The study will support the practice of evidence-based physical therapy for individuals with nonspecific neck pain.Trial Registration: This trial was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT0984021 ) on 7 November 2013 ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01984021 ).  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109721586. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20161223. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101263253. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109721586 Serial 2344  
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Author Ling, W.-man; Lui, L.Y.Y.; So, W.K.W.; Chan, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture and Acupressure on Cancer-Related Fatigue: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Oncology Nursing Forum Abbreviated Journal Oncol Nurs Forum  
  Volume 41 Issue 6 Pages 581-592  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Acupressure; Cancer Fatigue -- Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Cancer Patients; Thematic Analysis; CINAHL Database; Medline; Resource Databases; Middle Age; Scales; Sample Size; Treatment Duration  
  Abstract Purpose/Objectives: To critically examine the evidence for acupuncture and acupressure in the management of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in adult patients with cancer.Data Sources: 18 databases were searched for randomized, controlled trials published in English and Chinese through April 2014.Data Synthesis: Given the heterogeneity of data, meta-analysis was not conducted. A six-step thematic analysis method was used to synthesize the results.Conclusions: Although results are inconclusive, acupuncture and acupressure tend to be effective in relieving CRF, with the former producing a greater improvement. Future research is recommended to contribute further evidence.Implications for Nursing: Nurses should know about the relative effectiveness of acupuncture and acupressure in the management of CRF to educate and support their patients.  
  Address Nethersole School of Nursing, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China  
  Publisher Oncology Nursing Society
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  Notes Accession Number: 103911422. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141030. Revision Date: 20151102. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. Instrumentation: Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS); Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI); Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy¿Fatigue subscale (FACIT-F); Cancer- Related Fatigue Distress Scale (CRFDS); Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI); Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS). NLM UID: 7809033. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103911422 Serial 2343  
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Author Llamas-Ramos, R.; Pecos-Martin, D.; Gallego-Izquierdo, T.; Llamas-Ramos, I.É.S.; Plaza-Manzano, G.; Ortega-Santiago, R.; Cleland, J.; FernÁNdez-De-Las-PeÑAs, C.É.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of the Short-Term Outcomes Between Trigger Point Dry Needling and Trigger Point Manual Therapy for the Management of Chronic Mechanical Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Sports Phys Ther  
  Volume 44 Issue 11 Pages 852-861  
  Keywords Trigger Point -- Therapy; Needles -- Utilization; Manual Therapy; Pain Threshold; Functional Status; Range of Motion; Neck Pain -- Therapy; Human; Spain; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Pretest-Posttest Design; Alternative Therapies; Chronic Pain -- Therapy; Adult; Male; Female; Pain Measurement; Scales; Questionnaires; Functional Assessment; Analysis of Variance; Repeated Measures; Confidence Intervals; Summated Rating Scaling; Self Report; Interrater Reliability; Intrarater Reliability; Algometry; Biophysical Instruments; Power Analysis; Two-Tailed Test; Data Analysis Software; P-Value; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN; Randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of trigger point (TrP) dry needling (DN) and TrP manual therapy (MT) on pain, function, pressure pain sensitivity, and cervical range of motion in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain. BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that TrP DN could be effective in the treatment of neck pain. However, no studies have directly compared the outcomes of TrP DN and TrP MT in this population. METHODS: Ninety-four patients (mean ± SD age, 31 ± 3 years; 66% female) were randomized into a TrP DN group (n = 47) or a TrP MT group (n = 47). Neck pain intensity (11-point numeric pain rating scale), cervical range of motion, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over the spinous process of C7 were measured at baseline, postintervention, and at follow-ups of 1 week and 2 weeks after treatment. The Spanish version of the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire was used to measure disability/function at baseline and the 2-week follow-up. Mixed-model, repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to determine if a time-by-group interaction existed on the effects of the treatment on each outcome variable, with time as the within-subject variable and group as the between-subject variable. RESULTS: The ANOVA revealed that participants who received TrP DN had outcomes similar to those who received TrP MT in terms of pain, function, and cervical range of motion. The 4-by-2 mixed-model ANOVA also revealed a significant time-by-group interaction (P<.001) for PPT: patients who received TrP DN experienced a greater increase in PPT (decreased pressure sensitivity) than those who received TrP MT at all follow-up periods (between-group differences: posttreatment, 59.0 kPa; 95% confidence interval [Cl]: 40.0, 69.2; 1- week follow-up, 69.2 kPa; 95% Cl: 49.5, 79.1; 2- week follow-up, 78.9 kPa; 95% Cl: 49.5, 89.0). CONCLUSION: The results of this clinical trial suggest that 2 sessions of TrP DN and TrP MT resulted in similar outcomes in terms of pain, disability, and cervical range of motion. Those in the TrP DN group experienced greater improvements in PPT over the cervical spine. Future trials are needed to examine the effects of TrP DN and TrP MT over long-term follow-up periods,  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, Franklin Pierce University, Concord, NH; Rehabilitation Services, Concord Hospital, Concord, NH; Manual Therapy Fellowship Program, Regis University, Denver, CO  
  Publisher American Physical Therapy Association, Orthopaedic Section
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  Notes Accession Number: 107807283. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141120. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Commentary: Ware John W., Llamas-Ramos Rocio, Pecos-Martín Daniel, Gallego-Izquierdo Tomás, Llamas-Ramos Inés, Plaza-Manzano Gustavo, et al. MISREPORT OF TRIGGER POINT DIAGNOSIS RELIABILITY. (J ORTHOP SPORTS PHYS THER) Feb2015; 45 (2): 144-146. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Pain and Pain Management; Physical Therapy; Sports Medicine. Instrumentation: Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS); Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire [Spanish version]. NLM UID: 7908150. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107807283 Serial 2342  
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Author Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi, L.; Paes da Silva, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Chinese auriculotherapy to improve quality of life of nursing team Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem Abbreviated Journal Rev Brasil Enfermagem  
  Volume 68 Issue 1 Pages 109-115  
  Keywords Auriculotherapy; Quality of Life; Stress, Occupational; Nursing Staff, Hospital -- Psychosocial Factors; Single-Blind Studies; Human; P-Value; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Randomized Controlled Trials; Confidence Intervals; Acupuncture Points; Data Analysis Software; Repeated Measures; Analysis of Variance; Post Hoc Analysis; Adult; Middle Age; Coefficient Alpha; Academic Medical Centers; Treatment Outcomes; Male; Female; Shiftwork; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Objective: to evaluated the efficacy of auriculotherapy for improving quality of life and reducing stress in nursing staff. Method: single-blind radomizad clinical trail envolving 175 subjects randomized in: Control (G1), Protocol Group (G2) and without Protocol Group (G3). They were evaluated by the Stress Symptoms List and SF36v2 at baseline, after 12 sessions and follow up (30 days), between January and July 2012. Results: both intervention groups reduced stress (p <0.05) with greater effect for G3 (d = 1.15). G3 was also higher for improving life quality especially the physical domain (p = 0.05). Conclusion: individualized auriculotherapy (G3) had greater effect compared to the protocol auriculotherapy (G2) for reducing stress and improving life quality.  
  Address Universidade de São Paulo, School of Nursing, Graduate Program in Nursing Adult Health. Sao Paulo-SP, Brazil  
  Publisher Associacao Brasileira de Enfermagem
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  Notes Accession Number: 109798827. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150811. Revision Date: 20151008. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Mexico & Central/South America; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Instrumentation: Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) Version 2; Vasconcelos¿ Stress Symptoms List (VSSL). NLM UID: 7910105. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109798827 Serial 2341  
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Author Kim, J.-E.; Seo, B.-K.; Choi, J.-B.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, T.-H.; Lee, M.-H.; Kang, K.-W.; Kim, J.-H.; Shin, K.-M.; Lee, S.; Jung, S.-Y.; Kim, A.-R.; Shin, M.-S.; Jung, H.-J.; Park, H.-J.; Kim, S.-P.; Baek, Y.-H.; Hong, K.-E.; Choi, S.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic chronic fatigue: a multicenter, nonblinded, randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trials Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 314-314  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: The causes of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and idiopathic chronic fatigue (ICF) are not clearly known, and there are no definitive treatments for them. Therefore, patients with CFS and ICF are interested in Oriental medicine or complementary and alternative medicine. For this reason, the effectiveness of complementary and alternative treatments should be verified. We investigated the effectiveness of two forms of acupuncture added to usual care for CFS and ICF compared to usual care alone.Methods: A three-arm parallel, non-blinded, randomized controlled trial was performed in four hospitals. We divided 150 participants into treatment and control groups at the same ratio. The treatment groups (Group A, body acupuncture; Group B, Sa-am acupuncture) received 10 sessions for 4 weeks. The control group (Group C) continued usual care alone. The primary outcome was the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) at 5 weeks after randomization. Secondary outcomes were the FSS at 13 weeks and a short form of the Stress Response Inventory (SRI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and the EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) at 5 and 13 weeks.Results: Group A showed significantly lower FSS scores than Group C at 5 weeks (P = 0.023). SRI scores were significantly lower in the treatment groups than in the control group at 5 (Group A, P = 0.032; B, P <0.001) and 13 weeks (Group A, P = 0.037; B, P <0.001). Group B showed significantly lower BDI scores than Group C at 13 weeks (P = 0.007). NRS scores from the treatment groups were significantly reduced compared to control at 5 (Group A and B, P <0.001) and 13 weeks (Group A, P = 0.011; B, P = 0.002).Conclusions: Body acupuncture for 4 weeks in addition to usual care may help improve fatigue in CFS and ICF patients.Trial Registration: Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS) KCT0000508; Registered on 12 August 2012.  
  Address Acupuncture, Moxibustion & Meridian Research Group, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea. smchoi@kiom.re.kr.  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 109607755. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20160507. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101263253. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109607755 Serial 2340  
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Author Xiao Cun Yang; Tao Yin; Qian Gao; Ling Jun Kong url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Immunomodulatory Effect of Acupoint Application for Childhood Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Immune System; Asthma -- Therapy; Pediatric Care; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Herbal; Asthma -- Immunology; Human; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; China; Child; Funding Source; Data Analysis Software  
  Abstract Objective. To evaluate the evidence on the immunomodulatory effect of acupoint application for childhood asthma. Methods. Five electronic databases through October 2014 were searched. The risk of bias in eligible studies was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. Standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of random-effects model were calculated. And heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and quantified with the I² index. Results. Six studies were included in our review. The aggregated results suggested that acupoint application showed the beneficial effect for childhood asthma in improving IgA (SMD, -0.83; 95% CI -1.14 to -0.52; P < 0.00001), IgE (SMD, -0.52; 95% CI -0.76 to -0.29; P < 0.001), IgG (SMD, -1.17; 95% CI -1.61 to -0.74; P < 0.0001), IL-4 (SMD, -0.57; 95% CI -0.91 to -0.23; P = 0.0009), and IFN-? (SMD, -0.38; 95% CI -0.71 to -0.04; P = 0.03) but not IgM (SMD, -0.40; 95% CI -0.98 to 0.18; P = 0.18). And the effective dose of acupoint application may be 2-6 hours/time and a total of 3 times within 4 weeks. Conclusions. This review showed the positive evidence that acupoint application had the favorable immunomodulatory effect for childhood asthma. However, more studies with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.  
  Address Department of Tuina, Second Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210017, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
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  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824942. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. Grant Information: This work is supported by the Young Teacher Training Program of Education Committee of Shanghai (ZZszy12050); the Young Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (81403496); the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81273869); the Key Discipline of Tuina of the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine of China.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824942 Serial 2339  
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Author Chun-I Fan; Hsiu-Lin Huang; Yan-Ru Chen; Lee-Shia Hu; Shu-Ho Tasi; Shih-Hsin Hung url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Efficacy of Using an Auricular Acupressure Program to Improve Sleep Disturbance in Cancer Patients Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Nursing & Healthcare Research Abbreviated Journal J Nurs Healthc Res  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 3-12  
  Keywords Acupressure; Ear; Cancer Patients; Sleep Disorders -- Therapy; Magnetics; Acupuncture Points; Human; Prospective Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials; Scales; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract Background: Previous studies have shown auricular acupressure as effective in improving the sleep disturbance of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, patients with end-stage renal disease, and nurses working three shifts. Sleep disturbance is a commonly encountered problem in cancer patients. However, related studies addressing cancer patients are scarce. Purpose: This research explores the efficacy of auricular acupressure on cancer patients with sleep disturbance. Methods: A prospective, randomized-controlled trial was used and 89 cancer patients with untreated sleep disturbance were recruited. The experimental group (n = 33) received pasted auricular magnetic beads and acupressure on the Shenmen, Xin, Shen, and Pizhixia points. The control group (n = 56) received general nursing directions about insomnia only. All participants were assessed using the Chinese Athens Insomnia Scale (CAIS-8) prior to the intervention as well as on the 14th and 28th days after the intervention. The intervention effects were analyzed using the Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE). Results: The results showed that sleep disturbance improved more significantly in the experimental group than in the control group on both the 14th and 28th days. The scores were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group in several aspects, including sleep induction, awakenings during the night, early morning awakenings, total sleep duration, sleepiness during the day, sleep quality, and total CAIS-8 scores (p < .05). Conclusions / Implications for Practice: Findings indicate that auricular acupressure is an effective non-invasive and alternative method for improving sleep disturbance in cancer patients. Furthermore, this intervention may help reduce insomnia-drug dependence and improve patient quality of life, making auricular acupressure worth promoting to community-dwelling cancer patients.  
  Address Nurse Supervisor, Department of Nursing, Taipei Veterans General Hospital  
  Publisher Taiwan Nurses Association
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  Notes Accession Number: 103770272. Language: Chinese. Entry Date: 20150317. Revision Date: 20150819. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Asia; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. Instrumentation: Chinese Athens Insomnia Scale (CAIS¿8). Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103770272 Serial 2338  
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Author Aranha, M.F.M.; Müller, C.E.E.; Gavião, M.B.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pain intensity and cervical range of motion in women with myofascial pain treated with acupuncture and electroacupuncture: a double-blinded, randomized clinical trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy / Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia Abbreviated Journal Rev Brasil Fisioter  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 34-43  
  Keywords Myofascial Pain Syndromes -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Pain; Range of Motion; Neck; Human; Funding Source; Female; Randomized Controlled Trials; Visual Analog Scaling; Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test; Paired T-Tests; Analysis of Variance; Friedman Test; Kruskal-Wallis Test; Pearson's Correlation Coefficient; Treatment Outcomes; Academic Medical Centers; Brazil; One-Way Analysis of Variance; Repeated Measures; Post Hoc Analysis; Data Analysis Software; Linear Regression; Adult; Body Mass Index; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture stimulates points on the body, influencing the perception of myofascial pain or altering physiologic functions. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EAC) and acupuncture (AC) for myofascial pain of the upper trapezius and cervical range of motion, using SHAM acupuncture as control. Method: Sixty women presenting at least one trigger point at the upper trapezius and local or referred pain for more than six months were randomized into EAC, AC, and SHAM groups. Eight sessions were scheduled and a follow-up was conducted after 28 days. The Visual Analog Scale assessed the intensity of local and general pain. A fleximeter assessed cervical movements. Data were analyzed using paired t or Wilcoxon's tests, ANOVA or Friedman or Kruskal-Wallis tests and Pearson's correlation (?=0.05). Results: There was reduction in general pain in the EAC and AC groups after eight sessions (P<0.001). A significant decrease in pain intensity occurred for the right trapezius in all groups and for the left trapezius in the EAC and AC groups. Intergroup comparisons showed improvement in general pain in the EAC and AC groups and in local pain intensity in the EAC group (P<0.05), which showed an increase in left rotation (P=0.049). The AC group showed increases in inclination (P=0.005) sustained until follow-up and rotation to the right (P=0.032). Conclusion: EAC and AC were effective in reducing the pain intensity compared with SHAM. EAC was better than AC for local pain relief. These treatments can assist in increasing cervical range of motion, albeit subtly.  
  Address Departamento de Odontologia Infantil, FOP, UNICAMP, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil  
  Publisher Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy / Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 109799019. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150612. Revision Date: 20151008. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Blind Peer Reviewed; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Mexico & Central/South America; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Grant Information: To Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP), São Paulo, SP, Brazil (Process 2010/11684-0 and Process 2011/12659-1). NLM UID: 101186153. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109799019 Serial 2337  
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Author Albrecht, T.; Wu, S.; Baumann, I.; Plinkert, P.K.; Sertel, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measurable impact of acupuncture on mucosal swelling of inferior turbinates: a prospective, randomized, controlled study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acta Oto-Laryngologica Abbreviated Journal Acta Otolaryngol  
  Volume 135 Issue 2 Pages 169-176  
  Keywords Nasal Mucosa -- Pathology; Turbinates -- Pathology; Acupuncture -- Methods; Rhinitis -- Therapy; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Prospective Studies; Visual Analog Scaling; Pretest-Posttest Design; Descriptive Statistics; Academic Medical Centers; Germany; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Male; Female; Data Analysis Software; Linear Regression; T-Tests; Chi Square Test; McNemar's Test; Fisher's Exact Test; Mann-Whitney U Test; Manometry -- Methods; Diagnosis, Respiratory System  
  Abstract Conclusions: Sham acupuncture turned out to be more effective than expected. The effect of acupuncture cannot be assessed by optical rhinometry (ORM). Objectives: In most cases nasal congestion is caused by hypertrophy of the inferior turbinate as a result of allergic and chronic rhinitis. Topical decongestants cause severe side effects. As a consequence, there is an increasing demand for alternative treatment options such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Methods: A total of 25 patients with nasal congestion due to hypertrophic inferior turbinate were recruited. The mucosal swelling status of the inferior turbinate was assessed by continuous ORM for 20 min. Patients were asked to score the severity of their nasal congestion on a visual analogue scale (VAS) before and 10 and 20 min after acupuncture. Specific verum acupuncture points related to nasal congestion were tested against non-specific control sham acupuncture points. Results: Sham acupuncture improved VAS scores, whereas ORM measured an increase in nasal swelling. The ORM revealed a quicker onset of the effect of verum acupuncture on the nasal blood flow. Also, verum acupuncture reaches its maximum effect in a shorter time period, so that the net reaction time was much shorter. However, ORM could not prove a decongestant effect of verum acupuncture on inferior turbinate.  
  Address Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103872939. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150115. Revision Date: 20160725. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Biomedical; Continental Europe; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology. NLM UID: 0370354. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103872939 Serial 2336  
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Author Langevin, H.M.; Schnyer, R.; MacPherson, H.; Davis, R.; Harris, R.E.; Napadow, V.; Wayne, P.M.; Milley, R.J.; Lao, L.; Stener-Victorin, E.; Kong, J.-T.; Hammerschlag, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Manual and Electrical Needle Stimulation in Acupuncture Research: Pitfalls and Challenges of Heterogeneity Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 113-128  
  Keywords Research, Alternative Therapies; Electroacupuncture; Acupuncture; Research Methodology; Study Design; Alternative Therapies; Acupuncture -- Methods; Time Factors; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Treatment Outcomes; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Human; Medline; PubMed; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Systematic Review -- Evaluation; Meta Analysis -- Evaluation; Decision Making, Clinical  
  Abstract In the field of acupuncture research there is an implicit yet unexplored assumption that the evidence on manual and electrical stimulation techniques, derived from basic science studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, is generally interchangeable. Such interchangeability would justify a bidirectional approach to acupuncture research, where basic science studies and clinical trials each inform the other. This article examines the validity of this fundamental assumption by critically reviewing the literature and comparing manual to electrical acupuncture in basic science studies, clinical trials, and meta-analyses. The evidence from this study does not support the assumption that these techniques are interchangeable. This article also identifies endemic methodologic limitations that have impaired progress in the field. For example, basic science studies have not matched the frequency and duration of manual needle stimulation to the frequency and duration of electrical stimulation. Further, most clinical trials purporting to compare the two types of stimulation have instead tested electroacupuncture as an adjunct to manual acupuncture. The current findings reveal fundamental gaps in the understanding of the mechanisms and relative effectiveness of manual versus electrical acupuncture. Finally, future research directions are suggested to better differentiate electrical from manual simulation, and implications for clinical practice are discussed.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford Medical School, Palo Alto, CA.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103772045. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150312. Revision Date: 20160229. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103772045 Serial 2335  
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Author de Mello Pereira, R.D.; da Silva, W.W.O.; Ramos, J.C.; Titonelli Alvim, N.A.; Pereira, C.D.; Rocha, T.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Integrative And Complementary Health Practices: An Integrative Review About Non Pharmacological Measures For Oncologic Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Nursing UFPE / Revista de Enfermagem UFPE Abbreviated Journal Rev Enfermagem Ufpe  
  Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 710-717  
  Keywords Cancer Pain -- Therapy; Alternative Therapies -- Utilization; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Oncologic Nursing; Systematic Review; Human; Medicine, Herbal; Acupuncture; Meditation; Manual Therapy; Yoga; Databases, Health; Descriptive Statistics; Content Analysis; Thematic Analysis; Cancer Patients; Holistic Nursing  
  Abstract  
  Address Public Health Technologist, National Women's, Child and Adolescent Health Institute IFF/FIOCRUZ, School of Nursing Anna Nery/EEAN/UFRJ. Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brazil  
  Publisher Revista de Enfermagem UFPE
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103755102. Language: Portuguese. Entry Date: 20150218. Revision Date: 20150819. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Mexico & Central/South America; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care; Pain and Pain Management. NLM UID: 101484186. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103755102 Serial 2334  
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Author López-Garrido, B.; García-Gonzalo, J.; Patrón-Rodriguez, C.; Marlasca-Gutiérrez, M.J.; Gil-Pita, R.; Toro-Flores, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of Acupuncture on the Third Stage of Labor: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health Abbreviated Journal J Midwifery Womens Health  
  Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 199-205  
  Keywords Labor Stage, Third; Acupuncture -- Utilization -- In Pregnancy; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Pregnancy; Spain; Single-Blind Studies; Placenta; Time Factors; Confidence Intervals; T-Tests; Adult; Female; Descriptive Statistics; Body Mass Index; Patient Attitudes -- Evaluation  
  Abstract Introduction A prolonged third stage of labor is considered to be a risk factor for postpartum hemorrhage. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of acupuncture to reduce the length of the third stage of labor. Methods Seventy-six puerperal women who had a normal spontaneous birth at the Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias, Alcalá de Henares, Spain, were included in a single-blind randomized trial and evaluated by a third party. Women were randomly assigned to receive true acupuncture or placebo acupuncture (also known as sham acupuncture). In the first group, a sterilized steel needle was inserted at the Ren Mai 6 point, which is located on the anterior midline between the umbilicus and the upper part of the pubic symphysis. In the second group, the insertion site was located at the same horizontal level as the Ren Mai 6 point but shifted slightly to the left of the anterior midline. The management of the third stage of labor was the same in both groups. Results Statistically significant differences were found, with an average time to placental expulsion of 15.2 minutes in the placebo group and 5.2 minutes in the acupuncture group. No major complications occurred in either group. Discussion These results confirm that acupuncture at the Ren Mai 6 point can decrease the time to placental expulsion. This treatment represents a simple, safe, and inexpensive way of decreasing the duration of the third stage of labor.  
  Address  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103777071. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150319. Revision Date: 20160229. Publication Type: Journal Article; clinical trial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Commentary: White Adrian, Langweiler Mark, Meinen Michael. Third stage of labour. (ACUPUNCTURE MED) Jun2015; 33 (3): 242-243. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Obstetric Care; Women's Health. NLM UID: 100909407. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103777071 Serial 2333  
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Author Tong Lin; Lan Gong; Xiaoxu Liu; Xiaopeng Ma url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for Monitoring the Lower Tear Meniscus in Dry Eye after Acupuncture Treatment Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords Dry Eye Syndromes -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Tears -- Analysis; Dry Eye Syndromes -- Physiopathology; Tomography, Optical -- Utilization; Alternative Therapies; China; Funding Source; Dry Eye Syndromes -- Classification; Human; Ophthalmic Solutions -- Therapeutic Use; Sjogren's Syndrome; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Pretest-Posttest Design; Noninvasive Procedures; Clinical Assessment Tools; Data Analysis Software; Descriptive Statistics; P-Value; Kruskal-Wallis Test; Two-Way Analysis of Variance; Male; Female; Middle Age; Adult; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract Dry eye is highly prevalent and has a significant impact on quality of life. Acupuncture was found to be effective to treat dry eye. However, little was known about the effect of acupuncture on different subtypes of dry eye. The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of tear meniscus assessment by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography in the evaluation of acupuncture treatment response in dry eye patients and to explore the effect of acupuncture on different subtypes of dry eye compared with artificial tear treatment. A total of 108 dry eye patients were randomized into acupuncture or artificial tear group. Each group was divided into three subgroups including lipid tear deficiency (LTD), Sj¨ogren syndrome dry eye (SSDE), and non-Sj¨ogren syndrome dry eye (Non-SSDE) for data analysis. After 4-week treatment, the low tear meniscus parameters including tear meniscus height (TMH), tear meniscus depth (TMD), and tear meniscus area (TMA) in the acupuncture group increased significantly for the LTD and Non-SSDE subgroups compared with both the baseline and the control groups (all P values < 0.05), but not for the SSDE. Acupuncture provided a measurable improvement of the tear meniscus dimensions for the Non-SSDE and LTD patients, but not for the SSDE patients.  
  Address Shanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture and Meridian, No. 650 Wanping South Road, Shanghai 200030, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824718. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; diagnostic images; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI). Grant Information: This study was supported by the research Grant(12401907300) from Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824718 Serial 2332  
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Author Chi Yu; Pei Zhang; Zheng-Tao Lv; Jing-Jing Li; Hong-Ping Li; Cai-Hua Wu; Fang Gao; Xiao-Cui Yuan; Jing Zhang; Wei He; Xiang-Hong Jing; Man Li url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Acupuncture in Itch: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Clinical Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Pruritus -- Therapy; Human; Meta Analysis; Systematic Review; Randomized Controlled Trials; Placebos; Treatment Outcomes; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; Medline; Visual Analog Scaling; Publication Bias; Confidence Intervals; Chi Square Test; Funding Source  
  Abstract Background. Itch (pruritus) is a sensitive state that provokes the desire to scratch. It is not only a common symptom of skin diseases but it also occurs in some systemic diseases. Clinical studies on the efficacy of the acupuncture therapy in alleviating itch are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This systematic review aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for itch. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of eight databases was performed up to June 2014, and randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo acupuncture or no treatment group were identified. Accordingly, a meta-analysis was conducted. Results. This review included three articles of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from a total of 2530 articles. The results of Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was effective to alleviate itch compared with placebo acupuncture and no treatment group. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this systematic review, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy of itch. However, this conclusion needs more studies on various ethnic samples to confirm our final conclusion.  
  Address Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824554. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: Systematic review was supported by grants fromNational Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 81173328),National Natural Science Foundation of Hubei Province (no.2014CFB159), and the Fundamental Research Funds for thecentral public welfare research institutes (no. ZZKF08007). NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824554 Serial 2331  
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Author Zheng-tao Lv; Wen Song; Jing Wu; Jun Yang; Tao Wang; Cai-hua Wu; Fang Gao; Xiao-cui Yuan; Ji-hong Liu; Man Li url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Acupuncture in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes; Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Drug Therapy; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Confidence Intervals; Odds Ratio; Chi Square Test; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Human; Child, Preschool; Child; Adolescence; Young Adult; P-Value; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Background. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is recognized as a widespread health problem in young children and adolescents. Clinical researches about acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of 8 databases was performed up to June 2014; randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo treatment or pharmacological therapy were identified. A metaanalysis was conducted. Results. This review included 21 RCTs and a total of 1590 subjects. The overall methodological qualities were low. The results of meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was more effective for clinical efficacy when compared with placebo or pharmacological treatment. Adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were not documented. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy. However, the beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to low methodological qualities. Rigorous high quality RCTs are urgently needed.  
  Address Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824615. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This work was supported by Grants from the National NaturalScience Foundation of China (no. 81473768; no. 81101927)and Grants from Wuhan Science and Technology Bureau no.2013060602010280.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824615 Serial 2330  
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Author Junyoung Jo; Yoon Jae Lee; Hyangsook Lee url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Primary Ovarian Insufficiency: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Utilization; Anovulation -- Therapy; Treatment Outcomes; Human; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Treatment Outcomes -- Evaluation; Clinical Trials; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Female; Adult; Embase; Cochrane Library; AMED Database; Follicle-Stimulating Hormone; Medline; Confidence Intervals; Descriptive Statistics; Bias (Research) -- Evaluation; Luteinizing Hormone; Chi Square Test; Funding Source  
  Abstract Objective. This systematic review aimed to assess current evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of acupuncture for patients with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). Methods. We searched twelve databases to identify relevant studies published before July 2014. The outcomes were serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels and resumption of menstruation. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane's tool, extracted the results, and evaluated the overall level of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Results. Eight RCTs were selected. Acupuncture significantly lowered serum FSH levels and more women receiving acupuncture reported resumption of menses. However, the results should be interpreted with caution due to a small number of participants, high risk of bias for blinding, and likely publication bias. The level of evidence for FSH level and resumption of menses were assessed as “low” using GRADE. Conclusion. The current evidence on acupuncture for POI is insufficient to draw a firm conclusion due to scarcity of studies with a low risk of bias and likely publication bias. Further rigorously designed and conducted studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in patients with POI.  
  Address Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824905. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: National Research Foundationof Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korean government(Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning)(2013R1A6A6029251 and 2012R1A1A2006793).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824905 Serial 2329  
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Author Toosizadeh, N.; Lei, H.; Schwenk, M.; Sherman, S.J.; Sternberg, E.; Mohler, J.; Najafi, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does integrative medicine enhance balance in aging adults? Proof of concept for the benefit of electroacupuncture therapy in Parkinson's disease Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Gerontology  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 3-14  
  Keywords Activities of Daily Living; Affect; Balance, Postural -- Physiology; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Parkinson Disease -- Therapy; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Ankle Joint; Clinical Assessment Tools; Double-Blind Studies; Female; Gravitation; Hip Joint; Human; Integrative Medicine; Male; Middle Age; Parkinson Disease -- Physiopathology; Parkinson Disease -- Psychosocial Factors; Pilot Studies; Scales; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract Background: Postural balance and potentially fall risk increases among older adults living with neurological diseases, especially Parkinson's disease (PD). Since conventional therapies such as levodopa or deep brain stimulation may fail to alleviate or may even worsen balance, interest is growing in evaluating alternative PD therapies.Objective: The purpose of the current study was to assess improvement in postural balance in PD patients following electroacupuncture (EA) as an alternative therapy.Methods: 15 aging adults (71.2 ± 6.3 years) with idiopathic PD and 44 healthy age-matched participants (74.6 ± 6.5 years) were recruited. The PD participants were randomly assigned (at a ratio of 2:1) to an intervention (n = 10) or to a control group (n = 5). The intervention group received a 30-min EA treatment on a weekly basis for 3 weeks, while the control group received a sham treatment. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after the final therapy. Measurements included balance assessment, specifically the ratio of medial-lateral (ML) center-of-gravity (COG) sway to anterior-posterior (AP) sway (COGML/AP) and ankle/hip sway during eyes-open, eyes-closed, and eyes-open dual-task trials, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), as well as quality of life, concerns for fall, and pain questionnaires.Results: No difference was observed for the assessed parameters between the intervention and the control group at baseline. After treatment, an improvement in balance performance was observed in the intervention group. Compared with the healthy population, PD patients prior to treatment had larger COGML/AP sway with more dependency on upper-body movements for maintaining balance. Following EA therapy, COGML/AP sway was reduced by 31% and ankle/hip sway increased by 46% in the different conditions (p = 0.02 for the dual-task condition). The clinical rating revealed an overall improvement (p < 0.01) in mentation, behavior, and mood (UPDRS part I, 49%), activities of daily living (UPDRS part II, 46%), and motor examination (UPDRS part III, 40%). There was a significant reduction (p < 0.02) in the specific items regarding UPDRS fall status (67%) and rigidity (48%). Changes were small and nonsignificant in the controls (p > 0.29).Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates improvement in rigidity and balance following EA. These preliminary results suggest EA could be a promising alternative treatment for balance disturbance in PD.  
  Address  
  Publisher Karger AG
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109770823. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150911. Revision Date: 20161117. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Continental Europe; Europe. Special Interest: Gerontologic Care. Instrumentation: Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Grant Information: R42 AG032748/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States. NLM UID: 7601655. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109770823 Serial 2328  
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Author von Deneen, K.M.; Wei Qin; Peng Liu; Minghao Dong; Peng Chen; Huisheng Xie; Yi Zhang; Mark S. Gold; Yijun Liu; Jie Tian url  doi
openurl 
  Title Connectivity Study of the Neuromechanism of Acute Acupuncture Needling during fMRI in “Overweight” Subjects Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Obesity -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Human; Funding Source; Acupuncture Points; Body Temperature; Blood Glucose; Hunger; Brain -- Physiology; Male; China; Adult; Middle Age; Descriptive Statistics; Waist-Hip Ratio; Randomized Controlled Trials; T-Tests  
  Abstract This functional connectivity study depicts how acupoints ST 36 and SP 9 and their sham acupoints acutely act on blood glucose (GLU), core body temperature (CBT), hunger, and sensations pertaining to needling (De-qi) via the limbic system and dopamine (DA) to affect various brain areas in fasting, adult, and “overweight” Chinese males using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional connectivity (FC) analysis utilized the amygdala (AMY) and hypothalamus (HYP) as regions of interest (ROIs) in the discrete cosine transform and seed correlation analysis methods. There was a significant difference in the spatial patterns of the distinct brain regions between groups. Correlation results showed that increased HYP-hippocampus FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in CBT; increased HYP-putamen-insula FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in GLU; and increased HYP-anterior cingulate cortex FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was probably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. Decreased HYP-thalamus FC after ACU was negatively correlated or anticorrelated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was possibly associated with decreased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. No correlation was found for min SHAM. This was an important study in addressing acute acupuncture effects and neural pathways involving physiology and appetite regulation in overweight individuals.  
  Address Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, P O. Box 100126 2015 S W 16th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824644. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; diagnostic images; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: .This studywas financially supported by the National Natural ScienceFoundation of China under Grant nos. 81271549, 61131003,and 31150110171, Chinese Academy of Sciences Fellowship forYoung International Scientists no. 2013Y1GA0004, and theFundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824644 Serial 2327  
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