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Author Liu, F.; Li, Z. M.; Jiang, Y. J.; Chen, L. D.
Title (up) A Meta-Analysis of Acupuncture Use in the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment After Stroke Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2014 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med
Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 535-544
Keywords Systematic Review; Stroke; Mild Cognitive Impairment; Nervous System Diseases; Cerebrovascular Disease; Cerebrovascular Disorder; Acupuncture; Meta-Analysis
Abstract Abstract Objective: This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on cognitive impairment (function) after a stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation were identified from databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Chinese Periodical Database, Wangfang Chinese Periodical Database, Chinese Bio-medicine Database, Cochrane Library, and Chinese medical literature databases) and two relevant journals (Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion and the Journal of Shanghai Acupuncture and Moxibustion). Meta-analyses were conducted for the eligible RCTs. Results: Twenty-one trials with a total of 1421 patients met inclusion criteria. Pooled random-effects estimates of the change in the Mini-Mental State Examination were calculated for the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation. Following 4 weeks and 8 weeks of intervention with acupuncture, the merged mean difference was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.06-4.21; p<.00001) and 2.03 (95% CI, 0.26-3.80; p=0.02), respectively. For the comparison of 3-4 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the merged MD in Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination total scores was 5.63 (95% CI, 3.95-7.31; p<.00001). For the comparison of 8-12 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the P300 latency merged MD was -12.80 (95% CI, -21.08 to -4.51; p<.00001), while the P300 amplitude merged MD was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p<.00001). Overall, the study quality was rated as moderate on the basis of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (part 2: 8.5). Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture had positive effects on cognitive function after stroke and supports the need for additional research on the potential benefits of this therapeutic approach.
Address Academy of Integrative Medicine, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine , Fuzhou, China .
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition Mild Cognitive Impairment
Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 745
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Author Liu, F.; Li, Z.-M.; Jiang, Y.-J.; Chen, L.-D.
Title (up) A Meta-Analysis of Acupuncture Use in the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment After Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med
Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 535-544
Keywords Acupuncture; Cognition Disorders -- Therapy; Stroke -- Complications; Human; Alternative Therapies; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Cochrane Library; Neuropsychological Tests; Data Analysis Software; Odds Ratio; Linear Regression; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Male; Female; Adolescence; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Chi Square Test
Abstract Objective: This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on cognitive impairment (function) after a stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation were identified from databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Chinese Periodical Database, Wangfang Chinese Periodical Database, Chinese Bio-medicine Database, Cochrane Library, and Chinese medical literature databases) and two relevant journals ( Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion and the Journal of Shanghai Acupuncture and Moxibustion). Meta-analyses were conducted for the eligible RCTs. Results: Twenty-one trials with a total of 1421 patients met inclusion criteria. Pooled random-effects estimates of the change in the Mini-Mental State Examination were calculated for the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation. Following 4 weeks and 8 weeks of intervention with acupuncture, the merged mean difference was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.06-4.21; p<.00001) and 2.03 (95% CI, 0.26-3.80; p=0.02), respectively. For the comparison of 3-4 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the merged MD in Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination total scores was 5.63 (95% CI, 3.95-7.31; p<.00001). For the comparison of 8-12 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the P300 latency merged MD was ?12.80 (95% CI, ?21.08 to ?4.51; p<.00001), while the P300 amplitude merged MD was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p<.00001). Overall, the study quality was rated as moderate on the basis of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (part 2: 8.5). Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture had positive effects on cognitive function after stroke and supports the need for additional research on the potential benefits of this therapeutic approach.
Address Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition
Disease Category OCSI Score
Notes Accession Number: 103971838. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) (Folstein et al); Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination. Grant Information: This study was supported by the Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971838 Serial 2347
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Author Di, Y. M.; May, B. H.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhou, I. W.; Worsnop, C.; Xue, C. C.
Title (up) A meta-analysis of ear-acupuncture, ear-acupressure and auriculotherapy for cigarette smoking cessation Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2014 Publication Drug and alcohol dependence Abbreviated Journal Drug Alcohol Depend
Volume 142C Issue Pages 14-23
Keywords Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders; Tobacco Use Disorder; Auricular Acupuncture; Drug Addiction; Smoking Cessation; Substance Abuse; Auricular Acupressure
Abstract BACKGROUND: This systematic review evaluated the effects of ear acupuncture, ear acupressure and auriculotherapy for cigarette smoking cessation (SC) at end-of-treatment (EoT), three, six and 12 months follow-up. METHODS: Searches of six English and Chinese databases located 25 randomized controlled trials (3735 participants). Methodological quality was assessed using Cochrane Risk of Bias. Meta-analyses were conducted in two pools: 1. SC-specific ear acupuncture/acupressure or auriculotherapy (EAP/R) vs. non-specific/inactive control; and 2. SC-specific EAP/R vs. other SC-specific treatment. Sensitivity analyses were conducted based on the validity of interventions as SC-specific treatments or non-specific/inactive interventions; and the use of biochemical SC confirmation. RESULTS: Pool 1: the 12 valid SC-specific EAP/R interventions were superior to inactive EAP/R controls at EoT (RR=1.77 [1.39, 2.25]), three months follow-up (RR=1.54 [1.14, 2.08]), and six months follow-up (RR=2.01, [1.23, 3.28]) but data were insufficient at 12 months. In Pool 2: there was no superiority or inferiority for EAP/R at EoT or at 3 and 6 month follow-ups compared to SC-specific behavioural therapy or SC-specific body acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Pool 1 data appeared most consistent for studies of ear acupressure (EAPR) vs. non-specific EAPR controls, with confirmed SC rates at 3 months post-treatment of 20.0% for test groups vs. 7.5% for controls. In Pool 2 the EAP/R interventions appeared neither inferior nor superior to the behavioural interventions at 3 and 6 month follow-ups. However, meta-analysis results derived from relatively small-sized trials with no biochemical validation of SC in Pool 2. Larger, well-controlled studies using biochemical confirmation of SC are needed.
Address School of Health Sciences, Traditional & Complementary Medicine Research Program, Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia. Electronic address: yuan.di@rmit.edu.au
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 240
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Author Ter Riet, G.; Kleijnen, J.; Knipschild, P.
Title (up) A meta-analysis of studies into the effect of acupuncture on addiction Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 1990 Publication Abbreviated Journal Br J Gen Pract
Volume 40 Issue 338 Pages 379-382
Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Heroin Dependence; Meta-Analysis; Smoking Cessation; Substance Abuse; Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract A literature search revealed 22 controlled clinical studies on the efficacy of acupuncture in three fields of addiction: cigarette smoking (15), heroin (five), and alcohol (two). These studies were reviewed using a list of 18 predefined criteria of good methodology. A maximum of 100 points for study design could be earned, divided over four categories: comparability of prognosis; adequate intervention; adequate effect measurement; and good data presentation. The study design was generally poor. No study earned more than 75 points and 12 studies (55%) earned less than 50 points. For smoking cessation, the number of studies with negative outcomes exceeded by far the number with positive outcomes. Taking the quality of the studies into account this negative picture becomes even stronger. For heroin and alcohol addiction controlled clinical research is both scarce and of low quality. Claims that acupuncture is efficacious as a therapy for these addictions are thus not supported by results from sound clinical research
Address Department of Epidemiology and Health Care Research, University of Limburg, The Netherlands
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants
Time in Treatment N/A Condition Substance-Related Disorders
Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1156
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Author Long, Y. B.; Wu, X. P.
Title (up) A meta-analysis of the efficacy of acupuncture in treating dysphagia in patients with a stroke Type of Study Systematic Review
Year 2012 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med
Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 291-297
Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Stroke; Dysphagia; Acupuncture; Deglutition Disorders; Gastrointestinal Diseases
Abstract BACKGROUND: Dysphagia, or deglutition difficulty, is a common manifestation in patients with a stroke and its management is an important aspect of rehabilitation. Acupuncture, a complementary and alternative therapy, is the subject of growing public interest for treatment of stroke. OBJECTIVE: A meta-analysis was performed to study the effect of acupuncture for treatment of dysphagia in patients affected by a stroke. METHODS: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture treatment with non-acupuncture treatment of dysphagia in patients with a stroke were identified from the databases of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and CBM disc (China Biological Medicine Database). Eligible investigations were included and data on the effectiveness of acupuncture were extracted and synthesised by meta-analysis using RevMan 5.1.4. Results were expressed as OR for dichotomous data; 95% CIs were also calculated. RESULTS: Seventy-two RCTs (3208 patients in the treatment group and 2926 patients in the control group) were identified. Details of randomisation and blinding were not reported and information on withdrawals and dropouts was missing in most of included reports. Meta-analysis showed that the effectiveness of treatment in the group receiving acupuncture was higher than that in the non-acupuncture group (OR=5.17, 95% CI 4.18 to 6.38; p<0.00001). However, the study quality was generally low and of insufficient quality to make recommendations about using acupuncture in the rehabilitation of patients with dysphagia due to stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture might be beneficial in the rehabilitation of patients with dysphagia caused by stroke, and the evidence justifies future high-quality studies.
Address Department of Rehabilitation, The First Affiliated Hospital of GuangXi Medical University, NanNing, China.
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments
Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants
Time in Treatment Condition Stroke
Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 770
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Author Choi, S. M.; Park, J. E.; Li, S. S.; Jung, H.; Zi, M.; Kim, T. H.; Jung, S.; Kim, A.; Shin, M.; Sul, J. U.; Hong, Z.; Jiping, Z.; Lee, S.; Liyun, H.; Kang, K.; Baoyan, L.
Title (up) A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial testing the effects of acupuncture on allergic rhinitis Type of Study RCT
Year 2013 Publication Allergy Abbreviated Journal Allergy
Volume 68 Issue 3 Pages 365-374
Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Rhinitis, Allergic; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Wait-List Control; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control
Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the treatment for allergic rhinitis. METHODS: This study was a multicenter, randomized, parallel-controlled study. Participants were randomized to either the active acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or waitlist groups. The active and sham acupuncture groups received acupuncture treatment three times per week for 4 weeks. In the sham group, minimal acupuncture at nonacupuncture points was used. The waitlist group did not receive any acupuncture treatment. RESULTS: Of the 238 participants, 97, 94, and 47 individuals were assigned to the active acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and waitlist group, respectively. After the treatment, the difference in the total nasal symptom score (TNSS) was significantly reduced in the active acupuncture group compared with the sham acupuncture (difference: -1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.96, -0.09, P = 0.03) and waitlist (difference: -2.49, 95% CI: -3.68, -1.29, P &lt; 0.0001). The active acupuncture group exhibited a significant change in the total non-nasal symptom score (TNNSS) compared with the waitlist (difference: -0.78, 95% CI: -1.22, -0.34, P = 0.0002), but not the sham acupuncture group (difference; 0.15, 95% CI: -0.21, 0.5, P = 0.56). Both active and sham acupuncture treatments resulted in significant improvements in TNSS and TNNSS compared to baseline. CONCLUSION: Active acupuncture showed a significantly greater effect on symptoms of allergic rhinitis than either sham acupuncture or no active treatment. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis decreased significantly after treatment in the both acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups. Acupuncture appears to be an effective and safe treatment for allergic rhinitis.
Address Department of Medical Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea. smchoi@kiom.re.kr
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 12
Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 238
Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Rhinitis, Allergic
Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 182
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Author Liang, F.; Li, Y.; Yu, S.; Li, C.; Hu, L.; Zhou, D.; Yuan, X.; Li, Y.
Title (up) A multicentral randomized control study on clinical acupuncture treatment of Bell's palsy Type of Study RCT
Year 2006 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med
Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 3-7
Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bell Palsy; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Moxa, Indirect; Massage; Moxibustion; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Cranial Nerve Diseases
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To confirm the clinical therapeutic effects of acupuncture and moxibustion on Bell's palsy. METHODS: 480 cases from 4 hospitals were enrolled for this study, among whom 439 cases completed the whole course of the study. The patients were randomly divided into the following 3 groups, a control group(treated with prednisone, vitamin B1, vitamin B12 and dibazol), an acu-moxibustion group (treated with filiform needle plus moxibustion), and a basic treatment plus acu-moxibustion group (treated with oral medicine like those in the control group plus acupuncture, and with moxibustion like in the acu-moxibustion group). The whole treatment course lasted 4 weeks. The therapeutic effects were evaluated according to the symptoms and signs, House-Brackmann grading scale and facial disability indexes(FDI). RESULTS: All the 4 centers (hospitals) completed this study well, with no statistically significant difference found among the 4 centers in therapeutic effects. The patients with different conditions were well distributed in the 3 groups, thus the basic general data were comparable (P > 0.05). The therapeutic effects of the two treatment groups were better than the control group (respectively P < 0.05 and P < 0.01), and it was the best in the acu-moxibustion group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture and moxibustion may exert definite therapeutic effects on Bell's palsy, better than that of the basic treatment group or the basic treatment plus acu-moxibustion group
Address The College of Acupuncture and Massage, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Sichuan 610075, China
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 20
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 439
Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Bell Palsy
Disease Category Cranial Nerve Diseases OCSI Score 54
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 704
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Author Juel, J.; Liguori, S.; Liguori, A.; Valeriani, M.; Graversen, C.; Olesen, S.S.; Drewes, A.M.
Title (up) A New Method for Sham-Controlled Acupuncture in Experimental Visceral Pain – a Randomized, Single-Blinded Study Type of Study Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Pain Pract Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Visceral Pain; RCT; Pilot Study; Cross-Over Design; Acu Versus Sham; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Acupuncture is increasingly used as an alternative to medical therapy for various pain conditions. To study the effect of acupuncture in experimental and clinical studies, a control condition with sham acupuncture is needed. However, as such models have not been established in assessment of acupunctures effect against visceral pain, this study aimed to validate a new method for blinded sham acupuncture in experimental rectal pain. METHODS: Fifteen subjects underwent a sequence of either sham or real acupuncture in randomized order. In the sham arm, a hollow inner tube with a sharp tip was fitted into an outer tube and subjects were blinded to the stimulations. Before and after the intervention, pain was induced by rectal stimulation with an inflatable balloon distended until the subjects' pain threshold was reached. The resting electroencephalogram (EEG) was quantified by spectral power analysis to explore the central nervous system effects objectively. Additionally, after the second study day, the subject was asked to indicate the sequence of interventions. RESULTS: A significant increase in rectal balloon volume was observed after sham 12 +/- 21 mL (P = 0.049) and acupuncture 17 +/- 30 mL (P = 0.046). However, the change in volume was not different between groups (P = 0.6). No differences in EEG spectral power distributions between sham and acupuncture were seen (all P > 0.6). The correct sequence of sham and acupuncture was indicated by 36% of the subjects (P = 0.4). CONCLUSIONS: The presented sham procedure provides a valid method for blinding of “sham acupuncture” and may be used in future blinded controlled trials of acupuncture for visceral pain.
Address Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg University Hospital, Molleparkvej 4, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark. amd@rn.dk
Publisher (c) 2015 World Institute of Pain.
Language Number of Treatments 2
Treatment Follow-up 5 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 15
Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Anesthesia and Analgesia
Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score
Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 9/29/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=26011772 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1839
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Author Arnetz, B. B.; Berg, M.; Anderzen, I.; Lundeberg, T.; Haker, E.
Title (up) A nonconventional approach to the treatment of “environmental illness” Type of Study RCT
Year 1995 Publication Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Occup Environ Med
Volume 37 Issue 7 Pages 838-844
Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Environmental Illness; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Miscellaneous; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control
Abstract Twenty patients with symptoms of “environmental illness” were subject to a controlled study of deep versus superficial acupuncture. The patients were evaluated by a detailed questionnaire concerning their occupational, environmental, and medical history. Blood samples were taken as well. Patients were randomized to deep or superficial acupuncture. Both groups improved significantly in key variables during and after treatment. There were no group differences. There were no changes in biological variables apart from a gradual and continuous increase in serum cortisol and a decrease in neuropeptide Y, which was somewhat more accentuated in those receiving deep acupuncture. This rise in cortisol may have contributed to decreased dermal symptoms among the participants. It is hypothesized that the positive treatment results observed are partly due to weakening of the conditioned response, linking bodily symptoms to environmental agents. To date, a number of different methods have been tried in the management of patients with environmental illness. However, only rarely have the treatments been evaluated in controlled studies
Address National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 10
Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 20
Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Environmental Illness
Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 36
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Author Berle, C. A.; Cobbin, D.; Smith, N.; Zaslawski, C.
Title (up) A novel approach to evaluate traditional Chinese medicine treatment outcomes using pattern identification Type of Study RCT
Year 2010 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med
Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 357-367
Keywords AcuTrials; TCM Acupuncture Style; RCT; Hepatitis C; Liver Diseases; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Methodological Concerns; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a modern interpretation of Chinese medicine, developed in the 1950s. It differentiates biomedical diseases into patterns. Each pattern comprises symptom/signs that have their own unique treatment protocol. Most TCM research has used fixed formula treatments for Western-defined diseases with outcomes often measured using objective biomedical markers. More recently, a number of trials have attempted to accommodate TCM clinical practice within the framework of rigorous evidence-based medical research. The aim of this article is to describe a novel outcome measure based on TCM patterns that was used in a pilot study for people with hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS: Sixteen (16) participants with HCV were enrolled in a randomized, controlled pilot study and allocated to a treatment or control group. TCM pattern diagnosis was obtained at baseline and used to guide acupuncture treatment for the treatment group. Each individual's primary, secondary, and tertiary TCM patterns were identified, which involved the systematic evaluation of the participant's information against the TCM patterns and conversion of the pattern to a percentage. Baseline and postintervention percentages for the three TCM patterns for the two groups were compared to assess change. RESULTS: There was a significant mean percentage decrease in pattern expression at week 12 compared to baseline for the secondary and tertiary patterns of the treatment group (56.3% versus 47.5%; p = 0.045 and 48.1% versus 33.6%; p = 0.037, respectively). No significant change was found for the primary, secondary, or tertiary patterns for the control group or for the primary pattern associated with the treatment group. CONCLUSIONS: The quantification of TCM patterns in this study permitted statistical evaluation of TCM pattern change. Previously, TCM pattern identification had only been used as a basis for developing the treatment protocol in clinical trials. This is the first time it has been employed as a novel outcome measure.
Address College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of Medical and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Christine.Berle@uts.edu.au
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 24
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 16
Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hepatitis C
Disease Category Liver Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 66
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Author Kjendahl, A.; Sallstrom, S.; Osten, P. E.; Stanghelle, J. K.; Borchgrevink, C. F.
Title (up) A one year follow-up study on the effects of acupuncture in the treatment of stroke patients in the subacute stage: a randomized, controlled study Type of Study RCT
Year 1997 Publication Clinical rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Clin Rehabil
Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 192-200
Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style
Abstract OBJECTIVE: We recently reported that acupuncture treatment of stroke patients in the subacute stage gave additive therapeutic benefit. The purpose of the present study was to determine, approximately one year after discharge from the rehabilitation hospital, whether the group differences still remained. DESIGN: The patients were randomized into two groups: one acupuncture group and one control group, considering gender and side of hemispheral localization of lesion. With regard to the main parameters the groups were comparable at baseline. SETTING: Initially, 45 stroke patients admitted to Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital were included in the study: median 40 days post stroke. SUBJECTS: Forty-one of the patients were available one year after the treatment period: 21 patients in the acupuncture group and 20 controls. INTERVENTION: All subjects received an individually adapted, multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. The acupuncture group received additional treatment with classical acupuncture for 30 min three to four times weekly for six weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The patients were evaluated at inclusion, after six weeks and approximately 12 months after discharge from the rehabilitation hospital. The Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) for stroke patients, Sunnaas Index of Activity of Daily Living (ADL) and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) were used. In addition, the social situations of the patients were recorded at one year follow-up. RESULTS: The results show that the acupuncture group improved significantly more than the controls, both during the treatment period of six weeks, and even more during the following year, both according to MAS, ADL, NHP and the social situation. CONCLUSION: Although the mechanism of the effects is debatable, there seems to be a positive long-term effect of acupuncture given in the subacute stage post stroke
Address Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, Nesoddtangen, Norway
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 21
Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 41
Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Stroke
Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 590
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Author Yang, J.; Zeng, F.; Fang, L.; Feng, Y.; Qin, W.; Liu, X.; Song, W.; Xie, H.; Chen, J.; Liang, F.
Title (up) A PET-CT study on the specificity of acupoints through acupuncture treatment in migraine patients Type of Study RCT
Year 2012 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med
Volume 12 Issue 123 Pages 1-14
Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Headache Disorders; Migraine; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control
Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the field of acupuncture research, the topic of acupoint specificity has received increasing attention, but no unified conclusion has been reached on whether or not acupoint specificity exists. Furthermore, the majority of previous acupuncture neuroimaging studies have been performed using healthy subjects. In this study, patients with migraine were used to investigate acupoint specificity. METHODS: Thirty patients with migraine were enrolled and randomized into three groups: Traditional Acupuncture Group (TAG), Control Acupuncture Group (CAG), and Migraine Group (MG). The TAG was treated by acupuncture stimulation at Waiguan (TE5), Yang Lingquan (GB34), and Fengchi (GB20). The CAG was treated at Touwei (ST8), Pianli (LI6), and Zusanli (ST36). The MG received no treatment. Positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) was used to test for differences in brain activation between the TAG and CAG versus MG, respectively. RESULTS: Traditional acupuncture treatment was more effective for pain reduction than control acupuncture treatment. The TAG showed higher brain metabolism than the MG in the middle temporal cortex (MTC), orbital frontal cortex (OFC), insula, middle frontal gyrus, angular gyrus, post-cingulate cortex (PCC), the precuneus, and the middle cingulate cortex (MCC). Metabolism decreased in the parahippocampus, hippocampus, fusiform gyrus, postcentral gyrus, and cerebellum in the TAG compared with the MG. In the CAG, metabolism increased compared with the MG in the MTC, supratemporal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and MCC, whereas metabolism decreased in the cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture stimulation of different points on similar body regions in migraine patients reduced pain and induced different levels of cerebral glucose metabolism in pain-related brain regions. These findings may support the functional specificity of migraine- treatment-related acupoint.Trial registrationThe number of our clinical trial registration is: ChiCTR-TRC-11001813, and the protocol and inclusion criteria have already been registered as ChiCTR-TRC-11001813.
Address Acupuncture and Tuina School, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China.
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 1
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 30
Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Migraine
Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1368
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Author Deng, G.; Wong, W. D.; Guillem, J.; Chan, Y.; Affuso, T.; Yeung, K. S.; Coleton, M.; Sjoberg, D.; Vickers, A.; Cassileth, B.
Title (up) A Phase II, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Acupuncture for Reduction of Postcolectomy Ileus Type of Study RCT
Year 2013 Publication Annals of surgical oncology Abbreviated Journal Ann Surg Oncol
Volume 20 Issue 4 Pages 1164-1169
Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Ileus; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control; Ileus, Postoperative; Colectomy
Abstract PURPOSE: Postoperative ileus (POI) prolongs hospital stay and increases risk of postoperative complications. We conducted a randomized, sham-controlled trial to evaluate whether acupuncture reduces POI more effectively than sham acupuncture. METHODS: Colon cancer patients undergoing elective colectomy were randomized to receive 30 min of true or sham acupuncture twice daily during their first 3 postoperative days. GI-3 (the later of the following two events: time that the patient first tolerated solid food, AND time that the patient first passed flatus OR a bowel movement) and GI-2 (the later of the following two events: time patient first tolerated solid food AND time patient first passed a bowel movement) were determined. Pain, nausea, vomiting, and use of pain medications were evaluated daily for the first 3 postoperative days. RESULTS: Ninety patients were randomized. Eighty-one received the allocated intervention: 39 in the true acupuncture group and 42 in the sham acupuncture group, all evaluated for the primary endpoint. The mean time to GI-3 was 149 h [standard deviation (SD) 71 h] and 146 (SD 62 h) after surgery for the acupuncture group and the sham acupuncture group (difference between means -2 h; 95 % confidence interval -31, 26; p = 0.9). No significant differences were found between groups for secondary endpoints. CONCLUSIONS: True acupuncture as provided in this study did not reduce POI more significantly than sham acupuncture. The study was limited by a standard deviation much larger than expected, suggesting that a study with a larger sample size might be required.
Address Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA, dengg@mskcc.org.
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 6
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90
Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Ileus
Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 235
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Author Man, S. C.; Hung, B. H.; Ng, R. M.; Yu, X. C.; Cheung, H.; Fung, M. P.; Li, L. S.; Leung, K. P.; Leung, K. P.; Tsang, K. W.; Ziea, E.; Wong, V. T.; Zhang, Z. J.
Title (up) A pilot controlled trial of a combination of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation and body acupuncture for post-stroke depression Type of Study RCT
Year 2014 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med
Volume 14 Issue Pages 255-
Keywords RCT; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Pilot Study; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control
Abstract BACKGROUND: Our previous studies have demonstrated the treatment benefits of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS), a novel brain stimulation therapy in patients with major depression, postpartum depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of DCEAS combined with body acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). METHODS: In a single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 43 patients with PSD were randomly assigned to 12 sessions of DCEAS plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 23), or sham (non-invasive cranial electroacupuncture, n-CEA) plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 20) for 3 sessions per week over 4 weeks. Treatment outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), the Clinical Global Impression – Severity scale (CGI-S) and Barthel Index (BI), a measure used to evaluate movement ability associated with daily self-caring activity. RESULTS: DCEAS produced a significantly greater reduction of both HAMD-17 and CGI-S as early as week 1 and CGI-S at endpoint compared to n-CEA, but subjects of n-CEA group exhibited a significantly greater improvement on BI at week 4 than DCEAS. Incidence of adverse events was not different in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that DCEAS could be effective in reducing stroke patients' depressive symptoms. Superficial electrical stimulation in n-CEA group may be beneficial in improving movement disability of stroke patients. A combination of DCEAS and body acupuncture can be considered a treatment option for neuropsychiatric sequelae of stroke. TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01174394.
Address The School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 10 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. zhangzj@hku.hk.
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 12
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 43
Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 812
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Author Davis, C. L.; Lewith, G. T.; Broomfield, J.; Prescott, P.
Title (up) A pilot project to assess the methodological issues involved in evaluating acupuncture as a treatment for disabling breathlessness Type of Study RCT
Year 2001 Publication The journal of alternative and complementary medicine : research on paradigm, practice, and policy Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med
Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 633-639
Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; COPD; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pilot Study; Press Tacks; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Sham TENS; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Dyspnea
Abstract OBJECTIVES: This pilot study explores the methodological implications of evaluating the use of acupuncture in the treatment of disabling breathlessness. DESIGN: A randomized, controlled trial involving three treatments that were used on one occasion, each in random order. SETTINGS: The study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of providing acupuncture treatment on a domiciliary basis, in Southampton (United Kingdom) to patients with disabling breathlessness. SUBJECTS: Sixteen (16) subjects with disabling breathlessness caused by chronic lung disease (primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) were recruited from the respiratory medicine clinics of Southampton University Hospitals Trust. INTERVENTIONS: The treatments were real acupuncture, dummy acupuncture, and mock transelectrical nerve stimulation (TENS). OUTCOMES: To evaluate the respiratory outcome measures, to look at the credibility of the three treatments (using a previously validated Borkovec and Nau scale), and to calculate the sample size for a larger, more definitive study. RESULTS: Twelve (12) subjects completed the study. The acupuncture was a predefined point prescription that had been found previously to be of value in this condition, an approach that could be taught to health professionals and provided on a domiciliary basis. The treatment was provided only on one occasion, therefore, we did not expect a clear therapeutic benefit to emerge, but some nonsignificant benefit was noted as a consequence of acupuncture treatment. The shuttle test that we used as an objective measure of breathlessness was impractical in a domiciliary environment and will not be used in further studies. Each of the three treatments was equally credible at the outset, although real and dummy acupuncture were considered by the patients to be preferable choices after the completion of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to carry out this study on a domiciliary basis. The information obtained will allow us to design a much clearer definitive study and the small, but statistically insignificant, response to acupuncture has allowed us to estimate sample size
Address Royal South Hants Hospital, Southampton, United Kingdom
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 3
Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 16
Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Dyspnea
Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 226
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Author Painovich, J. M.; Shufelt, C. L.; Azziz, R.; Yang, Y.; Goodarzi, M. O.; Braunstein, G. D.; Karlan, B. Y.; Stewart, P. M.; Merz, C. N.
Title (up) A pilot randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial of traditional acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms and mechanistic pathways of menopause Type of Study RCT
Year 2012 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause
Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 54-61
Keywords AcuTrials; Climacteric; Menopause; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Wait-List Control
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot study for the feasibility of planning a definitive clinical trial comparing traditional acupuncture (TA) with sham acupuncture (SA) and waiting control (WC) on menopause-related vasomotor symptoms (VMS), quality of life, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. METHODS: Thirty-three perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with at least seven VMS daily were randomized to TA, SA, or WC. The TA and SA groups were given three treatments per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the number and severity of VMS, Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Instrument, Pittsburgh Quality Sleep Index, 24-hour urine cortisol and metabolites, and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing. RESULTS: Both the TA and SA groups demonstrated improved VMS trends compared with the WC group (Delta -3.5 +/- 3.00 vs -4.1 +/- 3.79 vs -1.2 +/- 2.4, respectively; P = 20) and significantly improved Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire vasomotor scores (Delta -1.5 +/- 2.02 vs -1.8 +/- 1.52 vs -0.3 +/- 0.64, respectively; P = 0.04). There were no psychosocial group differences. Exit 24-hour urinary measures were lower in the TA versus the SA or WC group in total cortisol metabolites (4,658.9 +/- 1,670.9 vs 7,735.8 +/- 3,747.9 vs 5,166.0 +/- 2,234.5, P = 0.03; respectively) and dehydroepiandrosterone (41.4 +/- 27.46, 161.2 +/- 222.77, and 252.4 +/- 385.40, respectively; P = 0.05). The response data on adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation cortisol also trended in the hypothesized direction (P = 0.17). CONCLUSIONS: Both TA and SA reduce VMS frequency and severity and improve VMS-related quality of life compared with WC; however, TA alone may impact the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This association is viewed as preliminary and hypothesis generating and should be explored in a large clinical trial.
Address Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA, USA; Departments of Endocrinology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA;
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 36
Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 33
Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Menopause
Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 923
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Author Zanette, S. D.; Born, I. G.; Brenol, J. C.; Xavier, R. M.
Title (up) A pilot study of acupuncture as adjunctive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis Type of Study RCT
Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Clin Rheum
Volume 27 Issue Pages 627-635
Keywords Acupuncture; Arthritis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Acupoint Control; Pain; Pilot Study; RCT; Arthritis, Rheumatoid; Superficial Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Penetrating Sham; AcuTrials; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care
Abstract We evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture as a useful adjuvant treatment in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A pilot, randomized, double-blind, and controlled clinical trial was conducted. Forty RA patients with active disease despite stable therapy for at least the preceding 1 month were randomized to receive a standard protocol of acupuncture (AC) or superficial acupuncture at non-acupuncture points (controlAC) for 9 weeks. The primary outcome was achievement of 20% improvement according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 criteria after five and ten treatment sessions and after 1 month of follow-up. Secondary measures included Disease Assessment Scale (DAS), tender and swollen joint count, morning stiffness, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain, physician global assessment of activity disease, physician and patient global assessment of treatment, and inflammatory markers (erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein). There was not significant difference between the groups regarding the number of patients that reached ACR20 at the end of the treatment (p = 0.479). However, after 1 month of follow-up, there was a trend in favor of the AC group, with p = 0,068. Compared with the controlAC, the AC group also demonstrated significant improvement in the patient and physician global assessment of treatment and physician global assessment of disease activity, but there was no difference on other clinical and laboratorial measures. On the other hand, only the AC patients had within group improvement on the variables DAS, HAQ, morning stiffness, patient and physician global assessment of treatment, and physician global assessment of disease activity in comparison to baseline visit. Despite the improvement of some studied variables, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients that reached ACR20 between the AC and controlAC groups. This negative result can be related to the small sample size, selection of patients, type of acupuncture protocol applied, and difficulties in establishing an innocuous and trustworthy placebo group to studies involving acupuncture
Address Servico de Reumatologia, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 10
Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40
Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Arthritis, Rheumatoid
Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1416
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Author White, A. R.; Eddleston, C.; Hardie, R.
Title (up) A pilot study of acupuncture for tension headache, using a novel placebo Type of Study RCT
Year 1996 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med
Volume 14 Issue Pages 11-15
Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pilot Study; RCT; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; Tension-Type Headache; Headache Disorders; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only;
Abstract
Address
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 6
Treatment Follow-up 3 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 10
Time in Treatment 9 Weeks Condition Tension-Type Headache
Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1291
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Author Bao, T.; Goloubeva, O.; Pelser, C.; Porter, N.; Primrose, J.; Hester, L.; Sadowska, M.; Lapidus, R.; Medeiros, M.; Lao, L.; Dorsey, S.G.; Badros, A.Z.
Title (up) A pilot study of acupuncture in treating bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with multiple myeloma Type of Study RCT
Year 2014 Publication Integr Cancer Ther Abbreviated Journal
Volume 13 Issue 5 Pages 396-404
Keywords Neoplasms; Peripheral Neuropathy; Peripheral Nervous System Diseases; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Observational Study; Cancer
Abstract BACKGROUND: Peripheral neuropathy is the dose limiting toxicity of bortezomib in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety, feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture in reducing bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy (BIPN) symptoms. METHODS: Patients with MM experiencing persistent BIPN >/=grade 2 despite adequate medical intervention and discontinuation of bortezomib received 10 acupuncture treatments for 10 weeks (2x/week for 2 weeks, 1x/week for 4 weeks, and then biweekly for 4 weeks). Responses were assessed by the Clinical Total Neuropathy Score (TNSc), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group-Neurotoxicity (FACT/GOG-Ntx) questionnaire, and the Neuropathy Pain Scale (NPS). Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to test for monotonic decline in scores on each of the measures. Serial serum levels of proinflammatory and neurotrophic cytokines were obtained at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 14. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients with MM were enrolled in the trial. There were no adverse events associated with the acupuncture treatments. TNSc data were deemed invalid and therefore were not reported. At weeks 10 and 14, FACT/GOG-Ntx and NPS showed significant reduction suggesting decreased pain, and improved function (P values were <.0001 for both FACT/GOG-Ntx and NPS at weeks 10 and 14). However, nerve conduction studies did not significantly change between baseline assessment and end of study. There was no correlation in serum cytokines for responders versus none responders. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is safe, feasible and produces subjective improvements in patients' symptoms. A follow-up randomized controlled trial is warranted.
Address The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA baot@mskcc.org.; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
Publisher (c) The Author(s) 2014.
Language Number of Treatments 10
Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 27
Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Chemotherapy Side Effects
Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score
Notes Date of Input: 2/26/2015; Date Modified: 3/10/2015; Priority: Normal; Chemotherapy Side Effects; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA baot@mskcc.org.; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24867959 Approved no
Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1745
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Author Itoh, K.; Hirota, S.; Katsumi, Y.; Ochi, H.; Kitakoji, H.
Title (up) A pilot study on using acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to treat knee osteoarthritis (OA) Type of Study RCT
Year 2008 Publication Chinese medicine [electronic resource] Abbreviated Journal Chin Med
Volume 3 Issue Pages 2-
Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Pain; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; TCM Acupuncture Style; TENS; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; TENS
Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The present study tests whether a combined treatment of acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is more effective than acupuncture or TENS alone for treating knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Thirty-two patients with knee OA were randomly allocated to four groups. The acupuncture group (ACP) received only acupuncture treatment at selected acupoints for knee pain; the TENS group (TENS) received only TENS treatment at pain areas; the acupuncture and TENS group (A&T) received both acupuncture and TENS treatments; the control group (CT) received topical poultice (only when necessary). Each group received specific weekly treatment five times during the study. Outcome measures were pain intensity in a visual analogue scale (VAS) and knee function in terms of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). RESULTS: The ACP, TENS and A&T groups reported lower VAS and WOMAC scores than the control group. Significant reduction in pain intensity (P = 0.039) and significant improvement in knee function (P = 0.008) were shown in the A&T group. CONCLUSION: Combined acupuncture and TENS treatment was effective in pain relief and knee function improvement for the sampled patients suffering from knee OA
Address Department of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Meiji University of Oriental Medicine, Kyoto 629-0392, Japan. k_itoh@meiji-u.ac.jp
Publisher
Language Number of Treatments 5
Treatment Follow-up 10 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 32
Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 506
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