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Author (up) Cho, Y. H.; Kim, C. K.; Heo, K. H.; Lee, M. S.; Ha, I. H.; Son, D. W.; Choi, B. K.; Song, G. S.; Shin, B. C. url  doi
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  Title Acupuncture for Acute Postoperative Pain after Back Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication Pain practice : the official journal of World Institute of Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain Pract  
  Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages 279-291  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain, Postoperative; Back Pain, Acute; Acupuncture; Back Surgery; Meta-Analysis; Pain  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Acupuncture is commonly used as a complimentary treatment for pain management. However, there has been no systematic review summarizing the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain (</=1 week) after back surgery. METHODS: We searched 15 electronic databases without language restrictions. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility and extracted data, outcomes, and risk of bias. Random effect meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were performed. RESULTS: Five trials, including 3 of high quality, met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed positive results for acupuncture treatment of pain after surgery in terms of the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity 24 hours after surgery, when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.67 (-1.04 to -0.31), P = 0.0003), whereas the other meta-analysis did not show a positive effect of acupuncture on 24-hour opiate demands when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.23 (-0.58 to 0.13), P = 0.21). CONCLUSION: Our systematic review finds encouraging but limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. Further rigorously designed clinical trials are required.  
  Address School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Republic of Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 179  
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Author (up) Cho, Y.H.; Kim, C.K.; Heo, K.H.; Lee, M.S.; Ha, I.H.; Son, D.W.; Choi, B.K.; Song, G.S.; Shin, B.C. doi  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Acute Postoperative Pain after Back Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Pain Pract Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 279-291  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain, Postoperative; Back Pain, Acute; Acupuncture; Back Surgery; Meta-Analysis; Pain  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Acupuncture is commonly used as a complimentary treatment for pain management. However, there has been no systematic review summarizing the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain (</=1 week) after back surgery. METHODS: We searched 15 electronic databases without language restrictions. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility and extracted data, outcomes, and risk of bias. Random effect meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were performed. RESULTS: Five trials, including 3 of high quality, met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed positive results for acupuncture treatment of pain after surgery in terms of the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity 24 hours after surgery, when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.67 (-1.04 to -0.31), P = 0.0003), whereas the other meta-analysis did not show a positive effect of acupuncture on 24-hour opiate demands when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.23 (-0.58 to 0.13), P = 0.21). CONCLUSION: Our systematic review finds encouraging but limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. Further rigorously designed clinical trials are required.  
  Address  
  Publisher (c) 2014 The Authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Pain practice : the official journal of World Institute of Pain Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 15 Condition 3
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 5/28/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Pain, Postoperative; School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Republic of Korea.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24766648 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1686  
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