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Author Furness, S.; Bryan, G.; McMillan, R.; Birchenough, S.; Worthington, H.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Interventions for the management of dry mouth: non-pharmacological interventions Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 9 Pages  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Neoplasms; Xerostomia; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Dry Mouth; Stomatognathic Diseases; Acupuncture; Radiation; Sjogren's Syndrome  
  Abstract Background: Xerostomia is the subjective sensation of dry mouth. Common causes of xerostomia include adverse effects of many commonly prescribed medications, disease (e.g. Sjogren's Syndrome) and radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancers. Non-pharmacological techniques such as acupuncture or mild electrostimulation may be used to improve symptoms. Objectives: To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions administered to stimulate saliva production for the relief of dry mouth. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 16th April 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 3), MEDLINE via OVID (1948 to 16th April 2013), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 16th April 2013), AMED via OVID (1985 to 16th April 2013), CINAHL via EBSCO (1981 to 16th April 2013), and CANCERLIT via PubMed (1950 to 16th April 2013). The metaRegister of Controlled Clinical Trials (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) were also searched to identify ongoing and completed trials. References lists of included studies and relevant reviews were also searched. There were no restrictions on the language of publication or publication status. Selection criteria: We included parallel group randomised controlled trials of non-pharmacological interventions to treat dry mouth, where participants had dry mouth symptoms at baseline. Data collection and analysis: At least two review authors assessed each of the included studies to confirm eligibility, assess risk of bias and extract data using a piloted data extraction form. We calculated mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for continuous outcomes or where different scales were used to assess an outcome, we calculated standardised mean differences (SMD) together with 95% CIs. We attempted to extract data on adverse effects of interventions. Where data were missing or unclear we attempted to contact study authors to obtain further information. Main results: There were nine studies (total 366 participants randomised) included in this review of non-pharmacological interventions for dry mouth which were divided into three comparisons. Eight studies were assessed at high risk of bias in at least one domain and the remaining study was at unclear risk of bias. Five small studies (total 153 participants, with dry mouth following radiotherapy treatment) compared acupuncture with placebo. Four were assessed at high risk and one at unclear risk of bias. Two trials reported outcome data for dry mouth in a form suitable for meta-analysis. The pooled estimate of these two trials (70 participants, low quality evidence) showed no difference between acupuncture and control in dry mouth symptoms (SMD -0.34, 95% CI -0.81 to 0.14, P value 0.17, I2 = 39%) with the confidence intervals including both a possible reduction or a possible increase in dry mouth symptoms. Acupuncture was associated with more adverse effects (tiny bruises and tiredness which were mild and temporary). There was a very small increase in unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) at the end of 4 to 6 weeks of treatment (three trials, 71 participants, low quality evidence) (MD 0.02 ml/minute, 95% CI 0 to 0.04, P value 0.04, I2 = 57%), and this benefit persisted at the 12-month follow-up evaluation (two trials, 54 participants, low quality evidence) (UWS, MD 0.06 ml/minute, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.11, P value 0.03, I2 = 10%). For the outcome of stimulated whole saliva (SWS, three trials, 71 participants, low quality evidence) there was a benefit favouring acupuncture (MD 0.19 ml/minute, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.31, P value 0.002, I2 = 1%) an effect which also persisted at the 12-month follow-up evaluation (SWS MD 0.28 ml/minute, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.47, P value 0.004, I2 = 0%) (two trials, 54 participants, low quality evidence). Two small studies, both at high risk of bias, compared the use of an electrostimulation device with a placebo device in participants with Sjögren's Syndrome (total 101 participants). A further study, also at high risk of bias, compared acupuncture-like electrostimulation of different sets of points in participants who had previously been treated with radiotherapy. None of these studies reported the outcome of dry mouth. There was no difference between electrostimulation and placebo in the outcomes of UWS or SWS at the end of the 4-week treatment period in the one study (very low that provided data for these outcomes. No adverse effects were reported. A single study at high risk of bias, compared the stimulatory effect of powered versus manual toothbrushing and found no difference for the outcomes of UWS or SWS. Authors' conclusions: There is low quality evidence that acupuncture is no different from placebo acupuncture with regard to dry mouth symptoms, which is the most important outcome. This may be because there were insufficient participants included in the two trials to show a possible effect or it may be that there was some benefit due to 'placebo' acupuncture which could have biased the effect to the null. There is insufficient evidence to determine the effects of electrostimulation devices on dry mouth symptoms. It is well known that dry mouth symptoms may be problematic even when saliva production is increased, yet only two of the trials that evaluated acupuncture reported dry mouth symptoms, a worrying reporting bias. There is some low quality evidence that acupuncture results in a small increase in saliva production in patients with dry mouth following radiotherapy. There is insufficient evidence to determine the effects of electrostimulation devices on dry mouth symptoms or saliva production in patients with Sjögren's Syndrome. Reported adverse effects of acupuncture are mild and of short duration, and there were no reported adverse effects from electrostimulation.  
  Address Cochrane Oral Health Group, School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Coupland III Building, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. Susan.Furness@manchester.ac.uk. suefurness@gmail.com  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Xerostomia
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2097  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gu, S.; Yang, A.W.H.; Xue, C.C.L.; Li, C.G.; Pang, C.; Zhang, W.; Williams, H.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Chinese herbal medicine for atopic eczema Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 9 Pages  
  Keywords Skin Diseases; Eczema; Systematic Review; Chinese Herbal Medicine; Herbal Formula; External Herbs  
  Abstract Background: Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been increasingly used for atopic eczema. A previous version of this Cochrane review published in 2004 found some evidence of a possible benefit for oral ingestion of CHM for eczema, but the results were inconclusive and the evidence needs to be updated. We have expanded the scope of this review to include an assessment of the topical and oral effects of CHM for eczema. Objectives: To assess the effects of oral ingestion and topical applications of CHM for the management of eczema in children and adults. Search methods: We searched the following databases up to September 2012: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2012, Issue 8), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), AMED (from 1985), LILACS (from 1982), and CINAHL (from 1981). We searched the following from inception: SCOPUS, HERBMED, ProQuest, CQVIP, CNKI, and Wanfang Data. We also searched trials registers, handsearched conference proceedings, checked the reference lists of all included and excluded studies and review articles for further references to relevant trials, and contacted experts in Chinese medicine for unpublished studies. Selection criteria: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in children and adults with eczema comparing CHM to placebo; no intervention; active controls, including acupuncture; or conventional medicines. Data collection and analysis: Two authors selected the RCTs, extracted data, and assessed quality independently. We contacted study authors for missing data. We collected adverse events from the included studies. Main results: We included 28 studies, with a total of 2306 participants. We assessed most of the studies at high 'risk of bias', particularly in blinding of participants and personnel, and there was substantial inconsistency between studies, so any positive effect of CHM must be treated with caution. We did not include the four studies from the previous version in this review, because they investigated a CHM product that has been withdrawn from the market since 2004. Four studies (three oral and one topical) compared CHM to placebo. Pooled data from 2 studies showed the total effectiveness rate in the CHM group was higher (by risk ratio (RR) 2.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32 to 3.32; 2 studies; n = 85), and the itching visual analogue score (VAS) in the CHM group was 1.53 lower (by standardised mean difference (SMD), 95% CI 2.64 to 0.41; 2 Studies; n = 94) than the placebo group, where a lower VAS score indicates reduced itch. One study of 85 participants with moderate to severe eczema who received an oral CHM formula for 12 weeks reported a quality of life (QoL) score 2.5 lower in the CHM group (by difference in means (MD), 95% CI 4.77 to 0.23; 1 study; n = 85) than the placebo group, where a lower score indicates better QoL. Twenty-two studies and 1 arm from a study with a 4-arm parallel controlled design compared CHM (5 oral, 6 topical, and 12 mixed oral and topical) to conventional medicines. The total effectiveness rate in the CHM groups was superior (RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.27 to 1.61; 21 studies; n = 1868; very low quality evidence), and the itching VAS in the CHM groups was 0.83 lower (SMD, 95% CI 1.43 to 0.22; 7 studies; n = 465) than the comparators. Two studies compared combined oral and topical CHM to the same oral CHM formula alone. The total effectiveness rate in 1 study was not statistically significant (RR 1.13, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.63; 1 study; n = 20). In the other study, the itching VAS in the CHM group was 1.05 lower (MD, 95% CI 1.75 to 0.35; 1 study; n = 23) than the control group. With regard to side-effects, four studies did not give any report of adverse events. The other 24 studies reported minor adverse events, which were reversed soon after stopping CHM. One participant withdrew from one trial because of exacerbation of their condition after using the CHM intervention. Eight studies received government funding. Authors' conclusions: We could not find conclusive evidence that CHM taken by mouth or applied topically to the skin could reduce the severity of eczema in children or adults. Well-designed, adequately powered RCTs are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CHM for managing eczema.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Plenty Road, Bundoora, Victoria, 3083, Australia. sherman.gu@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Eczema
  Disease Category Skin Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2096  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, X.; Wang, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture therapy for stroke patients Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int Rev Neurobiol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 111 Issue Pages 159-79 Lid - 10.1016/B97  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Animals; Humans; Stroke/*therapy; Oto – Notnlm; OT – Acupuncture; OT – Ischemia; OT – Preconditioning; OT – Rehabilitation; OT – Stroke  
  Abstract Acupuncture is one of the most important parts of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used for more than 3000 years as prevention and treatment for various diseases in China as well as in adjacent regions, and is widely accepted in western countries in recent years. More and more clinical trials revealed that acupuncture shows positive effect in stroke, not only as a complementary and alternative medicine for poststroke rehabilitation but also as a preventive strategy which could induce cerebral ischemic tolerance, especially when combined with modern electrotherapy. Acupuncture has some unique characteristics, which include acupoint specificity and parameter-dependent effect. It also involves complicated mechanism to exert the beneficial effect on stroke. Series of clinical trials have shown that acupuncture primarily regulates the release of neurochemicals, hemorheology, cerebral microcirculation, metabolism, neuronal activity, and the function of specific brain region. Animal studies showed that the effects of acupuncture therapy on stroke were possibly via inhibition of postischemic inflammatory reaction, stimulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and influence on neural plasticity. Mechanisms for its preconditioning effect include activity enhancement of antioxidant, regulation of the endocannabinoid system, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although being controversial, acupuncture is a promising preventive and treatment strategy for stroke, but further high-quality clinical trials would be needed to provide more confirmative evidence.  
  Address Postgraduate Department of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, China ; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Medical School, West China Hospital Sichuan University, 37 Guoxue Xiang, Wuhou District, Chengdu  
  Publisher (c) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/25/2015; Date Modified: 10/1/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24215922 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1832  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, Y.; Fu, R. openurl 
  Title Therapeutic Effect and Blood Rheology of Patients with Cervical Spondylosis Treated with Acupuncture Combined with Massage Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 61-63  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Neck Pain; Spondylosis; Rct; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Massage  
  Abstract To explore the effect of acupuncture combined with massage on the therapeutic effect and blood rheology in patients with cervical spondylosis. Methods: 120 patients with cervical spondylosis were divided into the treatment group and the control group by the multicenter, randomized, double blind method, the control group was given simple acupuncture treatment, and the treatment group was given massage on the basis of the control group, two groups were compared by curative effect and change of blood rheology. Results: The total efficiency was 93.3% in the treatment group was higher than 80% in the control group (P < 0.05). The improvement indexes of whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, erythrocyte aggregation was significantly higher in the treatment group than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Acupuncture combined with massage for cervical spondylosis patients can significantly improve the indexes of blood rheology, relieving the patient's symptoms and the treatment effect.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture and Massage, Nanjing Governmental Hospital, Nanjing, China. e-mail: tcmhealth@aol.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 15 Weeks Condition Spondylosis
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/5/2015; Date Modified: 10/1/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Spondylosis; Department of Acupuncture and Massage, Nanjing Governmental Hospital, Nanjing, China. e-mail: tcmhealth@aol.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1866  
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Author Yin, H.; Wang, S. openurl 
  Title Effect of Acupuncture at Shenmai (BL 62) and Zhaohai (KI 6) on Polysomnography of Primary Insomnia Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 114-116  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the effect of acupuncture at Shenmai (13L 62) and Zhaohai (K1 6) on polysomnography (PSG) in primary insomnia. Methods: 120 patients were randomly divided into 3 groups, with group A receiving acupuncture at Shenmai (BL 62) with reducing method, group B receiving acupuncture at Zhaohai (KI 6) with enhancing method, and group C receiving acupuncture at Shenmai (BL 62) and Zhaohai (KI 6) with reducing and enhancing method, respectively. Forty healthy volunteers were enrolled as the control group. PSG examination was given to patients in both groups before and after treatment. Self-controlled study was conducted in the treatment group, and the change of indicators in the three treatment groups and between all four groups were compared and observed. Results: Significant difference was observed in indicators before and after treatment in both group A and B (P < 0.05), but influence on sleep cycle and sleep structure was different. All indicators before and after treatment in group C showed significant difference (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Comparing with group A, B and C, a significant difference was observed in the indicators (P< 0.05 or P‹ 0.01) after treatment compared with control group. Group C showed no significant difference (P> 0.05) compared with control group after treatment. Conclusion: the acupuncture combination of Zhaohai (KI 6) and Shenmai (BL 62) could obviously improve the sleep quality.  
  Address Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 160  
  Time in Treatment 7 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1814  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, N.; Wang, A. M. J. openurl 
  Title Clinical Study of Acupuncture at Shangjuxu (ST37) in Treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 135-137  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; IBS; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; ST37  
  Abstract Objective: to observe the clinical curative effect of acupuncture at Shangjuxu (ST37)'in treating irritable bowel syndrome. Methods: 60 patients with irritable bowel syndrome were randomly divided into the acupuncture group (the treatment group, n = 30) and the oral medication group (the control group, n = 30); symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, abdominal distension were observed. Results: in the treatment group, 18 patients were cured, and 8 patients showed improvement; the total effective rate was 86.67%; in the control group, 13 patients were cured, and 7 patients showed improvement; the total effective rate was 66.67%. There were significant differences of the total effective rate between two groups (P< 0.05). The intes-tinal symptoms score were statistically significant in both groups before and after the treatment (P < 0.05), and between the treatment group and the control group after the treatment (P< 0.05). Conclusion: acupunc-ture at Shangjuxu (ST37) remarkably improved the symptoms of abdominal pain, diarrhea, and abdominal distension in patients with diarrhea type irritable bowel syndrome.  
  Address Community Health Centers of Xuecheng District, Zaozhuang City, Shandong, China bMassage Hospital of Zaozhuang, Shandong, China e-mail: brianfourinchina@mac.corn  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1813  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xiong, G.; Pang, Y.; Wei, Q.; Tao, J.; Hu, M. openurl 
  Title Bilateral Alternating Point Penetration Method for 25 Cases of Ischemic Stroke Hemiplegia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 151-153  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Stroke; Hemiplegia; Nervous System Diseases; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Symptom Based Point Selection; CAM Control  
  Abstract Objective: to observe the clinical curative effects of the bilateral alternating point penetration method versus conventional acupuncture on patients with ischemic stroke hemiplegia. Methods: 50 patients were randomized into the bilateral alternating point penetration method group (treatment group, n= 25) and the routine acupuncture group (control group, n = 25). Both groups had evaluation of clinical signs and symptoms before and after 4 courses of treatment. Results: reduction rate of symptoms and signs scores after treatment in the treatment group and control group was 13.760 ± 7.061 and 7.061 ± 6.947, respectively, with the treatment group showing a more significant decrease (P < 0.05); the total effective and markedly curative rates were 92 and 76%, and 80 and 36% in the treatment and control group, respectively, among which the markedly effective rate of the two groups displayed significant difference (P< 0.05). Conclusion: the curative effect of bilateral alternating point penetration method was superior to conventional acupuncture therapy in the treatment of ischemic stroke hemiplegia.  
  Address Guangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangxi, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Hemiplegia
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1781  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, X.; Ai, C. openurl 
  Title Electro Acupuncture in Treating 45 Patients with Sleep Disorders of Depression Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 71-73  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; Semi-Individualized Protocol; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture Only; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract To observe the clinical effects of electro acupuncture on sleep disorders of depression. Methods: 80 patients with sleep disorders of depression were randomly divided into the treatment group and control group. In the control group, -35 patients were assigned oral medication of Paroxetine, while in the treatment group 45 patients were treated with electro acupuncture in addition to Paroxetine. 7 days were defined as I course of treatment. Depression degrees were assessed using Hamilton depression scale (HAMD-17) and sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scale (PSQI); onset time was recorded and patients were observed for 4 weeks. Results: significant difference was observed between the clinical curative effects of the two groups (P< 0.05), with the curative effect in the treatment group better than the control group. Conclusion: electro acupuncture had good therapeutic effects on sleep disorders of depres-sion.  
  Address Shiyan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hubei, China e-mail: zhangjiajiagz@l63.net  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 7  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1772  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, H.; Li, P. openurl 
  Title Tranquilizing Mind Acupuncture in the Treatment of 35 Patients with Insomnia Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 129-131  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Insomnia; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Objective: to observe the curative effect of Tranquilizing Mind Acupuncture treatment for insomnia. Methods: 70 patients with insomnia were randomly divided into the treatment group and the control group. In the treatment group (n = 35), patients were assigned to Tranquilizing Mind acupuncture treatment while in the control group (n = 35), patients were administered with Estazolam. Results: according to the symptom scores, the total effective rate was 97.14 and 94.28% in the treatment and control groups, respectively; according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) deduction rate, the total effective rate of the treatment group and the control group was 94.28 and 91.42%, respectively; in comparison, the treatment group was more effective in improving sleep quality than the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Tranquilizing Mind Acupuncture Treatment displayed satisfied curative effect for insomnia.  
  Address Physiotherapy Department of Henan Shenhuo Worker's General Hospital, Henan, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 70  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1767  
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Author Lu, C.; Wang, J.; Liu, G. openurl 
  Title Clinical Research on Improving VAS Value of Patients with Thalamic Pain with Mind-Regulating and Pain-Relieving Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 154-155  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Pain; Rct; Thalamic Pain; Nervous System Diseases; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract Objective: To explore effective methods in treating thalamic pain, and observe the efficacy of mind-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture in the visual analogue scale (VAS). Methods: 65 patients with thalamic pain were randomly divided into the mind-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture group (treatment group, n = 34), and the body acupuncture group (control group, n = 31). Both groups were eval-uated by VAS before and after treatment. Results: Efficacy in the treatment group was significantly better than the control group (P< 0.05), VAS score of the treatment group was significantly lower than the control group (P < 0.01). Conclusion: mind-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture can ease central nervous system pain, and relieve symptoms of thalamic cerebrovascular pain. Mind-regulating and pain-relieving acupunc-ture was more effective in treating thalamic pain than body acupuncture treatment.  
  Address Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Liuzhou, Guangxi, China. e-mail: zhangjiajiagz@l63.net  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 65  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 1/15/2015; Date Modified: 6/9/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Pain; Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Liuzhou, Guangxi, China. e-mail: zhangjiajiagz@l63.net Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1780  
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Author Longhurst, J.C.; Tjen-A-Looi, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture regulation of blood pressure: two decades of research Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int Rev Neurobiol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 111 Issue Pages 257-71  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Animals; Autonomic Nervous System/*physiology; Blood Pressure/*physiology; Brain/*physiology; Humans; Oto – Notnlm; OT – Molecular mechanism; OT – Neuronal adaptation; OT – Point specificity; OT – Supraspinal regulation; OT – Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity; OT – Traditional Chinese medicine  
  Abstract Although mechanisms underlying acupuncture regulation of pain have been studied by a number of laboratories in many countries, much less is known about its ability to modulate cardiovascular function. In the last two decades, our laboratory has systematically investigated the peripheral and central neural mechanisms underlying acupuncture regulation of blood pressure. These observations account for acupuncture's distant actions and, to some extent, its local actions, with respect to the site of needling. Four fundamental findings have advanced our knowledge. First, point-specific effects of acupuncture underlie its cardiovascular actions. Second, variable regions in the supraspinal and spinal central nervous system that receive input from somatic afferent stimulation account for acupuncture's ability to modulate blood pressure. Thus, depending on the underlying situation, for example, high or low blood pressure, acupuncture modifies autonomic outflow by reducing activity in brain stem nuclei that participate in the primary response. Third, repetitive acupuncture through a molecular mechanism can cause prolonged cardiovascular effects that far outlast acupuncture stimulation. Fourth, there is a range of cardiovascular responsiveness to acupuncture that depends, at least in part, on interactions between neural modulators that synaptically regulate autonomic function in the brain stem. Thus, acupuncture has the capability of profoundly regulating cardiovascular function in patients with disease, for example, hypertension, and the experimental laboratory is directing best approaches to study its actions in humans.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, Medical Sciences, Irvine, California, USA. Electronic address: jcl@uci.edu.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/25/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, Medical Sciences, Irvine, California, USA. Electronic address: jcl@uci.edu.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24215927 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1579  
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Author Yang, J.; Lin, G. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation of Du Meridian Moxibustion Combined with Acupuncture in Relieving Pain of Ankylosing Spondylitis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 18-21  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Arthritis; Spondylitis, Ankylosing; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Moxibustion; Moxa; Direct Moxibustion; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Pain; Autoimmune Diseases  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the curative effects of Du meridian moxibustion combined with acupunc-ture therapy on relieving pain caused by ankylosing spondylitis of the Kidney Yang deficiency pattern differ-entiation. Methods: The eligible patients were equally randomized into the treatment group (Du meridian moxibustion combined with acupuncture, n = 30) and the control group (Du meridian moxibustion, n = 30). The degrees of back pain were evaluated before the treatment and after 1 course of the treatment, after which statistical analysis was conducted. Results: statistical significance was observed of the pain scores before and after the treatment in both groups (P < 0.05); statistical significance was also observed of the pain scores between the two groups after the treatment (P< 0.05), and curative effect of symptoms in the treatment group was significantly better than that of the control group after treatment (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Du meridian moxibustion therapy can noticeably relieve the pain of ankylosing spondylitis of Kidney Yang deficiency type and the curative effects were better when combined with acupuncture therapy.  
  Address Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China. E-mail: tcmhealth@aol.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 14 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 13 Weeks Condition Spondylitis, Ankylosing
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1769  
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Author Yang, Y.; Zhang, J. openurl 
  Title Dong's Extra-point Acupuncture Combined with Bloodletting Therapy in Treating Cervical Spondylosis of Nerve Root Type Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 158-159  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Neck Pain; Spondylosis; Musculoskeletal Diseases  
  Abstract Objective: to observe the curative effect of Dong's Extra-point acupuncture combined with blood-letting treatment in treating cervical spondylosis of nerve root type. Methods: Dong's Extra-point acupunc-ture combined with bloodletting treatment was assigned to 30 patients with cervical spondylosis of nerve root type; 7 treatments were defined as 1 course of treatment and patients were treated for a continuous 2 courses. Results: 21 patients (70.0%) were cured, 8 (26.7%) were markedly improved, and 1 patient (3.3%) had no improvement, with a total effective rate of 96.7%. Conclusion: Dong's Extra-point acupuncture combined with bloodletting treatment had good curative effect on cervical spondylosis of nerve root type.  
  Address Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture and Massage Department, Guiyang, China. Email: captainmollo@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Spondylosis
  Disease Category New Article to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 2/12/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture and Massage Department, Guiyang, China. Email: captainmollo@gmail.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1760  
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Author Zhu, Y.; Zhu, L.; Deng, Z. openurl 
  Title Acupoint Injection Combined with Auricular Point Taping in Treating 158 Cases of Epigastric Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 27-28  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Abdominal Pain; Epigastric Pain; Rct; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture Point Injection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Ear Seeds; Auricular Acupressure; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Epigastric pain is a disease characterized by the main manifestation of recurrent intense abdominal pain. From 2008 to 2010, we undertook acupoint injection of atropine combined with auricular point taping to 158 of 288 patients with epigastric pain, and achieved good clinical curative effects. The reports are as follows.  
  Address Luxian Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China b Juxian People's Hospital, Shandong, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants 288  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Disease OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 6/4/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Abdominal Pain; Luxian Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China b Juxian People's Hospital, Shandong, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1766  
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Author Zhang, J. openurl 
  Title Ashi Point Massage Combined with Warming Needle Acupuncture in Treating 40 Cases of Cervicogenic Headache Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 117-119  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Rct; Headache Disorders; Tension-Type Headache; Acupuncture; Warming Needle; Tuina; Massage; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract Objective: to observe the curative effect of ashi point massage combined with warming needle acu-puncture in treating cervicogenic headache. Methods: 76 patients were randomized into two groups. In the treatment group, 40 patients were assigned to receive ashi point massage combined with warming needle acu-puncture while in the control group, 36 patients were treated with warming needle acupuncture. Results: the total effective rate in the treatment group was 92.5%, higher than that of the control group of 72.2%, P< 0.05. Conclusion: the curative effect of ashi point massage combined with warming needle acupuncture in treating cervicogenic headache was remarkable.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 76  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Tension-Type Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 6/4/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Tension-Type Headache Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1765  
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Author Wu, H. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Treatment of Geriatric Herpes Zoster: A Study of 40 Cases Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 64-65  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Nervous System Diseases; Herpes Zoster; Rct; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; External Herbs; Qingpeng Ointment; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Herpes zoster is a disease characterized by clusters of small blisters distributed unilaterally along a peripheral nerve segment. It's commonly seen at chest flanks, axillary, around waist and face. Because of weakened immunity and primary diseases, the elderly are more prone to get severe herpes zoster. Post herpetic neuralgia is more commonly seen in middle-aged people. Conventional therapy combined with acupuncture treatment displayed good curative effect. The report is as follows.  
  Address Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China. captainmollo@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Herpes Zoster
  Disease Category Nervous System OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 1/15/2015; Date Modified: 1/15/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Herpes Zoster; Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China. captainmollo@gmail.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1782  
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Author Sun, J.; Li, Z.; Z, Q. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Combined with Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Vascular Dementia Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 14-17  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Mental Disorders; Dementia, Vascular; Rct; Acupuncture; Acu Versus Usual Care; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Herbal Formula; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Vascular Dementia; Mild Cognitive Impairment  
  Abstract Vascular dementia (VD) is defined as dementia caused by cerebral angiopathy of different etiology and pathology [1 I, most commonly seen in the elderly. It has an increasing incidence with age, accounting for 68.2% of the total number of senile dementia 121 cases. In the past three years, the authors combined acupuncture with Chinese medicine in the treatment of 85 patients with VD. The report is as follows below.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 85  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 6/9/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Dementia, Vascular Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1764  
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Author Qi, X.; Pan, F.; Wu, W. openurl 
  Title Influence of Acupuncture on Cytokines in Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 29-31  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Genital Diseases, Male; Prostatitis; Men's Health; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Cytokine; Chronic Pelvic Pain; Rct  
  Abstract Objective: to study the influence of acupuncture on cytokine levels in chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Methods: 60 patients were randomized into the acupuncture group (n = 30) and the control group (n = 30). In the control group, the oral medication Terazosin Hydrochloride was assigned, while patients in the acupuncture group were also treated with acupuncture therapy. Tumor necrosis factor (TN F-a), interleukin 13 (1L-113) levels were tested before the treatment and 1 month after treatment. Selected acupoints were Guanyuan (CV4), Zhongji (CV3), Huiyin (CV!), Yinlingquan (S P9, bilateral) and Xuehai (SPIO, bilat-eral). Results: after treatment, the expressions of TN F-a, IL-113 were significantly reduced in both groups, with the acupuncture group being more obviously decreased. Conclusion: acupuncture can regulate the TN F-a and I L-1 f3 levels in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome, mitigating the chemotaxis of inflammatory cells.  
  Address Shandong Institute of Skin Disease Control, Shandong, China. e-mail: zhangjiajiagz@l63.net  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Prostatitis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 6/9/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Prostatitis; Shandong Institute of Skin Disease Control, Shandong, China. e-mail: zhangjiajiagz@l63.net Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1770  
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Author He, L.; Tian, F. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation of Auricular Acupuncture and Acupoint Injection Combined with Transdermal Fentanyl Application in the Treatment of Cancer Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 51-54  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Neoplasms; Pain; Cancer; Rct; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Auricular Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Acupuncture Point Injection; Herbal Injection  
  Abstract To observe the clinical effects of auricular acupuncture and acupoint injection combined with transdermal Fentanyl application in the treatment of advanced cancer pain. Methods: 41 patients with cancer pain were randomly divided into the treatment group and control group. In the control group, 20 patients were assigned the medication of Transdermal Fentanyl application, while in the treatment group 21 patients were treated with Transdermal Fentanyl application in addition to auricular acupuncture and acupoint injection. Onset time was recorded and patients were observed for 15 days. Results: Significant difference of the clinical curative effect was observed between the two groups P<0.05), with a better effect of analgesia and improving the quality of life as well as less adverse reactions in the treatment group than in the control group. Conclusion: Auricular acupuncture combined with acupoint injection and transdermal Fentanyl application can effectively enhance the analgesic effects and improve the quality of life as well as reduce the adverse reactions of patients in treatment of cancer pain.  
  Address Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 41  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Pain
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/5/2015; Date Modified: 4/9/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Pain; Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1775  
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Author Chen, Z.; Xu, F. openurl 
  Title Clinical Research of Stomach Three-needle Acupuncture in the Treatment of Postoperative Gastroparesis Syndrome Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 58-60  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Gastroparesis; Rct; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Ponv; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; Vomiting; Nausea  
  Abstract Objective: To investigate the clinical effect of Stomach Three-needle acupuncture in the treatment of postoperative gastroparesis syndrome (PGS). Methods: 40 patients with postoperative gastroparesis syndrome were randomized into the treatment group and control group, with 20 patients in each group. Total effective rate in each group was observed after treatment and the scores of main clinical symptoms and corresponding difference were compared before and after treatment. Results: After 2 weeks of treatment, the total effective rate of the treatment group and the control group was 85 and 55%, respectively. Clinical symptom scores were improved compared with the same group before and after the treatment, and great significance was observed between the two groups (P< 0.01). The comparisons of clinical symptom score difference in two groups showed very obvious significance before and after treatment (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Stomach Three-needle Acupuncture combined with Mosapride could effectively treat postoperative gastroparesis syndrome.  
  Address The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. E-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Gastroparesis
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/5/2015; Date Modified: 4/9/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Gastroparesis; The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. E-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1776  
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