toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Al Rashoud, A.S.; Abboud, R.J.; Wang, W.; Wigderowitz, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of low-level laser therapy applied at acupuncture points in knee osteoarthritis: a randomised double-blind comparative trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Physiotherapy Abbreviated Journal Physiotherapy  
  Volume 100 Issue 3 Pages 242-248  
  Keywords Osteoarthritis, Knee -- Therapy; Laser Therapy -- Methods; Acupuncture Points; Combined Modality Therapy; Clinical Assessment Tools; Visual Analog Scaling; Scales; Treatment Outcomes; Disability Evaluation; Randomized Controlled Trials; Double-Blind Studies; Placebos; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Mann-Whitney U Test; Human  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied to acupuncture points on the knee joint in combination with exercise and advice in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Design: Randomised, double-blind, comparative clinical trial. Participants: Forty-nine patients with knee osteoarthritis were assigned at random into two groups: active laser group (n = 26) and placebo laser group (n = 23). Intervention: Using a gallium aluminium arsenide laser device, patients received either active or placebo LLLT at five acupuncture points on the affected knee during nine sessions. Outcome measures: Patients were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Saudi Knee Function Scale (SKFS) at baseline, the fifth treatment session, the last treatment session, 6 weeks post intervention and 6 months post intervention. Results: VAS scores showed a significant improvement in the active laser group compared with the placebo laser group at 6 weeks post intervention [mean difference -1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference -2.4 to -0.3; P = 0.014] and 6 months post intervention (mean difference -1.8, 95% CI of the difference -3.0 to -0.7; P = 0.003) using the independent samples test. SKFS scores also showed a significant improvement in the active laser group compared with the placebo laser group at the last treatment session (median difference -15, 95% CI of the difference -27 to -2; P = 0.035) and 6 months post intervention (median difference -21, 95% CI of the difference -34 to -7; P = 0.006) using the Mann-Whitney U test. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that short-term application of LLLT to specific acupuncture points in association with exercise and advice is effective in reducing pain and improving quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis.  
  Address Institute of Motion Analysis and Research, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109837763. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150913. Revision Date: 20150923. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Blind Peer Reviewed; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Instrumentation: Saudi Knee Function Scale (SKFS). NLM UID: 0401223. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109837763 Serial 2367  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Alizadeh, R.; Esmaeili, S.; Shoar, S.; Bagheri-Hariri, S.; Shoar, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting: efficacy of two acupuncture points versus a single one Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 71-75  
  Keywords RCT; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; PONV; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Anesthesiology  
  Abstract Despite recent advances in anesthesiology and postoperative care, postoperative nausea and vomiting are common complaints. Although acupuncture techniques have received attention in anesthesiology, the ideal technique and selection of the most appropriate acupuncture points are still under debate. This study compared the efficacy of two simultaneous acupuncture points with that of a single point in the prevention and treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting following general anesthesia through a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 227 surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia who were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group received acupuncture by stimulation only on the PC6 point (single group), and the second group underwent concomitant stimulation of the PC6 and the L14 acupuncture points (combined group) during surgery under general anesthesia. The prevalences of postoperative nausea and vomiting were compared between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups (p>0.05). Of 115 patients in the combined group, 80 (69.6%) complained about nausea and vomiting compared with 96 (85.7%) in the single group, a significantly lower proportion (p<0.05). Our findings favor a combination of PC6 and LI4 stimulation for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 227  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 15  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) An, L. X.; Chen, X.; Ren, X. J.; Wu, H. F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electro-Acupuncture Decreases Postoperative Pain and Improves Recovery in Patients Undergoing a Supratentorial Craniotomy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication The American Journal of Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; RCT; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain, Postoperative; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; PONV; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract We performed this study to examine the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on postoperative pain, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and recovery in patients after a supratentorial tumor resection. Eighty-eight patients requiring a supratentorial tumor resection were anesthetized with sevoflurane and randomly allocated to a no treatment group (Group C) or an EA group (Group A). After anesthesia induction, the patients in Group A received EA at LI4 and SJ5, at BL63 and LR3 and at ST36 and GB40 on the same side as the craniotomy. The stimulation was continued until the end of the operation. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) was used for the postoperative analgesia. The postoperative pain scores, PONV, the degree of dizziness and appetite were recorded. In the first 6 hours after the operation, the mean total bolus, the effective times of PCIA bolus administrations and the VAS scores were much lower in the EA group (p < 0.05). In the EA group, the incidence of PONV and degree of dizziness and feeling of fullness in the head within the first 24 hours after the operation was much lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). In the EA group, more patients had a better appetite than did the patients in group C (51.2% vs. 27.5%) (p < 0.05). The use of EA in neurosurgery patients improves the quality of postoperative analgesia, promotes appetite recovery and decreases some uncomfortable sensations, such as dizziness and feeling of fullness in the head.  
  Address Department of Anesthesia, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 88  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 25  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Arvidsdotter, T.; Marklund, B.; Taft, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Six-month effects of integrative treatment, therapeutic acupuncture and conventional treatment in alleviating psychological distress in primary care patients--follow up from an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 210 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords RCT; Mental Disorders; Anxiety; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Stress, Psychological; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; CAM Control; Salutogenic Counseling  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To evaluate and compare 6-month effects of 8 weeks of an integrative treatment (IT), therapeutic acupuncture (TA), and conventional treatment (CT) in reducing symptoms of anxiety, depression and in improving health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sense of coherence (SOC) in psychologically distressed primary care patients. METHODS: Patients who had participated in an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial were followed up six months after treatment. The study sample consisted of 120 adults (40 per treatment arm) aged 20 to 55 years referred from four different primary health care centres in western Sweden for psychological distress. Assessments were made at baseline after eight weeks and after 24 weeks. Anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), HRQL with the SF-36 Mental Component Summary scores (MCS) and SOC with the Sense of Coherence-13 questionnaire. RESULTS: No baseline differences were found between groups on any outcome variable. At 24 weeks, IT and TA had significantly better values than CT on all variables. All three groups showed significant improvements from baseline on all variables, except HAD depression in CT; however, improvements were significantly greater in IT and TA than in CT. IT and TA did not differ on any outcome variable. Effect sizes were large in IT and TA for all variables and small or moderate in CT. Improvements on all variables seen after 8-weeks of IT and TA remained stable at 24 weeks and the CT group improved on HAD anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: IT and TA seem to be more beneficial than CT in reducing anxiety, depression, and in improving quality of life and sense of coherence after 24 weeks of follow up in patients with psychological distress. More research is needed to confirm these results. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN trial number NCT01631500.  
  Address Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. tina.arvidsdotter@vgregion.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 38  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Au-Yeung, S.S.Y.; Hui-Chan, C.W.Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electrical acupoint stimulation of the affected arm in acute stroke: a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Clinical Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Clin Rehabil  
  Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 149-158  
  Keywords Stroke -- Complications; Hemiplegia -- Therapy; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Funding Source; Double-Blind Studies; Post Hoc Analysis; Clinical Assessment Tools; Grip Strength; Hong Kong; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; Analysis of Variance; Scales; Male; Female; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Publisher Sage Publications Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 104007212. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140124. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Instrumentation: Action Research Arm Test (ARAT); National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Grant Information: This work was supported by an Area of Strategic Development grant from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University to the corresponding author, CWY Hui-Chan.. NLM UID: 8802181. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 104007212 Serial 2387  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Aydogmus, Y.; Sunay, M.; Arslan, H.; Aydin, A.; Adiloglu, A. K.; Sahin, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture versus Solifenacin for Treatment of Overactive Bladder and Its Correlation with Urine Nerve Growth Factor Levels: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Urologia internationalis Abbreviated Journal Urol Int  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords RCT; Urologic Diseases; Urinary Bladder, Overactive; Urgency; Urinary Frequency; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Objective: To determine whether acupuncture is effective as an overactive bladder (OAB) treatment compared with solifenacin and placebo, and to investigate its relation with urine nerve growth factor (NGF) levels. Patients and Methods: The study was conducted with methodological rigor based on the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials criteria. 90 female patients with OAB were included and randomly assigned to a solifenacin, acupuncture or placebo group. The medicated group received solifenacin 5 mg/day; the acupuncture and placebo groups were treated twice a week for 4 weeks. Symptom scores, quality of life scores, frequency of micturition and urine NGF levels were used to assess treatment efficiency. Results: The study was completed with 82 patients (n = 30 in the solifenacin group, n = 28 in the acupuncture group and n = 24 in the placebo group). After treatment, comparison of the medical and acupuncture therapy groups with the placebo group showed significant differences between recovery concerning quality of life (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively) and symptom scores (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The decrease of NGF levels after treatment compared to before treatment was determined in each group (solifenacin, acupuncture, placebo group; p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.359, respectively). Sufficient symptomatic improvement was not achieved in 8 patients in the acupuncture group. Therefore, comparisons were assessed twice with and without including these patients, and NGF levels in the acupuncture group were higher than at first comparison in which all patients in the acupuncture group were included. Conclusions: In patients with OAB in whom anticholinergic treatment is contraindicated, acupuncture may be considered another treatment option. (c) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.  
  Address Clinic of Urology, Department of Acupuncture and Department of Microbiology, Ministry of Health Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Urinary Bladder, Overactive
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 49  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baccetti, S.; Da Fre, M.; Becorpi, A.; Faedda, M.; Guerrera, A.; Monechi, M. V.; Munizzi, R. M.; Parazzini, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and traditional chinese medicine for hot flushes in menopause: a randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 550-557  
  Keywords RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause; Hot Flushes; Acu Versus CAM Control; Diet; Tuina; Chinese Massage; Self Massage; Plum Blossom; Seven Star Needles; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Whole Systems  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes and other menopause-related symptoms used in an integrated system, including such therapeutic techniques as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage. DESIGN: Randomized trial. SETTING: Outpatient center. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred women in spontaneous menopause with at least three episodes of hot flushes daily were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (50 per group): Women in group A were given diet, self-massage training, and treatment with acupuncture, and women in group B (the control group) were given the same diet and self-massage training, but treatment with acupuncture started 6 weeks after they were enrolled into the study. INTERVENTION: Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean change in frequency and/or intensity in menopause-related symptoms were estimated by questionnaire after treatment at week 4. RESULTS: Treatment with acupuncture significantly reduced the occurrence of hot flushes and sudden sweating (p<.001). Other symptoms (sleep disorders, tightness in the chest, irritability, bone pain, feeling depressed) significantly improved. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture in an integrated system that includes therapeutic techniques such as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage can be used to treat hot flushes and selected symptoms in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Referring Center for Complementary Medicine , Tuscany Region, San Donnino, Campi Bisenzio, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 50  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baccetti, S.; Da Frè, M.; Becorpi, A.; Faedda, M.; Guerrera, A.; Monechi, M.V.; Munizzi, R.M.; Parazzini, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine for Hot Flushes in Menopause: A Randomized Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 550-557  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Hot Flashes -- Prevention and Control; Perimenopausal Symptoms -- Prevention and Control; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Human; Italy; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Pretest-Posttest Design; Alternative Therapies; Women's Health; Female; Massage; Self Care; Diet Therapy; Combined Modality Therapy; Questionnaires; Statistical Significance; Sleep Disorders; Anger; Pain; Depression; Prospective Studies; Middle Age; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; T-Tests; Linear Regression; Paired T-Tests; Confidence Intervals  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes and other menopause-related symptoms used in an integrated system, including such therapeutic techniques as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage. Design: Randomized trial. Setting: Outpatient center. Participants: One hundred women in spontaneous menopause with at least three episodes of hot flushes daily were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (50 per group): Women in group A were given diet, self-massage training, and treatment with acupuncture, and women in group B (the control group) were given the same diet and self-massage training, but treatment with acupuncture started 6 weeks after they were enrolled into the study. Intervention: Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures: Mean change in frequency and/or intensity in menopause-related symptoms were estimated by questionnaire after treatment at week 4. Results: Treatment with acupuncture significantly reduced the occurrence of hot flushes and sudden sweating ( p<.001). Other symptoms (sleep disorders, tightness in the chest, irritability, bone pain, feeling depressed) significantly improved. Conclusions: Acupuncture in an integrated system that includes therapeutic techniques such as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage can be used to treat hot flushes and selected symptoms in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103971835. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Women's Health. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971835 Serial 2354  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baeumler, P.I.; Fleckenstein, J.; Takayama, S.; Simang, M.; Seki, T.; Irnich, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture on sensory perception: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages e113731  
  Keywords Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Sensory Perception; Pressure Pain Threshold; Systematic Review; Meta-Analysis; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The effect of acupuncture on sensory perception has never been systematically reviewed; although, studies on acupuncture mechanisms are frequently based on the idea that changes in sensory thresholds reflect its effect on the nervous system. METHODS: Pubmed, EMBASE and Scopus were screened for studies investigating the effect of acupuncture on thermal or mechanical detection or pain thresholds in humans published in English or German. A meta-analysis of high quality studies was performed. RESULTS: Out of 3007 identified articles 85 were included. Sixty five studies showed that acupuncture affects at least one sensory threshold. Most studies assessed the pressure pain threshold of which 80% reported an increase after acupuncture. Significant short- and long-term effects on the pressure pain threshold in pain patients were revealed by two meta-analyses including four and two high quality studies, respectively. In over 60% of studies, acupuncture reduced sensitivity to noxious thermal stimuli, but measuring methods might influence results. Few but consistent data indicate that acupuncture reduces pin-prick like pain but not mechanical detection. Results on thermal detection are heterogeneous. Sensory threshold changes were equally frequent reported after manual acupuncture as after electroacupuncture. Among 48 sham-controlled studies, 25 showed stronger effects on sensory thresholds through verum than through sham acupuncture, but in 9 studies significant threshold changes were also observed after sham acupuncture. Overall, there is a lack of high quality acupuncture studies applying comprehensive assessments of sensory perception. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that acupuncture affects sensory perception. Results are most compelling for the pressure pain threshold, especially in pain conditions associated with tenderness. Sham acupuncture can also cause such effects. Future studies should incorporate comprehensive, standardized assessments of sensory profiles in order to fully characterize its effect on sensory perception and to explore the predictive value of sensory profiles for the effectiveness of acupuncture.  
  Address Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Anesthesia and Analgesia
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1698  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bahrami-Taghanaki, H.; Liu, Y.; Azizi, H.; Khorsand, A.; Esmaily, H.; Bahrami, A.; Xiao Zhao, B. url  openurl
  Title A randomized, controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic low-back pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Alternative therapies in health and medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 13-19  
  Keywords RCT; Back Pain, Chronic; Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; LBP; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Time Method Acupuncture; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Eight Confluent Points; CAM Control; Pain  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic low-back pain (cLBP) is a common condition throughout the world, and acupuncture is widely sought for treatment. As clinical evidence for the benefits of acupuncture grows, acupuncture for cLBP is receiving increased recognition and acceptance by both patients and professionals. Time method acupuncture has been previously researched with respect to chronic gastritis. OBJECTIVE: For individuals with cLBP in the current study, the research team examined the efficacy of adding confluent acupoints, related to the daytime period in time method acupuncture, to regular acupuncture and also evaluated the persistence of the benefits of such acupuncture in comparison with regular acupuncture. DESIGN: The study was a randomized, controlled trial (RCT). SETTING: The setting was an outpatient clinic of the Dongzhimen Hospital in Beijing, China. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were Chinese men and women with cLBP. INTERVENTION: Sixty participants were randomly divided into 2 groups to receive acupuncture. The control group received a treatment that followed a routine acupuncture (RA) protocol, while the intervention group received a treatment that followed an RA protocol plus acupuncture in confluent points related to time (TA). OUTCOME MEASURES: The research team measured the change in participants' scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the number of therapy sessions needed, the number of days that participants were absent from work during the treatment period and at 12 wk posttreatment, and the number of pain relapses between the end of treatment and the 4- and 12-wk follow-ups. RESULTS: VAS scores decreased from 69.6 +/- 7.9 to 11.8 +/- 4.9 in the intervention group compared with a decrease from 69.2 +/- 8.0 to 15.7 +/- 10.0 in the control group (P = .001). The intervention group received fewer therapy sessions (8.1 +/- 2.0) than did the control group (10.1 +/- 2.0, P < .001). Compared with the controls, the intervention group showed fewer days absent from work (0.5 vs 1.4; P = .03) and fewer pain relapses (4.0 vs 7.0; P = .04) at the 12-wk follow-up. In the 2 groups combined, VAS decreased from 69.4 +/- 7.9 before the first session of acupuncture to 13.8 +/- 8.0 after the last session (P < .001), and the number of therapy sessions needed for pain relief was 9.1 +/- 2.2. CONCLUSION: Accompanying routine acupuncture with time method acupuncture can enhance the efficacy of treatment and the persistence of its benefits in individuals with cLBP.  
  Address Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 51  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bai, Y.; Guo, Y.; Wang, H.; Chen, B.; Wang, Z.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, X.; Li, Y. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture on fibromyalgia syndrome: a meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 34 Issue 4 Pages 381-391  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Fibromyalgia; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Moxibustion  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: Two review authors independently selected the trials for the Meta-analysis, assessed their methodological quality and extracted relevant data. A quality assessment was conducted according to the Cochrane Review Handbook 5.0. RevMan 5.0.20 software was used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS: A total of 523 trials were reviewed and 9 trials were selected for Meta-analysis. (a) Compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, there was a significant difference in the visual analogue scale, but no difference in the pressure pain threshold. Additionally, and there was a difference in the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire and the multidisciplinary pain inventory after 4 weeks of treatment, but no difference after 7 weeks of therapy. There was no difference in the numerical rating scale in weeks 3, 8 and 13. (b) Acupuncture versus drugs. There were differences in the VAS after 20 days of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment comparing with the drug amitriptyline, and after 4 weeks of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment comparing with the drug fluoxetine and amitriptyline. There were also differences in the number of tender points when comparing acupuncture with amitriptyline or fluoxetine. There was no difference in total efficiency when comparing acupuncture with amitriptyline after 4 weeks of treatment, but there were differences between the two groups 45 days after treatment. There were also differences in total efficiency comparing acupuncture with fluoxetine, and when comparing 4 weeks post-treatment of acupuncture with a combination of amitriptyline, oryzanol and vitamin B. (c) A comparison of acupuncture, drugs and exercise with drugs and exercise showed PPT differences in months 3 and 6. There was no difference between the two comparison groups after follow-up visits in months 12 and 24. CONCLUSION: Compared with sham acupuncture, there was not enough evidence to prove the efficacy of acupuncture therapy for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Some evidence testified that the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for fibromyalgia was superior to drugs; however, the included trials were not of high quality or had high bias risks. Acupuncture combined with drugs and exercise could increase pain thresholds in the short-term, but there is a need for higher quality randomized controlled trials to further confirm this.  
  Address Acupuncture and Moxibustion College, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, China; Qibo Research Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Qingyang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Gansu 745000, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fibromyalgia
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 53  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bao, C. H.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, H. R.; Lu, Y.; Zhu, Y. F.; Shi, Y.; Weng, Z. J.; Feng, H.; Guan, X.; Li, J.; Chen, W. F.; Wu, L. Y.; Jin, X. M.; Dou, C. Z.; Wu, H. G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized controlled trial: Moxibustion and acupuncture for the treatment of Crohn's disease Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication World journal of gastroenterology : WJG Abbreviated Journal World J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 20 Issue 31 Pages 11000-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Crohn Disease; RCT; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Moxibustion; Moxa; Warming Needle; Indirect Moxibustion; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract AIM: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture and moxibustion for the treatment of active Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Ninety-two patients were equally and randomly divided into the treatment group and received herb-partitioned moxibustion combined with acupuncture, and the control group received wheat bran-partitioned moxibustion combined with superficial acupuncture. The patients received three treatment sessions per week for 12 wk and were followed up for 24 wk. The main outcome was evaluated using the CD Activity Index (CDAI) score, and the secondary outcomes were evaluated using laboratory indicators such as hemoglobin (HGB), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, quality-of-life, endoscopic ratings, and intestinal histology scores. RESULTS: The CDAI scores of both the treatment and control groups were significantly reduced after treatment compared with those measured before treatment. However, the degree of improvement in the treatment group was significantly greater than that of the control group. The improvement in symptoms in patients of the treatment group was sustained at follow-up, whereas that of the control group was not. The overall efficacy of the treatment was significantly greater than that of the control. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in quality-of-life ratings after treatment, but the improvement was significantly greater in the treatment group than in the control group. In addition, the patients in the treatment group showed significantly increased HGB and significantly decreased CRP levels and histopathological scores at the end of treatment, whereas the control group did not exhibit significant changes. CONCLUSION: Moxibustion with acupuncture provided significant therapeutic benefits in patients with active CD beyond the placebo effect and is therefore an effective and safe treatment for active CD.  
  Address Key Laboratory of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Immunological Effects, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200030, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 92  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Crohn Disease
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 58  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bao, T.; Cai, L.; Snyder, C.; Betts, K.; Tarpinian, K.; Gould, J.; Jeter, S.; Medeiros, M.; Chumsri, S.; Bardia, A.; Tan, M.; Singh, H.; Tkaczuk, K. H.; Stearns, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Patient-reported outcomes in women with breast cancer enrolled in a dual-center, double-blind, randomized controlled trial assessing the effect of acupuncture in reducing aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Cancer Abbreviated Journal Cancer  
  Volume 120 Issue 3 Pages 381-389  
  Keywords Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Women's Health; RCT; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupuncture; Acu Versus Sham; Cancer  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been associated with decrements in patient-reported outcomes (PROs). The objective of this study was to assess whether real acupuncture (RA), compared with sham acupuncture (SA), improves PROs in patients with breast cancer who are receiving an adjuvant AI. METHODS: Postmenopausal women with a stage 0 through III breast cancer who received an AI and had treatment-associated musculoskeletal symptoms were randomized to receive 8 weekly RA versus SA in a dual-center, randomized controlled trial. The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) menopausal symptoms questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD) scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the hot flash daily diary, the Hot Flash-Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDI), and the European quality-of-life survey (EuroQol) were used to assess PROs at baseline and at 4weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks. RESULTS: The intention-to-treat analysis included 23 patients in the RA arm and 24 patients in the SA arm. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the 2 groups. Compared with baseline, scores in the RA arm improved significantly at week 8 on the CESD (P = .022), hot flash severity (P = .006), hot flash frequency (P = .011), the HFRDI (P = .014), and NSABP menopausal symptoms (P = .022); scores in the SA arm improved significantly on the EuroQol (P = .022),the HFRDI (P = .043), and NSABP menopausal symptoms (P = .005). Post-hoc analysis indicated that African American patients (n = 9) benefited more from RA than SA compared with non-African American patients (n = 38) in reducing hot flash severity (P < .001) and frequency (P < .001) scores. CONCLUSIONS: Both RA and SA were associated with improvement in PROs among patients with breast cancer who were receiving AIs, and no significant difference was detected between arms. Racial differences in response to acupuncture warrant further study. Cancer 2014;120:381-389. (c) 2013 American Cancer Society.  
  Address University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 47  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Breast Neoplasms
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 60  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bao, T.; Goloubeva, O.; Pelser, C.; Porter, N.; Primrose, J.; Hester, L.; Sadowska, M.; Lapidus, R.; Medeiros, M.; Lao, L.; Dorsey, S.G.; Badros, A.Z. doi  openurl
  Title A pilot study of acupuncture in treating bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with multiple myeloma Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Integr Cancer Ther Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 13 Issue 5 Pages 396-404  
  Keywords Neoplasms; Peripheral Neuropathy; Peripheral Nervous System Diseases; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Observational Study; Cancer  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Peripheral neuropathy is the dose limiting toxicity of bortezomib in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety, feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture in reducing bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy (BIPN) symptoms. METHODS: Patients with MM experiencing persistent BIPN >/=grade 2 despite adequate medical intervention and discontinuation of bortezomib received 10 acupuncture treatments for 10 weeks (2x/week for 2 weeks, 1x/week for 4 weeks, and then biweekly for 4 weeks). Responses were assessed by the Clinical Total Neuropathy Score (TNSc), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group-Neurotoxicity (FACT/GOG-Ntx) questionnaire, and the Neuropathy Pain Scale (NPS). Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to test for monotonic decline in scores on each of the measures. Serial serum levels of proinflammatory and neurotrophic cytokines were obtained at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 14. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients with MM were enrolled in the trial. There were no adverse events associated with the acupuncture treatments. TNSc data were deemed invalid and therefore were not reported. At weeks 10 and 14, FACT/GOG-Ntx and NPS showed significant reduction suggesting decreased pain, and improved function (P values were <.0001 for both FACT/GOG-Ntx and NPS at weeks 10 and 14). However, nerve conduction studies did not significantly change between baseline assessment and end of study. There was no correlation in serum cytokines for responders versus none responders. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is safe, feasible and produces subjective improvements in patients' symptoms. A follow-up randomized controlled trial is warranted.  
  Address The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA baot@mskcc.org.; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.  
  Publisher (c) The Author(s) 2014.
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Chemotherapy Side Effects
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/26/2015; Date Modified: 3/10/2015; Priority: Normal; Chemotherapy Side Effects; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA baot@mskcc.org.; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24867959 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1745  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Boyuan, Z.; Yang, C.; Ke, C.; Xueyong, S.; Sheng, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture for psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 313549  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Substance-Related Disorders; Opioid-Related Disorders; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse; Mental Disorders; Psychological Symptoms; Anxiety; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Systematic Review; Meta-analysis  
  Abstract This review systematically assessed the clinical evidence for and against acupuncture as a treatment for psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. The database was accessed from MEDLINE and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database. We included all randomized clinical trials published in Chinese and English regardless of their controls. Meta-analysis was performed using the RevMan software, version 5.2. We conducted a literature search of 16 databases from their inception to January 2014. Four studies from Western countries did not report any clinical gains in the treatment of psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. 10 of 12 studies from China have reported positive findings regarding the use of acupuncture to treat the psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. The methodological quality of the included studies was poor. The meta-analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between the treatment group and the control group for anxiety and depression associated with opioid addiction, although groups did not differ on opioid craving. This review and meta-analysis could not confirm that acupuncture was an effective treatment for psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. However, considering the potential of acupuncture demonstrated in the included studies, further rigorous randomized controlled trials with long followup are warranted.  
  Address Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 200032, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Opioid-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25530779; PMCID:PMC4235186 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2110  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brown J; Farquhar C url  openurl
  Title Endometriosis: an overview of Cochrane Reviews Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages N.Pag-N.Pag  
  Keywords Endometriosis -- Therapy; Infertility -- Drug Therapy; Pain -- Drug Therapy; Treatment Outcomes; Alternative Therapies -- Classification; Antiinflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal -- Classification; Cochrane Library; Female; Gonadotropins -- Therapeutic Use; Human; Intrauterine Devices -- Utilization; Laparoscopy -- Utilization; Levonorgestrel -- Therapeutic Use; Surgery, Gynecologic -- Classification  
  Abstract This overview reports on interventions for pain relief and for subfertility in pre-menopausal women with clinically diagnosed endometriosis. The objective of this overview was to summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on treatment options for women with pain or subfertility associated with endometriosis. Published Cochrane systematic reviews reporting pain or fertility outcomes in women with clinically diagnosed endometriosis were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation (protocols and titles) for future inclusion. The reviews, protocols and titles were identified by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Archie (the Cochrane information management system) in March 2014.Pain-related outcomes of the overview were pain relief, clinical improvement or resolution and pain recurrence. Fertility-related outcomes were live birth, clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, miscarriage and adverse events.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed using the AMSTAR tool. The quality of the evidence for each outcome was assessed using GRADE methods. Review findings were summarised in the text and the data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Seventeen systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library were included. All the reviews were high quality. The quality of the evidence for specific comparisons ranged from very low to moderate. Limitations in the evidence included risk of bias in the primary studies, inconsistency between the studies, and imprecision in effect estimates. Pain relief (14 reviews) Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues One systematic review reported low quality evidence of an overall benefit for GnRH analogues compared with placebo or no treatment. Ovulation suppression Five systematic reviews reported on medical treatment using ovulation suppression. There was moderate quality evidence that the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUD) was more effective than expectant management, and very low quality evidence that danazol was more effective than placebo. There was no consistent evidence of a difference in effectiveness between oral contraceptives and goserelin, estrogen plus progestogen and placebo, or progestogens and placebo, though in all cases the relevant evidence was of low or very low quality. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)A review of NSAIDs reported inconclusive evidence of a benefit in symptom relief compared with placebo. Surgical interventions There were two reviews of surgical interventions. One reported moderate quality evidence of a benefit in pain relief following laparoscopic surgery compared to diagnostic laparoscopy only. The other reported very low quality evidence that recurrence rates of endometriomata were lower after excisional surgery than after ablative surgery. Post-surgical medical interventions Two reviews reported on post-surgical medical interventions. Neither found evidence of an effect on pain outcomes, though in both cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Alternative medicine There were two systematic reviews of alternative medicine. One reported evidence of a benefit from auricular acupuncture compared to Chinese herbal medicine, and the other reported no evidence of a difference between Chinese herbal medicine and danazol. In both cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Anti-TNF-I± drugs One review found no evidence of a difference in effectiveness between anti-TNF-I± drugs and placebo. However, the evidence was of low quality. Reviews reporting fertility outcomes (8 reviews) Medical interventions Four reviews reported on medical interventions for improving fertility in women with endometriosis. One compared three months of GnRH agonists with a control in women undergoing assisted reproduction and found very low quality evidence of an increase in clinical pregnancies in the treatment group. There was no evidence of a difference in effectiveness between the interventions in the other three reviews, which compared GnRH agonists versus antagonists, ovulation suppression versus placebo or no treatment, and pre-surgical medical therapy versus surgery alone. In all cases the evidence was of low or very low quality. Surgical interventions Three reviews reported on surgical interventions. There was moderate quality evidence that both live births or ongoing pregnancy rates and clinical pregnancy rates were higher after laparoscopic surgery than after diagnostic laparoscopy alone. There was low quality evidence of no difference in effectiveness between surgery and expectant management for endometrioma. One review found low quality evidence that excisional surgery resulted in higher clinical pregnancy rates than drainage or ablation of endometriomata. Post-surgical interventions Two reviews reported on post-surgical medical interventions. They found no evidence of an effect on clinical pregnancy rates. The evidence was of low or very low quality. Alternative medicine A review of Chinese herbal medicine in comparison with gestrinone found no evidence of a difference between the groups in clinical pregnancy rates. However, the evidence was of low quality. Adverse events Reviews of GnRH analogues and of danazol reported that the interventions were associated with higher rates of adverse effects than placebo; and depot progestagens were associated with higher rates of adverse events than other treatments. Chinese herbal medicine was associated with fewer side effects than gestrinone or danazol.Three reviews reported miscarriage as an outcome. No difference was found between surgical and diagnostic laparoscopy, between GnRH agonists and antagonists, or between aspiration of endometrioma and expectant management. However, in all cases the quality of the evidence was of low quality. For women with pain and endometriosis, suppression of menstrual cycles with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUD) and danazol were beneficial interventions. Laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis and excision of endometriomata were also associated with improvements in pain. The evidence on NSAIDs was inconclusive. There was no evidence of benefit with post-surgical medical treatment.In women with endometriosis undergoing assisted reproduction, three months of treatment with GnRH agonist improved pregnancy rates. Excisional surgery improved spontaneous pregnancy rates in the nine to 12 months after surgery compared to ablative surgery. Laparoscopic surgery improved live birth and pregnancy rates compared to diagnostic laparoscopy alone. There was no evidence that medical treatment improved clinical pregnancy rates.Evidence on harms was scanty, but GnRH analogues, danazol and depot progestagens were associated with higher rates than other interventions.[CINAHL Note: The Cochrane Collaboration systematic reviews contain interactive software that allows various calculations in the MetaView.]  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107855472. Language: English. Entry Date: 20101029. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management; Women's Health. NLM UID: 100909747. Cochrane AN: CD009590. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107855472 Serial 2388  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chan, Y.-Y.; Lo, W.-Y.; Li, T.-C.; Shen, L.-J.; Yang, S.-N.; Chen, Y.-H.; Lin, J.-G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture as an Adjunct to Methadone Treatment Services for Heroin Addicts: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication American Journal of Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chinese Med  
  Volume 42 Issue 3 Pages 569-586  
  Keywords Substance Abusers; Heroin; Methadone -- Administration and Dosage; Neoadjuvant Therapy -- Methods; Electroacupuncture -- Utilization; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Taiwan; Chi Square Test; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Analysis of Variance; Paired T-Tests; Step-Wise Multiple Regression; Male; Adult; Female; Funding Source  
  Abstract Scant scientific evidence supports the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of opiate dependence. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of acupuncture for heroin addicts on methadone maintenance by measuring the daily consumption of methadone, variations in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores, and heroin craving. Sixty heroin addicts were randomly assigned to true acupuncture (electroacupuncture at the Hegu [LI4] and Zusanli [ST36] acupoints, as well as acupuncture at the Ear Shenmen) or sham acupuncture (minimal acupuncture at the Hegu and Zusanli acupoints without electrical stimulation and superficial acupuncture at the Ear Shenmen), twice weekly for 4 weeks. From week 2 onwards, the daily dose of methadone was reduced by a significantly greater amount with true acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture. True acupuncture was also associated with a greater improvement in sleep latency at follow-up. All adverse events were mild in severity. Acupuncture appears to be a useful adjunct to methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) in heroin addiction.  
  Address Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan  
  Publisher World Scientific Publishing Company
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103951748. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140603. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Military/Uniformed Services; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Grant Information: This work was supported by grant NSC 100-2320-B-039-029-MY2 from the National Science Council, Taipei, Taiwan.. NLM UID: 7901431. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103951748 Serial 2362  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chang, B.-H.; Sommers, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and relaxation response for craving and anxiety reduction among military veterans in recovery from substance use disorder Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication American Journal on Addictions Abbreviated Journal Am J Addict  
  Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 129-136  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background and Objectives: Substance use disorder (SUD) is a major health issue, especially among military veterans. We previously reported the effects of auricular acupuncture and the relaxation response (RR) on reducing craving and anxiety following 10-week interventions among veterans who were in recovery from SUDs. Our current analysis examines effects following each intervention session and RR daily practice.Methods: We conducted a three-arm randomized controlled trial on residents of a homeless veteran rehabilitation program. Sixty-Seven enroled participants were randomly assigned to acupuncture (n=23), RR (n=23), or usual care (n=21). Participants in the two intervention groups rated their degree of craving for substance on a scale of 1-10 and anxiety levels on a scale of 1-4 (total score 20-80) before and after each intervention session. Mixed effects regression models were used for analysis.Results: Craving and anxiety levels decreased significantly following one session of acupuncture (-1.04, p=.0001; -8.83, p<.0001) or RR intervention (-.43, p=.02; -4.64, p=.03). The level of craving continued to drop with additional intervention sessions (regression coefficient b=-.10, p=.01, and b=-.10, p=.02 for acupuncture and RR groups, respectively). Number of daily practice days of RR-eliciting techniques is also associated with reduction in craving ratings (b=-.02, p=.008).Conclusions: Findings demonstrate the value of attending regular acupuncture and RR-eliciting intervention sessions, as well as the daily practice of RR-eliciting techniques.Scientific Significance: Substance addiction is a complex disease and effective treatment remains a challenge. Our study findings add to the scientific evidence of these two non-pharmaceutical approaches for SUD.  
  Address  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109677532. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20161118. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Psychiatry/Psychology. NLM UID: 9208821. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109677532 Serial 2385  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chang, W.-D.; Lai, P.-T.; Tsou, Y.-A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analgesic effect of manual acupuncture and laser acupuncture for lateral epicondylalgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication The American Journal of Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume 42 Issue 6 Pages 1301-1314  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Meta-analysis; Sprains and Strains; Tennis Elbow; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Lateral Epicondylitis; Acupuncture; Laser Acupuncture  
  Abstract Lateral epicondylalgia is a common orthopedic disorder. In traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture is often used for treating lateral epicondylalgia. Laser acupuncture, compared with manual acupuncture, has more advantages because it is painless, aseptic and safe. However, the analgesic effect of manual acupuncture and laser acupuncture on lateral epicondylalgia has rarely been explored. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the analgesic effect of laser acupuncture and manual acupuncture for the treatment of lateral epicondylalgia. We investigated studies published in the Medline, PubMed, and CINAHL databases from January 1980 to December 2013. This review included 9 randomized articles. Six of them examined manual acupuncture and the others focused on laser acupuncture. We analyzed the meta-analysis results regarding the analgesic effect of the treatment, and observed substantial differences in 4 articles related to manual acupuncture. Manual acupuncture is effective in short-term pain relief for the treatment of lateral epicondylalgia; however, its long-term analgesic effect is unremarkable. A suitable acupuncture point and depth can be used to treat lateral epicondylalgia. Manual acupuncture applied on lateral epicondylalgia produced stronger evidence of an analgesic effect than did laser acupuncture, and further study on the analgesic effect of laser acupuncture is required.  
  Address Department of Sports Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan, R.O.C  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Tennis Elbow
  Disease Category Sprains and Strains OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25384448 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2105  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chao, G.-Q.; Zhang, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture to treat irritable bowel syndrome: a meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication World Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal World J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 1871-1877  
  Keywords  
  Abstract AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) through meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. METHODS: We searched MEDLIINE, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1966 to February 2013 for double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigating the efficacy of acupuncture in the management of IBS. Studies were screened for inclusion based on randomization, controls, and measurable outcomes reported. We used the modified Jadad score for assessing the quality of the articles. STATA 11.0 and Revman 5.0 were used for meta-analysis. Publication bias was assessed by Begg's and Egger's tests. RESULTS: Six randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The modified Jadad score of the articles was > 3, and five articles were of high quality. We analyzed the heterogeneity and found that these studies did not cause heterogeneity in our meta-analysis. Begg's test showed P = 0.707 and Egger's test showed P = 0.334. There was no publication bias in our meta-analysis (Begg's test, P = 0.707; Egger's test, P = 0.334). From the forest plot, the diamond was on the right side of the vertical line and did not intersect with the line. The pooled relative risk for clinical improvement with acupuncture was 1.75 (95%CI: 1.24-2.46, P = 0.001). Using the two different systems of STATA 11.0 and Revman 5.0, we confirmed the significant efficacy of acupuncture for treating IBS. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture exhibits clinically and statistically significant control of IBS symptoms.  
  Address Guan-Qun Chao, Department of Family Medicine, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006, Zhejiang Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:24587665; PMCID:PMC3930986 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2160  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: