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Author (up) Abaraogu, U.O.; Tabansi-Ochuogu, C.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title As Acupressure Decreases Pain, Acupuncture May Improve Some Aspects of Quality of Life for Women with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 220-228  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology; Acupuncture; Acupressure; Quality of Life; Menstrual Pain  
  Abstract Primary dysmenorrhea is the most common gynecological symptom reported by women and constitutes a high health, social, and economic burden. Chemotherapies, along with their side effects, have not yielded satisfactory outcomes. Alternative nonpharmacological interventions, including acupuncture and acupressure, have been advocated, but evidence regarding their beneficial effect is inconclusive. This study sought to obtain evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupressure interventions. Twelve electronic databases were searched by using menstrual pain intensity and quality of life as primary and secondary outcomes, respectively, with the PEDro guideline for quality appraisal. Data unsuitable for a meta-analysis were reported as descriptive data. The search yielded 38 citations, from which eight studies were systematically reviewed, four of the eight being eligible for meta-analysis. The systematic review showed moderate methodological quality with a mean of 6.1 out of 10 on the PEDro quality scale. Acupressure showed evidence of pain relief while acupuncture improved both the mental and the physical components of quality of life. In conclusion, physiotherapists should consider using acupuncture and acupressure to treat primary dysmenorrhea, but a need exists for higher quality, randomized, blinded, sham-controlled trials with adequate sample sizes to establish clearly the effects of these modalities.  
  Address Department of Medical Rehabilitation, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26433798 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2019  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Arias-Buria, J.L.; Valero-Alcaide, R.; Cleland, J.A.; Salom-Moreno, J.; Ortega-Santiago, R.; Atin-Arratibel, M.A.; Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, C. doi  openurl
  Title Inclusion of Trigger Point Dry Needling in a Multimodal Physical Therapy Program for Postoperative Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Manipulative Physiol Ther Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Shoulder Pain; Rct; Postoperative; Pain, Perioperative; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Dry Needling, With Acupuncture Needle; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Physical  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of including 1 session of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) into a multimodal physiotherapy treatment on pain and function in postoperative shoulder pain. METHODS: Twenty patients (5 male; 15 female; age, 58 +/- 12 years) with postoperative shoulder pain after either open reduction and internal fixation with Proximal Humeral Internal Locking System plate plate or rotator cuff tear repair were randomly divided into 2 groups: physiotherapy group (n = 10) who received best evidence physical therapy interventions and a physical therapy plus TrP-DN group (n = 10) who received the same intervention plus a single session of TrP-DN targeted at active TrPs. The Constant-Murley score was used to determine pain, activities of daily living, range of motion, and strength, which was captured at baseline and 1 week after by an assessor blinded to group assignment RESULTS: Analysis of variance showed that subjects receiving TrP-DN plus physical therapy exhibited greater improvement in the Constant-Murley total score (P < .001) and also activities of daily living (P < .001) and strength (P = .019) subscales than those receiving physical therapy alone. Between-group effect sizes were large in favor of the TrP-DN group (0.97 < SMD < 1.45). Both groups experienced similar improvements in pain (P < .001) and range of motion (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that including a single session of TrP-DN in the first week of a multimodal physical therapy approach may assist with faster increases in function in individuals with postoperative shoulder pain.  
  Address  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 3/10/2015; Date Modified: 4/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Shoulder Pain; Clinician, Department of Physical Therapy, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid, Spain; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25666690 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1744  
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Author (up) Au, D.W.; Tsang, H.W.; Ling, P.P.; Leung, C.H.; Ip, P.K.; Cheung, W.M. doi  openurl
  Title Effects of acupressure on anxiety: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quantify the effects of acupressure on anxiety among adults. METHODOLOGY: RCTs published between January 1997 and February 2014, comparing acupressure with sham control, were identified from the databases Science Citation Index/Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus, PubMed and PsycINFO. Meta-analysis of eligible studies was performed and the magnitude of the overall effect size was calculated for the anxiety outcome. Revised STRICTA (the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture) criteria were used to appraise the acupressure procedures, and the Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. RESULTS: Of 39 potentially relevant studies, seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria for review while five studies met the criteria for meta-analysis. All studies reported the positive effect of acupressure on relieving anxiety from the anticipation of surgery or treatment. EX-HN3 (Yintang), HT7 (Shenmen) were the commonest points selected and two studies used bilateral points. The acupressure procedure was generally well reported and studies had a low risk of bias. The combined results of the five trials showed a greater overall reduction in anxiety in the acupressure group than in the sham controls (standardised mean differences (SMD)=-1.11; 95% CI -1.61 to -0.61; p<0.0001 heterogeneity: I2=75%; chi2=16.17; p=0.003; r=0.485). CONCLUSIONS: Acupressure seems to be effective in providing immediate relief of pretreatment anxiety among adults, and has a medium effect size. However, conflicting results were found for the improvements on physiological indicators. More rigorous reporting, including allocation concealment procedure, is needed to strengthen the results.  
  Address  
  Publisher Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/gro
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 6/30/2015; Priority: Normal; Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=26002571 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1610  
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Author (up) Bai, Z.-H.; Zhang, Z.-X.; Li, C.-R.; Wang, M.; Kim, M.-J.; Guo, H.; Wang, C.-Y.; Xiao, T.-W.; Chi, Y.; Ren, L.; Gu, Z.-Y.; Xu, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Eye Acupuncture Treatment for Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 871327  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Stroke; Acupuncture; Eye Acupuncture; Eye Acupuncture Therapy; TCM  
  Abstract There were applications of eye acupuncture for stroke patients. Unfortunately, similar to many other Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) treatments, it lacks comprehensive evaluation and system review for its effect and safety. Objective. This study is a systematic review to appraise the safety and effectiveness of eye acupuncture for stroke. Methods. “Eye acupuncture therapy” in eleven databases was searched by randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials. The search activity was ended in April 2014. The data were extracted and assessed by three independent authors. Rev Man 5.0 software was used for data analysis with effect estimate presented as relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. Results. Sixteen trials (1120 patients) were involved with generally poor methodological quality. The study indicated that when eye acupuncture was combined with western medicine compared to western medicine, there was a significant difference in the areas of mental state, swallow function, and NDS. When eye acupuncture was combined with western medicine and rehabilitation compared to western medicine and rehabilitation, there was significant difference in the changes of SSS, FMA, and constipation symptoms evaluation. No adverse events or side effects have been reported. Conclusions. The current evidence is insufficient and the rigorously designed trials are warranted.  
  Address Benxi City Hospital for Infectious Diseases, Benxi 117022, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Stroke Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26161127; PMCID:PMC4486759 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1955  
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Author (up) Bennell, K.L.; Buchbinder, R.; Hinman, R.S. openurl 
  Title Physical therapies in the management of osteoarthritis: current state of the evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Curr Opin Rheumatol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 304-311  
  Keywords  
  Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review considers the role of physical therapies in osteoarthritis management, highlighting key findings from systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials published in the last 2 years. RECENT FINDINGS: Three new trials question the role of manual therapy for hip and knee osteoarthritis. No between-group differences in outcome were detected between a multimodal programme including manual therapy and home exercise, and placebo in one trial; a second trial found no benefit of adding manual therapy to an exercise programme, while a third trial reported marginal benefits over usual care that were of doubtful importance. Recent trials have also found no or uncertain clinical benefits of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or acupuncture, or of valgus braces or lateral wedge insoles for pain and function in knee osteoarthritis. Available evidence suggests a small to moderate effect of exercise in comparison with not exercising for hip or knee osteoarthritis, although optimum exercise prescription and dosage are unclear. One trial also observed a delay in joint replacement in people with hip osteoarthritis. Two trials have reported conflicting findings about the effects of exercise for hand osteoarthritis. SUMMARY: Other than exercise, recent data suggest that the role of physical therapies in the treatment of osteoarthritis appears limited.  
  Address aCentre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne bDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University cMonash Department of C  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/27/2015; Priority: Normal; aCentre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne bDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University cMonash Department of C; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25775185 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1506  
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Author (up) Bezerra, A.G.; Pires, G.N.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.; Hachul, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture to Treat Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Climacteric; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Acupuncture; Insomnia; Women's Health  
  Abstract Sleep disorders are commonly observed among postmenopausal women, with negative effects on their quality of life. The search for complementary therapies for sleep disorders during postmenopausal period is of high importance, and acupuncture stands out as an appropriate possibility. The present review intended to systematically evaluate the available literature, compiling studies that have employed acupuncture as treatment to sleep disorders in postmenopausal women. A bibliographic search was performed in PubMed/Medline and Scopus. Articles which had acupuncture as intervention, sleep related measurements as outcomes, and postmenopausal women as target population were included and evaluated according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool and to the STRICTA guidelines. Out of 89 search results, 12 articles composed our final sample. A high heterogeneity was observed among these articles, which prevented us from performing a meta-analysis. Selected articles did not present high risk of bias and had a satisfactory compliance rate with STRICTA guidelines. In general, these studies presented improvements in sleep-related variables. Despite the overall positive effects, acupuncture still cannot be stated as a reliable treatment for sleep-related complaints, not due to inefficacy, but rather limited evidence. Nevertheless, results are promising and new comprehensive and controlled studies in the field are encouraged.  
  Address Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Napoleao de Barros 925, Vila Clementino, 04024-002 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment test Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26366181; PMCID:PMC4561166 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1930  
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Author (up) Bosch, P.; van den Noort, M.; Yeo, S.; Lim, S.; Coenen, A.; van Luijtelaar, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of acupuncture on mood and working memory in patients with depression and schizophrenia Type of Study
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 6 Pages 380-390  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; *Affect; Depression/*therapy; Female; Humans; Male; *Memory, Short-Term; Middle Aged; Schizophrenia/*therapy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In patients with depression, as well as in patients with schizophrenia, both mood and working memory performance are often impaired. Both issues can only be addressed and improved with medication to some extent. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the mood and the working memory performance in patients with depression or schizophrenia and whether acupuncture can improve these. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A pragmatic clinical trial design was used. The study was conducted in a psychiatric clinic. Fifty patients with depression and 50 with schizophrenia were randomly divided into an experimental and a waiting-list group. Additionally, 25 healthy control participants were included. Twelve weeks of individualized acupuncture treatment was used as the clinical intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All patients were tested before (T1) and after (T2) acupuncture treatment on a mood scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II), a simple working memory task (digit span), and a complex working memory task (letter-number sequencing); the healthy controls were tested at T1 only. RESULTS: Patients with depression scored worse than the others on the BDI-II, and patients with schizophrenia scored worse than the healthy controls. On the digit span, patients with schizophrenia did not differ from healthy controls whereas they scored worse of all on the letter-number sequencing. With respect to the acupuncture findings, first, the present study showed that the use of acupuncture to treat patients with schizophrenia was both practical and safe. Moreover, acupuncture had a positive effect on the BDI-II for the depression group, but acupuncture had no effect on the digit span and on the letter-number sequencing performance for the two clinical groups. CONCLUSION: The clinical improvement in patients with depression after acupuncture treatment was not accompanied by any significant change in a simple working memory task or in a more complex working memory task; the same was true for the patients with schizophrenia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register NTR3132.  
  Address Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 HR Nijmegen, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26559363 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2014  
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Author (up) Bosch, P.; van den, N. oort M.; Staudte, H.; Lim, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Schizophrenia and Depression: A systematic Review of the Effectiveness and the Working Mechanisms Behind Acupuncture Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Explore (NY) Abbreviated Journal Explore  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 281-291  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Schizophrenia; Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This systematic review assessed clinical evidence for the use of acupuncture as an add-on treatment in patients with depression and schizophrenia and for its underlying working mechanisms. DATA SOURCES: Four databases (Medline, Scopus, ERIC, and the Cochrane Library) were searched with a cutoff date of March 31, 2014. STUDY SELECTION: Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of acupuncture treatment for depression and schizophrenia were considered for inclusion. The scarcity of acupuncture research involving schizophrenia led to the inclusion of randomized controlled trials and case studies. DATA EXTRACTION: The primary and secondary aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of acupuncture in treating patients with depression or schizophrenia and the possible working mechanisms underlying acupuncture through a systematic literature review. DATA SYNTHESIS: The overall clinical results on using acupuncture to treat depression are promising, but only limited evidence for its effectiveness in treating schizophrenia was found. Acupuncture improves the quality of life, particularly that of sleep, in psychiatric patients. Brain research has revealed that acupuncture has a modulating and normalizing effect on the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN), including the default mode network. Because the LPNN is related to sleep and emotions, this might explain the improved qualities of life and sleep after acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: From the evidence found in this study, acupuncture seems to be an effective add-on treatment in patients with depression and, to a lesser degree, in patients with schizophrenia, but large well-designed studies are needed to confirm that evidence.  
  Address Center for Cognition, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen, Postbus 9104, Montessorilaan 3, Nijmegen 6525 HR, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1611  
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Author (up) Cagnie, B.; Castelein, B.; Pollie, F.; Steelant, L.; Verhoeyen, H.; Cools, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for the Use of Ischemic Compression and Dry Needling in the Management of Trigger Points of the Upper Trapezius in Patients with Neck Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation / Association of Academic Physiatrists Abbreviated Journal Am J Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Neck Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acupuncture; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Dry Needling; Ischemic Compression  
  Abstract The aim of this review was to describe the effects of ischemic compression and dry needling on trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle in patients with neck pain and compare these two interventions with other therapeutic interventions aiming to inactivate trigger points. Both PubMed and Web of Science were searched for randomized controlled trials using different key word combinations related to myofascial neck pain and therapeutic interventions. Four main outcome parameters were evaluated on short and medium term: pain, range of motion, functionality, and quality-of-life, including depression. Fifteen randomized controlled trials were included in this systematic review. There is moderate evidence for ischemic compression and strong evidence for dry needling to have a positive effect on pain intensity. This pain decrease is greater compared with active range of motion exercises (ischemic compression) and no or placebo intervention (ischemic compression and dry needling) but similar to other therapeutic approaches. There is moderate evidence that both ischemic compression and dry needling increase side-bending range of motion, with similar effects compared with lidocaine injection. There is weak evidence regarding its effects on functionality and quality-of-life. On the basis of this systematic review, ischemic compression and dry needling can both be recommended in the treatment of neck pain patients with trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Additional research with high-quality study designs are needed to develop more conclusive evidence  
  Address From the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1717  
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Author (up) Chai, Q.; Fei, Y.; Cao, H.; Wang, C.; Tian, J.; Liu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for melasma in women: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 33 Issue Pages 254-261  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Systematic Review; Skin Diseases; Melanosis; Melasma; Chloasma; Freckles; Women's Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Melasma is a common facial skin disorder seen in women. Manual acupuncture (MA) is widely used alone or in combination with conventional treatments for melasma in China. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of MA for melasma, and explore the range of treatments applied. METHODS: Six databases were searched systematically for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on acupuncture for melasma in women up to November 2014. RevMan software was used for data analysis. The Cochrane tool of Risk of Bias was used to assess the methodological quality of the RCTs. RESULTS: Eight RCTs involving 587 women were included. Seven studies used the encircling needling method, four studies used the quick needling method and four studies used intensive needle manipulations. Five studies provided individualised acupuncture treatments. Points used with highest frequency were SP6, ST36 and SP10. MA was compared with oral tranexamic acid, vitamin C and E, vitamin C and tamoxifen, topical 20% azelaic acid, hydroquinone, vitamin A and no treatment. Studies were too heterogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis. For global outcome measures, seven trials showed that MA groups were significantly better than the conventional treatments either with a better cure rate or with a better combined cure rate and markedly effective rate, and one trial did not (MA vs vitamin A). No acupuncture-related adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: MA appeared to be beneficial and safe for women with melasma, but insufficient evidence was found to reach conclusions. The encircling needling method, the quick needling method, intensive needle manipulations and individualised points' selection were widely used. Well-designed trials are required. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO Systematic review registration: CRD42013006396.  
  Address Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China  
  Publisher Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/gro
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Melanosis
  Disease Category Skin Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1600  
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Author (up) Chan, Y.Y.; Lo, W.Y.; Yang, S.N.; Chen, Y.H.; Lin, J.G. doi  openurl
  Title The benefit of combined acupuncture and antidepressant medication for depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Affect Disord Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 176 Issue Pages 106-117  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Meta-Analysis; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Acupuncture, one of the most popular complementary therapies, is best known for its ability to provide pain relief. Accumulating evidence suggests that acupuncture may also be beneficial in depression, although its effectiveness remains uncertain in this condition. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized trials in which the effects of acupuncture combined with antidepressant medications were compared with those of antidepressant medications alone in adults with a diagnosed depressive disorder. Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving 1046 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. Our results confirmed that the pooled standardized mean difference of the 'endpoint scores of the 17-item Hamilton rating scale for depression' was -3.74 (95% CI, -4.77 to -2.70, p<0.001) in week 1 and -2.52 (95% CI, -4.12 to -0.92; p<0.01) in week 6, indicating a significant difference in favor of acupuncture combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Moreover, therapeutic response rates were statistically significantly different between the two groups (risk ratio [RR], 1.23; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.39; p<0.001; I2=68%) in favor of the combined treatment group. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that acupuncture combined with antidepressant medication is effective, has an early onset of action, safe and well-tolerated over the first 6-week treatment period. Moreover, this treatment combination appears to result in greater therapeutic efficacy than SSRI therapy alone. More high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the clinical benefit and long-term effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of depression.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Taoyuan Armed Forces Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 5/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Depressive Disorder; Department of Psychiatry, Taoyuan Armed Forces Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25704563 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1713  
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Author (up) Chassot, M.; Dussan-Sarria, J.A.; Sehn, F.C.; Deitos, A.; de Souza, A.; Vercelino, R.; Torres, I.L.; Fregni, F.; Caumo, W. doi  openurl
  Title Electroacupuncture analgesia is associated with increased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in chronic tension-type headache: a randomized, sham controlled, crossover trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Complement Altern Med Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 144  
  Keywords Headache Disorders; Tension-Type Headache; Rct; Cross-Over Design; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) is characterized by almost daily headaches and central sensitization, for which electroacupuncture (EA) might be effective. The central nervous system (CNS) plasticity can be tracked in serum using the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neuroplasticity mediator. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that EA analgesia in CTTH is related to neuroplasticity indexed by serum BDNF. METHODS: We enrolled females aged 18-60 years with CTTH in a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled crossover trial, comparing ten EA sessions applied for 30 minutes (2-10 Hz, intensity by tolerance) in cervical areas twice per week vs. a sham intervention. Treatment periods were separated by two washout weeks. Pain on the 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and serum BDNF were assessed as primary outcomes. RESULTS: Thirty-four subjects underwent randomization, and twenty-nine completed the protocol. EA was superior to sham to alleviate pain (VAS scores 2.38 +/- 1.77 and 3.02 +/- 2.49, respectively, P = 0.005). The VAS scores differed according to the intervention sequence, demonstrating a carryover effect (P < 0.05). Using multiple regression, serum BDNF was adjusted for the Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS) and the VAS scores (r-squared = 0.07, standard beta coefficients = -0.2 and -0.14, respectively, P < 0.001). At the end of the first intervention period, the adjusted BDNF was higher in the EA phase (29.31 +/- 3.24, 27.53 +/- 2.94 ng/mL, Cohen's d = 0.55). CONCLUSION: EA analgesia is related to neuroplasticity indexed by the adjusted BDNF. EA modulation of pain and BDNF occurs according to the CNS situation at the moment of its administration, as it was related to depression and the timing of its administration.  
  Address Post-Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil. Email: monicachassot@hotmail.com.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 34  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Tension-Type Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 7/23/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Tension-Type Headache; Post-Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil. Email: monicachassot@hotmail.com.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25947167 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1605  
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Author (up) Chen, C.-C.; Yang, C.-C.; Hu, C.-C.; Shih, H.-N.; Chang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, P.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for pain relief after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study
  Year 2015 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume 40 Issue 1 Pages 31-36  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The effectiveness of acupuncture in relieving acute postoperative pain is still controversial. This patient-evaluator blinded and sham auricular acupuncture (AA)-controlled study tested whether acupuncture is effective in controlling acute postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: Patients were randomly assigned to receive true acupuncture (knee, scalp, and AA) or sham AA. All procedures were conducted under general anesthesia, and the AA needles were retained in situ for 3 days. Postoperative pain was managed with intravenous fentanyl using a patient-controlled analgesia pump. The amount of postoperative fentanyl required, the time to the first fentanyl request, pain intensity on a 100-mm visual analog scale, incidence of analgesia-related adverse effects, and success of patients' blinding were recorded. RESULTS: This study comprised 60 patients (30 in the study group and 30 in the control group). The fentanyl requirement via patient-controlled analgesia in the study group was lower [mean (SD), 620.7 (258.2) vs 868.6 (319.3) mug; P = 0.002). The time to first request for fentanyl was longer in the study group. Pain intensity on a 100-mm visual analog scale was lower in the study group in the first 24 hours after the operation. The incidence of analgesia-related adverse effects of nausea and vomiting was lower in the study group. The success of blinding was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P = 0.731). CONCLUSIONS: The data obtained from this clinical trial demonstrate the potential advantages of using acupuncture for postoperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty.  
  Address From the *Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital; daggerSchool of Medicine, Chang Gung University; and double daggerCenter for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25158837 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1996  
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Author (up) Chien, T.J.; Liu, C.Y.; Chang, Y.F.; Fang, C.J.; Hsu, C.H. doi  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for treating aromatase inhibitor-related arthralgia in breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Altern Complement Med Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 251-260  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Neoplasms; Pain; Arthralgia; Breast Cancer; Breast Neoplasms; Women's Health; Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy; Aromatase Inhibitors; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TENS; Acupressure; Auricular Acupuncture; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Cancer  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Acupuncture has been used as a complementary medical treatment for arthralgia and other types of pain. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of arthralgia in patients with breast cancer who were treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). METHODS: A literature search was performed, without language restrictions, of 10 databases from their inception through February 2014. The literature reviewed included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and clinical trials that compared real versus sham acupuncture for the treatment of AI-related musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS). The methodologic quality of these trials was assessed by using the modified Jadad Quality Scale. Meta-analytic software (RevMan 5.0) was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Five To compare the effects of real versus sham acupuncture, five RCTs were assessed by meta-analysis and quality analysis. Three of the RCTs reported favorable effects with regard to use of acupuncture in reducing pain and joint-related symptoms, while the other two RCTs did not. The meta-analysis showed trends toward reduced pain and stiffness in patients given acupuncture compared with those who received sham treatment (n=82; pain, mean difference: -2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), -4.72 to 0.57]; p=0.12; stiffness, mean difference: -86.10 [95% CI, -249.11 to 76.92]; p=0.30), although these differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture has been reported as a safe and promising treatment for AIMSS, but the present analysis indicated that the effects were not statistically significant. Other outcome measurements, such as imaging studies, would be worth including in future studies to further confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in AIMSS.  
  Address Institute of Traditional Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 8/6/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Pain; Institute of Traditional Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25915433 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1601  
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Author (up) Chiu, H.-Y.; Shyu, Y.-K.; Chang, P.-C.; Tsai, P.-S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Menopause-Related Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Cancer Nursing Abbreviated Journal Cancer Nurs  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Climacteric; Menopause; Hot Flashes; Hot Flushes; Women's Health; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Evidence regarding the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes in breast cancer survivors is conflicting. Little is known about the intermediate-term effects of acupuncture on hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term and intermediate-term effects of acupuncture on menopause-related symptoms and particularly on hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. METHODS: Electronic databases including EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, Wanfang Data Chinese Database, and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database from inception until June 15, 2014, were searched. Randomized controlled trials in which acupuncture was compared with sham controls or other interventions according to the reduction of hot flashes or menopause-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors were included. RESULTS: We analyzed 7 studies involving 342 participants. Acupuncture significantly reduced the frequency of hot flashes and severity of menopause-related symptoms (g = -0.23 and -0.36, respectively) immediately after the completion of treatment. In comparison with sham acupuncture, effects of true acupuncture on the frequency and severity of hot flashes were not significantly different. At 1 to 3 months' follow-up, the severity of menopause-related symptoms remained significantly reduced (g = -0.56). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture yielded small-size effects on reducing hot-flash frequency and the severity of menopause-related symptoms. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Acupuncture may be used as a complementary therapy for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms; however, whether acupuncture exerts specific treatment effects other than needling or placebo effects needs to be further evaluated.  
  Address Graduate Institute of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26050143 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1882  
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Author (up) Chiu, H.Y.; Pan, C.H.; Shyu, Y.K.; Han, B.C.; Tsai, P.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture on menopause-related symptoms and quality of life in women in natural menopause: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Menopause Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 234-244  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Meta-analysis; Climacteric; Menopause; Women's Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on hot flash frequency and severity, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life in women in natural menopause. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed/Medline, PsychINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and CINAHL using keywords such as acupuncture, hot flash, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life. Heterogeneity, moderator analysis, publication bias, and risk of bias associated with the included studies were examined. RESULTS: Of 104 relevant studies, 12 studies with 869 participants met the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. We found that acupuncture significantly reduced the frequency (g = -0.35; 95% CI, -0.5 to -0.21) and severity (g = -0.44; 95% CI, -0.65 to -0.23) of hot flashes. Acupuncture significantly decreased the psychological, somatic, and urogenital subscale scores on the Menopause Rating Scale (g = -1.56, g = -1.39, and g = -0.82, respectively; P < 0.05). Acupuncture improved the vasomotor subscale score on the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire (g= -0.46; 95% CI, -0.9 to -0.02). Long-term effects (up to 3 mo) on hot flash frequency and severity (g = -0.53 and g = -0.55, respectively) were found. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis confirms that acupuncture improves hot flash frequency and severity, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life (in the vasomotor domain) in women experiencing natural menopause.  
  Address Graduate Institute of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1688  
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Author (up) Chiu, H.Y.; Shyu, Y.K.; Chang, P.C.; Tsai, P.S. openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Menopause-Related Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Cancer Nurs Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Evidence regarding the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes in breast cancer survivors is conflicting. Little is known about the intermediate-term effects of acupuncture on hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term and intermediate-term effects of acupuncture on menopause-related symptoms and particularly on hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. METHODS: Electronic databases including EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, Wanfang Data Chinese Database, and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database from inception until June 15, 2014, were searched. Randomized controlled trials in which acupuncture was compared with sham controls or other interventions according to the reduction of hot flashes or menopause-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors were included. RESULTS: We analyzed 7 studies involving 342 participants. Acupuncture significantly reduced the frequency of hot flashes and severity of menopause-related symptoms (g = -0.23 and -0.36, respectively) immediately after the completion of treatment. In comparison with sham acupuncture, effects of true acupuncture on the frequency and severity of hot flashes were not significantly different. At 1 to 3 months' follow-up, the severity of menopause-related symptoms remained significantly reduced (g = -0.56). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture yielded small-size effects on reducing hot-flash frequency and the severity of menopause-related symptoms. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Acupuncture may be used as a complementary therapy for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms; however, whether acupuncture exerts specific treatment effects other than needling or placebo effects needs to be further evaluated.  
  Address Author Affiliations: Graduate Institute of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University (Drs Chiu, Chang, and Tsai)  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Obtain online when available OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 6/30/2015; Priority: Normal; Author Affiliations: Graduate Institute of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University (Drs Chiu, Chang, and Tsai); Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=26050143 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1615  
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Author (up) Cho, Y.H.; Kim, C.K.; Heo, K.H.; Lee, M.S.; Ha, I.H.; Son, D.W.; Choi, B.K.; Song, G.S.; Shin, B.C. doi  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Acute Postoperative Pain after Back Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Pain Pract Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 279-291  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain, Postoperative; Back Pain, Acute; Acupuncture; Back Surgery; Meta-Analysis; Pain  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Acupuncture is commonly used as a complimentary treatment for pain management. However, there has been no systematic review summarizing the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain (</=1 week) after back surgery. METHODS: We searched 15 electronic databases without language restrictions. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility and extracted data, outcomes, and risk of bias. Random effect meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were performed. RESULTS: Five trials, including 3 of high quality, met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed positive results for acupuncture treatment of pain after surgery in terms of the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity 24 hours after surgery, when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.67 (-1.04 to -0.31), P = 0.0003), whereas the other meta-analysis did not show a positive effect of acupuncture on 24-hour opiate demands when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.23 (-0.58 to 0.13), P = 0.21). CONCLUSION: Our systematic review finds encouraging but limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. Further rigorously designed clinical trials are required.  
  Address  
  Publisher (c) 2014 The Authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Pain practice : the official journal of World Institute of Pain Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 15 Condition 3
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 5/28/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Pain, Postoperative; School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Republic of Korea.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24766648 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1686  
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Author (up) Chung, K.-F.; Yeung, W.-F.; Yu, Y.-M.; Yung, K.-P.; Zhang, S.-P.; Zhang, Z.-J.; Wong, M.-T.; Lee, W.-K.; Chan, L.-W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for residual insomnia associated with major depressive disorder: a placebo- and sham-controlled, subject- and assessor-blind, randomized trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal J Clin Psychiatry  
  Volume 76 Issue 6 Pages e752-60  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for residual insomnia and other residual symptoms associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). METHOD: 150 participants having significant insomnia for more than 3 months and a history of MDD (both based on DSM-IV-TR criteria) were recruited from 4 psychiatric outpatient clinics in Hong Kong from May 2011 to August 2013 to receive 9 sessions of treatment over 3 weeks. They were randomized to receive acupuncture, minimal acupuncture, or placebo acupuncture. Primary outcome was sleep diary-derived sleep efficiency. Secondary outcomes included other sleep diary parameters, actigraphy, anxiety and depressive symptoms, daytime functioning, and adverse events. RESULTS: The mean difference in sleep diary-derived sleep efficiency at 1-week posttreatment was -1.40 (95% CI, -7.08 to 4.28) between the acupuncture and minimal acupuncture groups and was 3.10 (95% CI, -3.64 to 9.84) between the acupuncture and placebo acupuncture groups. A chi(2) test showed that acupuncture produced a significantly higher proportion of participants achieving sleep-onset latency </= 30 minutes than did minimal acupuncture at 1-week posttreatment (P = .04). However, there was no significant between-group difference in most of the other outcomes. Treatment blinding was successful, as a majority of participants did not know which treatment they had received. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture was well tolerated, but the efficacy was only mild and similar to that of minimal acupuncture and placebo acupuncture. A high proportion of patients remained clinically significantly affected by insomnia after treatment. The finding raises certain doubts about the value of acupuncture and underscores the difficulties in the treatment of residual insomnia in MDD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01707706.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Rd, Hong Kong SAR, China kfchung@hkucc.hku.hk  
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  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26132682 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1958  
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Author (up) Chung-Yuh Tzeng; Shih-Liang Chang; Chih-Cheng Wu; Chu-Ling Chang; Wen-Gii Chen; Kwok-Man Tong; Kui-Chou Huang; Ching-Liang Hsieh url  openurl
  Title Single-blinded, randomised preliminary study evaluating the effects of 2 Hz electroacupuncture for postoperative pain in patients with total knee arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 284-288  
  Keywords ACUPUNCTURE points; CORRELATION (Statistics); Electroacupuncture; POSTOPERATIVE pain; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); TOTAL knee replacement; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; VISUAL analog scale; TREATMENT effectiveness; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; MANN Whitney U Test; KRUSKAL-Wallis Test  
  Abstract Objective To explore the point-specific clinical effect of 2 Hz electroacupuncture (EA) in treating postoperative pain in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), Methods In a randomised, partially single-blinded preliminary study, 47patients with TKA were randomly divided into three groups: control group (CG, n=17) using only patient-controlled analgesia (PCA); EA group (EAG, n=16) with 2 Hz EA applied at ST36 ( Zusanli ) and GB34 ( Yanglingquan ) contralateral to the operated leg for 30 min on the first two postoperative days, also receiving PCA; and non-point group (NPG, n=14), with EA identical to the EAG except given 1 cm lateral to both ST36 and GB34. The Mann – Whitney test was used to show the difference between two groups and the Kruskal – Wallis test to show the difference between the three groups. Results The time until patients first required PCA in the CG was 34.1±22.0 min, which was significantly shorter than the 92.0±82.7 min in the EAG (p<0.001) and 90.7±94.8 min in the NPG (p<0.001); there was no difference between the EAG and NPG groups (p>0.05). The total dosage of PCA solution given was 4.6±0.9 mL/kg body weight in the CG, 4.2±1.0 mL/kg in the EAG and 4.5±1.0 mL/kg in the NPG; there were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the three groups. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, EA retarded the first demand for PCA in comparison with no EA. No effect was seen on the total dosage of PCA required and no point-specific effect was seen.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109111928; Source Information: Aug2015, Vol. 33 Issue 4, p284; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CORRELATION (Statistics); Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: POSTOPERATIVE pain; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: TOTAL knee replacement; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: VISUAL analog scale; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: KRUSKAL-Wallis Test; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 5p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 2 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2242  
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