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Author (up) Abaraogu, U.O.; Tabansi-Ochuogu, C.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title As Acupressure Decreases Pain, Acupuncture May Improve Some Aspects of Quality of Life for Women with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 220-228  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology; Acupuncture; Acupressure; Quality of Life; Menstrual Pain  
  Abstract Primary dysmenorrhea is the most common gynecological symptom reported by women and constitutes a high health, social, and economic burden. Chemotherapies, along with their side effects, have not yielded satisfactory outcomes. Alternative nonpharmacological interventions, including acupuncture and acupressure, have been advocated, but evidence regarding their beneficial effect is inconclusive. This study sought to obtain evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupressure interventions. Twelve electronic databases were searched by using menstrual pain intensity and quality of life as primary and secondary outcomes, respectively, with the PEDro guideline for quality appraisal. Data unsuitable for a meta-analysis were reported as descriptive data. The search yielded 38 citations, from which eight studies were systematically reviewed, four of the eight being eligible for meta-analysis. The systematic review showed moderate methodological quality with a mean of 6.1 out of 10 on the PEDro quality scale. Acupressure showed evidence of pain relief while acupuncture improved both the mental and the physical components of quality of life. In conclusion, physiotherapists should consider using acupuncture and acupressure to treat primary dysmenorrhea, but a need exists for higher quality, randomized, blinded, sham-controlled trials with adequate sample sizes to establish clearly the effects of these modalities.  
  Address Department of Medical Rehabilitation, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26433798 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2019  
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Author (up) AlBedah, A.; Khalil, M.; Elolemy, A.; Hussein, A.A.; AlQaed, M.; Al Mudaiheem, A.; Abutalib, R.A.; Bazaid, F.M.; Bafail, A.S.; Essa, A.B.; Bakrain, M.Y. url  openurl
  Title The Use of Wet Cupping for Persistent Nonspecific Low Back Pain: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 21 Issue 8 Pages 504-508  
  Keywords BACKACHE -- Treatment; ACETAMINOPHEN -- Therapeutic use; ACUPUNCTURE points; ALTERNATIVE medicine; CLINICAL trials; CONFIDENCE intervals; PROBABILITY theory; SAMPLING (Statistics); SCALE analysis (Psychology); Statistics; STATISTICAL power analysis; DATA analysis; QI (Chinese philosophy); PAIN measurement; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; PRE-tests & post-tests; MEDICAL suction; DATA analysis -- Software; FUNCTIONAL assessment; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; SAUDI Arabia  
  Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of wet cupping therapy as a single treatment for persistent nonspecific low back pain (PNSLBP). Design: Randomized controlled trial comparing wet cupping versus no treatment in PNSLBP. Setting: Outpatient clinic in three secondary care hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Patients: Eighty eligible participants with PNSLBP for at least 3 months were randomly allocated to an intervention group ( n=40) or to a control group ( n=40). Interventions: Six wet cupping sessions within 2 weeks, each of which were done at two bladder meridian (BL) acupuncture points among BL23, BL24, and BL25. Only acetaminophen was allowed as a rescue treatment in both groups. Outcome measures: The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), McGill Present Pain Intensity (PPI), and Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) were used as outcome measures. Numbers of acetaminophen tablets taken were compared at 4 weeks from baseline. Adverse events were recorded. Results: At the end of the intervention, statistically significant differences in the three outcome measures favoring the wet cupping group compared with the control group were seen: NRS score, 29.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.6-33.8) versus 57.9 (95% CI, 53.3-62.6), respectively; PPI score, 1.17 (95% CI, 0.96-1.4) versus 2.3 (95% CI, 2.1- 2.7); and ODQ score, 19.6 (95% CI, 16.5-22.7) versus 35.4 (95% CI, 32.3-38.5) ( p=0.0001). This improvement continued for another 2 weeks after the end of the intervention. Acetaminophen was used less in the wet cupping group, but this difference was not statistically significant. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: Wet cupping is potentially effective in reducing pain and improving disability associated with PNSLBP at least for 2 weeks after the end of the wet cupping period. Placebo-controlled trials are needed.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108593140; Source Information: Aug2015, Vol. 21 Issue 8, p504; Subject Term: BACKACHE -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACETAMINOPHEN -- Therapeutic use; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: SCALE analysis (Psychology); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: STATISTICAL power analysis; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: QI (Chinese philosophy); Subject Term: PAIN measurement; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: MEDICAL suction; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: FUNCTIONAL assessment; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: SAUDI Arabia; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 5p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 2 Charts, 1 Graph; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2297  
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Author (up) Albrecht, T.; Wu, S.; Baumann, I.; Plinkert, P.K.; Sertel, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measurable impact of acupuncture on mucosal swelling of inferior turbinates: a prospective, randomized, controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Acta Oto-Laryngologica Abbreviated Journal Acta Otolaryngol  
  Volume 135 Issue 2 Pages 169-176  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial; Allergies; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Conclusions: Sham acupuncture turned out to be more effective than expected. The effect of acupuncture cannot be assessed by optical rhinometry (ORM). Objectives: In most cases nasal congestion is caused by hypertrophy of the inferior turbinate as a result of allergic and chronic rhinitis. Topical decongestants cause severe side effects. As a consequence, there is an increasing demand for alternative treatment options such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Methods: A total of 25 patients with nasal congestion due to hypertrophic inferior turbinate were recruited. The mucosal swelling status of the inferior turbinate was assessed by continuous ORM for 20 min. Patients were asked to score the severity of their nasal congestion on a visual analogue scale (VAS) before and 10 and 20 min after acupuncture. Specific verum acupuncture points related to nasal congestion were tested against non-specific control sham acupuncture points. Results: Sham acupuncture improved VAS scores, whereas ORM measured an increase in nasal swelling. The ORM revealed a quicker onset of the effect of verum acupuncture on the nasal blood flow. Also, verum acupuncture reaches its maximum effect in a shorter time period, so that the net reaction time was much shorter. However, ORM could not prove a decongestant effect of verum acupuncture on inferior turbinate.  
  Address Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency N/A Number of Participants 25  
  Time in Treatment Condition Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2336  
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Author (up) Aranha, M.F.M.; Müller, C.E.E.; Gavião, M.B.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pain intensity and cervical range of motion in women with myofascial pain treated with acupuncture and electroacupuncture: a double-blinded, randomized clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal Braz J Phys Ther  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 34-43  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Musculoskeletal Diseases; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Ashi Acupuncture Style; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom-Based Point Selection; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Neck Pain; Cervical Pain  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture stimulates points on the body, influencing the perception of myofascial pain or altering physiologic functions. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EAC) and acupuncture (AC) for myofascial pain of the upper trapezius and cervical range of motion, using SHAM acupuncture as control. Method: Sixty women presenting at least one trigger point at the upper trapezius and local or referred pain for more than six months were randomized into EAC, AC, and SHAM groups. Eight sessions were scheduled and a follow-up was conducted after 28 days. The Visual Analog Scale assessed the intensity of local and general pain. A fleximeter assessed cervical movements. Data were analyzed using paired t or Wilcoxon's tests, ANOVA or Friedman or Kruskal-Wallis tests and Pearson's correlation (?=0.05). Results: There was reduction in general pain in the EAC and AC groups after eight sessions (P<0.001). A significant decrease in pain intensity occurred for the right trapezius in all groups and for the left trapezius in the EAC and AC groups. Intergroup comparisons showed improvement in general pain in the EAC and AC groups and in local pain intensity in the EAC group (P<0.05), which showed an increase in left rotation (P=0.049). The AC group showed increases in inclination (P=0.005) sustained until follow-up and rotation to the right (P=0.032). Conclusion: EAC and AC were effective in reducing the pain intensity compared with SHAM. EAC was better than AC for local pain relief. These treatments can assist in increasing cervical range of motion, albeit subtly.  
  Address Departamento de Morfologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Piracicaba (FOP), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP, Brazil  
  Publisher Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy / Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 72  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2337  
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Author (up) Arias-Buria, J.L.; Valero-Alcaide, R.; Cleland, J.A.; Salom-Moreno, J.; Ortega-Santiago, R.; Atin-Arratibel, M.A.; Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, C. doi  openurl
  Title Inclusion of Trigger Point Dry Needling in a Multimodal Physical Therapy Program for Postoperative Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Manipulative Physiol Ther Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Shoulder Pain; Rct; Postoperative; Pain, Perioperative; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Dry Needling, With Acupuncture Needle; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Physical  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of including 1 session of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) into a multimodal physiotherapy treatment on pain and function in postoperative shoulder pain. METHODS: Twenty patients (5 male; 15 female; age, 58 +/- 12 years) with postoperative shoulder pain after either open reduction and internal fixation with Proximal Humeral Internal Locking System plate plate or rotator cuff tear repair were randomly divided into 2 groups: physiotherapy group (n = 10) who received best evidence physical therapy interventions and a physical therapy plus TrP-DN group (n = 10) who received the same intervention plus a single session of TrP-DN targeted at active TrPs. The Constant-Murley score was used to determine pain, activities of daily living, range of motion, and strength, which was captured at baseline and 1 week after by an assessor blinded to group assignment RESULTS: Analysis of variance showed that subjects receiving TrP-DN plus physical therapy exhibited greater improvement in the Constant-Murley total score (P < .001) and also activities of daily living (P < .001) and strength (P = .019) subscales than those receiving physical therapy alone. Between-group effect sizes were large in favor of the TrP-DN group (0.97 < SMD < 1.45). Both groups experienced similar improvements in pain (P < .001) and range of motion (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that including a single session of TrP-DN in the first week of a multimodal physical therapy approach may assist with faster increases in function in individuals with postoperative shoulder pain.  
  Address  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 3/10/2015; Date Modified: 4/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Shoulder Pain; Clinician, Department of Physical Therapy, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid, Spain; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25666690 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1744  
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Author (up) Au, D.W.; Tsang, H.W.; Ling, P.P.; Leung, C.H.; Ip, P.K.; Cheung, W.M. doi  openurl
  Title Effects of acupressure on anxiety: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quantify the effects of acupressure on anxiety among adults. METHODOLOGY: RCTs published between January 1997 and February 2014, comparing acupressure with sham control, were identified from the databases Science Citation Index/Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus, PubMed and PsycINFO. Meta-analysis of eligible studies was performed and the magnitude of the overall effect size was calculated for the anxiety outcome. Revised STRICTA (the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture) criteria were used to appraise the acupressure procedures, and the Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. RESULTS: Of 39 potentially relevant studies, seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria for review while five studies met the criteria for meta-analysis. All studies reported the positive effect of acupressure on relieving anxiety from the anticipation of surgery or treatment. EX-HN3 (Yintang), HT7 (Shenmen) were the commonest points selected and two studies used bilateral points. The acupressure procedure was generally well reported and studies had a low risk of bias. The combined results of the five trials showed a greater overall reduction in anxiety in the acupressure group than in the sham controls (standardised mean differences (SMD)=-1.11; 95% CI -1.61 to -0.61; p<0.0001 heterogeneity: I2=75%; chi2=16.17; p=0.003; r=0.485). CONCLUSIONS: Acupressure seems to be effective in providing immediate relief of pretreatment anxiety among adults, and has a medium effect size. However, conflicting results were found for the improvements on physiological indicators. More rigorous reporting, including allocation concealment procedure, is needed to strengthen the results.  
  Address  
  Publisher Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/gro
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 6/30/2015; Priority: Normal; Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=26002571 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1610  
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Author (up) Au, D.W.H.; Tsang, H.W.H.; Ling, P.P.M.; Leung, C.H.T.; Ip, P.K.; Cheung, W.M. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupressure on anxiety: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages 353-359  
  Keywords ANXIETY -- Treatment; Acupressure; CHI-squared test; CONFIDENCE intervals; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Psychology; Medline; META-analysis; ONLINE information services; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics  
  Abstract Objective To evaluate the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quantify the effects of acupressure on anxiety among adults. Methodology RCTs published between January 1997 and February 2014, comparing acupressure with sham control, were identified from the databases Science Citation Index/Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus, PubMed and PsycINFO. Meta-analysis of eligible studies was performed and the magnitude of the overall effect size was calculated for the anxiety outcome. Revised STRICTA (the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture) criteria were used to appraise the acupressure procedures, and the Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. Results Of 39 potentially relevant studies, seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria for review while five studies met the criteria for meta-analysis. All studies reported the positive effect of acupressure on relieving anxiety from the anticipation of surgery or treatment. EX-HN3 (Yintang), HT7 (Shenmen) were the commonest points selected and two studies used bilateral points. The acupressure procedure was generally well reported and studies had a low risk of bias. The combined results of the five trials showed a greater overall reduction in anxiety in the acupressure group than in the sham controls (standardised mean differences (SMD)=-1.11; 95% CI -1.61 to -0.61; p<0.0001 heterogeneity: I²=75%; ?²=16.17; p=0.003; r=0.485). Conclusions Acupressure seems to be effective in providing immediate relief of pretreatment anxiety among adults, and has a medium effect size. However, conflicting results were found for the improvements on physiological indicators. More rigorous reporting, including allocation concealment procedure, is needed to strengthen the results.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 110629213; Source Information: Oct2015, Vol. 33 Issue 5, p353; Subject Term: ANXIETY -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPRESSURE; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Psychology; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 2 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2274  
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Author (up) Bai, Z.-H.; Zhang, Z.-X.; Li, C.-R.; Wang, M.; Kim, M.-J.; Guo, H.; Wang, C.-Y.; Xiao, T.-W.; Chi, Y.; Ren, L.; Gu, Z.-Y.; Xu, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Eye Acupuncture Treatment for Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 871327  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Stroke; Acupuncture; Eye Acupuncture; Eye Acupuncture Therapy; TCM  
  Abstract There were applications of eye acupuncture for stroke patients. Unfortunately, similar to many other Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) treatments, it lacks comprehensive evaluation and system review for its effect and safety. Objective. This study is a systematic review to appraise the safety and effectiveness of eye acupuncture for stroke. Methods. “Eye acupuncture therapy” in eleven databases was searched by randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials. The search activity was ended in April 2014. The data were extracted and assessed by three independent authors. Rev Man 5.0 software was used for data analysis with effect estimate presented as relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. Results. Sixteen trials (1120 patients) were involved with generally poor methodological quality. The study indicated that when eye acupuncture was combined with western medicine compared to western medicine, there was a significant difference in the areas of mental state, swallow function, and NDS. When eye acupuncture was combined with western medicine and rehabilitation compared to western medicine and rehabilitation, there was significant difference in the changes of SSS, FMA, and constipation symptoms evaluation. No adverse events or side effects have been reported. Conclusions. The current evidence is insufficient and the rigorously designed trials are warranted.  
  Address Benxi City Hospital for Infectious Diseases, Benxi 117022, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Stroke Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26161127; PMCID:PMC4486759 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1955  
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Author (up) Bardy, J.; Mackereth, P.; Finnegan-John, J.; Molassiotis, A. url  openurl
  Title Training in self-needling and performing it as part of a clinical trial: the practitioner and patient experience Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 3 Pages 210-216  
  Keywords CANCER -- Complications -- Treatment; FATIGUE -- Treatment; Acupuncture; ATTITUDE (Psychology); BREAST tumors; CONTENT analysis (Communication); FOCUS groups; Interviewing; RESEARCH -- Methodology; MEDICAL cooperation; MEDICAL personnel; Research; RESEARCH -- Finance; HEALTH self-care; QUALITATIVE research; TEACHING methods; THEMATIC analysis; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PATIENTS -- Attitudes; England  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the immediate effects of traditional local thermal therapy with indirect moxibustion on renal hemodynamics in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) by using Doppler ultrasonography (US). Design: Examiner-blinded crossover study. Participants: Forty-three participants with CKD (mean age ± standard deviation [SD], 44 ± 15 years; estimated glomerular filtration rate, 69.5 ± 25.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2; 20 men and 23 women). Intervention: Participants received three successive treatment sessions of indirect moxibustion bilaterally at BL 23, a crucial acupuncture point, in the session. In the control session, the examiner was blinded by using smoke and aroma produced by moxibustion performed in an ashtray placed near the patient's body. Outcome measures: The main outcome measure was resistive index (RI) in the renal segmental arteries. Blood flow parameters, including RI, were measured for six renal segmental arteries by using Doppler US at rest (baseline), immediately after completion of moxibustion (post 1), and 10 minutes later (post 2). Adverse events were monitored during intervention. Results: In the control session, RI at post 1 (median [first, third quartile]: 0.587 [0.562, 0.626]) and post 2 (0.583 [0.567, 0.629]) did not change significantly compared with baseline (0.592 [0.563, 0.636]), while in the treatment session, RI at post 1 (0.565 [0.530, 0.618]) and post 2 (0.561 [0.533, 0.614]) decreased significantly compared with baseline (0.590 [0.550, 0.652]) ( p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The reduction in RI from baseline to post 2 in treatment session was significantly greater than in control session (mean ± SD, ?0.026 ± 0.028 versus ?0.003 ± 0.028; mean difference, ?0.023 [95% confidence interval, ?0.036 to ?0.010]; p = 0.001]. No adverse events, such as burns, were observed during the study period. Conclusion: Renal vascular resistance was decreased after indirect moxibustion therapy in patients with CKD.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103624320; Source Information: Jun2015, Vol. 33 Issue 3, p210; Subject Term: CANCER -- Complications -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATIGUE -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: ATTITUDE (Psychology); Subject Term: BREAST tumors; Subject Term: CONTENT analysis (Communication); Subject Term: FOCUS groups; Subject Term: INTERVIEWING; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Methodology; Subject Term: MEDICAL cooperation; Subject Term: MEDICAL personnel; Subject Term: RESEARCH; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: QUALITATIVE research; Subject Term: TEACHING methods; Subject Term: THEMATIC analysis; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PATIENTS -- Attitudes; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: ENGLAND; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2300  
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Author (up) Bennell, K.L.; Buchbinder, R.; Hinman, R.S. openurl 
  Title Physical therapies in the management of osteoarthritis: current state of the evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Curr Opin Rheumatol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 304-311  
  Keywords  
  Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review considers the role of physical therapies in osteoarthritis management, highlighting key findings from systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials published in the last 2 years. RECENT FINDINGS: Three new trials question the role of manual therapy for hip and knee osteoarthritis. No between-group differences in outcome were detected between a multimodal programme including manual therapy and home exercise, and placebo in one trial; a second trial found no benefit of adding manual therapy to an exercise programme, while a third trial reported marginal benefits over usual care that were of doubtful importance. Recent trials have also found no or uncertain clinical benefits of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or acupuncture, or of valgus braces or lateral wedge insoles for pain and function in knee osteoarthritis. Available evidence suggests a small to moderate effect of exercise in comparison with not exercising for hip or knee osteoarthritis, although optimum exercise prescription and dosage are unclear. One trial also observed a delay in joint replacement in people with hip osteoarthritis. Two trials have reported conflicting findings about the effects of exercise for hand osteoarthritis. SUMMARY: Other than exercise, recent data suggest that the role of physical therapies in the treatment of osteoarthritis appears limited.  
  Address aCentre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne bDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University cMonash Department of C  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/27/2015; Priority: Normal; aCentre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne bDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University cMonash Department of C; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25775185 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1506  
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Author (up) Bezerra, A.G.; Pires, G.N.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.; Hachul, H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture to Treat Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-16  
  Keywords SLEEP disorders -- Treatment; SLEEP -- Evaluation; Acupuncture; ACUPUNCTURE points; COMPARATIVE studies; LONGITUDINAL method; CASE study (Research); Medline; ONLINE information services; RESEARCH -- Finance; SLEEP apnea syndromes; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Polysomnography; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; RESEARCH bias; Postmenopause  
  Abstract Sleep disorders are commonly observed among postmenopausal women, with negative effects on their quality of life. The search for complementary therapies for sleep disorders during postmenopausal period is of high importance, and acupuncture stands out as an appropriate possibility. The present review intended to systematically evaluate the available literature, compiling studies that have employed acupuncture as treatment to sleep disorders in postmenopausal women. A bibliographic search was performed in PubMed/Medline and Scopus. Articles which had acupuncture as intervention, sleep related measurements as outcomes, and postmenopausal women as target population were included and evaluated according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool and to the STRICTA guidelines. Out of 89 search results, 12 articles composed our final sample. A high heterogeneity was observed among these articles, which prevented us from performing a meta-analysis. Selected articles did not present high risk of bias and had a satisfactory compliance rate with STRICTA guidelines. In general, these studies presented improvements in sleep-related variables. Despite the overall positive effects, acupuncture still cannot be stated as a reliable treatment for sleep-related complaints, not due to inefficacy, but rather limited evidence. Nevertheless, results are promising and new comprehensive and controlled studies in the field are encouraged.  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109322047; Source Information: 8/23/2015, Vol. 2015, p1; Subject Term: SLEEP disorders -- Treatment; Subject Term: SLEEP -- Evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: COMPARATIVE studies; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: CASE study (Research); Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SLEEP apnea syndromes; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: POLYSOMNOGRAPHY; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: RESEARCH bias; Subject Term: POSTMENOPAUSE; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 16p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 3 Charts, 1 Graph; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2267  
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Author (up) Bezerra, A.G.; Pires, G.N.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.; Hachul, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture to Treat Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Climacteric; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Acupuncture; Insomnia; Women's Health  
  Abstract Sleep disorders are commonly observed among postmenopausal women, with negative effects on their quality of life. The search for complementary therapies for sleep disorders during postmenopausal period is of high importance, and acupuncture stands out as an appropriate possibility. The present review intended to systematically evaluate the available literature, compiling studies that have employed acupuncture as treatment to sleep disorders in postmenopausal women. A bibliographic search was performed in PubMed/Medline and Scopus. Articles which had acupuncture as intervention, sleep related measurements as outcomes, and postmenopausal women as target population were included and evaluated according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool and to the STRICTA guidelines. Out of 89 search results, 12 articles composed our final sample. A high heterogeneity was observed among these articles, which prevented us from performing a meta-analysis. Selected articles did not present high risk of bias and had a satisfactory compliance rate with STRICTA guidelines. In general, these studies presented improvements in sleep-related variables. Despite the overall positive effects, acupuncture still cannot be stated as a reliable treatment for sleep-related complaints, not due to inefficacy, but rather limited evidence. Nevertheless, results are promising and new comprehensive and controlled studies in the field are encouraged.  
  Address Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Napoleao de Barros 925, Vila Clementino, 04024-002 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment test Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26366181; PMCID:PMC4561166 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1930  
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Author (up) Bosch, P.; van den Noort, M.; Yeo, S.; Lim, S.; Coenen, A.; van Luijtelaar, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of acupuncture on mood and working memory in patients with depression and schizophrenia Type of Study
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 6 Pages 380-390  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; *Affect; Depression/*therapy; Female; Humans; Male; *Memory, Short-Term; Middle Aged; Schizophrenia/*therapy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In patients with depression, as well as in patients with schizophrenia, both mood and working memory performance are often impaired. Both issues can only be addressed and improved with medication to some extent. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the mood and the working memory performance in patients with depression or schizophrenia and whether acupuncture can improve these. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A pragmatic clinical trial design was used. The study was conducted in a psychiatric clinic. Fifty patients with depression and 50 with schizophrenia were randomly divided into an experimental and a waiting-list group. Additionally, 25 healthy control participants were included. Twelve weeks of individualized acupuncture treatment was used as the clinical intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All patients were tested before (T1) and after (T2) acupuncture treatment on a mood scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II), a simple working memory task (digit span), and a complex working memory task (letter-number sequencing); the healthy controls were tested at T1 only. RESULTS: Patients with depression scored worse than the others on the BDI-II, and patients with schizophrenia scored worse than the healthy controls. On the digit span, patients with schizophrenia did not differ from healthy controls whereas they scored worse of all on the letter-number sequencing. With respect to the acupuncture findings, first, the present study showed that the use of acupuncture to treat patients with schizophrenia was both practical and safe. Moreover, acupuncture had a positive effect on the BDI-II for the depression group, but acupuncture had no effect on the digit span and on the letter-number sequencing performance for the two clinical groups. CONCLUSION: The clinical improvement in patients with depression after acupuncture treatment was not accompanied by any significant change in a simple working memory task or in a more complex working memory task; the same was true for the patients with schizophrenia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register NTR3132.  
  Address Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 HR Nijmegen, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26559363 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2014  
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Author (up) Bosch, P.; van den, N. oort M.; Staudte, H.; Lim, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Schizophrenia and Depression: A systematic Review of the Effectiveness and the Working Mechanisms Behind Acupuncture Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Explore (NY) Abbreviated Journal Explore  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 281-291  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Schizophrenia; Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This systematic review assessed clinical evidence for the use of acupuncture as an add-on treatment in patients with depression and schizophrenia and for its underlying working mechanisms. DATA SOURCES: Four databases (Medline, Scopus, ERIC, and the Cochrane Library) were searched with a cutoff date of March 31, 2014. STUDY SELECTION: Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of acupuncture treatment for depression and schizophrenia were considered for inclusion. The scarcity of acupuncture research involving schizophrenia led to the inclusion of randomized controlled trials and case studies. DATA EXTRACTION: The primary and secondary aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of acupuncture in treating patients with depression or schizophrenia and the possible working mechanisms underlying acupuncture through a systematic literature review. DATA SYNTHESIS: The overall clinical results on using acupuncture to treat depression are promising, but only limited evidence for its effectiveness in treating schizophrenia was found. Acupuncture improves the quality of life, particularly that of sleep, in psychiatric patients. Brain research has revealed that acupuncture has a modulating and normalizing effect on the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN), including the default mode network. Because the LPNN is related to sleep and emotions, this might explain the improved qualities of life and sleep after acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: From the evidence found in this study, acupuncture seems to be an effective add-on treatment in patients with depression and, to a lesser degree, in patients with schizophrenia, but large well-designed studies are needed to confirm that evidence.  
  Address Center for Cognition, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen, Postbus 9104, Montessorilaan 3, Nijmegen 6525 HR, The Netherlands  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1611  
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Author (up) Cafaro, A.; Arduino, P.G.; Gambino, A.; Romagnoli, E.; Broccoletti, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of laser acupuncture on salivary flow rate in patients with Sjögren's syndrome Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Lasers in Medical Science Abbreviated Journal Lasers Med Sci  
  Volume 30 Issue 6 Pages 1805-1809  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by hypofunction of the salivary and lacrimal glands, frequently relieved with symptomatic treatments, such as saliva substitutes, eye lubricants, and cholinergic stimulators. The aim of this pilot randomized placebo-controlled study was to estimate the effects of laser acupuncture on salivary flow rates in patients with severe hyposalivation due to SS. A prospective cohort of 26 female patients affected by SS has been evaluated. The laser therapy equipment used was the Pointer Pulse, emitting light in the red visible spectrum (650 nm), with a power of 5 mW and an irradiation time of 120 s per acupoint, in an area of 3.14 mm(2) (fluence?=?19.2 J/cm(2), power density?=?0.16 W/cm(2), total dose?=?0.6 J). The following acupuncture points were stimulated bilaterally: LI 2 Erjian, ST 5 Daying, ST 6 Jiache, ST 7 Xiaguan, SI 19 Tinggong, and BL 13 Feishu. True laser acupuncture led to a significantly higher amount of saliva production, measured after the end of the protocol (5 weeks), and during the 6-month follow-up period. The results are stable from the end of the protocol until the 3rd month of follow-up; during the last control, a slight but significant decrease in production has also been shown. This preliminary study proposes laser acupuncture as a possible treatment for improving salivary flow rates in patients with SS, but further validation on a larger sample is still necessary.  
  Address  
  Publisher Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109612331. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20160801. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Continental Europe; Europe. Special Interest: Perioperative Care. NLM UID: 8611515. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109612331 Serial 2316  
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Author (up) Cagnie, B.; Castelein, B.; Pollie, F.; Steelant, L.; Verhoeyen, H.; Cools, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for the Use of Ischemic Compression and Dry Needling in the Management of Trigger Points of the Upper Trapezius in Patients with Neck Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation / Association of Academic Physiatrists Abbreviated Journal Am J Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Neck Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acupuncture; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Dry Needling; Ischemic Compression  
  Abstract The aim of this review was to describe the effects of ischemic compression and dry needling on trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle in patients with neck pain and compare these two interventions with other therapeutic interventions aiming to inactivate trigger points. Both PubMed and Web of Science were searched for randomized controlled trials using different key word combinations related to myofascial neck pain and therapeutic interventions. Four main outcome parameters were evaluated on short and medium term: pain, range of motion, functionality, and quality-of-life, including depression. Fifteen randomized controlled trials were included in this systematic review. There is moderate evidence for ischemic compression and strong evidence for dry needling to have a positive effect on pain intensity. This pain decrease is greater compared with active range of motion exercises (ischemic compression) and no or placebo intervention (ischemic compression and dry needling) but similar to other therapeutic approaches. There is moderate evidence that both ischemic compression and dry needling increase side-bending range of motion, with similar effects compared with lidocaine injection. There is weak evidence regarding its effects on functionality and quality-of-life. On the basis of this systematic review, ischemic compression and dry needling can both be recommended in the treatment of neck pain patients with trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Additional research with high-quality study designs are needed to develop more conclusive evidence  
  Address From the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1717  
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Author (up) Calamita, S.A.P.; Biasotto-Gonzalez, D.A.; De Melo, N.C.; Dos Santos, D.M.; de Lassa, R.; de Mendonça, F.S.; Oliveira, C.S.; Amorim, C.F.; Gonzalez, T.O.; Fumagalli, M.A.; de Gomes, C.A.F.P.; Politti, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trials Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 100-100  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Nonspecific neck pain can cause considerable suffering, possible disability and reductions in quality of life and productivity. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain.Methods/design: A total of 12 patients with nonspecific neck pain and 12 healthy subjects will be enrolled in a randomized, single-blind crossover study. Each subject will receive two forms of treatment in random order: a single session of traditional acupuncture (acupoints: triple energizer 5, 'Wai-guan' and large intestine 11, 'Qu-chi') and sham acupuncture. To eliminate carry-over treatment effects, a one-week wash-out period will be respected between sessions. Surface electromyography will be used to determine motor control in the upper trapezius muscle before and after treatment. The outcome measures in the group with neck pain will be a numerical pain rating scale (range: 0 (no pain) to 10 (maximum pain)), documentation of the pain area on a body chart and cervical range of motion. Comparisons before and after acupuncture treatment will demonstrate whether acupoints affect the activity of the upper trapezius muscle, pain and cervical range of motion.Discussion: The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain. Data will be published after the study is completed. The study will support the practice of evidence-based physical therapy for individuals with nonspecific neck pain.Trial Registration: This trial was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT0984021 ) on 7 November 2013 ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01984021 ).  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109721586. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20161223. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101263253. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109721586 Serial 2344  
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Author (up) Chai, Q.; Fei, Y.; Cao, H.; Wang, C.; Tian, J.; Liu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for melasma in women: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 33 Issue Pages 254-261  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Systematic Review; Skin Diseases; Melanosis; Melasma; Chloasma; Freckles; Women's Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Melasma is a common facial skin disorder seen in women. Manual acupuncture (MA) is widely used alone or in combination with conventional treatments for melasma in China. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of MA for melasma, and explore the range of treatments applied. METHODS: Six databases were searched systematically for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on acupuncture for melasma in women up to November 2014. RevMan software was used for data analysis. The Cochrane tool of Risk of Bias was used to assess the methodological quality of the RCTs. RESULTS: Eight RCTs involving 587 women were included. Seven studies used the encircling needling method, four studies used the quick needling method and four studies used intensive needle manipulations. Five studies provided individualised acupuncture treatments. Points used with highest frequency were SP6, ST36 and SP10. MA was compared with oral tranexamic acid, vitamin C and E, vitamin C and tamoxifen, topical 20% azelaic acid, hydroquinone, vitamin A and no treatment. Studies were too heterogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis. For global outcome measures, seven trials showed that MA groups were significantly better than the conventional treatments either with a better cure rate or with a better combined cure rate and markedly effective rate, and one trial did not (MA vs vitamin A). No acupuncture-related adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: MA appeared to be beneficial and safe for women with melasma, but insufficient evidence was found to reach conclusions. The encircling needling method, the quick needling method, intensive needle manipulations and individualised points' selection were widely used. Well-designed trials are required. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO Systematic review registration: CRD42013006396.  
  Address Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China  
  Publisher Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/gro
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Melanosis
  Disease Category Skin Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1600  
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Author (up) Chan, Y.Y.; Lo, W.Y.; Yang, S.N.; Chen, Y.H.; Lin, J.G. doi  openurl
  Title The benefit of combined acupuncture and antidepressant medication for depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Affect Disord Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 176 Issue Pages 106-117  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Meta-Analysis; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Acupuncture, one of the most popular complementary therapies, is best known for its ability to provide pain relief. Accumulating evidence suggests that acupuncture may also be beneficial in depression, although its effectiveness remains uncertain in this condition. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized trials in which the effects of acupuncture combined with antidepressant medications were compared with those of antidepressant medications alone in adults with a diagnosed depressive disorder. Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving 1046 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. Our results confirmed that the pooled standardized mean difference of the 'endpoint scores of the 17-item Hamilton rating scale for depression' was -3.74 (95% CI, -4.77 to -2.70, p<0.001) in week 1 and -2.52 (95% CI, -4.12 to -0.92; p<0.01) in week 6, indicating a significant difference in favor of acupuncture combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Moreover, therapeutic response rates were statistically significantly different between the two groups (risk ratio [RR], 1.23; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.39; p<0.001; I2=68%) in favor of the combined treatment group. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that acupuncture combined with antidepressant medication is effective, has an early onset of action, safe and well-tolerated over the first 6-week treatment period. Moreover, this treatment combination appears to result in greater therapeutic efficacy than SSRI therapy alone. More high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the clinical benefit and long-term effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of depression.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Taoyuan Armed Forces Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/7/2015; Date Modified: 5/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Depressive Disorder; Department of Psychiatry, Taoyuan Armed Forces Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25704563 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1713  
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Author (up) Changhe Yu; Kangshou Ji; Huijuan Cao; Ying Wang; Hwang Hye Jin; Zhe Zhang; Guanlin Yang url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bmc Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 1-22  
  Keywords Randomized Controlled Trials; Acupuncture; Angina Pectoris -- Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Descriptive Statistics; Relative Risk; Confidence Intervals; Meta Analysis; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Chi Square Test; Data Analysis Software; Middle Age; Male; Female; Adult; Aged  
  Abstract Background: The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris. Methods: Eleven electronic databases were searched until January 2013. The study included randomized controlled trials that the effectiveness of acupuncture alone was compared to anti-angina medicines (in addition to conventional treatment) and the effectiveness of a combination of acupuncture plus anti-angina medicines was compared to anti-angina medicines alone. The trial selection, data extraction, quality assessment and data analytic procedures outlined in the 2011 Cochrane Handbook were involved. Results: The study included 25 randomized controlled trials (involving 2,058 patients) that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled results showed that the number of patients with ineffectiveness of angina relief was less in the combined acupuncture-anti-angina treatment group than in the anti-angina medicines alone group (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.23-0.47, p < 0.00001, I2 = 0%). Similarly, compared to the anti-angina medicines alone group, fewer patients in the combined treatment group showed no ECG improvement (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.40-0.62, p < 0.00001, I2 = 0%). However, no differences were observed between acupuncture treatment alone and anti-angina medicines alone for both outcome measures. Only four trials mentioned adverse effects. One trial found no significant difference between acupuncture and Chinese medicine, and three reported no adverse events. The quality of the trials was found to be low. Conclusions: The findings showed very low evidence to support the use of acupuncture for improving angina symptoms and ECG of angina patients. However, the quality of the trials included in this study was low. Large and rigorously designed trials are needed to confirm the potential benefit and adverse events of acupuncture.  
  Address Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shenyang, Liaoning, China  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103807220. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150605. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101088661. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103807220 Serial 2319  
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