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Author (up) Abbaszadeh-Amirdehi, M.; Ansari, N.N.; Naghdi, S.; Olyaei, G.; Nourbakhsh, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effects of dry needling in patients with upper trapezius myofascial trigger points Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Myofascial Pain; Neurophysiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Active myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are major pain generators in myofascial pain syndrome. Dry needling (DN) is an effective method for the treatment of MTrPs. OBJECTIVE: To assess the immediate neurophysiological and clinical effects of DN in patients with upper trapezius MTrPs. METHODS: This was a prospective, clinical trial study of 20 patients with upper trapezius MTrPs and 20 healthy volunteers (matched for height, weight, body mass index and age), all of whom received one session of DN. Primary outcome measures were neuromuscular junction response (NMJR) and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Secondary outcomes were pain intensity (PI) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). Data were collected at baseline and immediately post-intervention. RESULTS: At baseline, SSR amplitude was higher in patients versus healthy volunteers (p<0.003). With respect to NMJR, a clinically abnormal increment and normal reduction was observed in patients and healthy volunteers, respectively. Moreover, PPT of patients was less than healthy volunteers (p<0.0001). After DN, SSR amplitude decreased significantly in patients (p<0.01), but did not change in healthy volunteers. A clinically important reduction in the NMJR of patients and increment in healthy volunteers was demonstrated after DN. PPT increased after DN in patients, but decreased in healthy volunteers (p<0.0001). PI improved after DN in patients (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study showed that one session of DN targeting active MTrPs appears to reduce hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and irritability of the motor endplate. DN seems effective at improving symptoms and deactivating active MTrPs, although further research is needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: IRCT20130316128.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Georgia, Dehlonega, Georgia, USA  
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  Notes PMID:27697768 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2145  
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Author (up) Arab, Z.; Shariati, A.R.; Asayesh, H.; Vakili, M.A.; Bahrami-Taghanaki, H.; Azizi, H. url  openurl
  Title A sham-controlled trial of acupressure on the quality of sleep and life in haemodialysis patients Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 34 Issue 1 Pages 2-6  
  Keywords Acupressure; ANALYSIS of variance; CHI-squared test; CORRELATION (Statistics); HEALTH surveys; Hemodialysis; QUALITY assurance; QUALITY of life; Questionnaires; RESEARCH -- Finance; Sleep; SLEEP disorders; Statistics; DATA analysis; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; DATA analysis -- Software; MANN Whitney U Test; KRUSKAL-Wallis Test  
  Abstract Background Sleep disorder in haemodialysis patients can lead to disturbance in their psychosocial function and interpersonal relations, and reduced quality of life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of acupressure on the quality of sleep of haemodialysis patients. Methods In a randomised controlled trial, 108 haemodialysis patients were randomly divided into three groups: true acupressure, placebo acupressure, and no treatment. The two acupressure groups received treatment three times a week for 4 weeks during dialysis. Routine care only was provided for the no treatment group. The main study outcome was sleep quality. Results The total Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score decreased significantly from 11.9±3.13 to 6.2±1.93 in the true acupressure group, from 11.3±3.69 to 10.6±3.82 in the sham acupressure group, and from 10.9±4.10 to 10.7±3.94 in the no treatment group. There was a significant difference between groups (p<0.001). Conclusions Acupressure seems to have a positive effect on the sleep quality in haemodialysis patients.  
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  Notes Accession Number: 113683039; Source Information: Feb2016, Vol. 34 Issue 1, p2; Subject Term: ACUPRESSURE; Subject Term: ANALYSIS of variance; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CORRELATION (Statistics); Subject Term: HEALTH surveys; Subject Term: HEMODIALYSIS; Subject Term: QUALITY assurance; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: QUESTIONNAIRES; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SLEEP; Subject Term: SLEEP disorders; Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: KRUSKAL-Wallis Test; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 5p; ; Illustrations: 5 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2261  
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Author (up) Arias-Buria, J.L.; Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, C.; Palacios-Cena, M.; Koppenhaver, S.L.; Salom-Moreno, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exercises and Dry Needling for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Pain : Official Journal of the American Pain Society Abbreviated Journal J Pain  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Subacromial pain syndrome; dry needling; exercise; trigger point  
  Abstract This randomized clinical trial investigated the effectiveness of exercise versus exercise plus trigger point (TrP) dry needling (TrP-DN) in subacromial pain syndrome. A randomized parallel-group trial, with 1-year follow-up was conducted. Fifty subjects with subacromial pain syndrome were randomly allocated to receive exercise alone or exercise plus TrP-DN. Participants in both groups were asked to perform an exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice daily for 5 weeks. Further, patients allocated to the exercise plus TrP-DN group also received dry needling to active TrPs in the muscles reproducing shoulder symptoms during the second and fourth sessions. The primary outcome was pain-related disability assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included mean current pain and the worst pain experienced in the shoulder during the previous week. They were assessed at baseline, 1 week, and 3, 6, and 12 months after the end of treatment. Analysis was according to intention to treat with mixed analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline outcomes. At 12 months, 47 patients (94%) completed follow-up. Statistically larger improvements (all, P < .01) in shoulder disability was found for the exercise plus TrP-DN group at all follow-up periods (post: Delta -20.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) -23.8 to -17.4]; 3 months: Delta -23.2 [95% CI -28.3 to -18.1)]; 6 months: Delta -23.6 [95% CI -28.9 to -18.3]; 12 months: Delta -13.9 [95% CI -17.5 to -10.3]). Both groups exhibited similar improvements in shoulder pain outcomes at all follow-up periods. The inclusion of TrP-DN with an exercise program was effective for improving disability in subacromial pain syndrome. No greater improvements in shoulder pain were observed. PERSPECTIVE: This study found that the inclusion of 2 sessions of TrP-DN into an exercise program was effective for improving shoulder pain-related disability at short-, medium-, and long-term; however, no greater improvement in shoulder pain was observed.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, Universidad Francisco de Vitoria, Madrid, Spain; Catedra de Investigacion y Docencia en Fisioterapia, Terapia Manual y Puncion Seca, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcon, Spain  
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  Notes PMID:27720812 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2143  
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Author (up) Asheghan, M.; Aghda, A.K.; Hashemi, E.; Hollisaz, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Investigation Of The Effectiveness Of Acupuncture In The Treatment Of Frozen Shoulder Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Materia Socio-Medica Abbreviated Journal Mater Sociomed  
  Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 253-257  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Frozen Shoulder; Physiotherapy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Adhesive capsulitis is a common disease that causes pain and reduced range of motion, but vague on the shoulder. Woman are affected fewer than men, but there is no known racial or genetic tendency. Most patients with adhesive capsulitis will improve with nonsurgical treatment. Acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief in patients without contraindication are first-line options. Acupuncture considered being safe and effective in reducing pain. The aim of this study was to Investigation of the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of frozen shoulder. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a controlled clinical trial, patients referred to the Baqiatallah clinic in 91 years with shoulder pain, frozen shoulder diagnosed based on history and physical exam, they have been enrolled. Indicators measured in the study was included the involved joint pain, range of motion and quality of life. Patients, first at baseline, one and a half months later (end of session) and then 3 months after the examination information about each individual entered in the from of questionnaires were pre-determined and data were analyzed by SPSS 17 software. RESULTS: In this clinical trial study total 40 patients with frozen shoulder (20 interference with the acupuncture and 20 people control) study that patients average age 55/54. Age maximum 71 years and minimum 44 years. Acupuncture in the treatment of frozen shoulder with the results achieved in the general case acupuncture may improve shoulder motion in patients. VAS index at three months after treatment compared with the control group had a greater improvement. CONCLUSION: In the case of acupuncture and ultimately improve the overall look of all the movement of flexion and adduction of the shoulder, but the movement has been further improved, VAS index at three months after treatment compared with the control group had a greater improvement and finally, we perform acupuncture as a way to improve shoulder motion in patients with frozen shoulder offered.  
  Address Baqyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
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  Notes PMID:27698596; PMCID:PMC5034968 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2150  
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Author (up) Baker, T.E.; Chang, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The use of auricular acupuncture in opioid use disorder: A systematic literature review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The American Journal on Addictions Abbreviated Journal Am J Addict  
  Volume 25 Issue 8 Pages 592-602  
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  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic disease with significant personal, societal, and public health consequences. Even for the minority who receive the most effective evidence-based treatments, morbidity, and mortality remain significant. These facts, along with the recovery movement calling for individualized, holistic, culturally sensitive care, have led to the exploration of adjunctive interventions including acupuncture. Despite hundreds of international trials, however, there is a lack of consensus regarding its efficacy in OUD due in large part to methodological issues of trials to date. In response to these issues, the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) developed an operationalized manual auricular acupuncture protocol that has since become the most widely used in the US. This systematic review is the first to focus explicitly on randomized trials utilizing the NADA protocol as a complementary intervention to address OUD. METHODS: The methods utilized to identify studies for inclusion are based on a 2009 protocol developed by the Cochrane Collaboration. RESULTS: Four trials met inclusion criteria. Despite methodological issues, results indicate that while the NADA protocol may not be effective in reducing acute opiate craving or withdrawal, it may be effectively utilized as an adjunctive treatment to increase treatment retention and decrease methadone detoxification and maintenance dosages in OUD. CONCLUSION AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: Incorporation of the NADA protocol into existing evidence-based treatment approaches may facilitate recovery and, through its impact on treatment retention and completion, indirectly impact morbidity, and mortality in individuals with OUD. Given the limitations of the current review, conclusions are tentative and directions for future research are discussed. (Am J Addict 2016;25:592-602).  
  Address Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts  
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  Notes PMID:28051842 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2178  
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Author (up) Betts, D.; Smith, C.A.; Dahlen, H.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does acupuncture have a role in the treatment of threatened miscarriage? Findings from a feasibility randomised trial and semi-structured participant interviews Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth Abbreviated Journal BMC Pregnancy Childbirth  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 298  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Feasibility study; Mixed methods; Randomised controlled trial; Supportive care; Threatened miscarriage  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Threatened miscarriage is a common complication of early pregnancy increasing the risk of miscarriage or premature labour. Currently there is limited evidence to recommend any biomedical pharmacological or self-care management, resulting in a 'watchful waiting' approach. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of offering acupuncture as a therapeutic treatment for women presenting with threatened miscarriage. METHODS: A mixed methods study involving a randomised controlled trial and semi structured interviews. A pragmatic acupuncture protocol including medical self-care advice was compared to an active control receiving touch intervention and medical self-care advice. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the demographic and baseline characteristics. Endpoints were analysed between groups using a mean t-test and chi-square tests with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Dichotomous data was expressed as Risk Ratio with 95 % confidence intervals. Eleven participants were purposively interviewed about their experiences on exiting the trial with interviews analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Forty women were successfully randomised. For women receiving acupuncture there was a statically significant reduction with threatened miscarriage symptoms including bleeding, cramping and back pain compared with the control (p = 0.04). Thematic analysis revealed women were dissatisfied with the medical support and advice received. An overarching theme emerged from the data of 'finding something you can do.' This encompassed the themes: 'they said there was nothing they could do,' 'feeling the benefits' and 'managing while marking time.' CONCLUSION: Acupuncture was a feasible intervention and reduced threatened miscarriage symptoms when compared to a touch intervention. Further research is required to further explore acupuncture use for this common complication and whether it can reduce the incidence of miscarriage. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), ACTRN12610000850077 . Date of registration 12/10/2010. Retrospectively registered, with first participant enrolled 11/10/2012.  
  Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia  
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  Notes PMID:27717319; PMCID:PMC5055689 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2144  
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Author (up) Bi, J.-Q.; Li, W.; Yang, Q.; Li, B.-lin; Meng, Q.-G.; Liu, Y.-fu url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Oculomotor Paralysis: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-6  
  Keywords OCULOMOTOR paralysis -- Treatment; Acupuncture; JOINTS (Anatomy) -- Range of motion; PILOT projects; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness; TREATMENT duration (Medical care); China  
  Abstract Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Publishing Corporation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
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  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
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  Notes Accession Number: 115602031; Source Information: 5/24/2016, p1; Subject Term: OCULOMOTOR paralysis -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: JOINTS (Anatomy) -- Range of motion; Subject Term: PILOT projects; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: TREATMENT duration (Medical care); Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 6p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 2 Charts, 2 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2246  
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Author (up) Boelig, R.C.; Barton, S.J.; Saccone, G.; Kelly, A.J.; Edwards, S.J.; Berghella, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Interventions for treating hyperemesis gravidarum Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 5 Pages  
  Keywords Pregnancy Complications; Hyperemesis Gravidarum; Women's Health; Systematic Review; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Hyperemesis gravidarum is a severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy affecting 0.3% to 1.0% of pregnancies, and is one of the most common indications for hospitalization during pregnancy. While a previous Cochrane review examined interventions for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, there has not yet been a review examining the interventions for the more severe condition of hyperemesis gravidarum. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety, of all interventions for hyperemesis gravidarum in pregnancy up to 20 weeks' gestation. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field's Trials Register (20 December 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials of any intervention for hyperemesis gravidarum. Quasi-randomized trials and trials using a cross-over design were not eligible for inclusion.We excluded trials on nausea and vomiting of pregnancy that were not specifically studying the more severe condition of hyperemesis gravidarum. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently reviewed the eligibility of trials, extracted data and evaluated the risk of bias. Data were checked for accuracy. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-five trials (involving 2052 women) met the inclusion criteria but the majority of 18 different comparisons described in the review include data from single studies with small numbers of participants. The comparisons covered a range of interventions including acupressure/acupuncture, outpatient care, intravenous fluids, and various pharmaceutical interventions. The methodological quality of included studies was mixed. For selected important comparisons and outcomes, we graded the quality of the evidence and created 'Summary of findings' tables. For most outcomes the evidence was graded as low or very low quality mainly due to the imprecision of effect estimates. Comparisons included in the 'Summary of findings' tables are described below, the remaining comparisons are described in detail in the main text.No primary outcome data were available when acupuncture was compared with placebo, There was no clear evidence of differences between groups for anxiodepressive symptoms (risk ratio (RR) 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73 to 1.40; one study, 36 women, very low-quality evidence), spontaneous abortion (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.05 to 5.03; one study, 57 women, low-quality evidence), preterm birth (RR 0.12, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.26; one study, 36 women, low-quality evidence), or perinatal death (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.04 to 8.30; one study, 36 women, low-quality evidence). There was insufficient evidence to identify clear differences between acupuncture and metoclopramide in a study with 81 participants regarding reduction/cessation in nausea or vomiting (RR 1.40, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.49 and RR 1.51, 95% CI 0.92 to 2.48, respectively; very low-quality evidence). In a study with 92 participants, women taking vitamin B6 had a slightly longer hospital stay compared with placebo (mean difference (MD) 0.80 days, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.52, moderate-quality evidence). There was insufficient evidence to demonstrate a difference in other outcomes including mean number of episodes of emesis (MD 0.50, 95% CI -0.40 to 1.40, low-quality evidence) or side effects.A comparison between metoclopramide and ondansetron identified no clear difference in the severity of nausea or vomiting (MD 1.70, 95% CI -0.15 to 3.55, and MD -0.10, 95% CI -1.63 to 1.43; one study, 83 women, respectively, very low-quality evidence). However, more women taking metoclopramide complained of drowsiness and dry mouth (RR 2.40, 95% CI 1.23 to 4.69, and RR 2.38, 95% CI 1.10 to 5.11, respectively; moderate-quality evidence). There were no clear differences between groups for other side effects.In a single study with 146 participants comparing metoclopramide with promethazine, more women taking promethazine reported drowsiness, dizziness, and dystonia (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.87, RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.69, and RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.90, respectively, moderate-quality evidence). There were no clear differences between groups for other important outcomes including quality of life and other side effects.In a single trial with 30 women, those receiving ondansetron had no difference in duration of hospital admission compared to those receiving promethazine (MD 0.00, 95% CI -1.39 to 1.39, very low-quality evidence), although there was increased sedation with promethazine (RR 0.06, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.94, low-quality evidence). Regarding corticosteroids, in a study with 110 participants there was no difference in days of hospital admission compared to placebo (MD -0.30, 95% CI -0.70 to 0.10; very low-quality evidence), but there was a decreased readmission rate (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.94; four studies, 269 women). For other important outcomes including pregnancy complications, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and congenital abnormalities, there was insufficient evidence to identify differences between groups (very low-quality evidence for all outcomes). In other single studies there were no clear differences between groups for preterm birth or side effects (very low-quality evidence). For hydrocortisone compared with metoclopramide, no data were available for primary outcomes and there was no difference in the readmission rate (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.00 to 1.28; one study, 40 women). In a study with 80 women, compared to promethazine, those receiving prednisolone had increased nausea at 48 hours (RR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.72; low-quality evidence), but not at 17 days (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.15, very low-quality evidence). There was no clear difference in the number of episodes of emesis or subjective improvement in nausea/vomiting. There was insufficient evidence to identify differences between groups for stillbirth and neonatal death and preterm birth. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of this review, there is little high-quality and consistent evidence supporting any one intervention, which should be taken into account when making management decisions. There was also very limited reporting on the economic impact of hyperemesis gravidarum and the impact that interventions may have.The limitations in interpreting the results of the included studies highlights the importance of consistency in the definition of hyperemesis gravidarum, the use of validated outcome measures, and the need for larger placebo-controlled trials.  
  Address Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Thomas Jefferson University, 833 Chestnut Street, Level 1, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, PA 19107  
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  Time in Treatment Condition Hyperemesis Gravidarum
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27168518 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2058  
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Author (up) Chen, H.; Ning, Z.; Lam, W.L.; Lam, W.-Y.; Zhao, Y.K.; Yeung, J.W.F.; Ng, B.F.-L.; Ziea, E.T.-C.; Lao, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Types of Control in Acupuncture Clinical Trials Might Affect the Conclusion of the Trials: A Review of Acupuncture on Pain Management Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages 227-233  
  Keywords acupuncture; control; pain; randomized controlled trial  
  Abstract Analgesic effects of acupuncture have been extensively studied in various clinical trials. However, the conclusion remains controversial, even among large scale randomized controlled trials. This study aimed to evaluate the association between the conclusion of the trials and the types of control used in those trials via systematic review. Published randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for pain were retrieved from electronic databases (Medline, AMED, Cochrane libraries, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Clinicaltrials.gov, and CAB Abstracts) using a prespecified search strategy. One hundred and thirty-nine studies leading to 166 pairs of acupuncture-control treatment effect comparisons (26 studies comprised of 53 intervention-control pairs) were analyzed based on the proportion of positive conclusions in different control designs. We found that treatment effects of acupuncture compared with nontreatment controls had the highest tendency to yield a positive conclusion (84.3%), compared with nonneedle-insertion controls (53.3%). Whereas with needle-insertion controls, the lowest tendency of positive conclusions was observed (37.8%). Consistently, in studies reporting successful blinding, a higher tendency of positive findings on the treatment effect of acupuncture was found in the noninsertion sham controls compared with that in the insertion sham controls. We conclude that the type of control is likely to affect the conclusion in acupuncture analgesic trials. Appropriate control should be chosen according to the aims of studies.  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Department of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, China. Electronic address: lxlao1@hku.hk  
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  Notes PMID:27776760 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2130  
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Author (up) Chi, L.-M.; Lin, L.-M.; Chen, C.-L.; Wang, S.-F.; Lai, H.-L.; Peng, T.-C. url  openurl
  Title The Effectiveness of Cupping Therapy on Relieving Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords CHRONIC pain -- Treatment; NECK pain -- Treatment; SHOULDER pain -- Treatment; ACUPUNCTURE points; BLOOD pressure; Moxibustion; PAIN measurement; SKIN temperature; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; VISUAL analog scale; TREATMENT effectiveness; BLIND experiment  
  Abstract The research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cupping therapy (CT) in changes on skin surface temperature (SST) for relieving chronic neck and shoulder pain (NSP) among community residents. A single-blind experimental design constituted of sixty subjects with self-perceived NSP. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. The cupping group received CT at SI 15, GB 21, and LI 15 acupuncture points, and the control group received no intervention. Pain was assessed using the SST, visual analog scale (VAS), and blood pressure (BP). The main results were SST of GB 21 acupuncture point raised from 30.6°C to 32.7°C and from 30.7°C to 30.6°C in the control group. Neck pain intensity (NPI) severity scores were reduced from 9.7 to 3.6 in the cupping group and from 9.7 to 9.5 in the control group. The SST and NPI differences between the groups were statistically significant (P?<?0.001). One treatment of CT is shown to increase SST. In conjunction with the physiological effect the subjective experience of NSP is reduced in intensity. Further studies are required to improve the understanding and potential long-term effects of CT.  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
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  Notes Accession Number: 113832933; Source Information: 3/17/2016, p1; Subject Term: CHRONIC pain -- Treatment; Subject Term: NECK pain -- Treatment; Subject Term: SHOULDER pain -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: BLOOD pressure; Subject Term: MOXIBUSTION; Subject Term: PAIN measurement; Subject Term: SKIN temperature; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: VISUAL analog scale; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: BLIND experiment; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 2 Charts, 3 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2293  
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Author (up) Chiu, H.Y.; Hsieh, Y.J.; Tsai, P.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture to reduce cancer-related pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Cancer Care Abbreviated Journal Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords acupuncture; cancer-related pain; meta-analysis  
  Abstract We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on malignancy-related, chemotherapy (CT)- or radiation therapy (RT)-induced, surgery-induced, and hormone therapy (HT)-induced pain. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of acupuncture on cancer-related pain were reached from the EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Airiti library, Taiwan Electrical Periodical Service, Wanfang Data (a Chinese database) and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database from inception through June 2014. Heterogeneity, moderator analysis, publication bias and risk of bias associated with the included studies were examined. A total of 29 RCTs yielding 36 effect sizes were included. The overall effect of acupuncture on cancer-related pain was -0.45 [95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.63 to -0.26]. The subanalysis indicated that acupuncture relieved malignancy-related and surgery-induced pain [effect size (g) = -0.71, and -0.40; 95% CI = -0.94 to -0.48, and -0.69 to -0.10] but not CT- or RT-induced and HT-induced pain (g = -0.05, and -0.64, 95% CI = -0.33 to 0.24, and -1.55 to 0.27). Acupuncture is effective in relieving cancer-related pain, particularly malignancy-related and surgery-induced pain. Our findings suggest that acupuncture can be adopted as part of a multimodal approach for reducing cancer-related pain.  
  Address School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan  
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  Notes PMID:26853524 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2001  
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Author (up) Choi, K.-H.; Kwon, O.S.; Cho, S.J.; Lee, S.; Kang, S.-Y.; Ahn, S.H.; Ryu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating Acupuncture Point and Nonacupuncture Point Stimulation with EEG: A High-Frequency Power Spectrum Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2016 Issue Pages 2134364  
  Keywords  
  Abstract To identify physical and sensory responses to acupuncture point stimulation (APS), nonacupuncture point stimulation (NAPS) and no stimulation (NS), changes in the high-frequency power spectrum before and after stimulation were evaluated with electroencephalography (EEG). A total of 37 healthy subjects received APS at the LI4 point, NAPS, or NS with their eyes closed. Background brain waves were measured before, during, and after stimulation using 8 channels. Changes in the power spectra of gamma waves and high beta waves before, during, and after stimulation were comparatively analyzed. After NAPS, absolute high beta power (AHBP), relative high beta power (RHBP), absolute gamma power (AGP), and relative gamma power (RGP) tended to increase in all channels. But no consistent notable changes were found for APS and NS. NAPS is believed to cause temporary reactions to stress, tension, and sensory responses of the human body, while APS responds stably compared to stimulation of other parts of the body.  
  Address KM Fundamental Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 1672 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811, Republic of Korea  
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  Notes PMID:27818695; PMCID:PMC5081448 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2119  
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Author (up) Cochrane, S.; Smith, C.A.; Possamai-Inesedy, A.; Bensoussan, A. url  openurl
  Title Prior to Conception: The Role of an Acupuncture Protocol in Improving Women’s Reproductive Functioning Assessed by a Pilot Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords Acupuncture; BEHAVIOR modification; Conception; CONFIDENCE intervals; Fertility; HEALTH behavior; MENSTRUAL cycle; REPRODUCTIVE health; PILOT projects; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; RELATIVE risk (Medicine); NEW South Wales  
  Abstract Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Publishing Corporation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
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  Notes Accession Number: 115089443; Source Information: 5/3/2016, p1; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: BEHAVIOR modification; Subject Term: CONCEPTION; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: FERTILITY; Subject Term: HEALTH behavior; Subject Term: MENSTRUAL cycle; Subject Term: REPRODUCTIVE health; Subject Term: PILOT projects; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: RELATIVE risk (Medicine); Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: NEW South Wales; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 11p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 5 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2257  
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Author (up) Cui, X.; Zhou, J.; Qin, Z.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Erectile Dysfunction: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication BioMed Research International Abbreviated Journal Biomed Res Int  
  Volume 2016 Issue Pages 2171923  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Male; Erectile Dysfunction; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Background. Acupuncture is increasingly used to treat patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), and our systematic review aimed to evaluate the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in treating ED. Methods. An electronic search was conducted in eight databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for treating erectile dysfunction that were published in English and Chinese. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias. Results. Three RCTs with a total of 183 participants met the inclusion criteria. One trial showed the beneficial effects of acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture while the others did not. One trial suggested that acupuncture combined with psychological therapy was superior to psychological therapy alone. However, the overall methodological and reporting quality of the studies was low. The safety of acupuncture for ED was unclear because there were too few reports on this topic. Conclusion. The available evidence supporting that acupuncture alone improves ED was insufficient and the available studies failed to show the specific therapeutic effect of acupuncture. Future well-designed and rigorous RCTs with a large sample size are required. This trial is registered with CRD42014013575.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China  
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  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Erectile Dysfunction
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26885501; PMCID:PMC4738993 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1999  
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Author (up) Daneshkazemi, A.; Daneshkazemi, P.; Davoudi, A.; Badrian, H.; Firouzabadi, V.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is acupuncturing effective in controlling the gag reflex during dental procedures? A review of literature Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication Anesthesia, Essays and Researches Abbreviated Journal Anesth Essays Res  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 173-177  
  Keywords Stomatognathic Diseases; Gagging; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Dentistry  
  Abstract Traditional acupuncture has been introduced more than 2500 years ago which provides an alternative and complementary option during clinical practices. Its main mechanism is based on stimulating the nerves by altering the processes and perception of pain transmitters. It facilitates releasing natural pain relievers such as endorphins and serotonin. Its success for various dental procedures has been proved earlier. However, its effects on controlling the gag reflex seem to be overlooked. The gag reflex is recognized as a protective reaction for stopping the entrance of any foreign bodies into the oropharynx. Pronounced gag reflexes can have negative impacts on the quality of dental procedures. Many techniques have been suggested for managing this reflex and acupuncturing is one of those which seems to be overlooked recently. The aim of this paper is reviewing the published high-quality researches about the efficacy of this technique for eliminating the gag reflex during dental procedures.  
  Address Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Shahid Sadoughi University Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran  
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  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Gagging
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27212742; PMCID:PMC4864703 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2056  
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Author (up) de Souza, L.L.; de Araujo, F.L.B.; da Silva, F.A.M.; Mucciaroni, T.S.; de Araujo, J.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Unilateral and Immediate Stimulation of Acupuncture Points Xiaohai (SI8) and Jianwaishu (SI14) of the Small Intestine Meridian Increases Electromyographic Activity and Strength in the Ipsilateral and Contralateral Upper Trapezius Muscle Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages 250-256  
  Keywords acupuncture; electromyography; muscle activation; strength  
  Abstract We previously showed that a yin meridian of the upper limb decreased electromyographic activity (root mean square) and muscle strength ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of stimulation. Here, we tested the upper trapezius (UT) muscle response after stimulation of a yang meridian of the upper limb, the small intestine (SI). Thirty-eight healthy volunteers were randomized into the following groups: UT muscle (SI14), distant of the UT muscle (SI8), without stimulation (CG), and sham (R3). An acupuncturist certificated by the Brazilian Society of Physical Therapists and Acupuncturists performed the needle insertion. Each volunteer received only one stimulation to the right upper limb. The evaluation occurred before, 5 minutes after, and 20 minutes after needle withdrawal. The root mean square activity increased on the right side in the UT muscle for the SI8 and SI14 groups (F3,37 = 4.67; p < 0.025) at the 20-minute evaluation. The most vigorous response occurred on the contralateral side because the effects were maintained for 5 minutes after withdrawal (F3,37 = 4.52; p < 0.025). Both groups showed an increase in the UT muscle strength at the 20-minute evaluation (F3,37 = 3.41; p < 0.025). The CG and R3 groups did not show any changes. Our data indicate that SI a yang meridian increases the UT muscle response.  
  Address Laboratory of Neuropsychobiology and Motor Behavior, Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor System, Ribeirao Preto Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: araujoje@fmrp.usp.br  
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  Notes PMID:27776763 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2128  
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Author (up) Dommerholt, J.; Hooks, T.; Finnegan, M.; Grieve, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies Abbreviated Journal J Bodyw Mov Ther  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 397-408  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acupuncture; Dry needling  
  Abstract The worldwide interest in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and trigger points (TrPs) is reflected in the increasing number of publications. In this overview of the literature, we included 26 studies, case reports and review articles by authors from 18 different countries. Several research groups are exploring the characteristic of TrPs such as Chen and colleagues, who continued their work on the quantification of the taut bands. Meng and colleagues studied the relationships between TrPs and central sensitization, while Yu and colleagues examined the electrophysiological characteristics that occur as a result of active TrPs. Several researchers used objective measurements to determine clinical outcomes, such as Koppenhaver and colleagues who measured objective changes in the function and nociceptive sensitivity of lumbar multifidus muscle subjects with low back pain. Turo and colleagues quantified muscle tissue changes after dry needling in chronic myofascial pain using elastography. Multiple studies explored various treatment options for TrPs, such as dry needling, injections with lidocaine or granisetron, traditional Thai massage, self-myofascial release, kinesiotaping, and monochromatic infrared photo energy, among others.  
  Address Department of Allied Health Professions, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Blackberry Hill, Bristol, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Rob.Grieve@uwe.ac.uk  
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  Time in Treatment Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27210859 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2057  
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Author (up) Dos Santos Maciel, L.Y.; Dos Santos Leite, P.M.; Neto, M.L.P.; Mendonca, A.C.R.; de Araujo, C.C.A.; da Hora Santos Souza, J.; DeSantana, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of the placebo effect between different non-penetrating acupuncture devices and real acupuncture in healthy subjects: a randomized clinical trial Type of Study
  Year 2016 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 518  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; *Acupuncture Therapy/instrumentation/psychology; Adult; Female; Healthy Volunteers; Humans; Male; Needles; Perception; Placebo Effect; Young Adult; Acupuncture; Acupuncture Points; Healthy Volunteers; Placebo  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Several studies have used placebo acupuncture methods in recent years as a way for blinding therapeutic effect of acupuncture, however placebo method selection has not followed enough methodological criteria to the point of stabilishing a consensus of what should be the best method to be used. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of three different placebo acupuncture methods for blinding applied in healthy subjects. METHODS: This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Federal University of Sergipe with the number 47193015.5.0000.5546 and all individuals participating in the study signed a free and informed consent. For this study, 321 healthy volunteers were randomly divided into seven groups using the abdominal point stomach (ST) 25 and seven groups using the lumbar point bladder (Bl) 52 for stimulation. For real acupuncture procedure, three different methods of placebo acupuncture plus a mix between real acupuncture and placebo applied in the same individual, totaling fourteen groups in this study. Outcome assessments were performed before and immediately after applying the technique. Investigator who assessed variables had no knowledgement about the method was applied. Identification, weight and height were measured before puncture by using. At the end, subjects were asked if they believed they were receiving real or placebo acupuncture. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between groups for the perception about the type o stimulation (wheter real or placebo puncture). Percentage of subjects who reported to have received real acupuncture in the abdominal point was 69.56% in real group, 86.95% in group Park Sham, 82.60% in needle + foam, 91.30% in insertion and removal, 78.26% in real + Park Sham, 86.36% in real + needle and foam, 86.95% in real + insertion and removal, and for the lumbar point was 86.36% in real group, 86.95% in group Park Sham, 69.56% in needle + foam, 72% in insertion and removal, 86.95% in real + Park Sham, 81.81% in real + needle and foam and 78.26% in real + insertion and removal. CONCLUSION: All placebo acupuncture methods proposed in this study were equally effective for bliding the study participants using either abdominal or lumbar acupoints, and none of the placebo methods presented benefit compared to the other to be used in future clinical trials. ETHICS COMMITTEE: Federal University of Sergipe (UFS), number of approval: 47193015.5.0000.5546 TRIAL REGISTRATION: ensaiosclinicos.gov.br RBR-3w2p32 Registered in 28th January 2016.  
  Address Professor of the Department of Physical Therapy and Post Graduate Programs in Health Sciences and Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Sergipe, Rua Claudio Batista, s/n. Bairro Santo Antonio, CEP 49060-100, Aracaju, Sergipe, Brasil. desantana@pq.cnpq.br  
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  Notes PMID:27978834; PMCID:PMC5159982 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2190  
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Author (up) Eftekharsadat, B.; Babaei-Ghazani, A.; Zeinolabedinzadeh, V. url  openurl
  Title Dry needling in patients with chronic heel pain due to plantar fasciitis: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran Abbreviated Journal Med J Islam Repub Iran  
  Volume 30 Issue Pages 401  
  Keywords Chronic heel pain; Dry needling; Myofascial trigger points; Plantar fasciitis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This study examined the effects of dry needling on chronic heel pain due to plantar fasciitis. METHODS: During this single-blinded clinical trial, 20 eligible patients were randomized into two groups: A case group treated with dry needling and a control group. Patients' plantar pain severity, (using modified visual analog scale [VAS] scoring system), range of motion of ankle joint in dorsiflexion [ROMDF] and plantar extension[ROMPE] and foot function index (using standard questionnaires of SEM5 and MDC7) were assessed at baseline, four weeks after intervention and four weeks after withdrawing treatment. Independent sample t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed rank tests, and chi square test were used for data analysis. RESULTS: The mean VAS scores in the case group was significantly lower than the control group after four weeks of intervention (p<0.001). Comparison of the ROMDF and ROMPE did not reveal any significant changes after four weeks of intervention in the case and control groups (p=0.7 and p=0.65, respectively). The mean of MDC7 and SEM5 scores in the case group were significantly lower than the control group following four weeks of intervention (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Despite the insignificant effect on ROMDF and ROMPE, trigger point dry needling, by improving the severity of heel pain, can be used as a good alternative option before proceeding to more invasive therapies of plantar fasciitis.  
  Address MD, General Physician, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. vahide.abediny@gmail.com  
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  Notes PMID:27683642; PMCID:PMC5038993 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2149  
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Author (up) Feng, J.; Wang, X.; Li, X.; Zhao, D.; Xu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): A multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 95 Issue 40 Pages e4879  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has been suggested to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw a firm conclusion regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in COPD. Therefore, this multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treating patients with COPD. METHODS: This is a two-arm, parallel group, multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled trial with concealed allocation, and participants, assessor, and analyst blinding. Seventy-two participants with COPD were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups (real acupuncture group and sham acupuncture group) in a 1:1 ratio. Patients received either real or sham needling at the same acupoints 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was dyspnea on exertion evaluated using the 6-minute walk test. In addition, health-related quality of life was also evaluated. Measurements were obtained at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: Six-minute walking distance measurements and health-related quality of life were significantly better in the real acupuncture group than that in the sham acupuncture group. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that acupuncture can be used as an adjunctive therapy to reduce dyspnea in patients with COPD.  
  Address Department of Respiratory Medicine bDepartment of Cardiovascular Medicine, Hangzhou Fuyang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine cDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, The People's Hospital of Fuyang, Hangzhou dDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Harbin, China  
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  Notes PMID:27749542; PMCID:PMC5059044 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2139  
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