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Author (down) Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2758  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2799  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2840  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2881  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2922  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2454  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2495  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2536  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2577  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2618  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2663  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2704  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2741  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2782  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2823  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2864  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2905  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2946  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Myofascial Trigger Point; Dry Needling, With Non-Acupuncture Needle  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2417  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Liu, J.; Li, S.-N.; Liu, L.; Zhou, K.; Li, Y.; Cui, X.-Y.; Wan, J.; Lu, J.-J.; Huang, Y.-C.; Wang, X.-S.; Lin, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Conventional acupuncture for cardiac arrhythmia: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arrhythmias, Cardiac  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To exam the effect and safety of conventional acupuncture (CA) on cardiac arrhythmia. METHODS: Nine medical databases were searched until February 2016 for randomized controlled trials. Heterogeneity was measured by Cochran Q test. Meta-analysis was conducted if I2 was less than 85% and the characteristics of included trials were similar. RESULTS: Nine qualified studies involving 638 patients were included. Only 1 study had definitely low risk of bias, while 7 trials were rated as unclear and 1 as high. Meta-analysis of CA alone did not have a significant benefit on response rate compared to amiodarone in patients with atrial fibrillation (Af) and atrial flutter (AF) [relative risk (RR): 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-1.49; P=0.61; I2=61%, P=0.11]. However, 1 study with higher methodological quality detected a lower recurrence rate of Af in CA alone as compared with sham acupuncture plus no treatment, and benefits on ventricular rate and time of conversion to normal sinus rhythm were found in CA alone group by 1 study, as well as the response rate in CA plus deslanoside group by another study. Meta-analysis of CA plus anti-arrhythmia drug (AAD) was associated with a significant benefit on the response rate when compared with AAD alone in ventricular premature beat (VPB) patients (RR, 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.34; P=0.005; I2=13%, P=0.32), and an improvement in quality-of-life score (QOLS) of VPB also showed in 1 individual study. Besides, a lower heart rate was detected in the CA alone group by 1 individual study when compared with no treatment in sinus tachycardia patients (MD-21.84 [-27.21,-16.47]) and lower adverse events of CA alone were reported than amiodarone. CONCLUSIONS: CA may be a useful and safe alternative or additive approach to AADs for cardiac arrhythmia, especially in VPB and Af patients, which mainly based on a pooled estimate and result from 1 study with higher methodological quality. However, we could not reach a robust conclusion due to low quality of overall evidence.  
  Address Department of Cardiology, Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100078, China. 13910565673@126.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Arrhythmias, Cardiac
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28432528 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2191  
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