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Author (up) Lei, H.; Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, Z. url  openurl
  Title Effect of Electroacupuncture on Visceral and Hepatic Fat in Women with Abdominal Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Study Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 285-294  
  Keywords OBESITY -- Treatment; FATTY liver -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ADIPOSE tissues; ALTERNATIVE medicine; Anthropometry; HUMAN body composition; CLINICAL trials; Electroacupuncture; LONGITUDINAL method; MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Mathematics; PROBABILITY theory; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); Statistics; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; DATA analysis; BODY mass index; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; WAIST circumference; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract Copyright of Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine is the property of Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 122401275; Source Information: Apr2017, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p285; Subject Term: OBESITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATTY liver -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ADIPOSE tissues; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTHROPOMETRY; Subject Term: HUMAN body composition; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Subject Term: MATHEMATICS; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: BODY mass index; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: WAIST circumference; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2251  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lei, H.; Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, Z. url  openurl
  Title Effect of Electroacupuncture on Visceral and Hepatic Fat in Women with Abdominal Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Study Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 285-294  
  Keywords OBESITY -- Treatment; FATTY liver -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ADIPOSE tissues; ALTERNATIVE medicine; Anthropometry; HUMAN body composition; CLINICAL trials; Electroacupuncture; LONGITUDINAL method; MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Mathematics; PROBABILITY theory; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); Statistics; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; DATA analysis; BODY mass index; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; WAIST circumference; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract Objective: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and hepatic fat deposition are the most important risk factors for women's health. Acupuncture, including electroacupuncture (EA), is used to treat obesity throughout the world. The effect of EA is evaluated mainly by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Few studies have assessed its effect in reducing VAT volume and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) based on an exact measurement method such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aimed to resolve this issue. Methods: Thirty subjects were randomly divided into two groups. The control group ( n = 15) did not receive any intervention and maintained a normal diet and their usual exercise habits. The treatment group ( n = 15) received EA three times a week for 3 months. BMI and WC were measured using different devices. VAT and HFF were measured by MRI and calculated by related software before and after the intervention. Results: A marked difference was evident in group that received EA treatment in the following tests. The differences in BMI (U = 21.00, p < 0.001), WC (U = 40.50, p = 0.002), VAT volume (U = 13.00, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (U = 0.00, p < 0.001) before and after the intervention in the treatment group were distinct and significant compared with those of the control group. Three months later, the treatment group showed a lower BMI (W = 91.00, p = 0.001), WC ( t = 4.755, p < 0.001), VAT volume ( t = 5.164, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (W = 120.00, p = 0.001) compared with pretreatment levels. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed a lower VAT volume ( t = 60.00, p = 0.029) after 3 months of treatment. After 3 months, the control group showed higher mean HFF ( t = ?2.900, p = 0.012) and VAT volume (W = 11.50, p = 0.006) compared with their initial levels. Conclusion: Based on MRI evaluation, this randomized controlled study proved that EA treatment reduces BMI and WC as well as VAT volume and HFF in women with abdominal obesity.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 122401275; Source Information: Apr2017, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p285; Subject Term: OBESITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATTY liver -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ADIPOSE tissues; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTHROPOMETRY; Subject Term: HUMAN body composition; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Subject Term: MATHEMATICS; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: BODY mass index; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: WAIST circumference; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2228  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2453  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2494  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2535  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2576  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2617  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2651  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2692  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2740  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2781  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2822  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2863  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2904  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2945  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Z.; Geng, G.; Chen, W.; Dong, H.; Chen, L.; Zhan, S.; Li, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 404-412  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*mortality; Benserazide/*therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Dopamine Agents/*therapeutic use; Drug Combinations; Humans; Levodopa/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; complementary medicine; neurology; parkinson's disease; systematic reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), compared to the use of Madopar alone. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and Madopar for the treatment of PD published between April 1995 and April 2015. The primary outcome was total effectiveness rate and secondary outcomes included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Data were pooled and analysed with RevMan 5.3. Results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: Finally, 11 RCTs with 831 subjects were included. Meta-analyses showed that acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of PD can significantly improve the clinical effectiveness compared with Madopar alone (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.38, P<0.001). It was also found that acupuncture combined with Madopar significantly improved the UPDRS II (SMD=-1.00, 95% CI -1.71 to -0.29, P=0.006) and UPDRS I-IV total summed scores (SMD=-1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.67, P<0.001) but not UPDRS I (SMD=-0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.02, P=0.06), UPDRS III (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.41, P=0.17) or UPDRS IV (SMD=-0.78, 95% CI -2.24 to 0.68, P=0.30) scores. Accordingly, acupuncture combined with Madopar appeared to have a positive effect on activities of daily life and the general condition of patients with PD, but was not better than Madopar alone for the treatment of mental activity, behaviour, mood and motor disability. In the safety evaluation, it was found that acupuncture combined with Madopar was associated with significantly fewer adverse effects including gastrointestinal reactions (RR=0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, P<0.001), on-off phenomena (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.66, P=0.004) and mental disorders (RR=0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.92, P=0.04) but did not significantly reduce dyskinesia (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, P=0.14). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture combined with Madopar appears, to some extent, to improve clinical effectiveness and safety in the treatment of PD, compared with Madopar alone. This conclusion must be considered cautiously, given the quality of most of the studies included was low. Therefore, more high-quality, multicentre, prospective, RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further clarify the effect of acupuncture combined with Madopar for PD.  
  Address Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29180347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2444  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Z.; Geng, G.; Chen, W.; Dong, H.; Chen, L.; Zhan, S.; Li, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 404-412  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*mortality; Benserazide/*therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Dopamine Agents/*therapeutic use; Drug Combinations; Humans; Levodopa/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; complementary medicine; neurology; parkinson's disease; systematic reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), compared to the use of Madopar alone. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and Madopar for the treatment of PD published between April 1995 and April 2015. The primary outcome was total effectiveness rate and secondary outcomes included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Data were pooled and analysed with RevMan 5.3. Results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: Finally, 11 RCTs with 831 subjects were included. Meta-analyses showed that acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of PD can significantly improve the clinical effectiveness compared with Madopar alone (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.38, P<0.001). It was also found that acupuncture combined with Madopar significantly improved the UPDRS II (SMD=-1.00, 95% CI -1.71 to -0.29, P=0.006) and UPDRS I-IV total summed scores (SMD=-1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.67, P<0.001) but not UPDRS I (SMD=-0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.02, P=0.06), UPDRS III (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.41, P=0.17) or UPDRS IV (SMD=-0.78, 95% CI -2.24 to 0.68, P=0.30) scores. Accordingly, acupuncture combined with Madopar appeared to have a positive effect on activities of daily life and the general condition of patients with PD, but was not better than Madopar alone for the treatment of mental activity, behaviour, mood and motor disability. In the safety evaluation, it was found that acupuncture combined with Madopar was associated with significantly fewer adverse effects including gastrointestinal reactions (RR=0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, P<0.001), on-off phenomena (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.66, P=0.004) and mental disorders (RR=0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.92, P=0.04) but did not significantly reduce dyskinesia (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, P=0.14). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture combined with Madopar appears, to some extent, to improve clinical effectiveness and safety in the treatment of PD, compared with Madopar alone. This conclusion must be considered cautiously, given the quality of most of the studies included was low. Therefore, more high-quality, multicentre, prospective, RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further clarify the effect of acupuncture combined with Madopar for PD.  
  Address Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29180347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2485  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Z.; Geng, G.; Chen, W.; Dong, H.; Chen, L.; Zhan, S.; Li, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 404-412  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*mortality; Benserazide/*therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Dopamine Agents/*therapeutic use; Drug Combinations; Humans; Levodopa/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; complementary medicine; neurology; parkinson's disease; systematic reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), compared to the use of Madopar alone. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and Madopar for the treatment of PD published between April 1995 and April 2015. The primary outcome was total effectiveness rate and secondary outcomes included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Data were pooled and analysed with RevMan 5.3. Results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: Finally, 11 RCTs with 831 subjects were included. Meta-analyses showed that acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of PD can significantly improve the clinical effectiveness compared with Madopar alone (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.38, P<0.001). It was also found that acupuncture combined with Madopar significantly improved the UPDRS II (SMD=-1.00, 95% CI -1.71 to -0.29, P=0.006) and UPDRS I-IV total summed scores (SMD=-1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.67, P<0.001) but not UPDRS I (SMD=-0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.02, P=0.06), UPDRS III (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.41, P=0.17) or UPDRS IV (SMD=-0.78, 95% CI -2.24 to 0.68, P=0.30) scores. Accordingly, acupuncture combined with Madopar appeared to have a positive effect on activities of daily life and the general condition of patients with PD, but was not better than Madopar alone for the treatment of mental activity, behaviour, mood and motor disability. In the safety evaluation, it was found that acupuncture combined with Madopar was associated with significantly fewer adverse effects including gastrointestinal reactions (RR=0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, P<0.001), on-off phenomena (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.66, P=0.004) and mental disorders (RR=0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.92, P=0.04) but did not significantly reduce dyskinesia (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, P=0.14). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture combined with Madopar appears, to some extent, to improve clinical effectiveness and safety in the treatment of PD, compared with Madopar alone. This conclusion must be considered cautiously, given the quality of most of the studies included was low. Therefore, more high-quality, multicentre, prospective, RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further clarify the effect of acupuncture combined with Madopar for PD.  
  Address Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29180347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2526  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Z.; Geng, G.; Chen, W.; Dong, H.; Chen, L.; Zhan, S.; Li, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 404-412  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*mortality; Benserazide/*therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Dopamine Agents/*therapeutic use; Drug Combinations; Humans; Levodopa/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; complementary medicine; neurology; parkinson's disease; systematic reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), compared to the use of Madopar alone. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and Madopar for the treatment of PD published between April 1995 and April 2015. The primary outcome was total effectiveness rate and secondary outcomes included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Data were pooled and analysed with RevMan 5.3. Results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: Finally, 11 RCTs with 831 subjects were included. Meta-analyses showed that acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of PD can significantly improve the clinical effectiveness compared with Madopar alone (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.38, P<0.001). It was also found that acupuncture combined with Madopar significantly improved the UPDRS II (SMD=-1.00, 95% CI -1.71 to -0.29, P=0.006) and UPDRS I-IV total summed scores (SMD=-1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.67, P<0.001) but not UPDRS I (SMD=-0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.02, P=0.06), UPDRS III (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.41, P=0.17) or UPDRS IV (SMD=-0.78, 95% CI -2.24 to 0.68, P=0.30) scores. Accordingly, acupuncture combined with Madopar appeared to have a positive effect on activities of daily life and the general condition of patients with PD, but was not better than Madopar alone for the treatment of mental activity, behaviour, mood and motor disability. In the safety evaluation, it was found that acupuncture combined with Madopar was associated with significantly fewer adverse effects including gastrointestinal reactions (RR=0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, P<0.001), on-off phenomena (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.66, P=0.004) and mental disorders (RR=0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.92, P=0.04) but did not significantly reduce dyskinesia (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, P=0.14). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture combined with Madopar appears, to some extent, to improve clinical effectiveness and safety in the treatment of PD, compared with Madopar alone. This conclusion must be considered cautiously, given the quality of most of the studies included was low. Therefore, more high-quality, multicentre, prospective, RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further clarify the effect of acupuncture combined with Madopar for PD.  
  Address Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29180347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2567  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Z.; Geng, G.; Chen, W.; Dong, H.; Chen, L.; Zhan, S.; Li, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 404-412  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*mortality; Benserazide/*therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Dopamine Agents/*therapeutic use; Drug Combinations; Humans; Levodopa/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; complementary medicine; neurology; parkinson's disease; systematic reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), compared to the use of Madopar alone. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and Madopar for the treatment of PD published between April 1995 and April 2015. The primary outcome was total effectiveness rate and secondary outcomes included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Data were pooled and analysed with RevMan 5.3. Results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: Finally, 11 RCTs with 831 subjects were included. Meta-analyses showed that acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of PD can significantly improve the clinical effectiveness compared with Madopar alone (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.38, P<0.001). It was also found that acupuncture combined with Madopar significantly improved the UPDRS II (SMD=-1.00, 95% CI -1.71 to -0.29, P=0.006) and UPDRS I-IV total summed scores (SMD=-1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.67, P<0.001) but not UPDRS I (SMD=-0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.02, P=0.06), UPDRS III (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.41, P=0.17) or UPDRS IV (SMD=-0.78, 95% CI -2.24 to 0.68, P=0.30) scores. Accordingly, acupuncture combined with Madopar appeared to have a positive effect on activities of daily life and the general condition of patients with PD, but was not better than Madopar alone for the treatment of mental activity, behaviour, mood and motor disability. In the safety evaluation, it was found that acupuncture combined with Madopar was associated with significantly fewer adverse effects including gastrointestinal reactions (RR=0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, P<0.001), on-off phenomena (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.66, P=0.004) and mental disorders (RR=0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.92, P=0.04) but did not significantly reduce dyskinesia (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, P=0.14). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture combined with Madopar appears, to some extent, to improve clinical effectiveness and safety in the treatment of PD, compared with Madopar alone. This conclusion must be considered cautiously, given the quality of most of the studies included was low. Therefore, more high-quality, multicentre, prospective, RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further clarify the effect of acupuncture combined with Madopar for PD.  
  Address Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29180347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2608  
Permanent link to this record
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