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Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2539  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2580  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2621  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2660  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2701  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2744  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2785  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2826  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2867  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2908  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2949  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, K.; Law, A.; Guo, M.; Wieland, L.S.; Shen, X.; Lao, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for acute hordeolum Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Hordeolum is an acute, purulent inflammation of the eyelid margin usually caused by obstructed orifices of the sebaceous glands of the eyelid. The condition, which affects sebaceous glands internally or externally, is common. When the meibomian gland in the tarsal plate is affected, internal hordeolum occurs, while when the glands of Zeis or Moll associated with eyelash follicles are affected, external hordeolum, or stye occurs. The onset of hordeolum is usually self limited, and may resolve in about a week with spontaneous drainage of the abscess. When the condition is severe, it can spread to adjacent glands and tissues. Recurrences are very common. As long as an internal hordeolum remains unresolved, it can develop into a chalazion or generalized eyelid cellulitis. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical therapy aimed to treat disease by using fine needles to stimulate specific points on the body. However, it is unclear if acupuncture is an effective and safe treatment for acute hordeolum. Objectives: The objective of this review was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum compared with no treatment, sham acupuncture, or other active treatment. We also compared the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture plus another treatment with that treatment alone. Search methods: We searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS), three major Chinese databases, as well as clinical trial registers all through 7 June 2016. We reviewed the reference lists from potentially eligible studies to identify additional randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Selection criteria: We included RCTs of people diagnosed with acute internal or external hordeola. We included RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture or no treatment, other active treatments, or comparing acupuncture plus another treatment versus another treatment alone. Data collection and analysis: We used standard methodological procedures used by Cochrane. Main results: We included 6 RCTs with a total of 531 participants from China. The mean age of the participants ranged from 18 to 28 years. Four RCTs included participants diagnosed with initial acute hordeolum with a duration of less than seven days; one RCT included participants diagnosed with initial acute hordeolum without specifying the duration; and one RCT included participants with recurrent acute hordeolum with a mean duration of 24 days. About 55% (291/531) of participants were women. Three RCTs included participants with either external or internal hordeolum; one RCT included participants with only external hordeolum; and two RCTs did not specify the type of hordeolum. Follow-up was no more than seven days after treatment in all included RCTs; no data were available for long-term outcomes. Overall, the certainty of the evidence for all outcomes was low to very low, and we judged all RCTs to be at high or unclear risk of bias. Three RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional treatments. We did not pool the data from these RCTs because the conventional treatments were not similar among trials. Two trials showed that resolution of acute hordeolum was more likely in the acupuncture group when compared with topical antibiotics (1 RCT; 32 participants; risk ratio (RR) 3.60; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34 to 9.70; low-certainty of evidence) or oral antibiotics plus warm compresses (1 RCT; 120 participants; RR 1.45; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.78; low-certainty of evidence). In the third trial, little or no difference in resolution of hordeolum was observed when acupuncture was compared with topical antibiotics plus warm compresses (1 RCT; 109 participants; RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.04; low-certainty of evidence). One RCT mentioned adverse outcomes, stating that there was no adverse event associated with acupuncture. Three RCTs compared acupuncture plus conventional treatments (two RCTs used topical antibiotics and warm compresses, one RCT used topical antibiotics only) versus the conventional treatments alone. One of the three RCTs, with very low-certainty evidence, did not report the resolution of acute hordeolum; however, it reported that acute hordeolum relief might be higher when acupuncture was combined with conventional treatments than with conventional treatments alone group (60 participants; RR 1.80; 95% CI 1.00 to 3.23). Pooled analysis of the remaining two RCTs, with low-certainty evidence, estimated resolution of acute hordeolum was slightly higher in the combined treatment group compared with the conventional treatment alone group at 7-day follow-up (210 participants; RR 1.12; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.23; I2 = 0%). None of the three RCTs reported adverse outcomes. Among the included RCTs, four participants, two from the acupuncture plus conventional treatments group and two from the conventional treatments alone group, withdrew due to exacerbation of symptoms. Authors' conclusions: Low-certainty evidence suggests that acupuncture with or without conventional treatments may provide short-term benefits for treating acute hordeolum when compared with conventional treatments alone. The certainty of the evidence was low to very low mainly due to small sample sizes, inadequate allocation concealment, lack of masking of the outcome assessors, inadequate or unclear randomization method, and a high or unreported number of dropouts. All RCTs were conducted in China, which may limit their generalizability to non-Chinese populations. Because no RCTs included a valid sham acupuncture control, we cannot rule out a potential expectation/placebo effect associated with acupuncture. As resolution is based on clinical observation, the outcome could be influenced by the observer's knowledge of the assigned treatment. Adverse effects of acupuncture were reported sparsely in the included RCTs, and, when reported, were rare. RCTs with better methodology, longer follow-up, and which are conducted among other populations are warranted to provide more general evidence regarding the benefit of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum.  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2167  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cheng, K.; Law, A.; Guo, M.; Wieland, L.S.; Shen, X.; Lao, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for acute hordeolum Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages Cd011075  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Hordeolum is an acute, purulent inflammation of the eyelid margin usually caused by obstructed orifices of the sebaceous glands of the eyelid. The condition, which affects sebaceous glands internally or externally, is common. When the meibomian gland in the tarsal plate is affected, internal hordeolum occurs, while when the glands of Zeis or Moll associated with eyelash follicles are affected, external hordeolum, or stye occurs. The onset of hordeolum is usually self limited, and may resolve in about a week with spontaneous drainage of the abscess. When the condition is severe, it can spread to adjacent glands and tissues. Recurrences are very common. As long as an internal hordeolum remains unresolved, it can develop into a chalazion or generalized eyelid cellulitis. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical therapy aimed to treat disease by using fine needles to stimulate specific points on the body. However, it is unclear if acupuncture is an effective and safe treatment for acute hordeolum. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum compared with no treatment, sham acupuncture, or other active treatment. We also compared the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture plus another treatment with that treatment alone. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS), three major Chinese databases, as well as clinical trial registers all through 7 June 2016. We reviewed the reference lists from potentially eligible studies to identify additional randomised clinical trials (RCTs). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included RCTs of people diagnosed with acute internal or external hordeola. We included RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture or no treatment, other active treatments, or comparing acupuncture plus another treatment versus another treatment alone. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures used by Cochrane. MAIN RESULTS: We included 6 RCTs with a total of 531 participants from China. The mean age of the participants ranged from 18 to 28 years. Four RCTs included participants diagnosed with initial acute hordeolum with a duration of less than seven days; one RCT included participants diagnosed with initial acute hordeolum without specifying the duration; and one RCT included participants with recurrent acute hordeolum with a mean duration of 24 days. About 55% (291/531) of participants were women. Three RCTs included participants with either external or internal hordeolum; one RCT included participants with only external hordeolum; and two RCTs did not specify the type of hordeolum. Follow-up was no more than seven days after treatment in all included RCTs; no data were available for long-term outcomes. Overall, the certainty of the evidence for all outcomes was low to very low, and we judged all RCTs to be at high or unclear risk of bias.Three RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional treatments. We did not pool the data from these RCTs because the conventional treatments were not similar among trials. Two trials showed that resolution of acute hordeolum was more likely in the acupuncture group when compared with topical antibiotics (1 RCT; 32 participants; risk ratio (RR) 3.60; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34 to 9.70; low-certainty of evidence) or oral antibiotics plus warm compresses (1 RCT; 120 participants; RR 1.45; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.78; low-certainty of evidence). In the third trial, little or no difference in resolution of hordeolum was observed when acupuncture was compared with topical antibiotics plus warm compresses (1 RCT; 109 participants; RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.04; low-certainty of evidence). One RCT mentioned adverse outcomes, stating that there was no adverse event associated with acupuncture.Three RCTs compared acupuncture plus conventional treatments (two RCTs used topical antibiotics and warm compresses, one RCT used topical antibiotics only) versus the conventional treatments alone. One of the three RCTs, with very low-certainty evidence, did not report the resolution of acute hordeolum; however, it reported that acute hordeolum relief might be higher when acupuncture was combined with conventional treatments than with conventional treatments alone group (60 participants; RR 1.80; 95% CI 1.00 to 3.23). Pooled analysis of the remaining two RCTs, with low-certainty evidence, estimated resolution of acute hordeolum was slightly higher in the combined treatment group compared with the conventional treatment alone group at 7-day follow-up (210 participants; RR 1.12; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.23; I2 = 0%). None of the three RCTs reported adverse outcomes. Among the included RCTs, four participants, two from the acupuncture plus conventional treatments group and two from the conventional treatments alone group, withdrew due to exacerbation of symptoms. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Low-certainty evidence suggests that acupuncture with or without conventional treatments may provide short-term benefits for treating acute hordeolum when compared with conventional treatments alone. The certainty of the evidence was low to very low mainly due to small sample sizes, inadequate allocation concealment, lack of masking of the outcome assessors, inadequate or unclear randomization method, and a high or unreported number of dropouts. All RCTs were conducted in China, which may limit their generalizability to non-Chinese populations.Because no RCTs included a valid sham acupuncture control, we cannot rule out a potential expectation/placebo effect associated with acupuncture. As resolution is based on clinical observation, the outcome could be influenced by the observer's knowledge of the assigned treatment. Adverse effects of acupuncture were reported sparsely in the included RCTs, and, when reported, were rare. RCTs with better methodology, longer follow-up, and which are conducted among other populations are warranted to provide more general evidence regarding the benefit of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum.  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 10 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam Rd, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28181687; PMCID:PMC5378315 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2194  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chien, T.-J.; Hsu, C.-H.; Liu, C.-Y.; Fang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in breast cancer- A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Climacteric; Menopause; Hot Flushes; Women's Health; Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many breast cancer patients suffer from hot flush and medical menopause as side effects of treatment. Some patients undergo acupuncture, rather than hormone therapy, to relieve these symptoms, but the efficacy of acupuncture is uncertain. This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in women with breast cancer. METHODS: A literature search was performed, following the PRISMA Statement and without language restrictions, of 7 databases from inception through March 2017. All selected studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that examined the effect of needle acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer. The methodological quality of these trials was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and meta-analysis software (RevMan 5.2) was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: We examined 844 breast cancer patients (average age: 58 years-old) from 13 RCTs. The trials had medium-to-high quality, based on the modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had no significant effect on the frequency and the severity of hot flush (p = 0.34; p = 0.33), but significantly ameliorated menopause symptoms (p = 0.009). None of the studies reported severe adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture significantly alleviated menopause symptoms, but had no effect on hot flush. Breast cancer patients concerned about the adverse effects of hormone therapy should consider acupuncture. Further large-scale studies that also measure biomarkers or cytokines may help to elucidate the mechanism by which acupuncture alleviates menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer.  
  Address Medical Library, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2413  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chiu, H.Y.; Hsieh, Y.J.; Tsai, P.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture to reduce cancer-related pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Cancer Care Abbreviated Journal Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)  
  Volume 26 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords acupuncture; cancer-related pain; meta-analysis  
  Abstract We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on malignancy-related, chemotherapy (CT)- or radiation therapy (RT)-induced, surgery-induced, and hormone therapy (HT)-induced pain. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of acupuncture on cancer-related pain were reached from the EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Airiti library, Taiwan Electrical Periodical Service, Wanfang Data (a Chinese database) and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database from inception through June 2014. Heterogeneity, moderator analysis, publication bias and risk of bias associated with the included studies were examined. A total of 29 RCTs yielding 36 effect sizes were included. The overall effect of acupuncture on cancer-related pain was -0.45 [95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.63 to -0.26]. The subanalysis indicated that acupuncture relieved malignancy-related and surgery-induced pain [effect size (g) = -0.71, and -0.40; 95% CI = -0.94 to -0.48, and -0.69 to -0.10] but not CT- or RT-induced and HT-induced pain (g = -0.05, and -0.64, 95% CI = -0.33 to 0.24, and -1.55 to 0.27). Acupuncture is effective in relieving cancer-related pain, particularly malignancy-related and surgery-induced pain. Our findings suggest that acupuncture can be adopted as part of a multimodal approach for reducing cancer-related pain.  
  Address School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26853524 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2200  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Choi, T.-Y.; Lee, M.S.; Kim, J.I.; Zaslawski, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Moxibustion for the treatment of osteoarthritis: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Maturitas Abbreviated Journal Maturitas  
  Volume 100 Issue Pages 33-48  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Pain; OA; Moxibustion; Direct Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to update previous reviews and examine recent evidence from randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of the use of moxibustion for osteoarthritis (OA). Twelve databases were searched from inception through to September 2016 with no language limits applied. Data extraction and risk-of-bias assessments were performed by two independent reviewers. A total of 19 RCTs met all inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Three RCTs compared the effects of moxibustion with those of sham moxibustion in patients with knee OA (KOA) and found favourable effects of moxibustion on pain reduction (n=305; SMD, -0.46; 95% CI: -0.86 to -0.06, P=0.02, I2=65%), including at follow-up (n=305; SMD, -0.36; 95% CI: -0.70 to -0.01, P=0.04, I2=54%). Eleven RCTs compared the effects of moxibustion with those of conventional oral drug therapies. Eight RCTs reported a total symptom score and the meta-analysis showed superior effects of moxibustion compared with drug therapies for this measure (n=691; SMD, -0.24; 95% CI: -0.78 to 0.29; P=0.37, I2=91%) and response rate (n=758 knees; RR, 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05-1.16, P <0.0001, I2=0%). Three RCTs found superior or equivalent effects of moxibustion on symptom score compared with intra-articular injection or topical drug therapy. The existing trial evidence is sufficiently convincing to suggest that moxibustion, compared with sham moxibustion and oral drugs, is effective for pain reduction and symptom management in KOA. The level of evidence is moderate, given the high risk of bias and small sample size.  
  Address Clinical Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 34054, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Osteoarthritis
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28539175 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2420  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chou, R.; Deyo, R.; Friedly, J.; Skelly, A.; Hashimoto, R.; Weimer, M.; Fu, R.; Dana, T.; Kraegel, P.; Griffin, J.; Grusing, S.; Brodt, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nonpharmacologic Therapies for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review for an American College of Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume 166 Issue 7 Pages 493-505  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Disorders; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Background: A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. Purpose: To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists. Study Selection: Randomized trials of 9 nonpharmacologic options versus sham treatment, wait list, or usual care, or of 1 nonpharmacologic option versus another. Data Extraction: One investigator abstracted data, and a second checked abstractions for accuracy; 2 investigators independently assessed study quality. Data Synthesis: The number of trials evaluating nonpharmacologic therapies ranged from 2 (tai chi) to 121 (exercise). New evidence indicates that tai chi (strength of evidence [SOE], low) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (SOE, moderate) are effective for chronic low back pain and strengthens previous findings regarding the effectiveness of yoga (SOE, moderate). Evidence continues to support the effectiveness of exercise, psychological therapies, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, spinal manipulation, massage, and acupuncture for chronic low back pain (SOE, low to moderate). Limited evidence shows that acupuncture is modestly effective for acute low back pain (SOE, low). The magnitude of pain benefits was small to moderate and generally short term; effects on function generally were smaller than effects on pain. Limitation: Qualitatively synthesized new trials with prior meta-analyses, restricted to English-language studies; heterogeneity in treatment techniques; and inability to exclude placebo effects. Conclusion: Several nonpharmacologic therapies for primarily chronic low back pain are associated with small to moderate, usually short-term effects on pain; findings include new evidence on mind-body interventions. Primary Funding Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (PROSPERO: CRD42014014735).  
  Address From Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, and University of Washington, Seattle, and Spectrum Research, Tacoma, Washington  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28192793 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2181  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cohen, M.M.; Smit, D.V.; Andrianopoulos, N.; Ben-Meir, M.; Taylor, D.M.D.; Parker, S.J.; Xue, C.C.; Cameron, P.A. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for analgesia in the emergency department: a multicentre, randomised, equivalence and non-inferiority trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication The Medical Journal of Australia Abbreviated Journal Med J Aust  
  Volume 206 Issue 11 Pages 494-499  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adult; Analgesia/*methods; Ankle Injuries/therapy; Emergency Medical Services/*methods; Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Humans; Low Back Pain/therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Migraine Disorders/therapy; Pain Measurement; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess analgesia provided by acupuncture, alone or in combination with pharmacotherapy, to patients presenting to emergency departments with acute low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. DESIGN: A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised, assessor-blinded, equivalence and non-inferiority trial of analgesia, comparing acupuncture alone, acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy, and pharmacotherapy alone for alleviating pain in the emergency department. Setting, participants: Patients presenting to emergency departments in one of four tertiary hospitals in Melbourne with acute low back pain, migraine, or ankle sprain, and with a pain score on a 10-point verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) of at least 4. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was pain at one hour (T1). Clinically relevant pain relief was defined as achieving a VNRS score below 4, and statistically relevant pain relief as a reduction in VNRS score of greater than 2 units. RESULTS: 1964 patients were assessed between January 2010 and December 2011; 528 patients with acute low back pain (270 patients), migraine (92) or ankle sprain (166) were randomised to acupuncture alone (177 patients), acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy (178) or pharmacotherapy alone (173). Equivalence and non-inferiority of treatment groups was found overall and for the low back pain and ankle sprain groups in both intention-to-treat and per protocol (PP) analyses, except in the PP equivalence testing of the ankle sprain group. 15.6% of patients had clinically relevant pain relief and 36.9% had statistically relevant pain relief at T1; there were no between-group differences. CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of acupuncture in providing acute analgesia for patients with back pain and ankle sprain was comparable with that of pharmacotherapy. Acupuncture is a safe and acceptable form of analgesia, but none of the examined therapies provided optimal acute analgesia. More effective options are needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12609000989246.  
  Address The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28918732 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2408  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Coyle, M.E.; Liang, H.; Wang, K.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture plus moxibustion for herpes zoster: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Dermatologic Therapy Abbreviated Journal Dermatol Ther  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords acupuncture; herpes zoster; meta-analysis; moxibustion; review; systematic; varicella  
  Abstract Herpes zoster is an acute inflammatory condition which can have a significant impact on quality of life. Antiviral therapies are effective, but do not meet patients' expectations of symptomatic relief. Acupuncture and moxibustion have been used for herpes zoster; this systematic review evaluated their efficacy and safety. Nine English and Chinese databases were searched from their inceptions to March 2016. Randomized controlled trials evaluating the combination of acupuncture plus moxibustion in adult herpes zoster were included. Outcomes included pain intensity and duration, quality of life and adverse events. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan software (version 5.3). Nine studies (945 participants) were included. Studies were of low to moderate methodological quality based on risk of bias assessment. Pain intensity (visual analogue scale) was lower among those who received acupuncture plus moxibustion compared with pharmacotherapy (one study; MD -8.25 mm, 95% CI -12.36 to -4.14). The clinical significance of this result is yet to be established. Some benefits were seen for other pain and cutaneous outcomes, and global improvement in symptoms. Mild adverse events were reported in the intervention groups. Acupuncture plus moxibustion may improve pain and cutaneous outcomes, although current evidence is limited by the number of studies and methodological shortcomings.  
  Address Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28338265 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2199  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2462  
Permanent link to this record
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