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Author Ugurlu, F.G.; Sezer, N.; Aktekin, L.; Fidan, F.; Tok, F.; Akkus, S. url  openurl
  Title The effects of acupuncture versus sham acupuncture in the treatment of fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acta Reumatologica Portuguesa Abbreviated Journal Acta Reumatol Port  
  Volume 42 Issue 1 Pages 32-37  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Acupuncture; Nervous System Diseases; Fibromyalgia; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acu Versus Sham; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this manuscript is to determine and to compare the efficacy of real acupuncture with sham acupuncture on fibromyalgia (FM) treatment. METHODS: 50 women with FM were randomized into 2 groups to receive either true acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Subjects were evaluated with VAS (at night, at rest, during activity), SF-36, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Beck Depression scale (BDI), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) at baseline, 1 month and 2 months after the 1st session. Patients in both groups received 3 sessions in the 1st week, 2 sessions/week during 2 weeks and 1 session/week in the following 5 weeks (totally 12 sessions). RESULTS: 25 subjects with a mean age of 47,28+/-7,86 years were enrolled in true acupuncture group and 25 subjects with a mean age of 43,60+/-8,18 years were enrolled in sham acupuncture group. Both groups improved significantly in all parameters 1 month after the 1st session and this improvement persisted 2 months after the 1st session (p<0,05). However, real acupuncture group had better scores than sham acupuncture score in terms of all VAS scores, BDI and FIQ scores either 1 or 2 months after the 1st session (all p<0,05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture significantly improved pain and symptoms of FM. Although sham effect was important, real acupuncture treatment seems to be effective in treatment of FM.  
  Address Yildirim Beyazit University Medical School  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Fibromyalgia
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28371571 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2169  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Landgren, K.; Hallstrom, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of minimal acupuncture for infantile colic: a multicentre, three-armed, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (ACU-COL) Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 171-179  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Pain; Colic; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom-Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Infantile Colic; Pediatrics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating infantile colic with acupuncture is contradictory. AIM: To evaluate and compare the effect of two types of acupuncture versus no acupuncture in infants with colic in public child health centres (CHCs). METHODS: A multicentre, randomised controlled, single-blind, three-armed trial (ACU-COL) comparing two styles of acupuncture with no acupuncture, as an adjunct to standard care, was conducted. Among 426 infants whose parents sought help for colic and registered their child's fussing/crying in a diary, 157 fulfilled the criteria for colic and 147 started the intervention. All infants received usual care plus four extra visits to CHCs with advice/support (twice a week for 2 weeks), comprising gold standard care. The infants were randomly allocated to three groups: (A) standardised minimal acupuncture at LI4; (B) semi-standardised individual acupuncture inspired by Traditional Chinese Medicine; and (C) no acupuncture. The CHC nurses and parents were blinded. Acupuncture was given by nurses with extensive experience of acupuncture. RESULTS: The effect of the two types of acupuncture was similar and both were superior to gold standard care alone. Relative to baseline, there was a greater relative reduction in time spent crying and colicky crying by the second intervention week (p=0.050) and follow-up period (p=0.031), respectively, in infants receiving either type of acupuncture. More infants receiving acupuncture cried <3 hours/day, and thereby no longer fulfilled criteria for colic, in the first (p=0.040) and second (p=0.006) intervention weeks. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture appears to reduce crying in infants with colic safely. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01761331; Results.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, Lund SE-22100, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 157  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Colic
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28093383 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2174  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jo, J.; Lee, Y.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 162-170  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Women's Health; Gynecology; PCOS; Infertility, Female  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review was to assess the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). METHODS: We searched a total of 15 databases through October 2015. The participants were women with PCOS (diagnosed using the Rotterdam criteria) undergoing IVF or ICSI. Eligible trials were those with intervention groups receiving manual acupuncture (MA) or electroacupuncture (EA), and control groups receiving sham acupuncture, no treatment or other treatments. Outcomes included the clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), live birth rate (LBR), ongoing pregnancy rate (OPR) and incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and adverse events (AEs). For statistical pooling, the risk ratio (RR) and its 95% (confidence interval) CI was calculated using a random effects model. RESULTS: Four RCTs including 430 participants were selected. All trials compared acupuncture (MA/EA) against no treatment. Acupuncture significantly increased the CPR (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.71) and OPR (RR 2.03, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.81) and decreased the risk of OHSS (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.94); however, there was no significant difference in the LBR (RR 1.61, 95% CI 0.73 to 3.58). None of the RCTs reported on AEs. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture may increase the CPR and OPR and decrease the risk of OHSS in women with PCOS undergoing IVF or ICSI. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy and safety of acupuncture as an adjunct to assisted reproductive technology in this particular population.  
  Address Department of Korean Gynecology, Jaseng Hospital of Korean Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Genital Diseases, Female Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28077366 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2175  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, R.; Li, X.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, X.; Yang, K.; Li, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Manual acupuncture for myofascial pain syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Musculoskeletal Diseases  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of manual acupuncture (MA) in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). METHODS: We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing MA versus sham/placebo or no intervention in patients with MPS in the following databases from inception to January 2016: PubMed; Cochrane Library; Embase; Web of Science; and China Biology Medicine. Two reviewers independently screened the literature extracted data and assessed the quality of the included studies according to the risk of bias tool recommended by the Cochrane Handbook (V.5.1.0). Then, a meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 software. RESULTS: Ten RCTs were combined in a meta-analysis of MA versus sham, which showed a favourable effect of MA on pain intensity after stimulation of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs; standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.90, 95% CI -1.48 to -0.32; p=0.002) but not traditional acupuncture points (p>0.05). Benefit was seen both after a single treatment (SMD -1.05, 95% CI -1.84 to -0.27; p=0.009) and course of eight sessions (weighted mean difference (WMD) -1.96, 95% CI -2.72 to -1.20; p<0.001). We also found a significant increase in pressure pain threshold following MA stimulation of MTrPs (WMD 1.00, 95% CI 0.32 to 1.67; p=0.004). Two of the included studies reported mild adverse events (soreness/haemorrhage) secondary to MA. CONCLUSIONS: Through stimulation of MTrPs, MA might be efficacious in terms of pain relief and reduction of muscle irritability in MPS patients. Additional well-designed/reported studies are required to determine the optimal number of sessions for the treatment of MPS.  
  Address Department of Joint Surgery, Lanzhou General Hospital, Lanzhou Military Command, Lanzhou, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28115321 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2173  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yue, J.; Liu, M.; Li, J.; Wang, Y.; Hung, E.-S.; Tong, X.; Sun, Z.; Zhang, Q.; Golianu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the treatment of hiccups following stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 2-8  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Hiccup/etiology/*therapy; Humans; Stroke/*complications; Treatment Outcome; *Acupuncture; *Stroke; *Systematic Reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for hiccups following stroke. METHODS: Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and four Chinese medical databases were searched from their inception to 1 June 2015. The dataset included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with no language restrictions that compared acupuncture as an adjunct to medical treatment (effectiveness) or acupuncture versus medical treatment (comparative effectiveness) in stroke patients with hiccups. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. RESULTS: Out of 436 potentially relevant studies, five met the inclusion criteria. When acupuncture was compared with other interventions (as sole or adjunctive treatment), meta-analysis revealed a significant difference in favour of cessation of hiccups within a specified time period (CHWST) following intervention when used as an adjunct (risk ratio (RR) 1.59, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.19, I2=0%), but not when used alone (RR 1.40, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.47, I2=65%, ie, high heterogeneity). No safety information was reported in these studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture may be an effective treatment for patients suffering from hiccups following stroke when used as an adjunct to medical treatment. However, due to the limited number of RCTs and poor methodology quality, we cannot reach a definitive conclusion, hence further large, rigorously designed trials are needed.  
  Address Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27286862 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2171  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author MacPherson, H.; Tilbrook, H.; Agbedjro, D.; Buckley, H.; Hewitt, C.; Frost, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: 2-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 17-23  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; IBS; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Unspecified  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A recent randomised controlled trial (RCT) of acupuncture as a treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) demonstrated sustained benefits over a period of 12 months post-randomisation. AIM: To extend the trial follow-up to evaluate the effects of acupuncture at 24 months post-randomisation. METHODS: Patients in primary care with ongoing IBS were recruited to a two-arm pragmatic RCT of acupuncture for IBS. Participants were randomised to the offer of up to 10 weekly sessions of acupuncture plus usual care (n=116 patients) or to continue with usual care alone (n=117). The primary outcome was the self-reported IBS symptom severity score (IBS SSS) measured at 24 months post-randomisation. Analysis was by intention-to-treat using an unstructured multivariate linear model incorporating all repeated measures. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 61%. The adjusted difference in mean IBS SSS at 24 months was -18.28 (95% CI -40.95 to 4.40) in favour of the acupuncture arm. Differences at earlier time points estimated from the multivariate model were: -27.27 (-47.69 to -6.86) at 3 months; -23.69 (-45.17 to -2.21) at 6 months; -24.09 (-45.59 to -2.59) at 9 months; and -23.06 (-44.52 to -1.59) at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: There were no statistically significant differences between the acupuncture and usual care groups in IBS SSS at 24 months post-randomisation, and the point estimate for the mean difference was approximately 80% of the size of the statistically significant results seen at 6, 9 and 12 months. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN08827905.  
  Address Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 233  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26980547 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2172  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yeung, W.-F.; Chung, K.-F.; Yu, Y.-M.B.; Lao, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What predicts a positive response to acupuncture? A secondary analysis of three randomised controlled trials of insomnia Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 24-29  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Educational Status; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Severity of Illness Index; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult; *Sleep Medicine; *Statistics & Research Methods  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Few studies have investigated the predictors of the specific and non-specific effects of acupuncture. The aim of this secondary analysis was to determine patient characteristics that may predict a better treatment response to acupuncture for insomnia. METHODS: We pooled the data of three randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of acupuncture for insomnia to examine sociodemographic variables, clinical characteristics, baseline sleep-wake variables, and treatment expectancy in relation to acupuncture response. Subjects with an improvement in insomnia severity index (ISI) scores of >/=8 points from baseline to 1 week post-treatment were classified as responders. Factors were compared between responders and non-responders, and also by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 116 subjects who received traditional needle acupuncture were included, of which 37 (31.9%) were classified as responders. Acupuncture responders had a higher educational level (p<0.01) and higher baseline ISI score (p<0.05), compared to non-responders. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, only the number of years spent in full-time education remained significant as a predictor of treatment response (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.38, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with previous studies, our data suggest that the response to acupuncture is difficult to predict. Although the predictive power of educational level is weak overall, our findings provide potentially valuable information that could be built upon in further research (including a larger sample size), and may help to inform patient selection for the treatment of chronic insomnia with acupuncture in the future. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov: #NCT00839592; Results, #NCT00838994; Results, and #NCT01707706; Results.  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27503746 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2170  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vixner, L.; Schytt, E.; Martensson, L.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Associations between maternal characteristics and women's responses to acupuncture during labour: a secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 3 Pages 180-188  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Analgesia; Adult; Age Factors; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Labor Pain/*therapy; Labor, Obstetric; Pregnancy; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult; Acupuncture; Obstetrics; Pain Management  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Patient characteristics are modulators of pain experience after acupuncture treatment for chronic pain. Whether this also applies to labour pain is unknown. AIM: To examine for associations between maternal characteristics and response to acupuncture in terms of labour pain intensity in close proximity to the treatment (within 60 min) and over a longer time period (up to 240 min), and whether or not epidural analgesia is used, before and after adjustment for obstetric status upon admission to the labour ward. METHODS: Cohort study (n=253) using data collected for a randomised controlled trial. Associations were examined using linear mixed models and logistic regression analyses. Tests of interactions were also applied to investigate whether maternal characteristics were influenced by treatment group allocation. RESULTS: In close proximity to the treatment, advanced age and cervical dilation were associated with lower pain scores (mean difference (MD) -13.2, 95% CI -23.4 to -2.9; and MD -5.0, 95% CI -9.6 to -0.5, respectively). For the longer time period, labour pain was negatively associated with age (MD -11.8, 95% CI -19.6 to -3.9) and positively associated with dysmenorrhoea (MD 5.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 9.5). Previous acupuncture experience and advanced cervical dilatation were associated with higher and lower use of epidural analgesia (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.9; and OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.5, respectively). No interactions with treatment allocation were found. CONCLUSIONS: This study did not identify any maternal characteristics associated with women's responses to acupuncture during labour. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01197950; Post-results.  
  Address School of Health and Education, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27986648; PMCID:PMC5466917 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2423  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Z.; Geng, G.; Chen, W.; Dong, H.; Chen, L.; Zhan, S.; Li, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 404-412  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*mortality; Benserazide/*therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Dopamine Agents/*therapeutic use; Drug Combinations; Humans; Levodopa/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; complementary medicine; neurology; parkinson's disease; systematic reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), compared to the use of Madopar alone. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and Madopar for the treatment of PD published between April 1995 and April 2015. The primary outcome was total effectiveness rate and secondary outcomes included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Data were pooled and analysed with RevMan 5.3. Results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: Finally, 11 RCTs with 831 subjects were included. Meta-analyses showed that acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of PD can significantly improve the clinical effectiveness compared with Madopar alone (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.38, P<0.001). It was also found that acupuncture combined with Madopar significantly improved the UPDRS II (SMD=-1.00, 95% CI -1.71 to -0.29, P=0.006) and UPDRS I-IV total summed scores (SMD=-1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.67, P<0.001) but not UPDRS I (SMD=-0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.02, P=0.06), UPDRS III (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.41, P=0.17) or UPDRS IV (SMD=-0.78, 95% CI -2.24 to 0.68, P=0.30) scores. Accordingly, acupuncture combined with Madopar appeared to have a positive effect on activities of daily life and the general condition of patients with PD, but was not better than Madopar alone for the treatment of mental activity, behaviour, mood and motor disability. In the safety evaluation, it was found that acupuncture combined with Madopar was associated with significantly fewer adverse effects including gastrointestinal reactions (RR=0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, P<0.001), on-off phenomena (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.66, P=0.004) and mental disorders (RR=0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.92, P=0.04) but did not significantly reduce dyskinesia (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, P=0.14). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture combined with Madopar appears, to some extent, to improve clinical effectiveness and safety in the treatment of PD, compared with Madopar alone. This conclusion must be considered cautiously, given the quality of most of the studies included was low. Therefore, more high-quality, multicentre, prospective, RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further clarify the effect of acupuncture combined with Madopar for PD.  
  Address Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29180347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2444  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Namazi, N.; Khodamoradi, K.; Larijani, B.; Ayati, M.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is laser acupuncture an effective complementary therapy for obesity management? A systematic review of clinical trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 452-459  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adult; Clinical Trials as Topic; Combined Modality Therapy; Female; Humans; Laser Therapy/*methods; Male; Obesity/surgery/*therapy; Obesity Management/*methods; *Weight Loss; appetite; fat accumulation; laser acupuncture; obesity  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies may increase the success rate of weight loss via a calorie-restricted diet. Acupuncture is a popular complementary therapy for obesity management. To our knowledge, no studies have summarised the effects of laser acupuncture (LA) on obesity. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of LA, in particular with respect to its impact on anthropometric features and appetite in obese adults, by conducting a systematic review of previous clinical trials. METHODS: We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar electronic databases for papers published through October 2016. All clinical trials in English containing either anthropometric indices or appetite parameters were included. Two reviewers independently examined studies based on a predefined form for data extraction and the Jadad scale for quality assessment in order to minimise bias throughout the evaluation. RESULTS: After screening the papers, seven clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the systematic review. Positive effects of LA therapy were seen in body weight (n=3), body mass index (n=5), waist circumference (n=4), hip circumference (n=3), waist to hip ratio (n=4) and % fat mass (n=3). Appetite parameters were reported in one study, which showed that LA can reduce appetite and increase the sensation of feeling full. CONCLUSION: Although some studies have indicated beneficial effects for LA on obesity, the lack of evidence with high methodological quality made it impossible to reach a definitive conclusion about the efficacy of LA for obesity management. Further high-quality, randomised, sham-controlled clinical trials with a larger sample size are needed to shed light on the efficacy of LA for obesity management and weight maintenance.  
  Address School of Traditional Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29074473 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2447  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2452  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2453  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Z.; Geng, G.; Chen, W.; Dong, H.; Chen, L.; Zhan, S.; Li, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 404-412  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*mortality; Benserazide/*therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Dopamine Agents/*therapeutic use; Drug Combinations; Humans; Levodopa/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; complementary medicine; neurology; parkinson's disease; systematic reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), compared to the use of Madopar alone. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and Madopar for the treatment of PD published between April 1995 and April 2015. The primary outcome was total effectiveness rate and secondary outcomes included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Data were pooled and analysed with RevMan 5.3. Results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: Finally, 11 RCTs with 831 subjects were included. Meta-analyses showed that acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of PD can significantly improve the clinical effectiveness compared with Madopar alone (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.38, P<0.001). It was also found that acupuncture combined with Madopar significantly improved the UPDRS II (SMD=-1.00, 95% CI -1.71 to -0.29, P=0.006) and UPDRS I-IV total summed scores (SMD=-1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.67, P<0.001) but not UPDRS I (SMD=-0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.02, P=0.06), UPDRS III (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.41, P=0.17) or UPDRS IV (SMD=-0.78, 95% CI -2.24 to 0.68, P=0.30) scores. Accordingly, acupuncture combined with Madopar appeared to have a positive effect on activities of daily life and the general condition of patients with PD, but was not better than Madopar alone for the treatment of mental activity, behaviour, mood and motor disability. In the safety evaluation, it was found that acupuncture combined with Madopar was associated with significantly fewer adverse effects including gastrointestinal reactions (RR=0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, P<0.001), on-off phenomena (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.66, P=0.004) and mental disorders (RR=0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.92, P=0.04) but did not significantly reduce dyskinesia (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, P=0.14). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture combined with Madopar appears, to some extent, to improve clinical effectiveness and safety in the treatment of PD, compared with Madopar alone. This conclusion must be considered cautiously, given the quality of most of the studies included was low. Therefore, more high-quality, multicentre, prospective, RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further clarify the effect of acupuncture combined with Madopar for PD.  
  Address Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29180347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2485  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Namazi, N.; Khodamoradi, K.; Larijani, B.; Ayati, M.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is laser acupuncture an effective complementary therapy for obesity management? A systematic review of clinical trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 452-459  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adult; Clinical Trials as Topic; Combined Modality Therapy; Female; Humans; Laser Therapy/*methods; Male; Obesity/surgery/*therapy; Obesity Management/*methods; *Weight Loss; appetite; fat accumulation; laser acupuncture; obesity  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies may increase the success rate of weight loss via a calorie-restricted diet. Acupuncture is a popular complementary therapy for obesity management. To our knowledge, no studies have summarised the effects of laser acupuncture (LA) on obesity. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of LA, in particular with respect to its impact on anthropometric features and appetite in obese adults, by conducting a systematic review of previous clinical trials. METHODS: We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar electronic databases for papers published through October 2016. All clinical trials in English containing either anthropometric indices or appetite parameters were included. Two reviewers independently examined studies based on a predefined form for data extraction and the Jadad scale for quality assessment in order to minimise bias throughout the evaluation. RESULTS: After screening the papers, seven clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the systematic review. Positive effects of LA therapy were seen in body weight (n=3), body mass index (n=5), waist circumference (n=4), hip circumference (n=3), waist to hip ratio (n=4) and % fat mass (n=3). Appetite parameters were reported in one study, which showed that LA can reduce appetite and increase the sensation of feeling full. CONCLUSION: Although some studies have indicated beneficial effects for LA on obesity, the lack of evidence with high methodological quality made it impossible to reach a definitive conclusion about the efficacy of LA for obesity management. Further high-quality, randomised, sham-controlled clinical trials with a larger sample size are needed to shed light on the efficacy of LA for obesity management and weight maintenance.  
  Address School of Traditional Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29074473 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2488  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2493  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2494  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Z.; Geng, G.; Chen, W.; Dong, H.; Chen, L.; Zhan, S.; Li, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 404-412  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*mortality; Benserazide/*therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Dopamine Agents/*therapeutic use; Drug Combinations; Humans; Levodopa/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; complementary medicine; neurology; parkinson's disease; systematic reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), compared to the use of Madopar alone. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and Madopar for the treatment of PD published between April 1995 and April 2015. The primary outcome was total effectiveness rate and secondary outcomes included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores. Data were pooled and analysed with RevMan 5.3. Results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: Finally, 11 RCTs with 831 subjects were included. Meta-analyses showed that acupuncture combined with Madopar for the treatment of PD can significantly improve the clinical effectiveness compared with Madopar alone (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.38, P<0.001). It was also found that acupuncture combined with Madopar significantly improved the UPDRS II (SMD=-1.00, 95% CI -1.71 to -0.29, P=0.006) and UPDRS I-IV total summed scores (SMD=-1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.67, P<0.001) but not UPDRS I (SMD=-0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.02, P=0.06), UPDRS III (SMD=-0.93, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.41, P=0.17) or UPDRS IV (SMD=-0.78, 95% CI -2.24 to 0.68, P=0.30) scores. Accordingly, acupuncture combined with Madopar appeared to have a positive effect on activities of daily life and the general condition of patients with PD, but was not better than Madopar alone for the treatment of mental activity, behaviour, mood and motor disability. In the safety evaluation, it was found that acupuncture combined with Madopar was associated with significantly fewer adverse effects including gastrointestinal reactions (RR=0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, P<0.001), on-off phenomena (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.66, P=0.004) and mental disorders (RR=0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.92, P=0.04) but did not significantly reduce dyskinesia (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, P=0.14). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture combined with Madopar appears, to some extent, to improve clinical effectiveness and safety in the treatment of PD, compared with Madopar alone. This conclusion must be considered cautiously, given the quality of most of the studies included was low. Therefore, more high-quality, multicentre, prospective, RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further clarify the effect of acupuncture combined with Madopar for PD.  
  Address Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29180347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2526  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Namazi, N.; Khodamoradi, K.; Larijani, B.; Ayati, M.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is laser acupuncture an effective complementary therapy for obesity management? A systematic review of clinical trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 452-459  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adult; Clinical Trials as Topic; Combined Modality Therapy; Female; Humans; Laser Therapy/*methods; Male; Obesity/surgery/*therapy; Obesity Management/*methods; *Weight Loss; appetite; fat accumulation; laser acupuncture; obesity  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies may increase the success rate of weight loss via a calorie-restricted diet. Acupuncture is a popular complementary therapy for obesity management. To our knowledge, no studies have summarised the effects of laser acupuncture (LA) on obesity. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of LA, in particular with respect to its impact on anthropometric features and appetite in obese adults, by conducting a systematic review of previous clinical trials. METHODS: We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar electronic databases for papers published through October 2016. All clinical trials in English containing either anthropometric indices or appetite parameters were included. Two reviewers independently examined studies based on a predefined form for data extraction and the Jadad scale for quality assessment in order to minimise bias throughout the evaluation. RESULTS: After screening the papers, seven clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the systematic review. Positive effects of LA therapy were seen in body weight (n=3), body mass index (n=5), waist circumference (n=4), hip circumference (n=3), waist to hip ratio (n=4) and % fat mass (n=3). Appetite parameters were reported in one study, which showed that LA can reduce appetite and increase the sensation of feeling full. CONCLUSION: Although some studies have indicated beneficial effects for LA on obesity, the lack of evidence with high methodological quality made it impossible to reach a definitive conclusion about the efficacy of LA for obesity management. Further high-quality, randomised, sham-controlled clinical trials with a larger sample size are needed to shed light on the efficacy of LA for obesity management and weight maintenance.  
  Address School of Traditional Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29074473 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2529  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2534  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2535  
Permanent link to this record
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