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Author Kim, B.H.; Kim, K.; Nam, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A comparative study on the effects of systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture, and digital electroacupuncture to treat tinnitus: A randomized, paralleled, open-labeled exploratory trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 85  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Ear Diseases; Tinnitus; Hearing Disorders; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Auricular Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; CAM Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many previous studies of electroacupuncture used combined therapy of electroacupuncture and systemic manual acupuncture, so it was uncertain which treatment was effective. This study evaluated and compared the effects of systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture and distal electroacupuncture for treating patients with tinnitus. METHODS: A randomized, parallel, open-labeled exploratory trial was conducted. Subjects aged 20-75 years who had suffered from idiopathic tinnitus for > 2 weeks were recruited from May 2013 to April 2014. The subjects were divided into three groups by systemic manual acupuncture group (MA), periauricular electroacupuncture group (PE), and distal electroacupuncture group (DE). The groups were selected by random drawing. Nine acupoints (TE 17, TE21, SI19, GB2, GB8, ST36, ST37, TE3 and TE9), two periauricular acupoints (TE17 and TE21), and four distal acupoints (TE3, TE9, ST36, and ST37) were selected. The treatment sessions were performed twice weekly for a total of eight sessions over 4 weeks. Outcomes were the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) score and the loud and uncomfortable visual analogue scales (VAS). Demographic and clinical characteristics of all participants were compared between the groups upon admission using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). One-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the THI, VAS loud, and VAS uncomfortable scores. The least significant difference test was used as a post-hoc test. RESULTS: Thirty-nine subjects were eligible and their data were analyzed. No difference in THI and VAS loudness scores was observed in between groups. The VAS uncomfortable scores decreased significantly in MA and DE compared with those in PE. Within the group, all three treatments showed some effect on THI, VAS loudness scores and VAS uncomfortable scores after treatment except DE in THI. CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference between systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture and distal electroacupuncture in tinnitus. However, all three treatments had some effect on tinnitus within the group before and after treatment. Systemic manual acupuncture and distal electroacupuncture have some effect on VAS uncomfortable. TRIAL REGISTRATION: KCT0001991 by CRIS (Clinical Research Information Service), 2016-8-1, retrospectively registered.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 130-701, Republic of Korea. ophthrl@khu.ac.kr  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 42  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28143471; PMCID:PMC5282839 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2189  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, W.-P.; Onose, Y.; Fujikawa, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A Trial Study of Moxibustion with a Warming Needle on Edema Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 20-25  
  Keywords Adult; Edema/physiopathology/*therapy; Female; Hot Temperature; Humans; Moxibustion/*instrumentation/*methods; Needles; Regional Blood Flow/physiology; Skin Temperature/physiology; Young Adult; *edema; *moxibustion; *warm acupuncture  
  Abstract Edema is an accumulation of an excessive amount of watery fluid in cells or intercellular tissues. In order to examine the effects of acupuncture and moxibustion on edema, seven subjects were randomly divided into three groups, that was a Control group, an Acupuncture group (Acp), and an acupuncture and moxibustion group (Acp-Mox). After sitting for 60 minutes keeping their bodies still, the Acp and Acp-Mox subjects were administered acupuncture or acupuncture/moxibustion on the points of Zusanli (ST-36) and Sanyinjiao (SP-6), separately as against the Control group who only lied on the bed after modelization. After modelization at 60 minutes, the skin temperature and blood flow of all the groups were significantly lower in blood flow when compared with premodelization. But shortly after the procedure at 80 minutes, skin temperature in the Acp and Acp-Mox groups were significantly increased when compared with premodelization (vs. 60 minutes, p < 0.05). Moreover, the skin temperature and blood flow of the Acp-Mox group were significantly increased as compared to both the Control and the Acp group at the 80-minute time point. These results indicate that Acp and Mox-Acp could relieve edematous conditions significantly, especially the procedure of moxibustion with warming needle, was effective in improving edema which is often accompanied with cold intolerance and would be a recommended and superior therapy for edema.  
  Address Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie, Japan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28254097 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2207  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ngai, S.P.C.; Spencer, L.M.; Jones, A.Y.M.; Alison, J.A. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acu-TENS Reduces Breathlessness during Exercise in People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords DYSPNEA -- Treatment; ACUPUNCTURE points; CONFIDENCE intervals; CROSSOVER trials; Exercise; OBSTRUCTIVE lung diseases; PHYSICAL fitness; TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation; Walking; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; BLIND experiment; DESCRIPTIVE statistics  
  Abstract Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Publishing Corporation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121349879; Source Information: 2/20/2017, p1; Subject Term: DYSPNEA -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: CROSSOVER trials; Subject Term: EXERCISE; Subject Term: OBSTRUCTIVE lung diseases; Subject Term: PHYSICAL fitness; Subject Term: TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation; Subject Term: WALKING; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: BLIND experiment; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Illustrations: 2 Color Photographs, 1 Diagram, 2 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2247  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2453  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2494  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2535  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2576  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2617  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2651  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2692  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2740  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2781  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2822  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2863  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2904  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2945  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schlaeger, J.M.; Gabzdyl, E.M.; Bussell, J.L.; Takakura, N.; Yajima, H.; Takayama, M.; Wilkie, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture and Acupressure in Labor Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health Abbreviated Journal J Midwifery Womens Health  
  Volume 62 Issue 1 Pages 12-28  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Labor, Obstetric; Delivery, Obstetric; Women's Health  
  Abstract Acupuncture and acupressure, 2 modalities of Traditional Chinese Medicine, are based on reducing pain and symptoms of disease through balancing yin and yang. Acupuncture and acupressure have been used in China for reduction of labor pain, labor augmentation, and other intrapartum indications for more than 2 millennia. This article presents a review of the current literature that has addressed the effects of acupuncture and acupressure on intrapartum events. Studies of acupuncture have demonstrated that acupuncture may reduce labor pain, the use of pharmacologic agents, the use of forceps and vacuum-assisted births, and the length of labor. Studies that examined the effect of acupuncture on labor that is induced or augmented for premature rupture of membranes have found that acupuncture may increase the degree of cervical ripening but does not reduce the amount of oxytocin or epidural analgesia administration, nor does it shorten length of induced labor. Acupressure may reduce labor pain and labor duration, but acupressure has not been found to increase cervical ripening or induce labor. There are insufficient studies about acupuncture and acupressure and their effects on labor at this time, and there is need for further research. Areas of uncertainty include efficacy, optimal point selection, best techniques, and length of time for point stimulation.  
  Address Judith M. Schlaeger, CNM, PhD, LAc, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing (M/C 802), Room 856, 845 S. Damen Ave. Chicago, IL 60612  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Delivery, Obstetric
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28002621 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2211  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fang, S.; Wang, M.; Zheng, Y.; Zhou, S.; Ji, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture and Lifestyle Modification Treatment for Obesity: A Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume 45 Issue 2 Pages 239-254  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases; Obesity; Acupuncture; Body Mass Index  
  Abstract Obesity is an epidemic health hazard associated with many medical conditions. Lifestyle interventions are foundational to the successful management of obesity. However, the body's adaptive biological responses counteract patients' desire to restrict food and energy intake, leading to weight regain. As a complementary and alternative medical approach, acupuncture therapy is widely used for weight control. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of acupuncture treatment alone and in combination with lifestyle modification. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and Chinese Biomedical Literature Databases for relevant publications available as of 24 October 2015 without language restriction. Eligible studies consisted of randomized controlled trials for acupuncture with comparative controls. A total of 23 studies were included with 1808 individuals. We performed meta-analyses of weighted mean differences based on a random effect model. Acupuncture exhibited a mean difference of body mass index reduction of 1.742[Formula: see text]kg/m2 (95% confidence interval [Formula: see text]) and 1.904[Formula: see text]kg/m2 (95% confidence interval [Formula: see text]) when compared with untreated or placebo control groups and when lifestyle interventions including basic therapy of both treatment and control groups. Adverse events reported were mild, and no patients withdrew because of adverse effects. Overall, our results indicate that acupuncture is an effective treatment for obesity both alone and together with lifestyle modification.  
  Address Prof. Guang Ji, Institution of Digestive Diseases, Longhua Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fenglin Street, Shanghai 200032, P. R. China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Obesity
  Disease Category Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28231746 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2179  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, T.; Xu, C.; Pan, K.; Xiong, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic fatigue syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 163  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: As the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is unclear and the treatment is still a big issue. There exists a wide range of literature about acupuncture and moxibustion (AM) for CFS in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). But there are certain doubts as well in the effectiveness of its treatment due to the lack of a comprehensive and evidence-based medical proof to dispel the misgivings. Current study evaluated systematically the effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion treatments on CFS, and clarified the difference among them and Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture. METHODS: We comprehensively reviewed literature including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CBM (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database) and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) up to May 2016, for RCT clinical research on CFS treated by acupuncture and moxibustion. Traditional direct meta-analysis was adopted to analyze the difference between AM and other treatments. Analysis was performed based on the treatment in experiment and control groups. Network meta-analysis was adopted to make comprehensive comparisons between any two kinds of treatments. The primary outcome was total effective rate, while relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used as the final pooled statistics. RESULTS: A total of 31 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were enrolled in analyses. In traditional direct meta-analysis, we found that in comparison to Chinese herbal medicine, CbAM (combined acupuncture and moxibustion, which meant two or more types of acupuncture and moxibustion were adopted) had a higher total effective rate (RR (95% CI), 1.17 (1.09 ~ 1.25)). Compared with Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture, SAM (single acupuncture or single moxibustion) had a higher total effective rate, with RR (95% CI) of 1.22 (1.14 ~ 1.30), 1.51 (1.31-1.74), 5.90 (3.64-9.56). In addition, compared with SAM, CbAM had a higher total effective rate (RR (95% CI), 1.23 (1.12 ~ 1.36)). In network meta-analyses, similar results were recorded. Subsequently, we ranked all treatments from high to low effective rate and the order was CbAM, SAM, Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: In the treatment of CFS, CbAM and SAM may have better effect than other treatments. However, the included trials have relatively poor quality, hence high quality studies are needed to confirm our finding.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Gaotanyan Road 30, Shapingba District, Chongqing, 400038, China. hongyanxiong@126.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28335756; PMCID:PMC5363012 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2188  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aroxa, F.H. de A.; Gondim, I.T.G. de O.; Santos, E.L.W.; Coriolano, M. das G.W. de S.; Asano, A.G.C.; Asano, N.M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture as Adjuvant Therapy for Sleep Disorders in Parkinson's Disease Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 33-38  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Insomnia; Acu Versus Usual Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Parkinson's Disease; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract There are few studies which attest the efficacy of acupuncture on treatment of sleep disturbs in Parkinson disease. The aimed of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on sleep disturbs of 22 patients with diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson disease (Hoehn-Yahr 1 to 3) who have assistance on the Pro-Parkinson Program of Clinical Hospital at Federal University of Pernambuco in Brazil. All participants were evaluated by Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) before and after 8 weeks. The experimental group was submitted to 8 sections (once a week) which had duration of 30 minutes. The control group had no intervention. The intervention was executed using the acupuncture points LR3 (Taichong), SP6 (Sanyinjiao), LI4 (Hegu), TE5 (Wai-Guan), HT7 (Shenmen), PC6 (Neiguan), LI11 (Quchi), GB20 (Fengchi). Paired analyses were obtained by Wilcoxon test and independent analyses were made according to Mann-Whitney test. This study presented a potential therapeutic benefit of acupuncture on sleep disturbs of Parkinson's disease patients. This study showed a possible therapeutic benefit through acupuncture in sleep disorders in patients with PD. However, we propose new studies related to the effects of acupuncture on the clinical symptoms and evolution of the disease.  
  Address Clinical Medicine Department of Federal University Pernambuco – Recife (PE), Brazil. Electronic address: nadjaasano@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 22  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28254099 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2206  
Permanent link to this record
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