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Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2724  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2765  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2806  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2847  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2888  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2929  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2431  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2472  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2513  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2554  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2595  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2644  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2685  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2718  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2759  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2800  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2841  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2882  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2923  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 30  
  Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine  
  Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.  
  Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2429  
Permanent link to this record
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