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Author Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Vermeulen, R.; Tian, L.; Zheng, T.; Chen, B.E.; Engels, E.A.; He, X.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q. openurl 
  Title Coal use, stove improvement, and adult pneumonia mortality in Xuanwei, China: a retrospective cohort study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Environ Health Perspect Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 261-6 LID - 10.1289/ehp.  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; China/epidemiology; Coal/*adverse effects; Cohort Studies; Female; *Household Articles; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Pneumonia/chemically induced/*epidemiology/*mortality; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Pmc – Pmc2649229; Oid – Nlm: Pmc2649229; Oto – Notnlm; OT – coal; OT – cohort study; OT – indoor air pollution; OT – pneumonia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In Xuanwei County, China, unvented indoor coal burning is strongly associated with increased risk of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the impact of coal burning and stove improvement on risk of pneumonia is not clear. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all farmers born 1917 through 1951 and living in Xuanwei as of 1 January 1976. The analysis included a total of 42,422 cohort members. Follow-up identified all deaths in the cohort from 1976 through 1996. Ages at entry into and at exit from follow-up ranged from 24 to 59 years and from 25 to 80 years, respectively. The record search detected 225 deaths from pneumonia, and 32,332 (76%) were alive as of 31 December 1996. We constructed multivariable Cox models (time variable = age) to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Use of coal, especially smokeless coal, was positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Annual tonnage and lifetime duration of smoky and smokeless coal use were positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Stove improvement was associated with a 50% reduction in pneumonia deaths (smoky coal users: HR, 0.521; 95% CI, 0.340-0.798; smokeless coal users: HR, 0.449; 95% CI, 0.215-0.937). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis is the first to suggest that indoor air pollution from unvented coal burning is an important risk factor for pneumonia death in adults and that improving ventilation by installing a chimney is an effective measure to decrease it.  
  Address (up)  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Environmental health perspectives Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 117 Condition 2
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 7/29/2015; Priority: Normal; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7240 , USA. shenmi@mail.nih.gov; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=19270797 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1553  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sastry, P.; Hardman, G.; Page, A.; Parker, R.; Goddard, M.; Large, S.; Jenkins, D.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mesenteric ischaemia following cardiac surgery: the influence of intraoperative perfusion parameters Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 419-24 LID - 10.1093/icv  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cardiac Surgical Procedures/*adverse effects/mortality; Cause of Death; England; Female; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Incidence; Logistic Models; Male; Mesenteric Ischemia/diagnosis/*etiology/mortality; Odds Ratio; *Perfusion/adverse effects; Retrospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome; Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use; Oto – Notnlm; OT – Cardiac surgery; OT – Intestinal ischaemia; OT – Mesenteric ischaemia  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Mesenteric ischaemia (MesI) remains a rare but lethal complication following cardiac surgery. Previously identified risk factors for MesI mortality (age, poor left ventricular (LV) function, cardiopulmonary bypass time and blood loss) are non-specific and cannot necessarily be modified. This study aims to identify potentially modifiable risk factors for MesI mortality through analysis of peri- and intraoperative perfusion data. METHODS: Patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2006 and 2011 at Papworth Hospital were retrospectively divided into 3 outcome categories: death caused by MesI; death due to other causes and survival to discharge. A published MesI risk calculator was used to estimate risk of MesI for each patient and then to create 3 cohorts of matched patients from each outcome group. Pre-, intra- and postoperative variables were collected and conditional logistic regression methods were used to identify parameters associated specifically with MesI deaths after cardiac surgery. RESULTS: A total of 10 409 patients underwent cardiac surgery between 2006 and 2011. The incidence of MesI was 0.3% (30 patients). Two hundred and sixty-one patients died of non-MesI causes and 10 118 survived. It was possible to identify 25 patients in each group at equivalent risk of MesI. The following parameters were found to be associated with MesI mortality: recent myocardial infarction [odds ratio (OR) 4.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.58-15.71, P = 0.01], standard EuroSCORE (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.21, P = 0.01), vasopressor dose on bypass (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.57, P = 0.02), metaraminol dose on bypass (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12-2.06, P = 0.01) and lowest documented mean arterial pressure (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.97, P = 0.01). No other intraoperative perfusion-related parameters (e.g. flow, average activated clotting time or pressure) were associated with MesI mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Our study not only confirms previously known predictive factors, but also demonstrates a new association between intraoperative vasopressor use and MesI mortality.  
  Address (up)  
  Publisher (c) The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 19 Condition 3
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/27/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK.; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK.; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK.; Department of Public Health and; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24939960 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1513  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Plaster, R.; Vieira, W.B.; Alencar, F.A.D.; Nakano, E.Y.; Liebano, R.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 3 Pages 236-241  
  Keywords Osteoarthritis, Knee -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Methods; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Pain; Physical Mobility; Muscle Strength; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Descriptive Statistics; Brazil; Female; Male; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Dynamometry; Intrarater Reliability; Sample Size Determination; Two-Way Analysis of Variance; Pretest-Posttest Design; Data Analysis Software; Clinical Assessment Tools  
  Abstract Objective: To compare the immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients with knee osteoarthritis, with a pain intensity of ?2 on the pain Numerical Rating Scale, were included. The patients were randomised into two groups: manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture. Pain intensity, degree of dysfunction (Timed Up and Go (TUG) test), maximal voluntary isometric contraction and pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after a single session of manual acupuncture or electroacupuncture treatments. Results: Both groups showed a significant reduction in pain intensity (p<0.001) and time to run the TUG test after the acupuncture treatment (p=0.005 for the manual acupuncture group and p=0.002 for the electroacupuncture group). There were no differences between the groups regarding pain intensity (p=0.25), TUG test (p=0.70), maximum voluntary isometric contraction (p=0.43) or pressure pain threshold (p=0.27). Conclusions: This study found no difference between the immediate effects of a single session of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on pain, muscle strength and mobility in patients with knee osteoarthritis.  
  Address (up) Departamento de Estatística, Universidade de Brasília (UnB), Brasília, DF, Brazil  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103977173. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140725. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: Timed 'Up and Go' Test (TUG); Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103977173 Serial 2369  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2440  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2481  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2522  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2563  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2604  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2658  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2699  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2727  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2768  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2809  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2850  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2891  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address (up) Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2932  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jain, T.K.; Sharma, N.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effectiveness of physiotherapeutic interventions in treatment of frozen shoulder/adhesive capsulitis: A systematic review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Back & Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal J Back Musculoskeletal Rehabil  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 247-273  
  Keywords Adhesive Capsulitis -- Therapy; Physical Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Medline; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; SportDiscus; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Male; Female; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Frozen shoulder is a common condition, yet its treatment remains challenging. In this review, the current best evidence for the use of physical therapy interventions (PTI) is evaluated.METHOD: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane, PEDro, ProQuest, Science Direct, and Sport Discus were searched for studies published in English since 2000. RESULTS: 39 articles describing the PTI were analyzed using Sackett's levels of evidence and were examined for scientific rigor. The PTI were given grades of recommendation that ranged from A to C. CONCLUSIONS: Therapeutic exercises and mobilization are strongly recommended for reducing pain, improving range of motion (ROM) and function in patients with stages 2 and 3 of frozen shoulder. Low-level laser therapy is strongly suggested for pain relief and moderately suggested for improving function but not recommended for improving ROM. Corticosteroid injections can be used for stage 1 frozen shoulder. Acupuncture with therapeutic exercises is moderately recommended for pain relief, improving ROM and function. Electro- therapy can help in providing short-term pain relief. Continuous passive motion is recommended for short-term pain relief but not for improving ROM or function. Deep heat can be used for pain relief and improving ROM. Ultrasound for pain relief, improving ROM or function is not recommended.  
  Address (up) Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA  
  Publisher IOS Press
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103983309. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140902. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Biomedical; Continental Europe; Europe; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management. NLM UID: 9201340. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103983309 Serial 2375  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Au-Yeung, S.S.Y.; Hui-Chan, C.W.Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electrical acupoint stimulation of the affected arm in acute stroke: a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Clinical Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Clin Rehabil  
  Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 149-158  
  Keywords Stroke -- Complications; Hemiplegia -- Therapy; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Funding Source; Double-Blind Studies; Post Hoc Analysis; Clinical Assessment Tools; Grip Strength; Hong Kong; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; Analysis of Variance; Scales; Male; Female; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract  
  Address (up) Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Publisher Sage Publications Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 104007212. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140124. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Instrumentation: Action Research Arm Test (ARAT); National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Grant Information: This work was supported by an Area of Strategic Development grant from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University to the corresponding author, CWY Hui-Chan.. NLM UID: 8802181. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 104007212 Serial 2387  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, F.; Li, Z.-M.; Jiang, Y.-J.; Chen, L.-D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Meta-Analysis of Acupuncture Use in the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment After Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 535-544  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Cognition Disorders -- Therapy; Stroke -- Complications; Human; Alternative Therapies; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Cochrane Library; Neuropsychological Tests; Data Analysis Software; Odds Ratio; Linear Regression; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Male; Female; Adolescence; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Chi Square Test  
  Abstract Objective: This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on cognitive impairment (function) after a stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation were identified from databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Chinese Periodical Database, Wangfang Chinese Periodical Database, Chinese Bio-medicine Database, Cochrane Library, and Chinese medical literature databases) and two relevant journals ( Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion and the Journal of Shanghai Acupuncture and Moxibustion). Meta-analyses were conducted for the eligible RCTs. Results: Twenty-one trials with a total of 1421 patients met inclusion criteria. Pooled random-effects estimates of the change in the Mini-Mental State Examination were calculated for the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation. Following 4 weeks and 8 weeks of intervention with acupuncture, the merged mean difference was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.06-4.21; p<.00001) and 2.03 (95% CI, 0.26-3.80; p=0.02), respectively. For the comparison of 3-4 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the merged MD in Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination total scores was 5.63 (95% CI, 3.95-7.31; p<.00001). For the comparison of 8-12 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the P300 latency merged MD was ?12.80 (95% CI, ?21.08 to ?4.51; p<.00001), while the P300 amplitude merged MD was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p<.00001). Overall, the study quality was rated as moderate on the basis of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (part 2: 8.5). Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture had positive effects on cognitive function after stroke and supports the need for additional research on the potential benefits of this therapeutic approach.  
  Address (up) Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103971838. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) (Folstein et al); Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination. Grant Information: This study was supported by the Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971838 Serial 2347  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ning Wang; Sheng-Feng Lu; Hui Chen; Jian-Fei Wang; Shu-Ping Fu; Chen-Jun Hu; Yi Yang; Fan-Rong Liang; Bing-Mei Zhu url  doi
openurl 
  Title A protocol of histone modification-based mechanistic study of acupuncture in patients with stable angina pectoris Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bmc Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 1-11  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture; Angina, Stable -- Therapy; Proteins -- Metabolism; Protocols; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Double-Blind Studies; Random Assignment; Patient Selection; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Male; Female; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Descriptive Statistics; Kruskal-Wallis Test; Chi Square Test; Paired T-Tests; Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test; Confidence Intervals; Scales; Fisher's Exact Test; Correlation Coefficient; China; Funding Source  
  Abstract Background: Angina pectoris (Angina) is a medical condition related to myocardial ischemia. Although acupuncture has been widely accepted as a clinical approach for angina, there is no sufficient evidence of its effectiveness against this syndrome, and its mechanisms have not yet been well elucidated. We develop this protocol to confirm the clinical efficacy of electro-acupuncture on stable angina pectoris by needling on acupoint Neiguan (PC6). Furthermore, we employ high-throughput sequencing technology to investigate the gene expression profiling and determine involvement of histone modifications in the regulation of genes after electro-acupuncture treatment. Methods/Design: A randomized, controlled, double-blinded (assessor and patients) trial will be carried out. Sixty participants will be randomly assigned to two acupuncture treatment groups and one control group in a 1:1:1 ratio. Participants in acupuncture groups will receive 12 sessions of electro-acupuncture treatment across 4 weeks, followed by a 12-week randomization period. The acupuncture groups are divided into Neiguan (PC6) on Pericardium Meridian of Hand-jueyin or a non-acupoint. The primary clinical measure of effect is the frequency of angina attacks between these groups for four weeks after randomization. RNAs are extracted from peripheral neutrophils collected from all participants on day 0, day 30, and week 16, and are processed to RNA-Seq. We then investigate profiles of histone modifications by ChIP-Seq, for H3 Lysine 4 (H3K4me) and acetylation of H3 Lysine 27 (H3K27ac), in the presence or absence of acupuncture treatment. Discussion: This study determines the efficacy and mechanisms of electro-acupuncture on stable angina pectoris. We focus on effectiveness of acupuncture on alleviating symptoms of myocardial ischemia and the gene regulation and the chromatin remodeling marks, including H3K4me1, H3K4me2, and H3K27ac, which could be key factors for regulating gene expressions caused by electro-acupuncture treatment at Neiguan. This is the first genome-wide study of electro-acupuncture treatment in angina patients, and will provide valuable information for future studies in the fields of acupuncture and its underlying mechanisms. Fourteen patients have been recruited since recruitment opened in November of 2012. This study is scheduled to end in November of 2014.  
  Address (up) School of Acupuncture and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditiona Chinese Medicine, 610075 Chengdu, Sichuan, China  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109830838. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150721. Revision Date: 20150923. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS); Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). Grant Information: The trial is sponsored and financially supported by (973 Program, No. 2012CB518501) the Ministry of Science and Technology of China.. NLM UID: 101088661. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109830838 Serial 2305  
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