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Author Bao, Y. H.; Feng, W.; zhu, G.; Zou, C.; Gong, Y.; Ji, C.; Li, J. openurl 
  Title A Randomized and Comparative Study on Vascular Dementia Treated by Needling Remaining at Head Points Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 12-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Dementia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular  
  Abstract  
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  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 54  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 62  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Co, L. L.; Schmitz, T. H.; Havdala, H.; Reyes, A.; Westerman, M. P. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture: an evaluation in the painful crises of sickle cell anaemia Type of Study RCT
  Year 1979 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 181-185  
  Keywords Anemia, Sickle Cell; Miscellaneous; Hematologic Diseases; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupuncture; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; RCT; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Pain; AcuTrials  
  Abstract An evaluation of acupuncture for pain relief was made in 10 patients with sickle cell anaemia during 16 pain crises. A model was developed in which the patient served as his own control and in which both patient and examiner were unaware of whether an acupuncture point or a sham site was treated. The results show (1) that pain relief was obtained in 15 of the 16 painful episodes regardless of whether an acupuncture point or a sham site was treated, demonstrating considerable overlap between the effects of needling acupuncture points and sham sites; (2) that needling at acupuncture points for pain relief is not significantly superior to treatment at sham sites; (3) that needling, per se, whether at acupuncture points of at sham sites can be useful for alleviating pain in sickle cell crises. The model could be useful for evaluation of pain relief by needling in other diseases.  
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  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Day Frequency N/A Number of Participants 10  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Anemia, Sickle Cell
  Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 200  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Duan, G.; He, J.; Zeng, Z. openurl 
  Title Comparison of effects of acupuncture on cerebral infarction in different parts Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal World J Acupunct-Moxibustion  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 3-7  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Brain Injuries; Cerebral Infarction; RCT; Scalp Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Stroke  
  Abstract Stable cerebral infarction patients were separated into cerebral surface infarction and deep infarction on the basis of symptoms and CT scans and randomized to acupuncture and control groups (treated with usual care and drugs). There were 31 surface and 61 deep infarctions, and patients were evaluated by a national Chinese Medical Association clinical effects scale. The clinical injury score for all 92 patients dropped 12 points with acupuncture vs 6 points for controls (22-23 baseline) with 11/16 markedly improved with acupunc ture in the surface infarct group and 10/31 with deep infarction, vs 0 of 15 and 0 of 30 controls, respectively. Scalp acupuncture demonstrated definite effectiveness, but less when the infarction is deep near the ventricles and internal capsule. Acupuncture enhances cerebral blood flow and tissue metabolism, but less abundant collateral circulation is available for the region of deep infarcts. CT scans showed the superficial infarct area reduced after I month of daily acupuncture, but the deep infarct reduction was limited.  
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  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Cerebral Infarction
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 264  
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Author Gang, O. url  openurl
  Title Effects of Various Stimulation Methods on Bone Mineral Densitiy in Patients with Primary Osteoporosis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Internat J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages 124-127  
  Keywords Miscellaneous; Osteoporosis; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Moxibustion; AcuTrials  
  Abstract Objective: To explore a method for increasing bone mineral density in the patient with primary osteoporosis. Methods: Sixty-two cases of primary osteoporosis were randomly divided into the acupuncture group of 32 cases and the moxibustion group of 30 cases. They were treated by acupuncture or moxibustion at Zusanli (ST36), Guanyuan (CV4), Pishu (BL20), Shenshu (BL23), Taixi (KI3) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) respectively. Results: Acupuncture or moxibustion both can increase the bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae (P<0.01, P<0.05), with acupuncture being better than that of moxibustion (P<0.05). Conclusion: The therapeutic effects of acupuncture is superior to that of moxibustion in treatment of primary osteoporosis.  
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  Language Number of Treatments 90  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 62  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Osteoporosis
  Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 355  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kalauokalani, D.; Cherkin, D. C.; Sherman, K. J.; Koepsell, T. D.; Deyo, R. A. url  openurl
  Title Lessons from a trial of acupuncture and massage for low back pain: patient expectations and treatment effects Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal Spine  
  Volume 26 Issue 13 Pages 1418-1424  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cupping; Electroacupuncture; Exercise; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Low Back Pain; Massage; Moxibustion; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Self Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Heat Lamp; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Back Pain  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A subanalysis of data derived from a randomized clinical trial was performed. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of a patient's expectation for benefit from a specific treatment with improved functional outcome. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Psychosocial factors, ambiguous diagnoses, and lack of a clearly superior treatment have complicated the management of patients with chronic low back pain. The authors hypothesized that patient expectation for benefit from a specific treatment is associated with improved functional outcomes when that treatment is administered. METHODS: In a randomized trial, 135 patients with chronic low back pain who received acupuncture or massage were studied. Before randomization, study participants were asked to describe their expectations regarding the helpfulness of each treatment on a scale of 0 to 10. The primary outcome was level of function at 10 weeks as measured by the modified Roland Disability scale. RESULTS: After adjustment for baseline characteristics, improved function was observed for 86% of the participants with higher expectations for the treatment they received, as compared with 68% of those with lower expectations (P = 0.01). Furthermore, patients who expected greater benefit from massage than from acupuncture were more likely to experience better outcomes with massage than with acupuncture, and vice versa (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that patient expectations may influence clinical outcome independently of the treatment itself. In contrast, general optimism about treatment, divorced from a specific treatment, is not strongly associated with outcome. These results may have important implications for clinical trial design and recruitment, and may help to explain the apparent success of some conventional and alternative therapies in trials that do not control for patient expectations. The findings also may be important for therapy choices made in the clinical setting  
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  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 10 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 262  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 547  
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Author Lai, X. s.; Huang, Y. openurl 
  Title A Comparative Study on Acupoints of Specialty of Baihui, Shuigou and Shenmen in Treatment Vascular Dementia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 161-166  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Dementia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Psychological Disorders; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular; Mental Disorders  
  Abstract  
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  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 616  
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Author Lamontagne, Y.; Annable, L.; Gagnon, M. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for smokers: lack of long-term therapeutic effect in a controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1980 Publication Abbreviated Journal CMAJ  
  Volume 122 Issue Pages 787-790  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Substance-Related Disorders; Tobacco Use Disorder; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Educational; Smoking Cessation; Substance Abuse; Drug Addiction  
  Abstract  
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  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 75  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 621  
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Author Lehmann, T. R.; Russell, D. W.; Spratt, K. F. url  openurl
  Title The impact of patients with nonorganic physical findings on a controlled trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and electroacupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 1983 Publication Abbreviated Journal Spine  
  Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages 625-634  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Electroacupuncture; Low Back Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Pain; RCT; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Back Pain; TENS; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only;  
  Abstract Fifty-four patients treated in a three-week in-patient rehabilitation program were randomly assigned to and accepted treatment with electroacupuncture (n = 17), TENS (low-intensity transcutaneous nerve stimulation, n = 18) and TENS-dead battery (placebo, n = 18). Outcome measures included estimates of pain (on a visual analogue scale) and disability by both physician and patient as well as physical measures of spine function. Two groups were constructed based on the absence of nonorganic physical findings (Valid group, n = 30) and the presence of two or more nonorganic physical findings out of a possible four (Invalid group, n = 10). Multivariate and univariate analyses of covariance were utilized to determine effects of treatment (acupuncture, TENS, placebo) and the effects of over-reporting (presence of excessive nonorganic physical findings). Statistically significant findings demonstrated that the acupuncture group enjoyed more relief of peak pain and more relief of pain on an average day at the three-month return assessment. Additionally, the acupuncture group demonstrated greater improvement in extension trunk strength at the discharge assessment. The Invalid group were found to have a contaminating effect on the acupuncture results. Analysis also demonstrated associations between nonorganic physical findings and both personality traits (“Conversion V” profile on MMPI) and retention of an attorney. Researchers conducting clinical trials in chronic low-back pain patients should control for contamination by the presence of over-reporters  
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  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 21 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 54  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 668  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lehmann, T. R.; Russell, D. W.; Spratt, K. F.; Colby, H.; Liu, Y. K.; Fairchild, M. L.; Christensen, S. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of electroacupuncture and TENS in the rehabilitation of Chronic Low Back Pain patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 1986 Publication Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 277-290  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Electroacupuncture; Low Back Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; RCT; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Verum Acupoint Control; Back Pain; TENS; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only;  
  Abstract Fifty-four patients treated in a 3-week inpatient rehabilitation program were randomly assigned to and accepted treatment with electroacupuncture (n = 17), TENS (low intensity transcutaneous nerve stimulation, n = 18), and TENS dead-battery (placebo, n = 18). Outcome measures included estimates of pain (on a Visual Analogue Scale) and disability by both physician and patient, physical measures of trunk strength and spine range of motion, as well as the patient's perceptions of the relative contribution of the education, exercise training, and the electrical stimulation. Analyses of variance were utilized to determine effects of treatment (electroacupuncture, TENS, placebo) across time (admission, discharge, and return) for the outcome measures. There were no significant differences between treatment groups with respect to their overall rehabilitation. All 3 treatment groups ranked the contribution of the education as being greater than the electrical stimulation. However, the electroacupuncture group consistently demonstrated greater improvement on the outcome measures than the other treatment groups. For the visual analogue scale measure of average pain, there was a statistical trend at the return visit suggesting that the acupuncture group was experiencing less pain  
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  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 54  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 669  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, H.; Wang, J.; Lu, G.; Zhang, Q. openurl 
  Title Effect of an Herbal Compound Combined with Acupuncture and Qigong on Angina Pectoris Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Am J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 8-13  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Angina Pectoris; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Formula; Qigong; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Cardiovascular Diseases  
  Abstract  
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  Language Number of Treatments 28  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Angina Pectoris
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score 54  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 680  
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Author Li, L. F.; Lu, J. H. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation on Acupuncture Treatment of Intractable Insomnia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Trad Chin Med  
  Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 21-22  
  Keywords Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Sleep Disorders; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Moxibustion; Auricular Acupressure; Ear Seeds; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract  
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  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 685  
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Author Lin, J. G.; Lo, M. W.; Wen, Y. R.; Hsieh, C. L.; Tsai, S. K.; Sun, W. Z. url  openurl
  Title The effect of high and low frequency electroacupuncture in pain after lower abdominal surgery Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 99 Issue 3 Pages 509-514  
  Keywords Abdominal Surgery; CAM Control; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus Acu; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Pain; Pain, Postoperative; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Sham Electroacupuncture; Standard Needling Depth; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Anesthesia and Analgesia  
  Abstract In the present study, we examined the effects of preoperative electroacupuncture (EA) at classical bilateral acupuncture points (Zusanli, also known as ST-36) on postoperative pain and opioid-related side effects. One hundred healthy consenting women undergoing lower abdominal surgery were randomly assigned to four treatment regimens: Group I (n=25), control; Group II (n=25), sham-EA (needle insertion without electrical stimulation); Group III (n=25), low-EA (2Hz of electrical stimulation); and Group IV (n=25), high-EA (100Hz of electrical stimulation). EA groups received needle insertion with or without electrical stimulation 20min prior to anesthesia. All patients received patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) of morphine postoperation. Postoperative pain was evaluated by recording (1) the time of the first required analgesic, (2) the number of PCA demands, (3) the total amount of morphine required by PCA, and (4) patients' VAS pain score. We found that the time of first analgesic requested was 10, 18, 28, and 28min in the control, sham-, low-, and high-EA groups, respectively. During the first 24h, the total amount of morphine required was decreased by 21, 43 and 61% in the sham-, low- and high-EA groups, respectively. The incidence of nausea and dizziness during the first 24h after surgery was significantly reduced in both the low-EA and high-EA groups compared with the control and sham-EA groups. We also found that sham-EA exerts a beneficial effect with respect to its pain relieving quality but not the side effect profiles. Our findings demonstrates that preoperative treatment with low-EA and high-EA can reduce postoperative analgesic requirements and associated side effects in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery  
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  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 day Frequency N/A Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score 68  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 715  
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Author Liu, Y.; Ju, Y.; Zhang, E. openurl 
  Title Upper Urinary Tract Calculi Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Chin Med  
  Volume 58 Issue Pages 15-19  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Kidney Diseases; RCT; Renal Calculi; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urinary Calculi; Urinary Stones; Urologic Diseases;  
  Abstract An acupuncture protocol consisting of Huatuojiaji points at T12, L1 and L2, Huangmen Bl-51, Zhishi Bl-32 and Weiyang Bl-37 has been designed by Professor Liu Yutan for the treatment of urinary calculi. Our clinical and animal experiments have shown that the therapeutic effect of the above acupuncture protocol is superior to the current commonly-used acupuncture protocol. Our clinical research shows that the cured rates were 45.4% and 91.6% in treating renal and ureteral calculus respectively, which were significantly higher than a routine method (P<0.05). Our animal experiment revealed that needling the Huatoujiaji point at L1 can increase the peristalsis of the renal pelvis and ureter and affect the internal pressure of the renal pelvis and quantity of urine, which can thus facilitate stone-discharge.  
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  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 63  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Urinary Caliculi
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 761  
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Author Margolin, A.; Kleber, H. D.; Avants, S. K.; Konefal, J.; Gawin, F.; Stark, E.; Sorensen, J.; Midkiff, E.; Wells, E.; Jackson, T. R.; Bullock, M.; Culliton, P. D.; Boles, S.; Vaughan, R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for the treatment of cocaine addiction: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal JAMA  
  Volume 287 Issue 1 Pages 55-63  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Relaxation Techniques; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Substance-Related Disorders; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Substance Abuse; Drug Addiction  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Auricular acupuncture is widely used to treat cocaine addiction in the United States and Europe. However, evidence from controlled studies regarding this treatment's effectiveness has been inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture as a treatment for cocaine addiction. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial conducted from November 1996 to April 1999. SETTING: Six community-based clinics in the United States: 3 hospital-affiliated clinics and 3 methadone maintenance programs. PATIENTS: Six hundred twenty cocaine-dependent adult patients (mean age, 38.8 years; 69.2% men); 412 used cocaine only and 208 used both opiates and cocaine and were receiving methadone maintenance. INTERVENTION: Patients were randomly assigned to receive auricular acupuncture (n = 222), a needle-insertion control condition (n = 203), or a relaxation control condition (n = 195). Treatments were offered 5 times weekly for 8 weeks. Concurrent drug counseling was also offered to patients in all conditions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cocaine use during treatment and at the 3- and 6-month postrandomization follow-up based on urine toxicology screens; retention in treatment. RESULTS: Intent-to-treat analysis of urine samples showed a significant overall reduction in cocaine use (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.74; P =.002) but no differences by treatment condition (P =.90 for acupuncture vs both control conditions). There were also no differences between the conditions in treatment retention (44%-46% for the full 8 weeks). Counseling sessions in all 3 conditions were poorly attended. CONCLUSIONS: Within the clinical context of this study, acupuncture was not more effective than a needle insertion or relaxation control in reducing cocaine use. Our study does not support the use of acupuncture as a stand-alone treatment for cocaine addiction or in contexts in which patients receive only minimal concurrent psychosocial treatment. Research will be needed to examine acupuncture's contribution to addiction treatment when provided in an ancillary role  
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  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 620  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Cocaine-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score 79  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 828  
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Author Martin, G. P.; Waite, P. M. url  openurl
  Title The efficacy of acupuncture as an aid to stopping smoking Type of Study RCT
  Year 1981 Publication Abbreviated Journal N Z Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 686 Pages 421-423  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Smoking Cessation; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tobacco Use Disorder; Substance-Related Disorders; Substance Abuse; Drug Addiction  
  Abstract The present study examines the usefulness of acupuncture as an aid to stopping smoking. Results from 405 subjects show acupuncture can help between 5 and 15 percent of the population to stop smoking for at least six months. Using chronically implanted press needles, previously reported 'effective' auricular acupuncture points for smoking cessation are shown to be no better than 'placebo' auricular points. Additional electroacupuncture on the hand neither increases the probability of stopping smoking nor enhances the reduction in smoking at three week, three month or six month follow-up periods. It is therefore likely that a large psychological component is attached to acupuncture to stop people from smoking  
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  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 405  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 833  
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Author Podoshin, L.; Ben David, Y.; Fradis, M.; Gerstel, R.; Felner, H. url  openurl
  Title Idiopathic subjective tinnitus treated by biofeedback, acupuncture and drug therapy Type of Study RCT
  Year 1991 Publication Abbreviated Journal Ear Nose Throat J  
  Volume 70 Issue 5 Pages 284-289  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Biofeedback; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tinnitus; Ear Diseases  
  Abstract The effect of three treatment modalities of idiopathic-subjective tinnitus (IST): acupuncture (AP), biofeedback (BF) and Cinnarizine (Cin), was investigated in 58 randomly selected subjects. The findings show that at the end of treatment, 50% of the patients in the biofeedback group reported some amelioration in the level of the tinnitus, while 30% of the acupuncture group and only 10% of the group receiving Cinnarizine reported an amelioration of the tinnitus. Treatment by biofeedback caused a significant easing in the degree of discomfort caused by the tinnitus to patients during rest. Within the limitations of the sample study, our results indicate that the biofeedback method is more effective in comparison with acupuncture and Cinnarizine in the treatment of those suffering from tinnitus  
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  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 58  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 955  
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Author Rakshy, M.; Weston, C. openurl 
  Title An Investigation into the Possible Additive Effects of Acupuncture and Autogenic Relaxation in the Management of Chronic Pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 74-75  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Music Therapy; RCT; Relaxation; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Pain; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; AcuTrials; Relaxation  
  Abstract  
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  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 970  
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Author Richter, A.; Herlitz, J.; Hjalmarson, A. url  openurl
  Title Effect of acupuncture in patients with angina pectoris Type of Study RCT
  Year 1991 Publication Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 175-178  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Angina Pectoris; Cross-Over Design; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Cardiovascular Diseases  
  Abstract Twenty-one patients with stable effort angina pectoris were randomized in a crossover study to 4 weeks traditional Chinese acupuncture or placebo tablet treatment. The patients had at least five anginal attacks per week in spite of intensive treatment. Acupuncture was given three times per week at main points Neiguan (Pericardium 6), Tongli (Heart 5), Xinshu (Urinary Bladder 15), Pishu (Urinary Bladder 20) and Zusanli (Stomach 36). Previous antianginal treatment remained unchanged during the whole study. During the acupuncture period, the number of anginal attacks per week was reduced from 10.6 to 6.1 compared with placebo (P less than 0.01). Accordingly, the performance before onset of pain during exercise test increased from 82 W to 94 W (P less than 0.05). However, maximal performance did not increase after acupuncture. Intensity of pain at maximal workload decreased from 1.4 to 0.8 (scale 0-4, P less than 0.01). Further, ST-segment depressions at maximal comparable load decreased from 1.03 to 0.71 mm after acupuncture (P less than 0.01). A life quality questionnaire confirmed improved feeling of well-being. Thus, acupuncture showed an additional beneficial effect in patients with severe, intensively treated angina pectoris  
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  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 26  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Angina Pectoris
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 992  
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Author Rutgers, M. J.; Van Romunde, L. K.J.; Osman, P. O. openurl 
  Title A small randomized comparative trial of acupuncture verses transcutaneous electrical neuro-stimulation in postherpetic neuralgia Type of Study RCT
  Year 1988 Publication Abbreviated Journal The Pain Clinic  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages 87-89  
  Keywords Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Auricular Acupuncture; Herpes Zoster; Neuralgia; Pain; Postherpetic Neuralgia; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Shingles; TENS; Nervous System Diseases; RCT; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; AcuTrials; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation;  
  Abstract In a small comparative trial 23 patients with postherpetic neuralgia were at random allocated to either transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) or acupuncture (ACP) treatment. A short-term effect was demonstrated only for acupuncture.  
  Address (up)  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 18 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 23  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Neuralgia, Postherpetic
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1006  
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Author Sertel, S.; Bergmann, Z.; Ratzlaff, K.; Baumann, I.; Greten, H. J.; Plinkert, P. K. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for nasal congestion: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Sinusitis; Nasal Congestion; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Acu Versus Acu; AcuTrials; Respiratory Tract Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Nasal congestion is one of the most common complaints dealt with in otorhinolaryngology. Side effects of decongestants are frequently seenin patients with chronic nasal congestion. This leads to an increasing demand of alternative treatments such as acupuncture. Future studies on acupuncture should aim at objectifying effects by both physical measuring and double blinding. Therefore, we were interested in whether these effects can potentially be measured as increase in nasal airflow (NAF) in ventus (“wind”) disease of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).METHODS: Twenty-four patients with a history of nasal congestion due to hypertrophic inferior turbinates or chronic sinusitis without polyposis wereadditionally diagnosed according to the Heidelberg model of TCM. They were asked to score the severity of their nasal congestion on a visual analog scale(VAS). The acupuncturist was blinded according to the Heidelberg blinding assay. NAF was measured by using active anterior rhinomanometry (ARM).Specific verum acupoints according to the Chinese medical diagnosis were tested against nonspecific control acupoints. VAS and NAF were scored andmeasured before and 15 and 30 minutes after acupuncture.RESULTS: Control acupuncture showed a significant improvement in VAS and a deterioration of NAF. Verum acupuncture showed highly significantimprovements in VAS and NAF. In addition, verum acupuncture improved NAF and VAS significantly over time.CONCLUSION: Our control and verum acupoints fulfill the condition of a control and verum treatment, respectively. Measuring NAF by RRM and scoringVAS are possible and reflect acupuncture effects in vivo  
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  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 24  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Sinusitis
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1030  
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