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Author Ahn, A. C.; Bennani, T.; Freeman, R.; Hamdy, O.; Kaptchuk, T. J. url  openurl
  Title Two styles of acupuncture for treating painful diabetic neuropathy--a pilot randomised control trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 1-2 Pages 11-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Diabetes Mellitus; Diabetic Neuropathies; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Neuropathy; Pain; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract In a pilot study, we evaluated the clinical and mechanistic effects of two styles of acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Japanese acupuncture, for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Out of seven patients enrolled, three received Traditional Chinese acupuncture while four received Japanese style acupuncture. Treatments were delivered once a week for 10 weeks. Acupuncturists were permitted to select the needle interventions. Substantial differences in diagnostic techniques, choice of acupuncture points, and needle manipulation were observed between TCM and Japanese acupuncturists. Clinically, patients allocated to Japanese acupuncture reported decreased neuropathy-associated pain according to the daily pain severity score, while the group allocated to the TCM acupuncture reported minimal effects. Both acupuncture styles, however, lowered pain according to the McGill Short Form Pain Score. The TCM style improved nerve sensation according to quantitative sensory testing while the Japanese style had a more equivocal effect. No evident changes were observed in glucose control or heart rate variability in either group  
  Address Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. aahn@hms.harvard.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 7  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Diabetic Neuropathies
  Disease Category Diabetes Mellitus OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 5  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahn, C. B.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, J. C.; Fossion, J. P.; Sant'Ana, A. url  openurl
  Title A clinical pilot study comparing traditional acupuncture to combined acupuncture for treating headache, trigeminal neuralgia and retro-auricular pain in facial palsy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 29-43  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Headache Disorders; Trigeminal Neuralgia; Nervous System Diseases; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Bell Palsy; Pilot Study; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Auricular Acupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Fossion Auricular Acupuncture; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; CAM Control; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract Traditional acupuncture (TA) and ear acupuncture (EA) are used for treatment of headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain. The purpose of this study is to develop effective treatment using combined acupuncture (CA) which consists of TA and EA and to set clinical protocols for future trials. Participants were divided into TA (n = 15) control and CA (n = 34) experimental groups. Obligatory points among Korean Five Element Acupuncture and optional individual points along with symptom points were used in the TA group. The CA group was exposed to ear points of Fossion and TA. Acupuncture treatment consisted of six mandatory sessions per patient over 3 weeks and extended to 12 sessions. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale. We compared TA to CA and researched their relevant publications. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (p = 0.968) which showed pain-alleviating tendency. Pain alleviation was significantly different after the fifth and sixth sessions (p = 0.021, p = 0.025), with headache being the most significantly relieved (F = 4.399, p = 0.018) among the diseases. When assessing pain intensity, both the Headache Impact Test and the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale should be adopted for headache and the fractal electroencephalography method be used in pain diseases. In the future, studies should consist of TA, EA, and CA groups; each group having 20 patients. Treatment number should to be no less than 10 sessions. Korean Five Element Acupuncture should be a compulsory inclusion along with individual points being optional inclusion in TA. EA could be selected from Nogier, Fossion and so forth. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment, whether TA or CA, showed pain alleviation in headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain, but no significant difference was seen between groups. Prospective, well-controlled, and relevant protocols using multimodal strategies to define the role of TA, EA, and CA are needed.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, College of Oriental Medicine, Dongeui University, Busan, Korea. cbahn@deu.ac.kr  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 6  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alizadeh, R.; Esmaeili, S.; Shoar, S.; Bagheri-Hariri, S.; Shoar, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting: efficacy of two acupuncture points versus a single one Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 71-75  
  Keywords RCT; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; PONV; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Anesthesiology  
  Abstract Despite recent advances in anesthesiology and postoperative care, postoperative nausea and vomiting are common complaints. Although acupuncture techniques have received attention in anesthesiology, the ideal technique and selection of the most appropriate acupuncture points are still under debate. This study compared the efficacy of two simultaneous acupuncture points with that of a single point in the prevention and treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting following general anesthesia through a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 227 surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia who were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group received acupuncture by stimulation only on the PC6 point (single group), and the second group underwent concomitant stimulation of the PC6 and the L14 acupuncture points (combined group) during surgery under general anesthesia. The prevalences of postoperative nausea and vomiting were compared between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups (p>0.05). Of 115 patients in the combined group, 80 (69.6%) complained about nausea and vomiting compared with 96 (85.7%) in the single group, a significantly lower proportion (p<0.05). Our findings favor a combination of PC6 and LI4 stimulation for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 227  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 15  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allais, G.; De Lorenzo, C.; Quirico, P. E.; Lupi, G.; Airola, G.; Mana, O.; Benedetto, C. url  openurl
  Title Non-pharmacological approaches to chronic headaches: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, lasertherapy and acupuncture in transformed migraine treatment Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology Abbreviated Journal Neurol Sci  
  Volume 24 Issue Pages 138-142  
  Keywords TENS; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Laser Acupuncture; Migraine; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Headache Disorders; Acu Versus > 1 Control; CAM Control; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract In an open, randomized trial, we evaluated transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), infrared lasertherapy and acupuncture in the treatment of transformed migraine, over a 4-month period free of prophylactic drugs. Sixty women suffering from transformed migraine were assigned, after a one month run-in period, to three different treatments: TENS (Group T; n=20), infrared lasertherapy (Group L; n=20) or acupuncture (Group A; n=20). In each group the patients underwent ten sessions of treatment and monthly control visits. In Group T patients were treated for two weeks (5 days/week) simultaneously with three TENS units with different stimulation parameters (I: pulse rate = 80 Hz, pulse width = 120 &mgr;s; II: 120 Hz, 90 &mgr;s; III: 4 Hz, 200 &mgr;s). In Group L an infrared diode laser (27 mW, 904 nm) was applied every other day on tender scalp spots. In Group A acupuncture was carried out twice a week in the first two weeks and weekly in the next 6 weeks. A basic formula (LR3, SP6, LI4, GB20, GV20 and Ex-HN5) was always employed; additional points were selected according to each patient's symptomatology. The number of days with headache per month significantly decreased during treatment in all groups. The response in the groups differed over time, probably due to the different timing of applications of the three methods. TENS, lasertherapy and acupuncture proved to be effective in reducing the frequency of headache attacks. Acupuncture showed the best effectiveness over time  
  Address Woman's Headache Center, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Via Ventimiglia 3, I-10126 Turin, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 58  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 18  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allais, G.; Romoli, M.; Rolando, S.; Airola, G.; Castagnoli Gabellari, I.; Allais, R.; Benedetto, C. url  openurl
  Title Ear acupuncture in the treatment of migraine attacks: a randomized trial on the efficacy of appropriate versus inappropriate acupoints Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology Abbreviated Journal Neurol Sci  
  Volume 1/1/1970 Issue Pages S173-5  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Headache Disorders; Migraine; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Auricular Acupuncture; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Needle Contact Test; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Other Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Ear acupuncture can be a useful mean for controlling migraine pain. It has been shown that a technique called the Needle Contact Test (NCT) can identify the most efficacious ear acupoints for reducing current migraine pain through just a few seconds of needle contact. The majority of the points were located on the antero-internal part of the antitragus (area M) on the same side of pain. The aim of this study was to verify the therapeutic value of area M and to compare it with an area of the ear (representation of the sciatic nerve, area S) which probably does not have a therapeutic effect on migraine attacks. We studied 94 females suffering from migraine without aura, diagnosed according to the ICHD-II criteria, during the attack. They were randomly subdivided into two groups: in group A, tender points located in area M, positive to NCT were inserted; in group B, the unsuitable area (S) was treated. Changes in pain intensity were measured using a VAS scale at various times of the study. During treatment, there was a highly significant trend in the reduction of the VAS value in group A (Anova for repeated measures: p < 0.001), whereas no significance was observed in group B. VAS values were significantly lower in group A than in group B at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after needle insertion. This study suggests that the therapeutic specificity of auricular points exists and is linked to the somatotopic representation of our body on the ear.  
  Address Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Women's Headache Center, University of Turin, Via Ventimiglia 3, 10126 Turin, Italy. gb.allais@tiscali.it  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 94  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 19  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arvidsdotter, T.; Marklund, B.; Taft, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of an integrative treatment, therapeutic acupuncture and conventional treatment in alleviating psychological distress in primary care patients – a pragmatic randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 13 Issue Pages 308-317  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Stress, Psychological; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Depression; Anxiety; Counseling; Salutogenic Counseling  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To evaluate and compare effects of an integrative treatment (IT), therapeutic acupuncture (TA), and conventional treatment (CT) in alleviating symptoms of anxiety and depression in psychologically distressed primary care patients. METHODS: An open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial comparing the three treatment regimens at four and eight weeks after treatment. The study sample consisted of 120 adults (40 per treatment arm) aged 20 to 55 years referred from four different primary health care centres in western Sweden for psychological distress. Psychological distress was evaluated at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD). Treatment sessions lasted about 60 minutes in IT and 45 minutes in TA. RESULTS: No baseline differences were found between groups on HAD depression or anxiety. HAD anxiety and depression decreased significantly more in the IT and TA groups than in the CT group both after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, but not between IT and TA. Improvements in the TA and IT groups were large and clinically significant, whereas CT effects were small and clinically non-significant. CONCLUSIONS: Both IT and TA appear to be beneficial in reducing anxiety and depression in primary care patients referred for psychological distress, whereas CT does not. These results need to be confirmed in larger, longer-term studies addressing potentially confounding design issues in the present study. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN trial number NCT01631500.  
  Address Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. tina.arvidsdotter@vgregion.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Stress, Psychological
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 37  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arvidsdotter, T.; Marklund, B.; Taft, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Six-month effects of integrative treatment, therapeutic acupuncture and conventional treatment in alleviating psychological distress in primary care patients--follow up from an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 210 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords RCT; Mental Disorders; Anxiety; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Stress, Psychological; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; CAM Control; Salutogenic Counseling  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To evaluate and compare 6-month effects of 8 weeks of an integrative treatment (IT), therapeutic acupuncture (TA), and conventional treatment (CT) in reducing symptoms of anxiety, depression and in improving health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sense of coherence (SOC) in psychologically distressed primary care patients. METHODS: Patients who had participated in an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial were followed up six months after treatment. The study sample consisted of 120 adults (40 per treatment arm) aged 20 to 55 years referred from four different primary health care centres in western Sweden for psychological distress. Assessments were made at baseline after eight weeks and after 24 weeks. Anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), HRQL with the SF-36 Mental Component Summary scores (MCS) and SOC with the Sense of Coherence-13 questionnaire. RESULTS: No baseline differences were found between groups on any outcome variable. At 24 weeks, IT and TA had significantly better values than CT on all variables. All three groups showed significant improvements from baseline on all variables, except HAD depression in CT; however, improvements were significantly greater in IT and TA than in CT. IT and TA did not differ on any outcome variable. Effect sizes were large in IT and TA for all variables and small or moderate in CT. Improvements on all variables seen after 8-weeks of IT and TA remained stable at 24 weeks and the CT group improved on HAD anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: IT and TA seem to be more beneficial than CT in reducing anxiety, depression, and in improving quality of life and sense of coherence after 24 weeks of follow up in patients with psychological distress. More research is needed to confirm these results. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN trial number NCT01631500.  
  Address Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. tina.arvidsdotter@vgregion.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 38  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Avants, S. K.; Margolin, A.; Holford, T. R.; Kosten, T. R. url  openurl
  Title A randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture for cocaine dependence Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume 160 Issue 15 Pages 2305-2312  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Substance-Related Disorders; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Group Acupuncture Style; Relaxation; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Partly because of a lack of a conventional, effective treatment for cocaine addiction, auricular acupuncture is used to treat this disorder in numerous drug treatment facilities across the country for both primary cocaine-dependent and opiate-dependent populations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture for the treatment of cocaine addiction. METHODS: Eighty-two cocaine-dependent, methadone-maintained patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: auricular acupuncture, a needle-insertion control condition, or a no-needle relaxation control. Treatment sessions were provided 5 times weekly for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was cocaine use assessed by 3-times-weekly urine toxicology screens. RESULTS: Longitudinal analysis of the urine data for the intent-to-treat sample showed that patients assigned to acupuncture were significantly more likely to provide cocaine-negative urine samples relative to both the relaxation control (odds ratio, 3.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-8.72; P =. 01) and the needle-insertion control (odds ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-5.75; P =.05). CONCLUSIONS: Findings from the current study suggest that acupuncture shows promise for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Further investigation of this treatment modality appears to be warranted  
  Address Substance Abuse Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06519, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 82  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Cocaine-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score 83  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 45  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aydin, S.; Ercan, M.; Caskurlu, T.; Tasci, A. I.; Karaman, I.; Odabas, O.; Yilmaz, Y.; Agargun, M. Y.; Kara, H.; Sevin, G. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and hypnotic suggestions in the treatment of non-organic male sexual dysfunction Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Urol Nephrol  
  Volume 31 Issue 3 Pages 271-274  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hypnosis; Impotence; Genital Diseases, Male; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Sexual Dysfunctions, Physiological; Erectile Dysfunction  
  Abstract We have examined the effects of acupuncture and hypnotic suggestions, and compared them with placebo in the treatment of male sexual dysfunction with no detectable organic cause. The study comprised 15 men (mean age 36.7 +/- 10.43 years) who received acupuncture treatment, 16 men (mean age 38.4 +/- 10.75 years) who underwent hypnosis (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.52 years) and 29 men (mean age 36.2 +/- 11.38 years) who served as controls. They were interviewed periodically; the patients' reports were verified by interviewing their partners. Men who received placebo had a 43-47% improvement in sexual function, while the rates of improvement in the treated groups were higher, but not significantly so. The success rates of acupuncture and hypnotic suggestions were 60% and 75% respectively. Although the improvement was not statistically significant, treatment with acupuncture could be used as an adjuvant therapy in non-organic male sexual dysfunction. The only treatment superior to placebo seemed to be hypnosis. A more effective treatment may be obtained by combining these therapeutic modalities, but this needs further study  
  Address Department of Urology, Medical School of Yuzuncu Yil University, Istanbul, Turkey  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 48  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baccetti, S.; Da Fre, M.; Becorpi, A.; Faedda, M.; Guerrera, A.; Monechi, M. V.; Munizzi, R. M.; Parazzini, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and traditional chinese medicine for hot flushes in menopause: a randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 550-557  
  Keywords RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause; Hot Flushes; Acu Versus CAM Control; Diet; Tuina; Chinese Massage; Self Massage; Plum Blossom; Seven Star Needles; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Whole Systems  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes and other menopause-related symptoms used in an integrated system, including such therapeutic techniques as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage. DESIGN: Randomized trial. SETTING: Outpatient center. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred women in spontaneous menopause with at least three episodes of hot flushes daily were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (50 per group): Women in group A were given diet, self-massage training, and treatment with acupuncture, and women in group B (the control group) were given the same diet and self-massage training, but treatment with acupuncture started 6 weeks after they were enrolled into the study. INTERVENTION: Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean change in frequency and/or intensity in menopause-related symptoms were estimated by questionnaire after treatment at week 4. RESULTS: Treatment with acupuncture significantly reduced the occurrence of hot flushes and sudden sweating (p<.001). Other symptoms (sleep disorders, tightness in the chest, irritability, bone pain, feeling depressed) significantly improved. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture in an integrated system that includes therapeutic techniques such as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage can be used to treat hot flushes and selected symptoms in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Referring Center for Complementary Medicine , Tuscany Region, San Donnino, Campi Bisenzio, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 50  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bahrami-Taghanaki, H.; Liu, Y.; Azizi, H.; Khorsand, A.; Esmaily, H.; Bahrami, A.; Xiao Zhao, B. url  openurl
  Title A randomized, controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic low-back pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Alternative therapies in health and medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 13-19  
  Keywords RCT; Back Pain, Chronic; Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; LBP; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Time Method Acupuncture; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Eight Confluent Points; CAM Control; Pain  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic low-back pain (cLBP) is a common condition throughout the world, and acupuncture is widely sought for treatment. As clinical evidence for the benefits of acupuncture grows, acupuncture for cLBP is receiving increased recognition and acceptance by both patients and professionals. Time method acupuncture has been previously researched with respect to chronic gastritis. OBJECTIVE: For individuals with cLBP in the current study, the research team examined the efficacy of adding confluent acupoints, related to the daytime period in time method acupuncture, to regular acupuncture and also evaluated the persistence of the benefits of such acupuncture in comparison with regular acupuncture. DESIGN: The study was a randomized, controlled trial (RCT). SETTING: The setting was an outpatient clinic of the Dongzhimen Hospital in Beijing, China. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were Chinese men and women with cLBP. INTERVENTION: Sixty participants were randomly divided into 2 groups to receive acupuncture. The control group received a treatment that followed a routine acupuncture (RA) protocol, while the intervention group received a treatment that followed an RA protocol plus acupuncture in confluent points related to time (TA). OUTCOME MEASURES: The research team measured the change in participants' scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the number of therapy sessions needed, the number of days that participants were absent from work during the treatment period and at 12 wk posttreatment, and the number of pain relapses between the end of treatment and the 4- and 12-wk follow-ups. RESULTS: VAS scores decreased from 69.6 +/- 7.9 to 11.8 +/- 4.9 in the intervention group compared with a decrease from 69.2 +/- 8.0 to 15.7 +/- 10.0 in the control group (P = .001). The intervention group received fewer therapy sessions (8.1 +/- 2.0) than did the control group (10.1 +/- 2.0, P < .001). Compared with the controls, the intervention group showed fewer days absent from work (0.5 vs 1.4; P = .03) and fewer pain relapses (4.0 vs 7.0; P = .04) at the 12-wk follow-up. In the 2 groups combined, VAS decreased from 69.4 +/- 7.9 before the first session of acupuncture to 13.8 +/- 8.0 after the last session (P < .001), and the number of therapy sessions needed for pain relief was 9.1 +/- 2.2. CONCLUSION: Accompanying routine acupuncture with time method acupuncture can enhance the efficacy of treatment and the persistence of its benefits in individuals with cLBP.  
  Address Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 51  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bai, Y. L.; Li, L.; Hu, Y. S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, P. J.; Wang, S. W.; Yang, M.; Xu, Y. M.; Zhu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial of Physiotherapy and Acupuncture on Motor Function and Daily Activities in Patients with Ischemic Stroke Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 8 Pages 684-689  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Stroke; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Physical; Motor Function  
  Abstract Abstract Objective: To assess the value of acupuncture for promoting the recovery of patients with ischemic stroke and to determine whether the outcomes of combined physiotherapy and acupuncture are superior to those with physiotherapy alone. Design: Prospective randomized controlled trial. Setting: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, P. R. China. Participants: 120 inpatients and outpatients (84 men and 36 women). Interventions: Acupuncture, physiotherapy, and physiotherapy combined with acupuncture. Main outcome measures: Motor function in the limbs was measured with the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA). The modified Barthel index (MBI) was used to rate activities of daily living. All evaluations were performed by assessors blinded to treatment group. Results: On the first day of therapy (day 0, baseline), FMA and MBI scores did not significantly differ among the treatment groups. Compared with baseline, on the 28th day of therapy the mean FMA scores of the physiotherapy, acupuncture, and combined treatment groups had increased by 65.6%, 57.7%, and 67.2%, respectively; on the 56th day, FMA scores had increased by 88.1%, 64.5%, and 88.6%, respectively (p&lt;0.05). The respective MBI scores in the three groups increased by 85.2%, 60.4%, and 63.4% at day 28 and by 108.0%, 71.2%, and 86.2% at day 56, respectively (p&lt;0.05). However, FMA scores did not significantly differ among the three treatment groups on the 28th day. By the 56th day, the FMA and MBI scores of the physiotherapy group were 46.1% and 33.2% greater, respectively, than those in the acupuncture group p&lt;0.05). No significant differences were seen between the combined treatment group and the other groups. In addition, the FMA subscores for the upper extremities did not reflect any significant improvement in any group on the 56th day. Although the FMA subscores for the upper and lower extremities and the MBI score in the combined treatment group were higher than those in the acupuncture group, the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture is less effective for the outcome measures studied than is physiotherapy. Moreover, the therapeutic effect of combining acupuncture with physiotherapy was not superior to that of physiotherapy alone. A larger-scale clinical trial is necessary to confirm these findings.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 52  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bao, Y. H.; Feng, W. M.; Zhu, G. X.; Zou, C.; Gong, Y.; Ji, C. T.; Li, J. openurl 
  Title Clinical Study of Scalp Acupuncture with Extended Needle Retention at Scalp-Acupoints for Treatment of Vascular Dementia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication American Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 35-37  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Dementia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular; Mental Disorders  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 61  
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Author Bao, Y. H.; Feng, W.; zhu, G.; Zou, C.; Gong, Y.; Ji, C.; Li, J. openurl 
  Title A Randomized and Comparative Study on Vascular Dementia Treated by Needling Remaining at Head Points Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 12-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Dementia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 54  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 62  
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Author Bernateck, M.; Becker, M.; Schwake, C.; Hoy, L.; Passie, T.; Parlesak, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Fink, M.; Karst, M. url  openurl
  Title Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Auricular acupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Forschende Komplementärmedizin = Research in complementary medicine Abbreviated Journal Forsch Komplementmed  
  Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages 187-193  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Arthritis; Auricular Acupuncture; Auricular Electroacupuncture; RCT; Arthritis, Rheumatoid; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patients with RA (n = 44) were randomized into EA or AT groups. EA and lessons in AT were performed once weekly for 6 weeks. Primary outcome measures were the mean weekly pain intensity and the disease activity score 28 (DAS 28); secondary outcome measures were the use of pain medication, the pain disability index (PDI), the clinical global impression (CGI) and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, which were assessed during the study period and 3 months after the end of treatment. RESULTS: At the end of the treatment and at 3-month follow-up a clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05) could be observed in all outcome parameters and both groups. In contrast to the AT group, the onset of these effects in the EA group could already be observed after the 2nd treatment week. In the 4th treatment week the EA group reported significantly less pain than the AT group (p = 0.040). After the end of treatment (7th week) the EA group assessed their outcome as significantly more improved than the AT group (p = 0.035). The erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the EA group was significantly reduced (p = 0.010), and the serum concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly increased compared to the AT group (p = 0.020). CONCLUSIONS: The adjuvant use of both EA and AT in the treatment of RA resulted in significant short- and long-term treatment effects. The treatment effects of auricular EA were more pronounced  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Clinic, Hannover, Germany. bernateck.michael@mh-hannover.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 44  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 71  
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Author Berry, H.; Fernandes, L.; Bloom, B.; Clark, R. J.; Hamilton, E. B. url  openurl
  Title Clinical study comparing acupuncture, physiotherapy, injection and oral anti-inflammatory therapy in shoulder-cuff lesions Type of Study RCT
  Year 1980 Publication Current medical research and opinion Abbreviated Journal Curr Med Res Opin  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 121-126  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Moxibustion; Pain; Physical Therapy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Shoulder Impingement Syndrome; Shoulder Pain  
  Abstract In a single-blind trial, five treatments for painful stiff shoulder were compared for a 4-week assessment period in 60 patients. The treatments were acupuncture, steroid injection with placebo and with active tolmetin sodium, physiotherapy in the form of ultrasound and 'placebo' physiotherapy with placebo tolmetin sodium. Objective assessment was gained by use of goniometer readings to monitor shoulder abduction. Pain was measured by visual analogue scales and by a 4-point scale. Comparative assessment was also recorded and at the end of the study a success or failure was recorded for each patient's treatment. With very few exceptions all patients improved markedly, both in terms of the subjective and objective parameters. No differences between the treatments were detected. The incidence and severity of side-effects was low. It is suggested that the results show that the painful stiff shoulder may be a self-limiting condition and that any beneficial effect was really due to natural recovery. This is an important consideration because patients do not always receive immediate attention when referred to an out-patient department and the use of physiotherapy and acupuncture in such cases, perhaps, should be critically examined  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 72  
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Author Borup, L.; Wurlitzer, W.; Hedegaard, M.; Kesmodel, U. S.; Hvidman, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as pain relief during delivery: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Birth Abbreviated Journal Birth  
  Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 5-12  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Auricular Acupuncture; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; TENS; Women's Health; Analgesia, Obstetrical; Labor, Obstetric; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many women need some kind of analgesic treatment to relieve pain during childbirth. The objective of our study was to compare the effect of acupuncture with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) and traditional analgesics for pain relief and relaxation during delivery with respect to pain intensity, birth experience, and obstetric outcome. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 607 healthy women in labor at term who received acupuncture, TENS, or traditional analgesics. Primary outcomes were the need for pharmacological and invasive methods, level of pain assessed by a visual analogue scale, birth experience and satisfaction with delivery, and pain relief evaluated at 2 months postpartum. Secondary obstetric outcomes were duration of labor, use of oxytocin, mode of delivery, postpartum hemorrhage, Apgar score, and umbilical cord pH value. Analysis complied with the intention-to-treat principle. RESULTS: Use of pharmacological and invasive methods was significantly lower in the acupuncture group (acupuncture vs traditional, p < 0.001; acupuncture vs TENS, p = 0.031). Pain scores were comparable. Acupuncture did not influence the duration of labor or the use of oxytocin. Mean Apgar score at 5 minutes and umbilical cord pH value were significantly higher among infants in the acupuncture group compared with infants in the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture reduced the need for pharmacological and invasive methods during delivery. Acupuncture is a good supplement to existing pain relief methods.  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 607  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Analgesia, Obstetrical
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 85  
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Author Bu, Y.; Du, G.; Chen, S. openurl 
  Title Clinical study on the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea with preconditioning acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Chinese journal of integrative medicine Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 3 Pages 224-227  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 95  
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Author Cai, X. M.; Wu, J. openurl 
  Title The mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating method for acupuncture treatment of delayed menstrual cycle--a clinical controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit.Chin Med.  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 35-38  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Menstruation Disturbances; Oligomenorrhea; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Other Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Menstruation-Regulating Method  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method with the routine acupuncture method in treating delayed menstrual cycle. METHODS: 40 patients with delayed menstrual cycle were randomly divided into a treatment group of 23 cases (treated by the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method), and a control group of 17 cases (treated by the routine acupuncture method for delayed menstrual cycle due to stagnation of the liver-qi). The treatment involved three menstrual cycles. The evaluations were done by scoring the symptoms before treatment and at the end of each menstrual cycle. RESULTS: After treatment, significant differences were found between the two groups in the therapeutic effects (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: The therapeutic effect of the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method is significantly superior to that of the routine acupuncture method for delayed menstrual cycle  
  Address College of Acupuncture and Massage, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, Sichuan, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Oligomenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 104  
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Author Cao, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, L. openurl 
  Title Treatment of Cholelithiasis by acupuncture and oral decoction Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 167-169  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cholelithiasis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Formula; Miscellaneous; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 7  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 72  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Cholelithiasis
  Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 113  
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