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Author (up) Diener, H. C.; Kronfeld, K.; Boewing, G.; Lungenhausen, M.; Maier, C.; Molsberger, A.; Tegenthoff, M.; Trampisch, H. J.; Zenz, M.; Meinert, R. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture for the prophylaxis of migraine: a multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication The Lancet. Neurology Abbreviated Journal Lancet Neurol  
  Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 310-316  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Penetrating Sham; Migraine; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess the efficacy of a part-standardised verum acupuncture procedure, in accordance with the rules of traditional Chinese medicine, compared with that of part-standardised sham acupuncture and standard migraine prophylaxis with beta blockers, calcium-channel blockers, or antiepileptic drugs in the reduction of migraine days 26 weeks after the start of treatment. METHODS: This study was a prospective, randomised, multicentre, double-blind, parallel-group, controlled, clinical trial, undertaken between April 2002 and July 2005. Patients who had two to six migraine attacks per month were randomly assigned verum acupuncture (n=313), sham acupuncture (n=339), or standard therapy (n=308). Patients received ten sessions of acupuncture treatment in 6 weeks or continuous prophylaxis with drugs. Primary outcome was the difference in migraine days between 4 weeks before randomisation and weeks 23-26 after randomisation. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN52683557. FINDINGS: Of 1295 patients screened, 960 were randomly assigned to a treatment group. Immediately after randomisation, 125 patients (106 from the standard group) withdrew their consent to study participation. 794 patients were analysed in the intention-to-treat popoulation and 443 in the per-protocol population. The primary outcome showed a mean reduction of 2 .3 days (95% CI 1.9-2.7) in the verum acupuncture group, 1.5 days (1.1-2.0) in the sham acupuncture group, and 2.1 days (1.5-2.7) in the standard therapy group. These differences were statistically significant compared with baseline (p<0.0001), but not across the treatment groups (p=0.09). The proportion of responders, defined as patients with a reduction of migraine days by at least 50%, 26 weeks after randomisation, was 47% in the verum group, 39% in the sham acupuncture group, and 40% in the standard group (p=0.133). INTERPRETATION: Treatment outcomes for migraine do not differ between patients treated with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture, or standard therapy  
  Address Department of Neurology, University Essen, Essen, Germany. h.diener@uni-essen.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 20 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 960  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 96  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 245  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dong, H.; Wang, X.; Meng, X.; Liu, G. url  openurl
  Title Forty-six cases of the nerve root-involved cervical spondylopathy treated by needling the “Sitian” points Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 163-165  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cervical Spondylosis; Neck Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Spondylosis  
  Abstract In order to investigate the analgesic effect of needling at “Sitian” points for the nerve root-involved cervical spondylopathy, 68 cases of the nerve root-involved cervical spondylopathy were randomly divided into a treatment group of 46 cases treated by needling at “Sitian” points, and a control group of 22 cases treated by needling at cervical Jiaji points. After 2 therapeutic courses, the therapeutic effects were evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the semeiographic format. The results showed that the markedly effective rate was 78.3% and 54.5%, respectively in the treatment group and the control group, and the difference between the two groups was of significance (P<0.05). It can be concluded that needling at “Sitian” points can bring about a better therapeutic effect on the improvement of clinical symptoms, physical signs and pain than that of the needling at the cervical Jiaji points  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Tianjin College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 68  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Spondylosis
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 254  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dong, J.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, Q. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and blood-letting for 30 cases of rheumatic gonitis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 121-122  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bloodletting; Cupping; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Wounds and Injuries; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Rheumatic Gonitis; TCM Acupuncture Style; Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome  
  Abstract  
  Address Heilongjiang Provincial Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Helongjiang Province 150036  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 255  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dou, H. openurl 
  Title Clinical observation of ziwuliuzhu acupuncture therapy on recurrence of ischemic stroke: a study of 30 cases Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 8-10  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Nervous System Diseases; Stroke; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Other Acupuncture Style; Ziwuliuzhu Acupuncture; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Herbal Injection  
  Abstract  
  Address Dou, H. CLinical Observation of Ziwiliushu Acupuncture Therapy On Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke. Laiwu hospital of TCM, Shangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 259  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Duan, G.; He, J.; Zeng, Z. openurl 
  Title Comparison of effects of acupuncture on cerebral infarction in different parts Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal World J Acupunct-Moxibustion  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 3-7  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Brain Injuries; Cerebral Infarction; RCT; Scalp Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Stroke  
  Abstract Stable cerebral infarction patients were separated into cerebral surface infarction and deep infarction on the basis of symptoms and CT scans and randomized to acupuncture and control groups (treated with usual care and drugs). There were 31 surface and 61 deep infarctions, and patients were evaluated by a national Chinese Medical Association clinical effects scale. The clinical injury score for all 92 patients dropped 12 points with acupuncture vs 6 points for controls (22-23 baseline) with 11/16 markedly improved with acupunc ture in the surface infarct group and 10/31 with deep infarction, vs 0 of 15 and 0 of 30 controls, respectively. Scalp acupuncture demonstrated definite effectiveness, but less when the infarction is deep near the ventricles and internal capsule. Acupuncture enhances cerebral blood flow and tissue metabolism, but less abundant collateral circulation is available for the region of deep infarcts. CT scans showed the superficial infarct area reduced after I month of daily acupuncture, but the deep infarct reduction was limited.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Cerebral Infarction
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 264  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Duan, J.; Peng, W.; Liu, Z.; Yang, D.; Guo, J. openurl 
  Title Clinical Study on Deep Insertion at Tianshu (ST 25) for Colonic Slow Transit Constipation Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 46-50  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Constipation; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical effect of deep insertion at Tianshu (ST 25) for colonic slow transit constipation (STC). Methods: 120 cases of STC patients were randomly divided, 60 cases in a deep insertion group, 30 cases in an electroacupuncture group and 30 cases in a medication group by 2:1:1 ratio. The deep insertion group was treated with deep insertion at Tianshu (ST 25). The electroacupuncture group was treated with routine insertion at Tianshu (ST 25). The medication group was treated with oral administration of Lactulose oral liquid. The first voluntary defecation time, and constipation scores before the treatment, four weeks after the treatment and relevant scores of clinical symptoms were assessed in the three groups of the patients. Results: The scores of the clinical symptoms in improvement of constipation were better in the deep insertion group than in the electroacupuncture group and medication group, with differences in statistical significance (P<0.01). The unsuccessful numbers in the improvement of defecation and abdominal pain were also better in the deep insertion group than in the other two groups, and better in instant effect in the deep insertion. Conclusion: The improvement of STC clinical symptoms was better by deep insertion at Tianshu (ST 25) than by medication and routine acupuncture method at Tianshu (ST 25).  
  Address Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100053, P. R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Constipation
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 266  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Duncan, B.; Barton, L.; Edmonds, D.; Blashill, B. M. url  openurl
  Title Parental perceptions of the therapeutic effect from osteopathic manipulation or acupuncture in children with spastic cerebral palsy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal Clin Pediatr (Phila)  
  Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 349-353  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Auricular Acupuncture; Cerebral Palsy; Craniosacral Therapy; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Osteopathic Medicine; Pediatrics; RCT; Scalp Acupuncture; Muscle Spasticity; Usual Care Control, Physical; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Wait-List Control  
  Abstract SUMMARY: Fifty children were involved in a randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of either osteopathic manipulation or acupuncture as a 6-month therapeutic adjunct for children with spastic cerebral palsy. Exit interviews were used to obtain parental perceptions and form the basis of this report. Only 2 of 17 parents reported positive gains while their child was in a wait-list control period but all 17 reported gains while in the treatment phase of the study. Ninety-six percent (48 of 50) of the parents reported some improvement while their child was receiving treatments but the gains varied from child to child. The most frequent gains were seen in improvement in the use of arms or legs (61% and 68%) and more restful sleep (39% and 68%) in the osteopathic and the acupuncture groups, respectively. Improvement in mood and improved bowel function were also very common benefits noted by the parents in both groups. Clin Pediatr. 2004;43:349-353  
  Address University of Arizona, Department of Pediatrics, Tucson, AZ  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 69  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Cerebral Palsy
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 267  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Duncan, B.; Donough-Means, S.; Worden, K.; Schnyer, R.; Andrews, J.; Meaney, F. J. url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of osteopathy in the cranial field and myofascial release versus acupuncture as complementary treatment for children with spastic cerebral palsy: a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Osteopath Assoc  
  Volume 108 Issue 10 Pages 559-570  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cerebral Palsy; Motor Function; Myofascial Release; Pediatrics; Pilot Study; RCT; Wait-List Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; CAM Control; Osteopathic Medicine; Nervous System Diseases; Auricular Acupuncture; Scalp Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Case reports and clinical trials have indicated that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) may improve motor function and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of osteopathy in the cranial field, myofascial release, or both versus acupuncture in children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy, as measured by several outcomes instruments in a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Children between the ages of 20 months and 12 years with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized wait-list control pilot study. There were three arms in the study: OMT (ie, osteopathy in the cranial field, myofascial release, or both, using direct or indirect methods), acupuncture, and control (ie, nontherapeutic attention). Children who were initially randomly assigned to the control arm were subsequently randomly reassigned to the intervention arms, increasing the sample size. Outcome measures included standard instruments used in the evaluation of children with cerebral palsy. Less traditional measures were also used, including serial evaluations by an independent blind osteopathic physician and visual analog scale assessments by an independent osteopathic physician and the parents or guardians. A total of 11 outcome variables were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients were included in the study. Individual analyses of the 11 outcome variables revealed statistically significant improvement in two mobility measures for patients who received OMT--the total score of Gross Motor Function Measurement and the mobility domain of Functional Independence Measure for Children (P<.05). No statistically significant improvements were seen among patients in the acupuncture treatment arm. CONCLUSIONS: A series of treatments using osteopathy in the cranial field, myofascial release, or both improved motor function in children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy. These results can be used to guide future research into the effectiveness of OMT or acupuncture in treating children with spastic cerebral palsy  
  Address Department of Pediatrics at University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson, AZ, USA. brduncan@email.arizona.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 55  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Cerebral Palsy
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 268  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dyson-Hudson, T. A.; Shiflett, S. C.; Kirshblum, S. C.; Bowen, J. E.; Druin, E. L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and Trager psychophysical integration in the treatment of wheelchair user's shoulder pain in individuals with spinal cord injury Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 82 Issue 8 Pages 1038-1046  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Pain; Paralysis; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Shoulder Pain; Spinal Cord Injuries; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trager Psychophysical Integration; Wounds and Injuries  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of acupuncture and Trager Psychophysical Integration (a form of manual therapy) in decreasing chronic shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: A prospective clinical trial, with subjects randomized to acupuncture or Trager treatment condition. Subjects served as their own controls by including a 5-week pretreatment baseline period and a 5-week posttreatment follow-up period. SETTING: Rehabilitation hospital research department. PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen subjects with chronic SCI and chronic shoulder pain who used manual wheelchairs as their primary means of mobility. INTERVENTION: Ten acupuncture or 10 Trager treatments over a 5-week period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in performance-corrected Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (PC-WUSPI) scores during baseline, treatment, and follow-up periods were assessed by using analysis of variance. RESULTS: The mean PC-WUSPI score +/- standard deviation of the 18 subjects at entry was 48.9 +/- 24.6 (range, 8.0-94). No significant change in mean PC-WUSPI scores occurred during the pretreatment baseline period. Mean PC-WUSPI scores decreased significantly during the treatment period in both the acupuncture (53.4%; 23.3 points) and Trager (53.8%; 21.7 points) treatment groups. The reduced PC-WUSPI scores were maintained in both groups throughout the 5-week posttreatment follow-up period. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture and Trager are both effective treatments for reducing chronic shoulder pain associated with functional activities in persons with SCI  
  Address Center for Research in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Kessler Medical Rehabilitation Research and Education Corp, West Orange, NJ 07052, USA. tdyson-hudson@kmrrec.org  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 5 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 18  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Shoulder Pain
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score 73  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 276  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Eisenberg, D. M.; Post, D. E.; Davis, R. B.; Connelly, M. T.; Legedza, A. T.; Hrbek, A. L.; Prosser, L. A.; Buring, J. E.; Inui, T. S.; Cherkin, D. C. url  openurl
  Title Addition of choice of complementary therapies to usual care for acute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Spine Abbreviated Journal Spine  
  Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 151-158  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Low Back Pain, Acute; AcuTrials; Chiropractic; Cost Effectiveness; Low Back Pain; Massage; Pain; RCT; Usual Care Control, Unspecified  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness and cost of usual care plus patient choice of acupuncture, chiropractic, or massage therapy (choice) compared with usual care alone in patients with acute low back pain (LBP). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Few studies have evaluated care models with facilitated access to and financial coverage for adjunctive complementary and alternative medicine therapies. METHODS: A total of 444 patients with acute LBP (<21 days) were recruited from 4 clinical sites and randomized into 2 groups: usual care or choice. Outcomes included symptoms (bothersomeness), functional status (Roland), and satisfaction between baseline and 5 weeks, and cost of medical care in the 12 weeks after randomization. RESULTS: After 5 weeks, providing patients with a choice did not yield clinically important reductions in symptoms (median -4, [interquartile range -7, -2] for usual care, and -5 [-7, -3] for choice; P = 0.002) or improvements in functional status (-8 [-13, -2] for usual care, and -9 [-15, -4] for choice; P = 0.15). Although there was a significantly greater satisfaction with care in the choice group, this came at a net increase in costs of 244 dollars per patient. This consisted of a 99 dollars reduction in the average cost to the insurer for medical care but an additional cost of 343 dollars, for an average of 6.0 complementary and alternative medicine treatments per patient. CONCLUSIONS: A model of care that offered access to a choice of complementary and alternative medicine therapies for acute LBP did not result in clinically significant improvements in symptom relief or functional restoration. This model was associated with greater patient satisfaction but increased total costs. Future evaluations of this choice model should focus on patients with chronic conditions (including chronic back pain) for which conventional medical care is often costly and of limited benefit  
  Address Division for Research and Education in Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies, Osher Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. david_eisenberg@hms.harvard.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 5 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 444  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Acute
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 280  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ekblom, A.; Hansson, P.; Thomsson, M.; Thomas, M. url  openurl
  Title Increased postoperative pain and consumption of analgesics following acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 1991 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 44 Issue 3 Pages 241-247  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; No Treatment Control; Pain; Pain, Postoperative; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Stomatognathic Diseases  
  Abstract Acupuncture was given to patients before (preoperative-acupuncture group, PRE-ACU, n = 25) or after (postoperative-acupuncture group, POST-ACU, n = 25) operative removal of impacted mandibular third molars. Sixty patients did not receive acupuncture and participated as a control group (CG). All patients completed a questionnaire in order to characterize state tension and stress, degrees of neuroticism, extroversion, depression and psychosomatic disorders. We also recorded intraoperative discomfort and pain intensity, postoperative pain intensity and consumption of analgesics for 72 h. The PRE-ACU was significantly more tense following surgery and found the operative procedure more unpleasant than the other two groups. The PRE-ACU further rated intraoperative pain intensity higher than the CG and experienced higher pain intensity immediately postoperatively compared with POST-ACU and CG. Of the PRE-ACU patients 15/24 needed additional local anesthesia intraoperatively while none in the POST-ACU or CG requested extra lidocaine. Postoperatively patients in both PRE- and POST-ACU reported a higher total sum of pain scores (pain intensity) and the PRE-ACU consumed more analgesics compared with the CG. A significantly larger number of patients suffering from “dry socket” (a complication during wound healing) was found in both PRE- and POST-ACU compared with the CG. No correlation was found between assessed personality characteristics and reported postoperative pain/consumption of analgesics in any group and could thus not explain the observed differences between the groups. The reason for our unexpected “negative” findings is unclear but some hypothetical explanations are discussed  
  Address Department of Physiology II, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 110  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 281  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) El Rakshy, M.; Weston, C. openurl 
  Title An Investigation into the Possible Additive Effects of Acupuncture and Autogenic Relaxation in the Management of Chronic Pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 74-  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Music Therapy; Pain; RCT; Relaxation; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 282  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Elden, H.; Ladfors, L.; Olsen, M. F.; Ostgaard, H. C.; Hagberg, H. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture and stabilising exercises as adjunct to standard treatment in pregnant women with pelvic girdle pain: randomised single blind controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication BMJ : British medical journal / British Medical Association Abbreviated Journal BMJ  
  Volume 330 Issue 7494 Pages 761-  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Exercise Therapy; Pain; Pelvic Pain; Pregnancy Complications; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy of standard treatment, standard treatment plus acupuncture, and standard treatment plus stabilising exercises for pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy. DESIGN: Randomised single blind controlled trial. Settings East Hospital, Gothenburg, and 27 maternity care centres in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 386 pregnant women with pelvic girdle pain. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment for six weeks with standard treatment (n = 130), standard treatment plus acupuncture (n = 125), or standard treatment plus stabilising exercises (n = 131). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome measure was pain (visual analogue scale); secondary outcome measure was assessment of severity of pelvic girdle pain by an independent examiner before and after treatment. RESULTS: After treatment the stabilising exercise group had less pain than the standard group in the morning (median difference = 9, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 12.8; P = 0.0312) and in the evening (13, 2.7 to 17.5; P = 0.0245). The acupuncture group, in turn, had less pain in the evening than the stabilising exercise group (-14, -18.1 to -3.3; P = 0.0130). Furthermore, the acupuncture group had less pain than the standard treatment group in the morning (12, 5.9 to 17.3; P < 0.001) and in the evening (27, 13.3 to 29.5; P < 0.001). Attenuation of pelvic girdle pain as assessed by the independent examiner was greatest in the acupuncture group. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture and stabilising exercises constitute efficient complements to standard treatment for the management of pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy. Acupuncture was superior to stabilising exercises in this study  
  Address Perinatal Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute for the Health of Women and Children, Sahlgrenska Academy, East Hospital, 41685 Gothenburg, Sweden. helen.elden@vgregion.se  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 386  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Pelvic Pain
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score 73  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 286  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Elden, H.; Ostgaard, H. C.; Fagevik-Olsen, M.; Ladfors, L.; Hagberg, H. url  openurl
  Title Treatments of pelvic girdle pain in pregnant women: adverse effects of standard treatment, acupuncture and stabilising exercises on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/ neonate Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine [electronic resource] Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 34-  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Adverse Effects; Analgesia; Delivery, Obstetric; Exercise; Pain; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; AcuTrials; CAM Control  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous publications indicate that acupuncture is efficient for the treatment of pelvic girdle pain, PGP, in pregnant women. However, the use of acupuncture for PGP is rare due to insufficient documentation of adverse effects of this treatment in this specific condition. The aim of the present work was to assess adverse effects of acupuncture on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/ neonate in comparison with women that received stabilising exercises as adjunct to standard treatment or standard treatment alone. METHODS: In all, 386 women with PGP entered this controlled, single-blind trial. They were randomly assigned to standard treatment plus acupuncture (n=125), standard treatment plus specific stabilising exercises (n=131) or to standard treatment alone (n=130) for 6 weeks. Acupuncture that may be considered strong was used and treatment was started as early as in the second trimester of pregnancy. Adverse effects were recorded during treatment and throughout the pregnancy. Influence on the fetus was measured with cardiotocography (CTG) before-during and after 43 acupuncture sessions in 43 women. A standardised computerized method to analyze the CTG reading numerically (Oxford 8000, Oxford, England) was used. After treatment, the women rated their overall experience of the treatment and listed adverse events if any in a questionnaire. Data of analgesia and oxytocin augmentation during labour, duration of labour, frequency of preterm birth, operative delivery, Apgar score, cord-blood gas/ acid base balance and birth weight were also recorded. RESULTS: There were no serious adverse events after any of the treatments. Minor adverse events were common in the acupuncture group but women rated acupuncture favourably even despite this. The computerized or visually assessed CTG analyses of antenatal recordings in connection with acupuncture were all normal. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that acupuncture administered with a stimulation that may be considered strong led to minor adverse complaints from the mothers but had no observable severe adverse influences on the pregnancy, mother, delivery or the fetus/ neonate  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 386  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Pelvic Girdle Pain
  Disease Category Adverse Effects OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 287  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Emmons, S. L.; Otto, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for overactive bladder: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Obstetrics and gynecology Abbreviated Journal Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages 138-143  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urinary Bladder, Overactive; Urologic Diseases; Women's Health; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Urgency; Urinary Frequency  
  Abstract Objective: To compare acupuncture treatment for overactive bladder with urge incontinence with a placebo acupuncture treatment. Methods: Eighty-five women enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Women were randomly assigned to either receive an acupuncture treatment expected to improve their bladder symptoms, or a placebo acupuncture treatment designed to promote relaxation. They underwent cystometric testing, completed a 3-day voiding diary, and completed the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire, validated quality-of-life inventories, before and after 4 weekly acupuncture treatments. The primary endpoint was number of incontinent episodes over 3 days. Secondary endpoints included voiding frequency and urgency, cystometric bladder capacity, maximum voided volume, and the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire symptom scores. Results: Seventy-four women completed all aspects of the study. Women in both treatment and placebo groups had significant decreases in number of incontinent episodes (59% for treatment, 40% for placebo) without a significant difference in the change between the groups. Women in the treatment group had a 14% reduction in urinary frequency (P = .013), a 30% reduction in the proportion of voids associated with urgency (P = .016), and a 13% increase in both maximum voided volume and maximum cystometric capacity (P = .01). Both groups also had an improvement in the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire scores (54% decrease for treatment, 30% decrease for placebo, P < .001 for the difference in change between the groups). Conclusion: Women who received 4 weekly bladder-specific acupuncture treatments had significant improvements in bladder capacity, urgency, frequency, and quality-of-life scores as compared with women who received placebo acupuncture treatments. Level of Evidence: I  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; and Providence Continence Center, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 74  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Urinary Bladder, Overactive
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 289  
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Author (up) Facco, E.; Liguori, A.; Petti, F.; Zanette, G.; Coluzzi, F.; De, Nardin M.; Mattia, C. url  openurl
  Title Traditional Acupuncture in Migraine: A Controlled, Randomized Study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Headache Abbreviated Journal Headache  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Migraine; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; RCT; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Verum Acupoint Control; Headache Disorders; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract Objective.-To check the effectiveness of a true acupuncture treatment according to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in migraine without aura, comparing it to a standard mock acupuncture protocol, an accurate mock acupuncture healing ritual, and untreated controls. Background.-Migraine prevalence is high and affects a relevant rate of adults in the productive phase of their life. Acupuncture has been increasingly advocated and used in Western countries for migraine treatment, but the evidence of its effectiveness still remains weak. A large variability of treatments is present in published studies and no acupoint selection according to TCM has been investigated so far; therefore, the low level of evidence of acupuncture effectiveness might partly depend on inappropriate treatment. Design and Methods.-A prospective, randomized, controlled study was performed in 160 patients suffering from migraine without aura, assessed according to the ICD-10 classification. The patients were divided into the following 4 groups: (1) group TA, treated with true acupuncture (according to TCM) plus Rizatriptan; (2) group RMA, treated with ritualized mock acupuncture plus Rizatriptan; (3) group SMA, treated with standard mock acupuncture plus Rizatriptan; (4) group R, without prophylactic treatment with relief therapy only (Rizatriptan). The MIDAS Questionnaire was administered before treatment (T0), at 3 (T1) and 6 months (T2) from the beginning of treatment, and the MIDAS Index (MI) was calculated. Rizatriptan intake was also checked in all groups of patients at T0, T1, and T2. Group TA and RMA were evaluated according to TCM as well; then, the former was submitted to true acupuncture and the latter to mock acupuncture treatment resembling the same as TA. The statistical analysis was conducted with factorial ANOVA and multiple tests with a Bonferroni adjustment. Results.-A total of 127 patients completed the study (33 dropouts): 32 belonged to group TA, 30 to group RMA, 31 to group SMA, and 34 to group R. Before treatment the MI (T(0)) was moderate to severe with no significant intergroup differences. All groups underwent a decrease of MI at T(1) and T(2), with a significant group difference at both T(1) and T(2) compared to T(0) (P < .0001). Only TA provided a significant improvement at both T(1) and T(2) compared to R (P < .0001). RMA underwent a transient improvement of MI at T(1). The Rizatriptan intake paralleled the MI in all groups. Conclusions.-TA was the only treatment able to provide a steady outcome improvement in comparison to the use of only Rizatriptan, while RMA showed a transient placebo effect at T1  
  Address University of Padua – Department of Medico-Surgical Specialities – Sect. Dentistry, Padua, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up 13 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 160  
  Time in Treatment 11 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 309  
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Author (up) Feng, L. openurl 
  Title Treatment of Ischemic Apoplexy Based on the Theory of “Lingering Illness Affecting Collaterals” Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 55-58  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arteriosclerosis; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Injection; Herbal Formula; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Ichemic apoplexy, also called ischemic cerebrovascular disease (including cerebral thrombosis, cerebral embolism, and transient cerebral ischemic attack), belongs to the TCM category of “wind-stroke syndomre.” The increasingly high incidence of the disease has imposed serious influence on life quality of people. Based on the theory of “lingering illness affecting collaterals,” we have treated the disease by acupuncture and oral administration of leech capsule and centipede capsule, with good therapeutic results reported as follows.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 63  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 316  
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Author (up) Feng, L.; Zhang, J.; Wei, C.; Sun, Y. url  openurl
  Title Clinical observation on 30 cases of transient cerebral ischemia attack treated with acupuncture and medication Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 100-102  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Ischemia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Formula; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To probe the curative effect of acupuncture and medication on transient cerebral ischemia attack. METHOD: 30 patients with transient cerebral ischemia attack in the treatment group were acupunctured at Fengchi (GB 20), Wangu (GB 12) and Tianzhu (BL 10) and given orally leech capsules and centipede capsules. 30 patients with transient cerebral ischemia attack in the control group were given intravenous drip of compound Danshen injection and orally aspirin. At the end of two treatment courses, the curative effects were evaluated and the changes in blood rheology and in 3 indexes of blood coagulation were observed before and after treatment in the 2 groups. RESULTS: The total effective rate in the treatment group was 86.7% with obvious difference as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). There were remarkable differences in blood rheology and 3 indexes of blood coagulation before and after treatment in the treatment group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). There were remarkable differences after treatment between the 2 groups (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB 20), Wangu (GB 12) and Tianzhu (BL 10) and medication with leech capsules and centipede capsules are effective methods in treating transient cerebral ischemia attack  
  Address Acupuncture Department of the Second Hospital Affiliated to Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang 550002, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 317  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Feng, Z. url  openurl
  Title Two-hundred and ten cases of shoulder periarthritis treated by needling lingxia and sanjian Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 201-202  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Pain; Periarthritis; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Shoulder Pain; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address Jinhua TCM Hospital, Jinhua City 321000, Zhejiang Province  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 272  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Arthritis
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 320  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ferro, E. C.; Biagini, A. P.; da Silva, I. E.; Silva, M. L.; Silva, J. R. url  openurl
  Title The combined effect of acupuncture and Tanacetum parthenium on quality of life in women with headache: randomised study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 252-257  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Headache Disorders; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Herb, Single; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; Migraine  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of acupuncture (AC), Tanacetum (TAN) or combined treatment on quality of life in women with chronic migraine (CM). METHODS: A total of 69 women volunteers were randomly divided into 3 groups: AC, acupuncture administered in 20 sessions over 10 weeks (n=22); TAN, at 150 mg/day (n=23); and AC+TAN (n=23). The primary outcome was Short-Form 36 (SF-36) quality of life assessment score. Secondary outcomes included the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) and visual analogue scale (VAS) score experienced after randomisation. RESULTS: AC+TAN was statistically significantly more effective than AC or TAN alone in overall health-related quality of life (SF-36; p<0.05), on MIDAS score (-35.1 (10.6) AC vs -24.8 (11.7) TAN vs -42.5 (9.8) AC+TAN; p<0.05) and in reducing the mean score of pain on VAS (-5.6 (2.4) AC vs -3.7 (2.1) TAN vs -6.4 (3.1) AC+TAN; p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The present work shows an improvement of the quality of life and better analgesic effect of acupuncture combined with TAN treatment on migraine pain in women when compared with acupuncture or TAN alone.  
  Address Instituto Paulista de Estudos Sistemicos (IPES), Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 69  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 321  
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