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Author Duan, G.; He, J.; Zeng, Z. openurl 
  Title Comparison of effects of acupuncture on cerebral infarction in different parts Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal World J Acupunct-Moxibustion  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 3-7  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Brain Injuries; Cerebral Infarction; RCT; Scalp Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Stroke  
  Abstract Stable cerebral infarction patients were separated into cerebral surface infarction and deep infarction on the basis of symptoms and CT scans and randomized to acupuncture and control groups (treated with usual care and drugs). There were 31 surface and 61 deep infarctions, and patients were evaluated by a national Chinese Medical Association clinical effects scale. The clinical injury score for all 92 patients dropped 12 points with acupuncture vs 6 points for controls (22-23 baseline) with 11/16 markedly improved with acupunc ture in the surface infarct group and 10/31 with deep infarction, vs 0 of 15 and 0 of 30 controls, respectively. Scalp acupuncture demonstrated definite effectiveness, but less when the infarction is deep near the ventricles and internal capsule. Acupuncture enhances cerebral blood flow and tissue metabolism, but less abundant collateral circulation is available for the region of deep infarcts. CT scans showed the superficial infarct area reduced after I month of daily acupuncture, but the deep infarct reduction was limited.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Cerebral Infarction
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 264  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, K. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observations of Treatement of 89 Adhesive Capsulitis Cases with Ear Pressing and Warming Acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Intl J Clin Acu  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 169-191  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Ear Seeds; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Shoulder Pain; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; AcuTrials; Pain; Adhesive Capsulitis;  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Shoulder Pain
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1245  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hansen, P. E.; Hansen, J. H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture management of chronic facial pain. A double-blind cross-over study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1981 Publication Ugeskrift for laeger Abbreviated Journal Ugeskr Laeger  
  Volume 143 Issue 44 Pages 2885-2887  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Facial Pain; Pain; RCT; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trigeminal Neuralgia  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 429  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wan, H.; Du, D.Q.; Ma, Z. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture at Cervical Jiaji (EX B2) Combined with Motion Moxibustion in Treating 58 Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 9-10  
  Keywords Nervous System Diseases; Radiculopathy; Cervical; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Symptom Based Point Selection; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Moxibustion; Moxa; Motion Moxibustion; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Jiaji Points  
  Abstract Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy (CSR) is a kind of syndrome caused by cervical degeneration or nerve root oppression which leads to pain, numbness, loss of sensation and reflex changes in the dominant area. From January 2011 to October 2012, we treated 58 patients with CS R with acupuncture at cervical Jiaji (EX B2) point combined with motion moxibustion and came up with good effect, the report is as follows.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/5/2015; Date Modified: 6/9/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Radiculopathy; Jinan Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1773  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahn, A. C.; Bennani, T.; Freeman, R.; Hamdy, O.; Kaptchuk, T. J. url  openurl
  Title Two styles of acupuncture for treating painful diabetic neuropathy--a pilot randomised control trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 1-2 Pages 11-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Diabetes Mellitus; Diabetic Neuropathies; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Neuropathy; Pain; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract In a pilot study, we evaluated the clinical and mechanistic effects of two styles of acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Japanese acupuncture, for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Out of seven patients enrolled, three received Traditional Chinese acupuncture while four received Japanese style acupuncture. Treatments were delivered once a week for 10 weeks. Acupuncturists were permitted to select the needle interventions. Substantial differences in diagnostic techniques, choice of acupuncture points, and needle manipulation were observed between TCM and Japanese acupuncturists. Clinically, patients allocated to Japanese acupuncture reported decreased neuropathy-associated pain according to the daily pain severity score, while the group allocated to the TCM acupuncture reported minimal effects. Both acupuncture styles, however, lowered pain according to the McGill Short Form Pain Score. The TCM style improved nerve sensation according to quantitative sensory testing while the Japanese style had a more equivocal effect. No evident changes were observed in glucose control or heart rate variability in either group  
  Address Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. aahn@hms.harvard.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 7  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Diabetic Neuropathies
  Disease Category Diabetes Mellitus OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 5  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arvidsdotter, T.; Marklund, B.; Taft, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of an integrative treatment, therapeutic acupuncture and conventional treatment in alleviating psychological distress in primary care patients – a pragmatic randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 13 Issue Pages 308-317  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Stress, Psychological; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Depression; Anxiety; Counseling; Salutogenic Counseling  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To evaluate and compare effects of an integrative treatment (IT), therapeutic acupuncture (TA), and conventional treatment (CT) in alleviating symptoms of anxiety and depression in psychologically distressed primary care patients. METHODS: An open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial comparing the three treatment regimens at four and eight weeks after treatment. The study sample consisted of 120 adults (40 per treatment arm) aged 20 to 55 years referred from four different primary health care centres in western Sweden for psychological distress. Psychological distress was evaluated at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD). Treatment sessions lasted about 60 minutes in IT and 45 minutes in TA. RESULTS: No baseline differences were found between groups on HAD depression or anxiety. HAD anxiety and depression decreased significantly more in the IT and TA groups than in the CT group both after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, but not between IT and TA. Improvements in the TA and IT groups were large and clinically significant, whereas CT effects were small and clinically non-significant. CONCLUSIONS: Both IT and TA appear to be beneficial in reducing anxiety and depression in primary care patients referred for psychological distress, whereas CT does not. These results need to be confirmed in larger, longer-term studies addressing potentially confounding design issues in the present study. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN trial number NCT01631500.  
  Address Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. tina.arvidsdotter@vgregion.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Stress, Psychological
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 37  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arvidsdotter, T.; Marklund, B.; Taft, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Six-month effects of integrative treatment, therapeutic acupuncture and conventional treatment in alleviating psychological distress in primary care patients--follow up from an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 210 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords RCT; Mental Disorders; Anxiety; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Stress, Psychological; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; CAM Control; Salutogenic Counseling  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To evaluate and compare 6-month effects of 8 weeks of an integrative treatment (IT), therapeutic acupuncture (TA), and conventional treatment (CT) in reducing symptoms of anxiety, depression and in improving health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sense of coherence (SOC) in psychologically distressed primary care patients. METHODS: Patients who had participated in an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial were followed up six months after treatment. The study sample consisted of 120 adults (40 per treatment arm) aged 20 to 55 years referred from four different primary health care centres in western Sweden for psychological distress. Assessments were made at baseline after eight weeks and after 24 weeks. Anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), HRQL with the SF-36 Mental Component Summary scores (MCS) and SOC with the Sense of Coherence-13 questionnaire. RESULTS: No baseline differences were found between groups on any outcome variable. At 24 weeks, IT and TA had significantly better values than CT on all variables. All three groups showed significant improvements from baseline on all variables, except HAD depression in CT; however, improvements were significantly greater in IT and TA than in CT. IT and TA did not differ on any outcome variable. Effect sizes were large in IT and TA for all variables and small or moderate in CT. Improvements on all variables seen after 8-weeks of IT and TA remained stable at 24 weeks and the CT group improved on HAD anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: IT and TA seem to be more beneficial than CT in reducing anxiety, depression, and in improving quality of life and sense of coherence after 24 weeks of follow up in patients with psychological distress. More research is needed to confirm these results. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN trial number NCT01631500.  
  Address Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. tina.arvidsdotter@vgregion.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 38  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bernateck, M.; Becker, M.; Schwake, C.; Hoy, L.; Passie, T.; Parlesak, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Fink, M.; Karst, M. url  openurl
  Title Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Auricular acupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Forschende Komplementärmedizin = Research in complementary medicine Abbreviated Journal Forsch Komplementmed  
  Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages 187-193  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Arthritis; Auricular Acupuncture; Auricular Electroacupuncture; RCT; Arthritis, Rheumatoid; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patients with RA (n = 44) were randomized into EA or AT groups. EA and lessons in AT were performed once weekly for 6 weeks. Primary outcome measures were the mean weekly pain intensity and the disease activity score 28 (DAS 28); secondary outcome measures were the use of pain medication, the pain disability index (PDI), the clinical global impression (CGI) and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, which were assessed during the study period and 3 months after the end of treatment. RESULTS: At the end of the treatment and at 3-month follow-up a clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05) could be observed in all outcome parameters and both groups. In contrast to the AT group, the onset of these effects in the EA group could already be observed after the 2nd treatment week. In the 4th treatment week the EA group reported significantly less pain than the AT group (p = 0.040). After the end of treatment (7th week) the EA group assessed their outcome as significantly more improved than the AT group (p = 0.035). The erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the EA group was significantly reduced (p = 0.010), and the serum concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly increased compared to the AT group (p = 0.020). CONCLUSIONS: The adjuvant use of both EA and AT in the treatment of RA resulted in significant short- and long-term treatment effects. The treatment effects of auricular EA were more pronounced  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Clinic, Hannover, Germany. bernateck.michael@mh-hannover.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 44  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 71  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Berry, H.; Fernandes, L.; Bloom, B.; Clark, R. J.; Hamilton, E. B. url  openurl
  Title Clinical study comparing acupuncture, physiotherapy, injection and oral anti-inflammatory therapy in shoulder-cuff lesions Type of Study RCT
  Year 1980 Publication Current medical research and opinion Abbreviated Journal Curr Med Res Opin  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 121-126  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Moxibustion; Pain; Physical Therapy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Shoulder Impingement Syndrome; Shoulder Pain  
  Abstract In a single-blind trial, five treatments for painful stiff shoulder were compared for a 4-week assessment period in 60 patients. The treatments were acupuncture, steroid injection with placebo and with active tolmetin sodium, physiotherapy in the form of ultrasound and 'placebo' physiotherapy with placebo tolmetin sodium. Objective assessment was gained by use of goniometer readings to monitor shoulder abduction. Pain was measured by visual analogue scales and by a 4-point scale. Comparative assessment was also recorded and at the end of the study a success or failure was recorded for each patient's treatment. With very few exceptions all patients improved markedly, both in terms of the subjective and objective parameters. No differences between the treatments were detected. The incidence and severity of side-effects was low. It is suggested that the results show that the painful stiff shoulder may be a self-limiting condition and that any beneficial effect was really due to natural recovery. This is an important consideration because patients do not always receive immediate attention when referred to an out-patient department and the use of physiotherapy and acupuncture in such cases, perhaps, should be critically examined  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 72  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ceccherelli, F.; Gioioso, L.; Casale, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Ori, C. url  openurl
  Title Neck Pain Treatment With Acupuncture: Does the Number of Needles Matter? Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication The Clinical journal of pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords RCT; AcuTrials; Neck Pain; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Acupuncture has been successfully used in myofascial pain syndromes. However, the number of needles used, that is, the dose" of acupuncture stimulation, to obtain the best antinociceptive efficacy is still a matter of debate. The question was addressed comparing the clinical efficacy of two different therapeutic schemes, characterized by a different number of needles used on 36 patients between 29 – 60 years of age with by a painful cervical myofascial syndrome. METHODS: Patients were divided into two groups; the first group of 18 patients were treated with 5 needles and the second group of 18 patients were treated with 11 needles, the time of needle stimulation was the same in both groups: 100 seconds. Each group underwent six cycles of somatic acupuncture. Pain intensity was evaluated before, immediately after and 1 and 3 months after the treatment by means of both the Mc Gill Pain Questionnaire and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). In both groups, the needles were fixed superficially excluding the two most painful trigger points where they were deeply inserted. RESULTS: Both groups, independently from the number of needles used, obtained a good therapeutic effect without clinically relevant differences. CONCLUSIONS: For this pathology, the number of needles, 5 or 11, seems not to be an important variable in determining the therapeutic effect when the time of stimulation is the same in the two groups.  
  Address *Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova daggerA.I.R.A.S. (Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca e l'Aggiornamento Scientifico), Padova double daggerService of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Florence section signRehabilitat  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 122  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ceccherelli, F.; Lovato, A.; Piana, E.; Gagliardi, G.; Roveri, A. url  openurl
  Title Somatic acupuncture versus ear acupuncture in migraine therapy: a randomized, controlled, blind study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Acupuncture & electro-therapeutics research Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Electrother Res  
  Volume 37 Issue 4 Pages 277-293  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Migraine; Headache Disorders; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Auricular Acupuncture; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control;  
  Abstract This study compares the clinical effectiveness of somatic and ear acupuncture for treatment of migraine without aura. 35 patients were divided into 2 groups, one receiving somatic and the other ear acupuncture. Both groups were treated once a week for 8 weeks and needles were stimulated manually. The severity of pain was evaluated with the Migraine Index and the visual analogue of Scott-Huskisson; other 2 tests were used to monitor the pain threshold and Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale was applied to assess variations in patients' mood. These tests were performed before the beginning and at the end of treatment and, for the follow up, after 1, 3 and 6 months from the end of therapy. On the basis of the migraine index, pain at the end of therapy was significantly lower than before the treatment, being residual pain 54.83% and 63.43%, respectively for somatic and ear acupuncture. Apparently, the 2 treatments were equally effective, as no significant difference could be assessed. On the contrary, a significant difference between the 2 groups was clear during the follow up: in fact, after 6 months residual pain was 16.80% and 48.83% for somatic and ear acupuncture, respectively (p=0.038). These results were confirmed by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) test and by the evaluation of pain threshold. It is noteworthy that also Zung's depression test showed a significant decrease of score was present in both groups, at all the times investigated with no difference between the two treatments. These results, though preliminary, are quite promising in supporting the effectiveness of ear acupuncture for treatment of migraine without aura.  
  Address Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, A.I.R.A.S., Padova, Italy. info@ceccherelli.it  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 35  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 123  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ceccherelli, F.; Tortora, P.; Nassimbeni, C.; Casale, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Giron, G. url  openurl
  Title The therapeutic efficacy of somatic acupuncture is not increased by auriculotherapy: a randomised, blind control study in cervical myofascial pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 47-52  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Auricular Acupuncture; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Neck Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture) is a therapeutic technique in which points on the auricle are stimulated with needles. Usually it is combined with somatic acupuncture because of possible synergy, although the efficacy of this pairing has neither been confirmed nor disproved. The aim of this study was to verify: (1) if somatic acupuncture can reduce myofascial cervical pain; (2) if concomitant auriculotherapy improves the efficacy of somatic acupuncture. A group of 62 patients affected by cervical myofascial pain was randomly divided into two groups of 31. Group A (6 males and 25 females) underwent eight sessions of somatic acupuncture. Group B (7 males and 24 females) underwent eight sessions of somatic acupuncture in the same way as group A, paired with auriculotherapy. Pain was scored using the McGill Pain Questionnaire before and at the end of treatment, and 1 and 3 months later. The results showed that both somatic acupuncture and somatic plus ear acupuncture have a positive effect in reducing pain. The pain intensity score was 40.70 +/- 17.78 in group A before therapy and 13.32 +/- 9.62 after therapy; in group B it was 38.90 +/- 15.31 and 13.43 +/- 10.96. Somatic plus auriculotherapy was therefore not statistically significantly superior to somatic therapy alone in the treatment of cervical myofascial pain  
  Address Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, Italy. istaneri@unipd.it  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 62  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 125  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chang, B. H.; Boehmer, U.; Zhao, Y.; Sommers, E. url  openurl
  Title The combined effect of relaxation response and acupuncture on quality of life in patients with HIV: a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication The journal of alternative and complementary medicine : research on paradigm, practice, and policy Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 8 Pages 807-815  
  Keywords Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Pilot Study; RCT; Relaxation; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; HIV Infections  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Treatment advances have transformed human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) into a chronic manageable disease; quality of life (QoL) has become an important health outcome. Some studies have shown the individual effects of acupuncture and the relaxation response (RR) in improving QoL of patients with HIV/AIDS. In light of the presumed shared features of acupuncture and the RR, we conducted a pilot study to examine the effects of adding the RR to usual acupuncture treatment on improving the QoL of HIV/AIDS patients. DESIGN: Two-arm double-blind randomized controlled trial. SETTINGS/LOCATION AND SUBJECTS: We enrolled 119 patients with HIV/AIDS (mean age 46 years, 85% male) who had at least 1 of the highly prevalent HIV-related symptoms and who were receiving acupuncture treatment in an acupuncture clinic in Boston, MA. INTERVENTION: We randomized patients into intervention (N = 58) and control (N = 61) groups. All participants received individualized acupuncture treatments prescribed by their acupuncturists. While receiving acupuncture treatment, the intervention group wore earphones to listen to tapes with instructions to elicit the RR followed by soft music that was routinely played in the clinic; the control group listened only to soft music. OUTCOME MEASURES: Three (3) QoL scales: the Medical Outcomes Study HIV health survey, the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being, measured at baseline, 4-week, 8-week, and 12-week follow-ups. RESULTS: At the 12-week follow-up, the intervention group showed significant improvements in emotional (p = 0.0002), spiritual/peace (p = 0.02), physical (p = 0.003) and mental health (p = 0.0003) QoL from baseline. Results of mixed effects regression models indicated linear trends of improvement over time in these dimensions of QoL for the intervention group (p < 0.02). In the control group, the only significant improvement was observed in the emotional QoL (p < 0.01). The intervention group showed trends of greater improvements than the control group (p = 0.07 for 12-week physical health QoL). CONCLUSIONS: Data from this pilot trial suggested that adding the RR to acupuncture may enhance improvement in QoL of patients with HIV/AIDS. Further investigation on this putative synergistic effect is warranted  
  Address Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02130, USA. bhchang@bu.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 119  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition HIV Infections
  Disease Category HIV Infections OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 128  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, D.; Zhang, Q.; Zhong, J.; Chen, D. openurl 
  Title Effects and Mechanisms of Needle Pricking Therapy and Rotation-pulling Manipulation on Blood Velocity of Patients with Vertibral Artery Type of Cervical Spondylosis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 304-309  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Neck Pain; Spondylosis; Cervical Spondylosis; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Tuina; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control  
  Abstract Objecitve: To compare the effects of needle pricking therapy plus rotating-pulling manipulation and rotating-pulling manipulation on blood velocity, angiokinesis, and blood viscosity in patients with vertebral artery type of cervical spndylosis (CSA), and discuss its mechanisms. Methods: 216 patients were randomly divided into 2 goupls according to numeric representation, 108 cases in th treatment group were treated by needle pricking therapy plus, rotating pulling manipulation, and 108 cases in the control group were treated by rotating pulling manipulation. The peak systolic blood velocity (V peak), end diastolic blood velocity (V min), pulsatle index (PI) and resistant index (RI) of the bilateral vertebreal arteries (VA) and basilar arteries (BA) were examind by transcranial doppler sonography (TCD). The values of whole blood apparent discosity and plasma cviscosity of both groups were recorded. The indexes before and after treatment of both groups were compared. Results: The therapeutic effects of the above-mentioned inexes of the tretment group were significantly superior to those of the control group (P<0.05). In comparision with pre-treatment, the whole blood apparent viscosity (hign, medium and low shear rates) and plasma viscosity of the treatment group post-treatment were obviously reduced (P<0.01, P<0.05). Conclusion: Needle pricking therapy combined with pulling-rotating manipulation can significantly improve VATCS patients' clinical symptoms, which may be closely related to its effects in lowering vascular blood resistance and blood viscosity and increasing cerebral blood supply.  
  Address Affiliated Medical College Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 216  
  Time in Treatment 9 Weeks Condition Spondylosis
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 137  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, L.; Yang, L.; Wang, R.; Yi, H. openurl 
  Title Blood-letting therapy of pricking jing points combined with common acupuncture therapy to treat shoulder hand syndrome: a report of 56 cases Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 5-7  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Nervous System Diseases; Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Bloodletting; CAM Control; Shoulder Hand Syndrome  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Acupuncture Moxibustion, First Affiliated Hospital of Shangdong University of TCM, Shangdong, China. Email: zhangjiajiagz@163.net  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 98  
  Time in Treatment 1.5 Weeks Condition Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 153  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cherkin, D. C.; Eisenberg, D.; Sherman, K. J.; Barlow, W.; Kaptchuk, T. J.; Street, J.; Deyo, R. A. url  openurl
  Title Randomized trial comparing traditional Chinese medical acupuncture, therapeutic massage, and self-care education for chronic low back pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume 161 Issue 8 Pages 1081-1088  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Cupping; Electroacupuncture; Exercise; Exercise Therapy; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Low Back Pain; Massage; Moxibustion; Pain; RCT; Self Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Heat Lamp; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Back Pain  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Because the value of popular forms of alternative care for chronic back pain remains uncertain, we compared the effectiveness of acupuncture, therapeutic massage, and self-care education for persistent back pain. METHODS: We randomized 262 patients aged 20 to 70 years who had persistent back pain to receive Traditional Chinese Medical acupuncture (n = 94), therapeutic massage (n = 78), or self-care educational materials (n = 90). Up to 10 massage or acupuncture visits were permitted over 10 weeks. Symptoms (0-10 scale) and dysfunction (0-23 scale) were assessed by telephone interviewers masked to treatment group. Follow-up was available for 95% of patients after 4, 10, and 52 weeks, and none withdrew for adverse effects. RESULTS: Treatment groups were compared after adjustment for prerandomization covariates using an intent-to-treat analysis. At 10 weeks, massage was superior to self-care on the symptom scale (3.41 vs 4.71, respectively; P =.01) and the disability scale (5.88 vs 8.92, respectively; P<.001). Massage was also superior to acupuncture on the disability scale (5.89 vs 8.25, respectively; P =.01). After 1 year, massage was not better than self-care but was better than acupuncture (symptom scale: 3.08 vs 4.74, respectively; P =.002; dysfunction scale: 6.29 vs 8.21, respectively; P =.05). The massage group used the least medications (P<.05) and had the lowest costs of subsequent care. CONCLUSIONS: Therapeutic massage was effective for persistent low back pain, apparently providing long-lasting benefits. Traditional Chinese Medical acupuncture was relatively ineffective. Massage might be an effective alternative to conventional medical care for persistent back pain  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 262  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score 85  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 161  
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Author Cottraux, J. A.; Harf, R.; Boissel, J. P.; Schbath, J.; Bouvard, M.; Gillet, J. url  openurl
  Title Smoking cessation with behaviour therapy of acupuncture--a controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1983 Publication Behaviour research and therapy Abbreviated Journal Behav Res Ther  
  Volume 21 Issue 4 Pages 417-424  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupuncture; Behavioral Therapy; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Smoking Cessation; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Wait-List Control; Tobacco Use Disorder; Substance-Related Disorders; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 558  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 207  
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Author Di Cesare, A.; Giombini, A.; Di Cesare, M.; Ripani, M.; Vulpiani, M. C.; Saraceni, V. M. url  openurl
  Title Comparison between the effects of trigger point mesotherapy versus acupuncture points mesotherapy in the treatment of chronic low back pain: a short term randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 19-26  
  Keywords RCT; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Back Pain; Pain; Mesotherapy; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Other Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acu Versus CAM Control; AcuTrials  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to compare the effects of trigger point (TRP) mesotherapy and acupuncture (ACP) mesotherapy in the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain. DESIGN: Short term randomized controlled trial. SETTING: 62 subjects with chronic low back pain were recruited at outpatients Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic at the University of Rome “La Sapienza” in the period between July 2006 and May 2008. INTERVENTION: Study subjects were assigned to receive 4 weeks treatments with either trigger point mesotherapy (TRP mesotherapy, n=29) or acupoints mesotherapy (ACP mesotherapy, n=33). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain intensity with a pain visual analogic scale (VAS) and verbal rating scale (VRS) and pain disability with McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form (SFMPQ), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ) and Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionaire (ODQ). RESULTS: ACP mesotherapy shows a more effective results in VRS and VAS measures in the follow-up (p(VRS)=&lt;.001 and p(VAS)=&lt;.001). The SF-MPQ measure shows a better results for ACP instead of TRP with statistically significant differences between groups and time (p=.035). Participants reported a slight discomfort at the time of the inoculation, and 15% reported slight neck pain in ACP mesotherapy group. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the response to ACP mesotherapy may be greater than the response to TRP mesotherapy in the short term follow-up. This technique could be nevertheless a viable option as an adjunct treatment in an overall treatment planning of CLBP.  
  Address Complex Operative Unit of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome, Italy. annalisa.dicesare@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 62  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 239  
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Author Emmons, S. L.; Otto, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for overactive bladder: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Obstetrics and gynecology Abbreviated Journal Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages 138-143  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urinary Bladder, Overactive; Urologic Diseases; Women's Health; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Urgency; Urinary Frequency  
  Abstract Objective: To compare acupuncture treatment for overactive bladder with urge incontinence with a placebo acupuncture treatment. Methods: Eighty-five women enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Women were randomly assigned to either receive an acupuncture treatment expected to improve their bladder symptoms, or a placebo acupuncture treatment designed to promote relaxation. They underwent cystometric testing, completed a 3-day voiding diary, and completed the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire, validated quality-of-life inventories, before and after 4 weekly acupuncture treatments. The primary endpoint was number of incontinent episodes over 3 days. Secondary endpoints included voiding frequency and urgency, cystometric bladder capacity, maximum voided volume, and the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire symptom scores. Results: Seventy-four women completed all aspects of the study. Women in both treatment and placebo groups had significant decreases in number of incontinent episodes (59% for treatment, 40% for placebo) without a significant difference in the change between the groups. Women in the treatment group had a 14% reduction in urinary frequency (P = .013), a 30% reduction in the proportion of voids associated with urgency (P = .016), and a 13% increase in both maximum voided volume and maximum cystometric capacity (P = .01). Both groups also had an improvement in the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire scores (54% decrease for treatment, 30% decrease for placebo, P < .001 for the difference in change between the groups). Conclusion: Women who received 4 weekly bladder-specific acupuncture treatments had significant improvements in bladder capacity, urgency, frequency, and quality-of-life scores as compared with women who received placebo acupuncture treatments. Level of Evidence: I  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; and Providence Continence Center, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 74  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Urinary Bladder, Overactive
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 289  
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Author Ga, H.; Choi, J. H.; Park, C. H.; Yoon, H. J. url  openurl
  Title Dry needling of trigger points with and without paraspinal needling in myofascial pain syndromes in elderly patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication The journal of alternative and complementary medicine : research on paradigm, practice, and policy Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 6 Pages 617-624  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Dry Needling; Dry Needling, With Acupuncture Needle; Local Twitch Response; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Neck Pain; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacies of dry needling of trigger points (TrPs) with and without paraspinal needling in myofascial pain syndrome of elderly patients. DESIGN: Single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. SUBJECTS: Forty (40) subjects, between the ages of 63 and 90 with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper trapezius muscle. INTERVENTIONS: Eighteen (18) subjects were treated with dry needling of all the TrPs only and another 22 with additional paraspinal needling on days 0, 7, and 14. RESULTS: At 4-week follow-up the results were as follows: (1) TrP and paraspinal dry needling resulted in more continuous subjective pain reduction than TrP dry needling only; (2) TrP and paraspinal dry needling resulted in significant improvements on the geriatric depression scale but TrP dry needling only did not; (3) TrP and paraspinal dry needling resulted in improvements of all the cervical range of motions but TrP dry needling only did not in extensional cervical range of motion; and (4) no cases of gross hemorrhage were noted. CONCLUSIONS: TrP and paraspinal dry needling is suggested to be a better method than TrP dry needling only for treating myofascial pain syndrome in elderly patients  
  Address Department of Family Medicine, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, South Korea. gahyuk@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency (up) 1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 352  
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