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Author Shi, X.; Wang, H.; Wang, L.; Zhao, Z.; Litscher, D.; Tao, J.; Gaischek, I.; Sheng, Z.; Litscher, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can tongue acupuncture enhance body acupuncture? First results from heart rate variability and clinical scores in patients with depression Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2014 Issue Pages 329746-  
  Keywords RCT; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tongue Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Heart Rate Variability; HRV  
  Abstract Tongue acupuncture (TA) is a method which is not used in western medicine and even in China it is applied very rarely in clinical practice. This study aimed at investigating whether additional TA can improve the efficacy of body acupuncture (BA) in patients with depression. Twenty patients with a mean age of +/- SD of 42.9 +/- 11.2 years were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10 patients each), one group receiving BA (Zusanli, Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Shenting, Yintang, and Baihui) and the other receiving BA and TA (Liver, Heart, and Brain). The quantitative and qualitative outcome measures were heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and different clinical scores. We found that in both groups all scores and HR improved significantly, whereas HRV increased partly significantly. It seems that TA can enhance acute and treatment effects of BA in patients with depression. The investigation of de qi sensation in TA needs further attention.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 20  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1046  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maimer, A.; Remppis, A.; Sack, F. U.; Ringes-Lichtenberg, S.; Greten, T.; Brazkiewicz, F.; Schroder, S.; Goncalves, M.; Efferth, T.; Greten, H. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Objectifying acupuncture effects by lung function and numeric rating scale in patients undergoing heart surgery Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2013 Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Pain; Pain, Postoperative; Pilot Study; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract Rationale. Poststernotomy pain and impaired breathing are common clinical problems in early postoperative care following heart surgery. Insufficiently treated pain increases the risk of pulmonary complications. High-dose opioids are used for pain management, but they may cause side effects such as respiratory depression. Study Design. We performed a prospective, randomized, controlled, observer-blinded, three-armed clinical trial with 100 patients. Group 1 (n = 33) and Group 2 (n = 34) received one 20 min session of standardized acupuncture treatment with two different sets of acupoints. Group 3 (n = 33) served as standard analgesia control without additional intervention. Results. Primary endpoint analysis revealed a statistically significant analgesic effect for both acupuncture treatments. Group 1 showed a mean percentile pain reduction (PPR) of 18% (SD 19, P < 0.001). Group 2 yielded a mean PPR of 71% (SD 13, P < 0.001). In Group 1, acupuncture resulted in a mean forced vital capacity (FVC) increase of 30 cm(3) (SD 73) without statistical significance (P = 0.303). In Group 2, posttreatment FVC showed a significant increase of 306 cm(3) (SD 215, P < 0.001). Conclusion. Acupuncture revealed specific analgesic effects after sternotomy. Objective measurement of poststernotomy pain via lung function test was possible.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany ; Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine, Karlsruher Strasse 12, 69126 Heidelberg, Germany ; ICBAS, University of Porto, Rua de Jo  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 809  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pach, D.; Yang-Strobel, X.; Ludtke, R.; Roll, S.; Icke, K.; Brinkhaus, B.; Witt, C. M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Standardized versus Individualized Acupuncture for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2013 Issue Pages 1-8  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; CAM Control  
  Abstract We aimed to compare the effectiveness of standardized and individualized acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic low back pain. A single-center randomized controlled single-blind trial was performed in a general medical practice in Germany run by a Chinese-born medical doctor trained in western and Chinese medicine. One hundred and fifty outpatients with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups (78 standardized and 72 individualized acupuncture). Patients received either standardized acupuncture or individualized acupuncture. Treatment encompassed between 10 and 15 treatments based on individual symptoms with two treatments per week. The main outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC) summarizing eight weeks of daily rated pain severity measured with a visual analogue scale (0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst imaginable pain). No significant differences between groups were observed for the AUC (individualized acupuncture mean: 1768.7 (95% CI, 1460.4; 2077.1); standardized acupuncture 1482.9 (1177.2; 1788.7); group difference, 285.8 (-33.9; 605.5) P = 0.080). In this single-center trial, individualized acupuncture was not superior to standardized acupuncture for patients suffering from chronic pain. As a next step, a multicenter noninferiority study should be performed to investigate whether standardised acupuncture treatment for chronic low back pain might be applicable in a broader usual care setting. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00758017.  
  Address Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, 10098 Berlin, Germany.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 26 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 150  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 922  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Huang, T.; Chen, B.; He, J.; Bai, J.; Gu, M.; Cao, H.; He, M.; Li, X.; Jiang, J.; Zhai, G.; Yu, M. openurl 
  Title Study on Clinical Efficacy of Needling Danzhong (CV 17) in Treating Postpartum Hypogalactia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume (down) 2008 Issue 1 Pages 27-31  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Pregnancy Complications; Lactation Disorders; Acu Versus CAM Control; Herbal Formula; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control  
  Abstract Objective: To investigate the clinical efficacy of needling Danzhong (CV 17) in the treatment of postpartum hypogalactia and provide clinical evidence for indications of the point. Methods: A multi-centre single-blind randomized controlled trial was carried out. Two hundred and seventy-six puerperal women with postpartum hypogalactia were randomly allocated into acupuncture group and herb group, and respectively treated for three consecutive days. The degree of mammary fullness, the amount of milk secreted, prolactin, baby weight, the frequency and volume of artificial feeding, the number of infant urination events, and the duration of baby crying were observed. The clinical curative effects on postpartum hypogalactia were compared. Results: Hypogalactia was effectively treated in both acupuncture and herb groups. There were statistically significant differences in degree of mammary fullness, amount of milk secreted, baby weight, the frequency and amount of artificial feeding, and the number of infant urination events between pretreatment and post-treatment, but no difference between the two groups. There was no significant difference in prolactin in the acupuncture group and there was a difference in prolactin in the herb group between pretreatment and posttreatment. Conclusion: Needling Danzhong (CV 17) can effectively promote lactation.  
  Address Research Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100700, P. R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 276  
  Time in Treatment 0.5 Weeks Condition Lactation Disorders
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 477  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pavao, T.S.; Vianna, P.; Pillat, M.M.; Machado, A.B.; Bauer, M.E. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture is effective to attenuate stress and stimulate lymphocyte proliferation in the elderly Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Neurosci Lett Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 484 Issue 1 Pages 47-50  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Nrct; Stress, Psychological; Immunity, Cellular; Nrct; Geriatrics; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acu Versus CAM Control  
  Abstract Acupuncture has increasingly been used to treat many conditions, including psychiatric disorders and immunological-related disorders. However, the effects of acupuncture as stress management and immune functions in the elderly are largely unclear. Here we investigated the effects of acupuncture on stress-related psychological symptoms and cellular immunity in young adults and elderly subjects. The acupuncture treatment consisted of six sessions and the procedures included the insertion of needles at bilateral acupoints LI4, SP6 and ST36. Psychological variables (depression, anxiety and stress) were investigated by means of self-assessment inventories. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and cultured in vitro to measure mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation as well as cellular sensitivity to dexamethasone. All data were assessed before and after the intervention. Acupuncture was able to significantly reduce depression (p<0.001), anxiety (p<0.001) and stress (p<0.001) scores. The intervention also increased T-cell proliferation, with greater intensity in the elderly group (p=0.004). No changes in cellular sensitivity to dexamethasone were observed following acupuncture. We conclude that acupuncture was efficient to attenuate the psychological distress as well as to increase an important feature of cellular immunosenescence.  
  Address Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Research, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre (RS), Brazil.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 24  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/28/2015; Date Modified: 6/25/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Stress, Psychological; Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Research, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre (RS), Brazil.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=20709154 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1642  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elden, H.; Ladfors, L.; Olsen, M. F.; Ostgaard, H. C.; Hagberg, H. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture and stabilising exercises as adjunct to standard treatment in pregnant women with pelvic girdle pain: randomised single blind controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication BMJ : British medical journal / British Medical Association Abbreviated Journal BMJ  
  Volume (down) 330 Issue 7494 Pages 761-  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Exercise Therapy; Pain; Pelvic Pain; Pregnancy Complications; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy of standard treatment, standard treatment plus acupuncture, and standard treatment plus stabilising exercises for pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy. DESIGN: Randomised single blind controlled trial. Settings East Hospital, Gothenburg, and 27 maternity care centres in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 386 pregnant women with pelvic girdle pain. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment for six weeks with standard treatment (n = 130), standard treatment plus acupuncture (n = 125), or standard treatment plus stabilising exercises (n = 131). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome measure was pain (visual analogue scale); secondary outcome measure was assessment of severity of pelvic girdle pain by an independent examiner before and after treatment. RESULTS: After treatment the stabilising exercise group had less pain than the standard group in the morning (median difference = 9, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 12.8; P = 0.0312) and in the evening (13, 2.7 to 17.5; P = 0.0245). The acupuncture group, in turn, had less pain in the evening than the stabilising exercise group (-14, -18.1 to -3.3; P = 0.0130). Furthermore, the acupuncture group had less pain than the standard treatment group in the morning (12, 5.9 to 17.3; P < 0.001) and in the evening (27, 13.3 to 29.5; P < 0.001). Attenuation of pelvic girdle pain as assessed by the independent examiner was greatest in the acupuncture group. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture and stabilising exercises constitute efficient complements to standard treatment for the management of pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy. Acupuncture was superior to stabilising exercises in this study  
  Address Perinatal Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute for the Health of Women and Children, Sahlgrenska Academy, East Hospital, 41685 Gothenburg, Sweden. helen.elden@vgregion.se  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 386  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Pelvic Pain
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score 73  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 286  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Irnich, D.; Behrens, N.; Molzen, H.; Konig, A.; Gleditsch, J.; Krauss, M.; Natalis, M.; Senn, E.; Beyer, A.; Schops, P. url  openurl
  Title Randomised trial of acupuncture compared with conventional massage and “sham” laser acupuncture for treatment of chronic neck pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication BMJ : British medical journal / British Medical Association Abbreviated Journal BMJ  
  Volume (down) 322 Issue 7302 Pages 1574-1578  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Dry Needling; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Massage; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Neck Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Sham Laser; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy of acupuncture and conventional massage for the treatment of chronic neck pain. DESIGN: Prospective, randomised, placebo controlled trial. Setting: Three outpatient departments in Germany. PARTICIPANTS: 177 patients aged 18-85 years with chronic neck pain. Interventions: Patients were randomly allocated to five treatments over three weeks with acupuncture (56), massage (60), or “sham” laser acupuncture (61). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome measure: maximum pain related to motion (visual analogue scale) irrespective of direction of movement one week after treatment. Secondary outcome measures: range of motion (3D ultrasound real time motion analyser), pain related to movement in six directions (visual analogue scale), pressure pain threshold (pressure algometer), changes of spontaneous pain, motion related pain, global complaints (seven point scale), and quality of life (SF-36). Assessments were performed before, during, and one week and three months after treatment. Patients' beliefs in treatment were assessed. RESULTS: One week after five treatments the acupuncture group showed a significantly greater improvement in motion related pain compared with massage (difference 24.22 (95% confidence interval 16.5 to 31.9), P=0.0052) but not compared with sham laser (17.28 (10.0 to 24.6), P=0.327). Differences between acupuncture and massage or sham laser were greater in the subgroup who had had pain for longer than five years (n=75) and in patients with myofascial pain syndrome (n=129). The acupuncture group had the best results in most secondary outcome measures. There were no differences in patients' beliefs in treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is an effective short term treatment for patients with chronic neck pain, but there is only limited evidence for long term effects after five treatments  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 175  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 75  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 501  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ghoname, E. A.; Craig, W. F.; White, P. F.; Ahmed, H. E.; Hamza, M. A.; Henderson, B. N.; Gajraj, N. M.; Huber, P. J.; Gatchel, R. J. url  openurl
  Title Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for low back pain: a randomized crossover study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1999 Publication Journal of the American Medical Association Abbreviated Journal JAMA  
  Volume (down) 281 Issue 9 Pages 818-823  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Cross-Over Design; Dry Needling, With Non-Acupuncture Needle; Electroacupuncture; Penetrating Sham; Low Back Pain; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Usual Care Control, Physical; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Verum Acupoint Control; Percutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; TENS; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; PENS; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Low back pain (LBP) contributes to considerable disability and lost wages in the United States. Commonly used opioid and nonopioid analgesic drugs produce adverse effects and are of limited long-term benefit in the management of this patient population. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of a novel nonpharmacologic pain therapy, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS), with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and flexion-extension exercise therapies in patients with long-term LBP. DESIGN: A randomized, single-blinded, sham-controlled, crossover study from March 1997 to December 1997. SETTING: An ambulatory pain management center at a university medical center. PATIENTS: Twenty-nine men and 31 women with LBP secondary to degenerative disk disease. INTERVENTIONS: Four therapeutic modalities (sham-PENS, PENS, TENS, and exercise therapies) were each administered for a period of 30 minutes 3 times a week for 3 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pretreatment and posttreatment visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain, physical activity, and quality of sleep; daily analgesic medication usage; a global patient assessment questionnaire; and Health Status Survey Short Form (SF-36). RESULTS: PENS was significantly more effective in decreasing VAS pain scores after each treatment than sham-PENS, TENS, and exercise therapies (after-treatment mean +/- SD VAS for pain, 3.4+/-1.4 cm, 5.5+/-1.9 cm, 5.6+/-1.9 cm, and 6.4+/-1.9 cm, respectively). The average +/- SD daily oral intake of nonopioid analgesics (2.6+/-1.4 pills per day) was decreased to 1.3+/-1.0 pills per day with PENS (P<.008) compared with 2.5+/-1.1, 2.2+/-1.0, and 2.6+/-1.2 pills per day with sham-PENS, TENS, and exercise, respectively. Compared with the other 3 modalities, 91 % of the patients reported that PENS was the most effective in decreasing their LBP. The PENS therapy was also significantly more effective in improving physical activity, quality of sleep, and sense of well-being (P<.05 for each). The SF-36 survey confirmed that PENS improved posttreatment function more than sham-PENS, TENS, and exercise. CONCLUSIONS: In this sham-controlled study, PENS was more effective than TENS or exercise therapy in providing short-term pain relief and improved physical function in patients with long-term LBP  
  Address Eugene McDermott Center for Pain Management, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235-9068, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Days Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 378  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, S. B.; Huang, B.; Zhang, C. Y.; Du, P.; Yuan, Q.; Bi, G. J.; Zhang, G. B.; Xie, M. J.; Luo, X.; Huang, G. Y.; Wang, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of strengthened stimulation during acupuncture for the treatment of Bell palsy: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne Abbreviated Journal CMAJ  
  Volume (down) 185 Issue 6 Pages 473-479  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Bell Palsy; RCT; Acu Versus Acu; CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The traditional Chinese theory of acupuncture emphasizes that the intensity of acupuncture must reach a threshold to generate de qi, which is necessary to achieve the best therapeutic effect. De qi is an internal compound sensation of soreness, tingling, fullness, aching, cool, warmth and heaviness, and a radiating sensation at and around the acupoints. However, the notion that de qi must be achieved for maximum benefit has not been confirmed by modern scientific evidence. METHODS: We performed a prospective multicentre randomized controlled trial involving patients with Bell palsy. Patients were randomly assigned to the de qi (n = 167) or control (n = 171) group. Both groups received acupuncture: in the de qi group, the needles were manipulated manually until de qi was reached, whereas in the control group, the needles were inserted without any manipulation. All patients received prednisone as a basic treatment. The primary outcome was facial nerve function at month 6. We also assessed disability and quality of life 6 months after randomization. RESULTS: After 6 months, patients in the de qi group had better facial function (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.23-7.78), better disability assessment (differences of least squares means 9.80, 95% CI 6.29-13.30) and better quality of life (differences of least squares means 29.86, 95% CI 22.33-37.38). Logistic regression analysis showed a positive effect of the de qi score on facial-nerve function (adjusted OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.09). INTERPRETATION: Among patients with Bell palsy, acupuncture with strong stimulation that elicited de qi had a greater therapeutic effect, and stronger intensity of de qi was associated with the better therapeutic effects. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov no. NCT00685789.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 338  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Bell Palsy
  Disease Category Cranial Nerve Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1350  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author MacPherson, H.; Tilbrook, H.; Richmond, S.; Woodman, J.; Ballard, K.; Atkin, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Essex, H.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Parrott, S.; Torgerson, D.; Wenham, A.; Watt, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Alexander Technique Lessons or Acupuncture Sessions for Persons With Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume (down) 163 Issue 9 Pages 653-662  
  Keywords RCT; Neck Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; Alexander Technique; Usual Care Control, Multimodality  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Management of chronic neck pain may benefit from additional active self-care-oriented approaches. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical effectiveness of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture versus usual care for persons with chronic, nonspecific neck pain. DESIGN: Three-group randomized, controlled trial. (Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN15186354). SETTING: U.K. primary care. PARTICIPANTS: Persons with neck pain lasting at least 3 months, a score of at least 28% on the Northwick Park Questionnaire (NPQ) for neck pain and associated disability, and no serious underlying pathology. INTERVENTION: 12 acupuncture sessions or 20 one-to-one Alexander lessons (both 600 minutes total) plus usual care versus usual care alone. MEASUREMENTS: NPQ score (primary outcome) at 0, 3, 6, and 12 months (primary end point) and Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale score, quality of life, and adverse events (secondary outcomes). RESULTS: 517 patients were recruited, and the median duration of neck pain was 6 years. Mean attendance was 10 acupuncture sessions and 14 Alexander lessons. Between-group reductions in NPQ score at 12 months versus usual care were 3.92 percentage points for acupuncture (95% CI, 0.97 to 6.87 percentage points) (P = 0.009) and 3.79 percentage points for Alexander lessons (CI, 0.91 to 6.66 percentage points) (P = 0.010). The 12-month reductions in NPQ score from baseline were 32% for acupuncture and 31% for Alexander lessons. Participant self-efficacy improved for both interventions versus usual care at 6 months (P < 0.001) and was significantly associated (P < 0.001) with 12-month NPQ score reductions (acupuncture, 3.34 percentage points [CI, 2.31 to 4.38 percentage points]; Alexander lessons, 3.33 percentage points [CI, 2.22 to 4.44 percentage points]). No reported serious adverse events were considered probably or definitely related to either intervention. LIMITATION: Practitioners belonged to the 2 main U.K.-based professional associations, which may limit generalizability of the findings. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture sessions and Alexander Technique lessons both led to significant reductions in neck pain and associated disability compared with usual care at 12 months. Enhanced self-efficacy may partially explain why longer-term benefits were sustained. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Arthritis Research UK.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 517  
  Time in Treatment 20 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26524571 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2016  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cherkin, D. C.; Eisenberg, D.; Sherman, K. J.; Barlow, W.; Kaptchuk, T. J.; Street, J.; Deyo, R. A. url  openurl
  Title Randomized trial comparing traditional Chinese medical acupuncture, therapeutic massage, and self-care education for chronic low back pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume (down) 161 Issue 8 Pages 1081-1088  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Cupping; Electroacupuncture; Exercise; Exercise Therapy; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Low Back Pain; Massage; Moxibustion; Pain; RCT; Self Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Heat Lamp; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Back Pain  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Because the value of popular forms of alternative care for chronic back pain remains uncertain, we compared the effectiveness of acupuncture, therapeutic massage, and self-care education for persistent back pain. METHODS: We randomized 262 patients aged 20 to 70 years who had persistent back pain to receive Traditional Chinese Medical acupuncture (n = 94), therapeutic massage (n = 78), or self-care educational materials (n = 90). Up to 10 massage or acupuncture visits were permitted over 10 weeks. Symptoms (0-10 scale) and dysfunction (0-23 scale) were assessed by telephone interviewers masked to treatment group. Follow-up was available for 95% of patients after 4, 10, and 52 weeks, and none withdrew for adverse effects. RESULTS: Treatment groups were compared after adjustment for prerandomization covariates using an intent-to-treat analysis. At 10 weeks, massage was superior to self-care on the symptom scale (3.41 vs 4.71, respectively; P =.01) and the disability scale (5.88 vs 8.92, respectively; P<.001). Massage was also superior to acupuncture on the disability scale (5.89 vs 8.25, respectively; P =.01). After 1 year, massage was not better than self-care but was better than acupuncture (symptom scale: 3.08 vs 4.74, respectively; P =.002; dysfunction scale: 6.29 vs 8.21, respectively; P =.05). The massage group used the least medications (P<.05) and had the lowest costs of subsequent care. CONCLUSIONS: Therapeutic massage was effective for persistent low back pain, apparently providing long-lasting benefits. Traditional Chinese Medical acupuncture was relatively ineffective. Massage might be an effective alternative to conventional medical care for persistent back pain  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 262  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score 85  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 161  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Avants, S. K.; Margolin, A.; Holford, T. R.; Kosten, T. R. url  openurl
  Title A randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture for cocaine dependence Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume (down) 160 Issue 15 Pages 2305-2312  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Substance-Related Disorders; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Group Acupuncture Style; Relaxation; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Partly because of a lack of a conventional, effective treatment for cocaine addiction, auricular acupuncture is used to treat this disorder in numerous drug treatment facilities across the country for both primary cocaine-dependent and opiate-dependent populations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture for the treatment of cocaine addiction. METHODS: Eighty-two cocaine-dependent, methadone-maintained patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: auricular acupuncture, a needle-insertion control condition, or a no-needle relaxation control. Treatment sessions were provided 5 times weekly for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was cocaine use assessed by 3-times-weekly urine toxicology screens. RESULTS: Longitudinal analysis of the urine data for the intent-to-treat sample showed that patients assigned to acupuncture were significantly more likely to provide cocaine-negative urine samples relative to both the relaxation control (odds ratio, 3.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-8.72; P =. 01) and the needle-insertion control (odds ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-5.75; P =.05). CONCLUSIONS: Findings from the current study suggest that acupuncture shows promise for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Further investigation of this treatment modality appears to be warranted  
  Address Substance Abuse Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06519, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 82  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Cocaine-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score 83  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 45  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Law, S.K.; Lowe, S.; Law, S.M.; Giaconi, J.A.A.; Coleman, A.L.; Caprioli, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective Evaluation of Acupuncture as Treatment for Glaucoma Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication American Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal Am J Ophthalmol  
  Volume (down) 160 Issue 2 Pages 256-265  
  Keywords Eye Diseases; Glaucoma; Cross-Over Design; Acu + Usual Care Versus CAM; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate acupuncture as treatment for glaucoma. DESIGN: Prospective double-masked randomized crossover study. METHODS: setting: Clinical practice. POPULATION: One eye per patient with primary open-angle glaucoma and stable intraocular pressure (IOP). INTERVENTION: Patients were randomized to receive 1 acupuncture series (12 sessions with either eye-related [eye-points] or non-eye-related [non-eye-points] acupoints) and then crossed over to receive the other series. OUTCOME MEASURES: IOP, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), visual field (VF), optic disc and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurements, compliance, and adverse reactions. Probability to detect 3 mm Hg IOP difference between series was 90%. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients volunteered and 11 (50.0%) completed the study; 8 (36.4%) did not complete treatment owing to changes of health, moving away, lack of transportation, or family crisis; and 3(13.6%) were withdrawn owing to needle sensitivity or IOP elevation (8 mm Hg) in the contralateral eye. After an acupuncture session, mean IOP increased slightly with both eye-points (from 12.9 +/- 1.8 mm Hg to 13.6 +/- 2.0 mm Hg, P = .019) and non-eye-points (from 13.0 +/- 1.5 mm Hg to 13.5 +/- 1.7 mm Hg, P = .073) series. HR, diurnal IOP, and BCVA showed no statistically significant changes after 12 sessions of either series. Systolic and diastolic BP were reduced after 12 sessions of non-eye-points series (P = .040, P = .002, respectively). Optic disc, RNFL, and VF showed no statistically significant changes. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture has no overall effect on diurnal IOP or BCVA but may temporally increase the IOP immediately after a treatment session. BP is lowered by acupuncture with non-eye-points, but not with eye-points. Compliance and adverse event rates were low.  
  Address Glaucoma Division, Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 week Frequency 1/wk Number of Participants 11  
  Time in Treatment 12 weeks Condition Glaucoma
  Disease Category Eye Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25935101 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1968  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ma, Y. X.; Ye, X. N.; Liu, C. Z.; Cai, P. Y.; Li, Z. F.; Du, D. Q.; Guo, G.; Chen, S. Z.; Zhao, J. P.; Liu, J. J.; Yi, H. Q.; Gao, S. Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A clinical trial of acupuncture about time-varying treatment and points selection in primary dysmenorrhea Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of ethnopharmacology Abbreviated Journal J Ethnopharmacol  
  Volume (down) 148 Issue 2 Pages 498-504  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical therapeutic effects of acupuncture at single point Shiqizhui (EX-B8) and multi-points in time-varying treatment for primary dysmenorrhea. METHODS: 600 patients with primary dysmenorrhea were randomly assigned to the single point group (n=200) including group A (treating before the menstruation, n=100) and group B (immediately treating as soon as pain occurrence, n=100), the multi-points group (n=200) including group C (treating before the menstruation, n=100) and group D (immediately treating as soon as pain occurrence, n=100), or the control group, group E (n=200, no treatment). The therapeutic effects were analyzed after treatment for three menstrual cycles and interviewed for three follow-up periods. RESULTS: Acupuncture could effectively relieve menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea compared with the control group (P<0.05, P<0.01). Immediate pain relief occurred following acupuncture within 5min in group B (P<0.01) and group D (P<0.01), and the two groups obviously relieved menstrual pain for VAS scores. Both group A and group C obviously relieved menstrual pain (P<0.01), and group C was better than group A (P<0.05). Compared with group D, Group C was much better for CMSS scores in cycle 1. CONCLUSION: Treating before the menstruation is better than immediately treating as soon as pain occurrence at the improvement in symptoms of dysmenorrheal at multi-points. And single point is better than multi-points when immediately treating as soon as pain occurrence. The present trial suggest Shiqizhui (EX-B8) should be chosen as a convenient point.  
  Address Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, Jinan 250355, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 600  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Dysmennorhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 795  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hansen, P. E.; Hansen, J. H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture management of chronic facial pain. A double-blind cross-over study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1981 Publication Ugeskrift for laeger Abbreviated Journal Ugeskr Laeger  
  Volume (down) 143 Issue 44 Pages 2885-2887  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Facial Pain; Pain; RCT; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trigeminal Neuralgia  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 429  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lundeberg, T.; Bondesson, L.; Thomas, M. openurl 
  Title Effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 1987 Publication Br J Dermatol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 117 Issue 6 Pages 771-777  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Pruritus; NRCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract The effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch was studied in 10 healthy volunteers. Itching was induced by intradermal injections of histamine on the upper arm. 'Placebo-acupuncture', acupuncture and electro-acupuncture at 2 Hz or 80 Hz were applied over the injection site, proximal to the injection site (in the same dermatome) or extrasegmentally (ipsilateral to the injected arm) for a period of 5 min following induction of itch. In addition, the effect of a 5 min period and a 20 min period of stimulation of the skin area prior to the induction of itch were studied. The same periods of stimulation were also applied to extrasegmental points prior to the induction of itch on the arm. Acupuncture and 2 Hz and 80 Hz electro-acupuncture significantly reduced subjective itch intensity when applied intrasegmentally. No significant effects were obtained when stimulation was applied extrasegmentally. The results suggest that acupuncture or electro-acupuncture could be tried in clinical conditions associated with pruritus.  
  Address Department of Physiology II, Karolinska Institutet, S-104 01 Stockholm, Sweden.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 7  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 10  
  Time in Treatment 7 Weeks Condition Pruritus
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/28/2015; Date Modified: 5/28/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Department of Physiology II, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=3426954 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1647  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hubscher, M.; Vogt, L.; Ziebart, T.; Banzer, W. openurl 
  Title Immediate effects of acupuncture on strength performance: a randomized, controlled crossover trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Eur J Appl Physiol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 110 Issue 2 Pages 353-358  
  Keywords Healthy Subjects; Athletic Performance; Sports Medicine; Acupuncture; Cross-Over Design; Acu Versus > 1 Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Laser; CAM Control; Rct; AcuTrials; Exercise  
  Abstract The present study investigated the immediate efficacy of acupuncture compared to sham acupuncture and placebo laser acupuncture on strength performance. A total of 33 recreational athletes (25.2 +/- 2.8 years; 13 women) were randomized to receive acupuncture, sham acupuncture (needling at non-acupuncture points) and placebo laser acupuncture (deactivated laser device) in a double-blind crossover fashion with 1 week between trials. Assessment included bipedal drop jumps for maximum rebound height and quadriceps maximum isometric voluntary force (MIVF). Furthermore, surface electromyography (EMG) was used to measure the EMG activity of the rectus femoris muscle during a 30-s sustained MIVF of the knee extensors. Mean power frequency (MPF) analysis was applied to characterize muscular endurance. Measurements were performed at baseline and immediately after treatment by a blinded investigator. Repeated measures ANOVA and post hoc paired-sample t test with Bonferroni-Holm correction were used for statistical analysis. The difference in the mean change in MIVF from baseline between acupuncture (46.6 N) and sham laser acupuncture (19.6 N) was statistically significant (p < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between acupuncture (46.6 N) and sham acupuncture (28.8 N). ANOVA did not show statistically significant treatment effects for drop jump height or MPF. The present study shows that a single acupuncture treatment was efficacious for improving isometric quadriceps strength in recreational athletes. These results might have implications not only for athletic performance enhancement, but also for rehabilitation programs aimed at restoring neuromuscular function.  
  Address Department of Sports Medicine, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Ginnheimer Landstrasse 39, 60487, Frankfurt, Germany, m.huebscher@sport.uni-frankfurt.de.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 33  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Athletic Performance
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/7/2013; Date Modified: 10/13/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Athletic Performance; Department of Sports Medicine, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Ginnheimer Landstrasse 39, 60487, Frankfurt, Germany, m.huebscher@sport.uni-frankfurt.de.; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=20499248 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1869  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Duncan, B.; Donough-Means, S.; Worden, K.; Schnyer, R.; Andrews, J.; Meaney, F. J. url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of osteopathy in the cranial field and myofascial release versus acupuncture as complementary treatment for children with spastic cerebral palsy: a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Osteopath Assoc  
  Volume (down) 108 Issue 10 Pages 559-570  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cerebral Palsy; Motor Function; Myofascial Release; Pediatrics; Pilot Study; RCT; Wait-List Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; CAM Control; Osteopathic Medicine; Nervous System Diseases; Auricular Acupuncture; Scalp Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Case reports and clinical trials have indicated that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) may improve motor function and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of osteopathy in the cranial field, myofascial release, or both versus acupuncture in children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy, as measured by several outcomes instruments in a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Children between the ages of 20 months and 12 years with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized wait-list control pilot study. There were three arms in the study: OMT (ie, osteopathy in the cranial field, myofascial release, or both, using direct or indirect methods), acupuncture, and control (ie, nontherapeutic attention). Children who were initially randomly assigned to the control arm were subsequently randomly reassigned to the intervention arms, increasing the sample size. Outcome measures included standard instruments used in the evaluation of children with cerebral palsy. Less traditional measures were also used, including serial evaluations by an independent blind osteopathic physician and visual analog scale assessments by an independent osteopathic physician and the parents or guardians. A total of 11 outcome variables were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients were included in the study. Individual analyses of the 11 outcome variables revealed statistically significant improvement in two mobility measures for patients who received OMT--the total score of Gross Motor Function Measurement and the mobility domain of Functional Independence Measure for Children (P<.05). No statistically significant improvements were seen among patients in the acupuncture treatment arm. CONCLUSIONS: A series of treatments using osteopathy in the cranial field, myofascial release, or both improved motor function in children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy. These results can be used to guide future research into the effectiveness of OMT or acupuncture in treating children with spastic cerebral palsy  
  Address Department of Pediatrics at University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson, AZ, USA. brduncan@email.arizona.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 55  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Cerebral Palsy
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 268  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Emmons, S. L.; Otto, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for overactive bladder: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Obstetrics and gynecology Abbreviated Journal Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume (down) 106 Issue 1 Pages 138-143  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urinary Bladder, Overactive; Urologic Diseases; Women's Health; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; Urgency; Urinary Frequency  
  Abstract Objective: To compare acupuncture treatment for overactive bladder with urge incontinence with a placebo acupuncture treatment. Methods: Eighty-five women enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Women were randomly assigned to either receive an acupuncture treatment expected to improve their bladder symptoms, or a placebo acupuncture treatment designed to promote relaxation. They underwent cystometric testing, completed a 3-day voiding diary, and completed the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire, validated quality-of-life inventories, before and after 4 weekly acupuncture treatments. The primary endpoint was number of incontinent episodes over 3 days. Secondary endpoints included voiding frequency and urgency, cystometric bladder capacity, maximum voided volume, and the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire symptom scores. Results: Seventy-four women completed all aspects of the study. Women in both treatment and placebo groups had significant decreases in number of incontinent episodes (59% for treatment, 40% for placebo) without a significant difference in the change between the groups. Women in the treatment group had a 14% reduction in urinary frequency (P = .013), a 30% reduction in the proportion of voids associated with urgency (P = .016), and a 13% increase in both maximum voided volume and maximum cystometric capacity (P = .01). Both groups also had an improvement in the urinary distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire scores (54% decrease for treatment, 30% decrease for placebo, P < .001 for the difference in change between the groups). Conclusion: Women who received 4 weekly bladder-specific acupuncture treatments had significant improvements in bladder capacity, urgency, frequency, and quality-of-life scores as compared with women who received placebo acupuncture treatments. Level of Evidence: I  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; and Providence Continence Center, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 74  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Urinary Bladder, Overactive
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 289  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Irnich, D.; Behrens, N.; Gleditsch, J.; Stor, W.; Schreiber, M.; Schops, P.; Vickers, A.; Beyer, A. url  openurl
  Title Immediate effects of dry needling and acupuncture at distant points in chronic neck pain: results of a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled crossover trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume (down) 99 Issue 1-2 Pages 83-  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Cross-Over Design; Dry Needling; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Neck Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Sham Laser; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract To evaluate immediate effects of two different modes of acupuncture on motion-related pain and cervical spine mobility in chronic neck pain patients compared to a sham procedure. Thirty-six patients with chronic neck pain and limited cervical spine mobility participated in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled crossover trial. Every patient was treated once with needle acupuncture at distant points, dry needling (DN) of local myofascial trigger points and sham laser acupuncture (Sham). Outcome measures were motion-related pain intensity (visual analogue scale, 0-100mm) and range of motion (ROM). In addition, patients scored changes of general complaints using an 11-point verbal rating scale. Patients were assessed immediately before and after each treatment by an independent (blinded) investigator. Multivariate analysis was used to assess the effects of true acupuncture and needle site independently. For motion-related pain, use of acupuncture at non-local points reduced pain scores by about a third (11.2mm; 95% CI 5.7, 16.7; P=0.00006) compared to DN and sham. DN led to an estimated reduction in pain of 1.0mm (95% CI -4.5, 6.5; P=0.7). Use of DN slightly improved ROM by 1.7 degrees (95% CI 0.2, 3.2; P=0.032) with use of non-local points improving ROM by an additional 1.9 degrees (95% CI 0.3, 3.4; P=0.016). For patient assessment of change, non-local acupuncture was significantly superior both to Sham (1.7 points; 95% CI 1.0, 2.5; P=0.0001) and DN (1.5 points; 95% CI 0.4, 2.6; P=0.008) but there was no difference between DN and Sham (0.1 point; 95% CI -1.0, 1.2; P=0.8). Acupuncture is superior to Sham in improving motion-related pain and ROM following a single session of treatment in chronic neck pain patients. Acupuncture at distant points improves ROM more than DN; DN was ineffective for motion-related pain  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 76  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 500  
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