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Author Tasoglu, O.; Sahin Onat, S.; Boluk, H.; Tasoglu, I.; Ozgirgin, N. url  openurl
  Title Comparision of two different dry-needling techniques in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Agri : Agri (Algoloji) Dernegi'nin Yayin Organidir = The Journal of the Turkish Society of Algology Abbreviated Journal Agri  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 9-16  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Dry Needling with Non-Acupuncture Needle; Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Acu Versus CAM Control; CAM Control; Dry-Needling; Peppering; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom-Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy of two different dry needling (DN) techniques (deep dry needling & peppering) in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). METHODS: Seventy-two patients, who were diagnosed as MPS at our outpatient clinic were randomly assigned into two groups as deep dry needling (DDN) and peppering. All patients were evaluated four times as: before the treatment and 1-5-12 weeks after the completion of treatment protocol. In each evaluation, Visual analogue scale (VAS), Nottingham extended activities of daily living scale (NEADLS), Beck depression inventory (BDI) scores were recorded. Additionally, all patients were evaluated for the pain felt during the procedure and side effect profile. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients from DDN group and twenty-eight patients from peppering group accomplished the follow-up period. Both DDN and peppering seem to be effective for relieving pain and depressive symptoms and improving functionality compared to baseline when evaluated on the 1st, 5th and 12th weeks. On the other hand the intergroup analyses showed no significant differences between DDN and peppering groups. The only significant difference between the groups is the lesser pain felt during the procedure in the DDN group. CONCLUSION: Both DDN and peppering are effective in MPS and the effects last up to 12 weeks. Also the adverse event profiles of the two techniques are similar. On the other hand, DDN is a painless procedure.  
  Address Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ankara Physcial Medicine and Rehabiliation Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.humaboluk@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 72  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28467572 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2177  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, B.H.; Kim, K.; Nam, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A comparative study on the effects of systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture, and digital electroacupuncture to treat tinnitus: A randomized, paralleled, open-labeled exploratory trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 85  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Ear Diseases; Tinnitus; Hearing Disorders; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Auricular Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; CAM Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many previous studies of electroacupuncture used combined therapy of electroacupuncture and systemic manual acupuncture, so it was uncertain which treatment was effective. This study evaluated and compared the effects of systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture and distal electroacupuncture for treating patients with tinnitus. METHODS: A randomized, parallel, open-labeled exploratory trial was conducted. Subjects aged 20-75 years who had suffered from idiopathic tinnitus for > 2 weeks were recruited from May 2013 to April 2014. The subjects were divided into three groups by systemic manual acupuncture group (MA), periauricular electroacupuncture group (PE), and distal electroacupuncture group (DE). The groups were selected by random drawing. Nine acupoints (TE 17, TE21, SI19, GB2, GB8, ST36, ST37, TE3 and TE9), two periauricular acupoints (TE17 and TE21), and four distal acupoints (TE3, TE9, ST36, and ST37) were selected. The treatment sessions were performed twice weekly for a total of eight sessions over 4 weeks. Outcomes were the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) score and the loud and uncomfortable visual analogue scales (VAS). Demographic and clinical characteristics of all participants were compared between the groups upon admission using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). One-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the THI, VAS loud, and VAS uncomfortable scores. The least significant difference test was used as a post-hoc test. RESULTS: Thirty-nine subjects were eligible and their data were analyzed. No difference in THI and VAS loudness scores was observed in between groups. The VAS uncomfortable scores decreased significantly in MA and DE compared with those in PE. Within the group, all three treatments showed some effect on THI, VAS loudness scores and VAS uncomfortable scores after treatment except DE in THI. CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference between systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture and distal electroacupuncture in tinnitus. However, all three treatments had some effect on tinnitus within the group before and after treatment. Systemic manual acupuncture and distal electroacupuncture have some effect on VAS uncomfortable. TRIAL REGISTRATION: KCT0001991 by CRIS (Clinical Research Information Service), 2016-8-1, retrospectively registered.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 130-701, Republic of Korea. ophthrl@khu.ac.kr  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 42  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28143471; PMCID:PMC5282839 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2189  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Armour, M.; Dahlen, H.G.; Zhu, X.; Farquhar, C.; Smith, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of treatment timing and mode of stimulation in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea with acupuncture: An exploratory randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages 1-20  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology; Acu Versus Acu; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: We examined the effect of changing treatment timing and the use of manual, electro acupuncture on the symptoms of primary dysmenorrhea. METHODS: A randomised controlled trial was performed with four arms, low frequency manual acupuncture (LF-MA), high frequency manual acupuncture (HF-MA), low frequency electro acupuncture (LF-EA) and high frequency electro acupuncture (HF-EA). A manualised trial protocol was used to allow differentiation and individualized treatment over three months. A total of 74 women were randomly assigned to one of the four groups (LF-MA n = 19, HF-MA n = 18, LF-EA n = 18, HF-EA n = 19). Twelve treatments were performed over three menstrual cycles, either once per week (LF groups) or three times in the week prior to menses (HF groups). All groups received a treatment in the first 48 hours of menses. The primary outcome was the reduction in peak menstrual pain at 12 months from trial entry. RESULTS: During the treatment period and nine month follow-up all groups showed statistically significant (p < .001) reductions in peak and average menstrual pain compared to baseline but there were no differences between groups (p > 0.05). Health related quality of life increased significantly in six domains in groups having high frequency of treatment compared to two domains in low frequency groups. Manual acupuncture groups required less analgesic medication than electro-acupuncture groups (p = 0.02). HF-MA was most effective in reducing secondary menstrual symptoms compared to both-EA groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture treatment reduced menstrual pain intensity and duration after three months of treatment and this was sustained for up to one year after trial entry. The effect of changing mode of stimulation or frequency of treatment on menstrual pain was not significant. This may be due to a lack of power. The role of acupuncture stimulation on menstrual pain needs to be investigated in appropriately powered randomised controlled trials.  
  Address The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 74  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2416  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ozgoli, G.; Sedigh Mobarakabadi, S.; Heshmat, R.; Alavi Majd, H.; Sheikhan, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of LI4 and BL32 acupressure on labor pain and delivery outcome in the first stage of labor in primiparous women: A randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2016 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 29 Issue Pages 175-180  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupressure; TCM Acupuncture Style; Labor, Obstetric; Analgesia; Women's Health; Labor Pain; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study examines and compares the effect of LI4 and BL32 acupressure with each other and control group on labor pain and delivery outcomes. DESIGN: In this randomized controlled trial, 105 primiparous women in active phase of first-stage of labor were equally assigned to two experimental groups [acupressure on LI4 (n=35) or BL32 (n=35)] and a control group (n=35). INTERVENTIONS: The experimental groups received routine labor care and acupressure in LI4 or BL32 points in three cervical dilatations (4-5, 6-7, and 8-10cm). The control group only received routine labor care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain was assessed by numerical rating scale in three cervical dilatations, before and after intervention. Type of delivery (cesarean, vaginal or operative delivery) and neonatal Apgar score were considered as delivery outcomes, these data collected by a check list. Data were analyzed using Repeated Measurement, ANOVA, Chi-Square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests. RESULTS: Pain reduction was significantly greater in LI4 and BL32 groups compared with control in all periods of study. Also, acupressure on BL32 point was superior to LI4 point in pain relief in the first and second but not third intervention. No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of delivery outcomes. CONCLUSION: Acupressure on BL32 and LI4 points are effective in reducing labor pain compared to control group with a slight superiority for BL32 points. Acupressure on these points could apply for relief pain in labor as an inexpensive and easy to administered method.  
  Address Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: zsheikhan@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency N/A Number of Participants 105  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Analgesia
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27912944 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2198  
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Author MacPherson, H.; Tilbrook, H.; Richmond, S.; Woodman, J.; Ballard, K.; Atkin, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Essex, H.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Parrott, S.; Torgerson, D.; Wenham, A.; Watt, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Alexander Technique Lessons or Acupuncture Sessions for Persons With Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2015 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume 163 Issue 9 Pages 653-662  
  Keywords RCT; Neck Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; Alexander Technique; Usual Care Control, Multimodality  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Management of chronic neck pain may benefit from additional active self-care-oriented approaches. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical effectiveness of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture versus usual care for persons with chronic, nonspecific neck pain. DESIGN: Three-group randomized, controlled trial. (Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN15186354). SETTING: U.K. primary care. PARTICIPANTS: Persons with neck pain lasting at least 3 months, a score of at least 28% on the Northwick Park Questionnaire (NPQ) for neck pain and associated disability, and no serious underlying pathology. INTERVENTION: 12 acupuncture sessions or 20 one-to-one Alexander lessons (both 600 minutes total) plus usual care versus usual care alone. MEASUREMENTS: NPQ score (primary outcome) at 0, 3, 6, and 12 months (primary end point) and Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale score, quality of life, and adverse events (secondary outcomes). RESULTS: 517 patients were recruited, and the median duration of neck pain was 6 years. Mean attendance was 10 acupuncture sessions and 14 Alexander lessons. Between-group reductions in NPQ score at 12 months versus usual care were 3.92 percentage points for acupuncture (95% CI, 0.97 to 6.87 percentage points) (P = 0.009) and 3.79 percentage points for Alexander lessons (CI, 0.91 to 6.66 percentage points) (P = 0.010). The 12-month reductions in NPQ score from baseline were 32% for acupuncture and 31% for Alexander lessons. Participant self-efficacy improved for both interventions versus usual care at 6 months (P < 0.001) and was significantly associated (P < 0.001) with 12-month NPQ score reductions (acupuncture, 3.34 percentage points [CI, 2.31 to 4.38 percentage points]; Alexander lessons, 3.33 percentage points [CI, 2.22 to 4.44 percentage points]). No reported serious adverse events were considered probably or definitely related to either intervention. LIMITATION: Practitioners belonged to the 2 main U.K.-based professional associations, which may limit generalizability of the findings. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture sessions and Alexander Technique lessons both led to significant reductions in neck pain and associated disability compared with usual care at 12 months. Enhanced self-efficacy may partially explain why longer-term benefits were sustained. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Arthritis Research UK.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 517  
  Time in Treatment 20 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26524571 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2016  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gemma, M.; Nicelli, E.; Gioia, L.; Moizo, E.; Beretta, L.; Calvi, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture accelerates recovery after general anesthesia: a prospective randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2015 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 99-104  
  Keywords RCT; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Anesthesia Recovery Period; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture anesthesia was created in the 1950's in China and continues to be used there today during most major surgeries. It is widely used in China for such complex operations as brain, heart, and abdominal surgery. It is popular in China because it is economical, practical, and beneficial to the patients. With acupuncture anesthesia there is less bleeding during surgery and there is also quicker post-operative recovery. OBJECTIVE: This randomized prospective study aims at comparing the effect of two acupoints (Yongquan, KI1 and Renzhong, DU26) with sham acupuncture and no acupuncture on the time to recovery of consciousness after general anesthesia by means of the Bispectral Index monitor (BIS). DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: This is a prospective randomized controlled study. We randomly assigned 50 patients to 5 groups during recovery from surgical anesthesia. Four groups had acupuncture on KI1 (group A), DU26 (groups B), both KI1 and DU26 (group C), and sham points (group D), and one had no acupuncture (group E). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bispectral Index (BIS), time to spontaneous eye opening, time to tracheal extubation, and time to following commands were measured as the main outcome measures. RESULTS: Time to spontaneous eye opening differed among groups (P=0.002), as well as time to tracheal extubation (P<0.000 1) and time to following commands (P=0.000 6). BIS values differed significantly among groups both 5 and 10 min after the end of anesthesia (P<0.000 1 and P=0.000 4, respectively). BIS values of groups D and E were lower than those of the other groups and those of group C were higher. The same pattern was observed also 15 and 30 min after the end of anesthesia, although the difference among groups was not significant at these time points (P=0.164 and P=0.104, respectively). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture on DU26 and KI1 accelerates recovery of consciousness after general anesthesia. Moreover, a possible synergistic effect of DU26 and KI1 is suggested. This issue may play a role in the optimization of operating room management and raise interest about the usefulness of acupuncture on unconsciousness states of different nature.  
  Address Department of Anesthesia and Neurointensive Care, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132 Milan, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Day Frequency N/A Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Recovery Time
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25797640 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1978  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhenzhong, L.; Xiaojun, Y.; Weijun, T.; Yuehua, C.; Jie, S.; Jimeng, Z.; Anqi, W.; Chunhui, B.; Yin, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparative effect of electroacupuncture and moxibustion on the expression of substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide in patients with irritable bowel syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2015 Publication Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung i tsa Chih Ying wen pan / Sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 402-410  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; IBS; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Colonic Mucosa; Neuropeptide Substance P; Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide; Immunohistochemistry Assay; Colonoscopy; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Moxibustion; Moxa; Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the impacts of electroacupuncture (EA) and moxibustion (Mox) on the primary gastrointestinal symptoms and the expressions of colonic mucosa-associated neuropeptide substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in patients with either diarrhea-predominant or constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D and IBS-C, respectively). METHODS: Eighty-five IBS patients were randomly allocated to the EA and Mox groups. Zusanli (ST 36) and Shangjuxu (ST 37) were selected as acupoints for electroacupuncture or warm moxibustion treatment once a day for 14 consecutive days. Before and after the treatment sessions, a Visual Analog Pain Scale and the Bristol Stool Form Scale were used to evaluate gastrointestinal symptoms. There were four dropout cases, leaving 81 participants (41 with IBS-D and 40 with IBS-C) who volunteered to undergo colonoscopy before and after the treatment sessions. During colonoscopy, sigmoid mucosa were collected to detect SP and VIP expression using immunohistochemistry assay. RESULTS: Both EA and Mox treatments were effective at relieving abdominal pain in IBS-D and IBS-C patients. However, Mox was more effective at reducing diarrhea in IBS-D patients, whereas EA was more effective at improving constipation in IBS-C patients. EA and Mox treatments both down-regulated the abnormally increased SP and VIP expression in the colonic mucosa, with no significant difference shown between the two treatments. CONCLUSION: Both EA and Mox treatments are effective at ameliorating gastrointestinal symptoms by reducing SP and VIP expression in the colonic mucosa of IBS patients.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy and Acupuncture, Jinhua Hospital of Zhejiang University, Jinhua 321000, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 85  
  Time in Treatment 2 weeks Condition Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26427109 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1923  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qu, L.; Ye, Y.; Li, C.; Gao, G. url  openurl
  Title Effect of Electroacupuncture on Transcutaneous Oxygen Partial Pressure During Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Healthy Individuals Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2015 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 44-51  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation; PENS; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Physical; CAM Control; Acu versus Acu; HBOT; Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy; Oxygen Partial Pressure  
  Abstract CONTEXT: The goal of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is to increase the oxygen (O(2)) supply to the body significantly. Because of the toxic side effects and complications of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)), the environmental pressure and treatment time must be restricted. The research team hypothesized that other therapies administered during HBOT could safely improve the value of the arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO(2)) during HBOT and improve its therapeutic effect. OBJECTIVE: The study intended to investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA) while receiving HBOT had a greater effect for healthy individuals than HBOT or EA alone or EA combined with normobaric pure oxygen (pure O(2)). DESIGN: The research team designed a randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: The study was performed in the Department of Hyperbaric Medicine at the No. 401 Hospital of the People's Liberation Army in Qingdao, China. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 81 volunteers were recruited. After thorough physical examination and laboratory testing, 21 volunteers were excluded from the study. Participants included 60 healthy volunteers. INTERVENTION: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups of 15 participants each: (1) an HBOT group, (2) an EA group, (3) an EA During HBOT group, and (4) an EA Combined With Pure O(2)group. OUTCOME MEASURES: Because at the current technology level a blood gas analyzer cannot test PaO(2)during HBOT, transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure (PtcO(2)) of the participants was tested instead. Before, during, and after EA, variations in PtcO(2)were monitored in each group. RESULTS: For the EA During HBOT group, (1) the increase in PtcO(2)during EA was significantly greater than that observed for the other 3 groups (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: The EA During HBOT method provided improvements in the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of HBOT, and the study's results partially demonstrated the accuracy of the research team's hypothesis that EA therapy applied during HBOT could safely improve the value of PtcO(2)(PaO(2)) during HBOT and produce a greater therapeutic effect.  
  Address Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, No. 401, Hospital of the People's Liberation Army, Qingdao, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Healthy Subjects
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26393991 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2022  
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Author You, X.-M.; Mo, X.-S.; Ma, L.; Zhong, J.-H.; Qin, H.-G.; Lu, Z.; Xiang, B.-D.; Wu, F.-X.; Zhao, X.-H.; Tang, J.; Pang, Y.-H.; Chen, J.; Li, L.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy of Simo Decoction and Acupuncture or Chewing Gum Alone on Postoperative Ileus in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Hepatectomy Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2015 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 94 Issue 45 Pages e1968  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Ileus; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture Point Injection; Herbal Formula; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities; Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract To compare the efficacy of simo decoction (SMD) combined with acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint or chewing gum alone for treating postoperative ileus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy.In postoperative ileus, a frequent complication following hepatectomy, bowel function recovery is delayed, which increases length of hospital stay. Studies suggest that chewing gum may reduce postoperative ileus; SMD and acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint have long been used in China to promote bowel movement.Patients with primary HCC undergoing hepatectomy between January 2015 and August 2015 were randomized to receive SMD and acupuncture (n = 55) or chewing gum (n = 53) or no intervention (n = 54) starting on postoperative day 1 and continuing for 6 consecutive days or until flatus. Primary endpoints were occurrence of postoperative ileus and length of hospital stay; secondary endpoints were surgical complications.Groups treated with SMD and acupuncture or with chewing gum experienced significantly shorter time to first peristalsis, flatus, and defecation than the no-intervention group (all P < 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the combined SMD and acupuncture group (mean 14.0 d, SD 4.9) than in the no-intervention group (mean 16.5 d, SD 6.8; P = 0.014), while length of stay was similar between the chewing gum group (mean 14.7, SD 6.2) and the no-intervention group (P = 0.147). Incidence of grades I and II complications was slightly lower in both intervention groups than in the no-intervention group.The combination of SMD and acupuncture may reduce incidence of postoperative ileus and shorten hospital stay in HCC patients after hepatectomy. Chewing gum may also reduce incidence of ileus but does not appear to affect hospital stay. (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT02438436.).  
  Address From the Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University (XMY, XSM, LM, JHZ, HGQ, ZL, BDX, FXW, YHP, JT, XHZ, JC, LQL); and Guangxi Liver Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Engineering and Technology Research Center, Nanning, PR China (XMY, LM, JHZ, BDX, FXW, YHP, JT, XHZ, JC, LQL)  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 181  
  Time in Treatment 6 Days Condition Ileus
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26559269 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2015  
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Author Law, S.K.; Lowe, S.; Law, S.M.; Giaconi, J.A.A.; Coleman, A.L.; Caprioli, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prospective Evaluation of Acupuncture as Treatment for Glaucoma Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2015 Publication American Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal Am J Ophthalmol  
  Volume 160 Issue 2 Pages 256-265  
  Keywords Eye Diseases; Glaucoma; Cross-Over Design; Acu + Usual Care Versus CAM; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate acupuncture as treatment for glaucoma. DESIGN: Prospective double-masked randomized crossover study. METHODS: setting: Clinical practice. POPULATION: One eye per patient with primary open-angle glaucoma and stable intraocular pressure (IOP). INTERVENTION: Patients were randomized to receive 1 acupuncture series (12 sessions with either eye-related [eye-points] or non-eye-related [non-eye-points] acupoints) and then crossed over to receive the other series. OUTCOME MEASURES: IOP, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), visual field (VF), optic disc and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurements, compliance, and adverse reactions. Probability to detect 3 mm Hg IOP difference between series was 90%. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients volunteered and 11 (50.0%) completed the study; 8 (36.4%) did not complete treatment owing to changes of health, moving away, lack of transportation, or family crisis; and 3(13.6%) were withdrawn owing to needle sensitivity or IOP elevation (8 mm Hg) in the contralateral eye. After an acupuncture session, mean IOP increased slightly with both eye-points (from 12.9 +/- 1.8 mm Hg to 13.6 +/- 2.0 mm Hg, P = .019) and non-eye-points (from 13.0 +/- 1.5 mm Hg to 13.5 +/- 1.7 mm Hg, P = .073) series. HR, diurnal IOP, and BCVA showed no statistically significant changes after 12 sessions of either series. Systolic and diastolic BP were reduced after 12 sessions of non-eye-points series (P = .040, P = .002, respectively). Optic disc, RNFL, and VF showed no statistically significant changes. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture has no overall effect on diurnal IOP or BCVA but may temporally increase the IOP immediately after a treatment session. BP is lowered by acupuncture with non-eye-points, but not with eye-points. Compliance and adverse event rates were low.  
  Address Glaucoma Division, Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 week Frequency 1/wk Number of Participants 11  
  Time in Treatment 12 weeks Condition Glaucoma
  Disease Category Eye Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25935101 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1968  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aranha, M.F.M.; Müller, C.E.E.; Gavião, M.B.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pain intensity and cervical range of motion in women with myofascial pain treated with acupuncture and electroacupuncture: a double-blinded, randomized clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2015 Publication Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal Braz J Phys Ther  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 34-43  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Musculoskeletal Diseases; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Ashi Acupuncture Style; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom-Based Point Selection; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Neck Pain; Cervical Pain  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture stimulates points on the body, influencing the perception of myofascial pain or altering physiologic functions. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EAC) and acupuncture (AC) for myofascial pain of the upper trapezius and cervical range of motion, using SHAM acupuncture as control. Method: Sixty women presenting at least one trigger point at the upper trapezius and local or referred pain for more than six months were randomized into EAC, AC, and SHAM groups. Eight sessions were scheduled and a follow-up was conducted after 28 days. The Visual Analog Scale assessed the intensity of local and general pain. A fleximeter assessed cervical movements. Data were analyzed using paired t or Wilcoxon's tests, ANOVA or Friedman or Kruskal-Wallis tests and Pearson's correlation (?=0.05). Results: There was reduction in general pain in the EAC and AC groups after eight sessions (P<0.001). A significant decrease in pain intensity occurred for the right trapezius in all groups and for the left trapezius in the EAC and AC groups. Intergroup comparisons showed improvement in general pain in the EAC and AC groups and in local pain intensity in the EAC group (P<0.05), which showed an increase in left rotation (P=0.049). The AC group showed increases in inclination (P=0.005) sustained until follow-up and rotation to the right (P=0.032). Conclusion: EAC and AC were effective in reducing the pain intensity compared with SHAM. EAC was better than AC for local pain relief. These treatments can assist in increasing cervical range of motion, albeit subtly.  
  Address Departamento de Morfologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Piracicaba (FOP), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP, Brazil  
  Publisher Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy / Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 72  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2337  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alizadeh, R.; Esmaeili, S.; Shoar, S.; Bagheri-Hariri, S.; Shoar, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting: efficacy of two acupuncture points versus a single one Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 71-75  
  Keywords RCT; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; PONV; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Anesthesiology  
  Abstract Despite recent advances in anesthesiology and postoperative care, postoperative nausea and vomiting are common complaints. Although acupuncture techniques have received attention in anesthesiology, the ideal technique and selection of the most appropriate acupuncture points are still under debate. This study compared the efficacy of two simultaneous acupuncture points with that of a single point in the prevention and treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting following general anesthesia through a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 227 surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia who were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group received acupuncture by stimulation only on the PC6 point (single group), and the second group underwent concomitant stimulation of the PC6 and the L14 acupuncture points (combined group) during surgery under general anesthesia. The prevalences of postoperative nausea and vomiting were compared between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups (p>0.05). Of 115 patients in the combined group, 80 (69.6%) complained about nausea and vomiting compared with 96 (85.7%) in the single group, a significantly lower proportion (p<0.05). Our findings favor a combination of PC6 and LI4 stimulation for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 227  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 15  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arvidsdotter, T.; Marklund, B.; Taft, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Six-month effects of integrative treatment, therapeutic acupuncture and conventional treatment in alleviating psychological distress in primary care patients--follow up from an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 210 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords RCT; Mental Disorders; Anxiety; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Stress, Psychological; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; CAM Control; Salutogenic Counseling  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To evaluate and compare 6-month effects of 8 weeks of an integrative treatment (IT), therapeutic acupuncture (TA), and conventional treatment (CT) in reducing symptoms of anxiety, depression and in improving health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sense of coherence (SOC) in psychologically distressed primary care patients. METHODS: Patients who had participated in an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial were followed up six months after treatment. The study sample consisted of 120 adults (40 per treatment arm) aged 20 to 55 years referred from four different primary health care centres in western Sweden for psychological distress. Assessments were made at baseline after eight weeks and after 24 weeks. Anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), HRQL with the SF-36 Mental Component Summary scores (MCS) and SOC with the Sense of Coherence-13 questionnaire. RESULTS: No baseline differences were found between groups on any outcome variable. At 24 weeks, IT and TA had significantly better values than CT on all variables. All three groups showed significant improvements from baseline on all variables, except HAD depression in CT; however, improvements were significantly greater in IT and TA than in CT. IT and TA did not differ on any outcome variable. Effect sizes were large in IT and TA for all variables and small or moderate in CT. Improvements on all variables seen after 8-weeks of IT and TA remained stable at 24 weeks and the CT group improved on HAD anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: IT and TA seem to be more beneficial than CT in reducing anxiety, depression, and in improving quality of life and sense of coherence after 24 weeks of follow up in patients with psychological distress. More research is needed to confirm these results. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN trial number NCT01631500.  
  Address Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. tina.arvidsdotter@vgregion.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 38  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baccetti, S.; Da Fre, M.; Becorpi, A.; Faedda, M.; Guerrera, A.; Monechi, M. V.; Munizzi, R. M.; Parazzini, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and traditional chinese medicine for hot flushes in menopause: a randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 550-557  
  Keywords RCT; Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause; Hot Flushes; Acu Versus CAM Control; Diet; Tuina; Chinese Massage; Self Massage; Plum Blossom; Seven Star Needles; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Whole Systems  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes and other menopause-related symptoms used in an integrated system, including such therapeutic techniques as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage. DESIGN: Randomized trial. SETTING: Outpatient center. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred women in spontaneous menopause with at least three episodes of hot flushes daily were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (50 per group): Women in group A were given diet, self-massage training, and treatment with acupuncture, and women in group B (the control group) were given the same diet and self-massage training, but treatment with acupuncture started 6 weeks after they were enrolled into the study. INTERVENTION: Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean change in frequency and/or intensity in menopause-related symptoms were estimated by questionnaire after treatment at week 4. RESULTS: Treatment with acupuncture significantly reduced the occurrence of hot flushes and sudden sweating (p<.001). Other symptoms (sleep disorders, tightness in the chest, irritability, bone pain, feeling depressed) significantly improved. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture in an integrated system that includes therapeutic techniques such as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage can be used to treat hot flushes and selected symptoms in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Referring Center for Complementary Medicine , Tuscany Region, San Donnino, Campi Bisenzio, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 50  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bahrami-Taghanaki, H.; Liu, Y.; Azizi, H.; Khorsand, A.; Esmaily, H.; Bahrami, A.; Xiao Zhao, B. url  openurl
  Title A randomized, controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic low-back pain Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Alternative therapies in health and medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 13-19  
  Keywords RCT; Back Pain, Chronic; Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; LBP; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Time Method Acupuncture; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Eight Confluent Points; CAM Control; Pain  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic low-back pain (cLBP) is a common condition throughout the world, and acupuncture is widely sought for treatment. As clinical evidence for the benefits of acupuncture grows, acupuncture for cLBP is receiving increased recognition and acceptance by both patients and professionals. Time method acupuncture has been previously researched with respect to chronic gastritis. OBJECTIVE: For individuals with cLBP in the current study, the research team examined the efficacy of adding confluent acupoints, related to the daytime period in time method acupuncture, to regular acupuncture and also evaluated the persistence of the benefits of such acupuncture in comparison with regular acupuncture. DESIGN: The study was a randomized, controlled trial (RCT). SETTING: The setting was an outpatient clinic of the Dongzhimen Hospital in Beijing, China. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were Chinese men and women with cLBP. INTERVENTION: Sixty participants were randomly divided into 2 groups to receive acupuncture. The control group received a treatment that followed a routine acupuncture (RA) protocol, while the intervention group received a treatment that followed an RA protocol plus acupuncture in confluent points related to time (TA). OUTCOME MEASURES: The research team measured the change in participants' scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the number of therapy sessions needed, the number of days that participants were absent from work during the treatment period and at 12 wk posttreatment, and the number of pain relapses between the end of treatment and the 4- and 12-wk follow-ups. RESULTS: VAS scores decreased from 69.6 +/- 7.9 to 11.8 +/- 4.9 in the intervention group compared with a decrease from 69.2 +/- 8.0 to 15.7 +/- 10.0 in the control group (P = .001). The intervention group received fewer therapy sessions (8.1 +/- 2.0) than did the control group (10.1 +/- 2.0, P < .001). Compared with the controls, the intervention group showed fewer days absent from work (0.5 vs 1.4; P = .03) and fewer pain relapses (4.0 vs 7.0; P = .04) at the 12-wk follow-up. In the 2 groups combined, VAS decreased from 69.4 +/- 7.9 before the first session of acupuncture to 13.8 +/- 8.0 after the last session (P < .001), and the number of therapy sessions needed for pain relief was 9.1 +/- 2.2. CONCLUSION: Accompanying routine acupuncture with time method acupuncture can enhance the efficacy of treatment and the persistence of its benefits in individuals with cLBP.  
  Address Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 51  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jin, C.; Zhou, X.; Pang, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of electroacupuncture combined with tolterodine on treating female mixed urinary incontinence Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Journal of wound, ostomy, and continence nursing : official publication of The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society / WOCN Abbreviated Journal J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs  
  Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 268-272  
  Keywords RCT; Urologic Diseases; Urinary Incontinence; Acu + Usual Care Versus CAM; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Acu Versus Acu; CAM Control; Women's Health  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To examine the effectiveness of combination therapy of electroacupuncture and tolterodine in treating female patients with mixed urinary incontinence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one women with mixed urinary incontinence were recruited to receive electroacupuncture therapy or combination therapy with electroacupuncture and tolterodine 2 mg orally twice a day for 8 weeks. In electroacupuncture therapy, the acupoints, including BL32 (Ci Liao), BL35 (Hui Yang), SP6 (San Yin Jiao), and ST36 (Zu San Li), were selected with the stimulation of a low-frequency (20 Hz) disperse-dense wave. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire score, the number of incontinence episodes, and urine leakage were measured before and after the treatment to evaluate the effect. RESULTS: Response rates were 73.5% and 78.4% in electroacupuncture therapy group and in the combination therapy group respectively. No significant differences were found when group outcomes were compared. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire score, the number of incontinence episodes, and urine leakage improved significantly (P < .001) after 8 weeks compared with baseline values in both groups. Significantly more patients in the combination therapy group experienced more than 50% reduction in the number of incontinent episodes than in the electroacupuncture group (75.7% vs 58.8%, P < .01). They also had significantly less urine leakage than those in electroacupuncture therapy group (11.2 +/- 7.6 g vs 15 +/- 9.1 g) (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: The effect of electroacupuncture for female mixed urinary incontinence may be enhanced by tolterodine.  
  Address Chunlan Jin, MD, L.Ac., Attending physician, Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and Division of Gynecology, Hospital of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Dong Che  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 71  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Urinary Incontinence
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 528  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lin, M.; Li, X.; Liang, W.; Liu, J.; Guo, J.; Zheng, J.; Liu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Needle-knife therapy improves the clinical symptoms of knee osteoarthritis by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Experimental and therapeutic medicine Abbreviated Journal Exp Ther Med  
  Volume 7 Issue 4 Pages 835-842  
  Keywords Arthritis; Osteoarthritis, Knee; RCT; Needle-Knife Therapy; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acu Versus CAM Control  
  Abstract Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a degenerative joint disease that occurs mainly in the elderly population. However, there are currently no effective treatments for treating this condition. In this study, the efficacy of needle-knife therapy, a technique of traditional Chinese medicine that has been widely used to treat KOA was investigated. Patients (n=170) with KOA were randomly divided for needle-knife therapy (treatment group) and acupuncture therapy (control group). Outcome evaluation included stiffness, pain, physiological function, overall changes, total symptom score, clinical curative effects and the concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the synovial fluid. The trial was completed in 151 patients (233 knees) from a total of 170 patients (264 knees); the treatment group comprised 76 patients (117 knees) who completed the trial and 9 patients (14 knees) who were removed from the study, and the control group comprised 75 patients (116 knees) who completed the trial and 10 patients (17 knees) who were removed from the study. The symptom scores of KOA in stages I-IV were reduced significantly in the treatment group and those of stages I-III were decreased significantly in the control group. The effective rate of the KOA therapy in the patients of stages III and IV in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group. After treatment, the decrements of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the treatment group were greater than those in the control group. These results showed that the use of needle-knife therapy to treat KOA effectively improved the clinical symptoms by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines.  
  Address Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command, Fuzhou, Fujian 350025, P.R. China.; Academy of Integrative Medicine, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 170  
  Time in Treatment 6 Days Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 718  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Miao, Edwin, Yong; Miao, Miranda, Yi mo; Kildea, Daniel, George; Lao, Yi-Wen url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Electroacupuncture and Electroacupuncture Plus Tao Hong Si Wu Wan in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Journal of Acupuncture & Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 6-14  
  Keywords Dysmenorrhea; Menstruation Disturbances; Women's Health; Gynecology; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Herbal Formula; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract Abstract: This study investigated the efficacies of electroacupuncture and electroacupuncture combined with Tao Hong Si Wu Wan in treating primary dysmenorrhea and compared the results with those obtained using conventional medical treatment. One treatment group, group 1, was administered Tao Hong Si Wu Wan (2625 mg) while the other, group 2, was administered a placebo (2625 mg) twice daily for 3 months. Electroacupuncture was used in both treatment groups: two sessions per menstrual cycle for three menstrual cycles. The reference group, group 3, was administered ibuprofen, 600 mg, twice daily, for five menstrual cycles. Uses of the herb, placebo and ibuprofen were blinded. A ridit analysis was used for testing and interpreting the effects of treatment. Pain intensity was determined using a qualitative grading method in a blinded manner. The ridit scores in groups 1 and 2 were significantly higher than those in reference group immediately after treatment and three months later. Twelve months after the treatment, group 1 had a higher ridit score than group 2. In comparison to the reference group, groups 1 and 2 achieved better menstrual pain relief both immediately and 3 months after treatment. In addition, group 1 had better long-term pain relief than group 2.  
  Address M. Modern Traditional Chinese Medical Clinic, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia; M. Modern Traditional Chinese Medical Clinic, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia; School of Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences, RMIT (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology) U  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 128  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 867  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nedeljkovic, M.; Tian, L.; Ji, P.; Deglon-Fischer, A.; Stute, P.; Ocon, E.; Birkhauser, M.; Ausfeld-Hafter, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine (Zhi Mu 14) on hot flushes and quality of life in postmenopausal women: results of a four-arm randomized controlled pilot trial Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 15-24  
  Keywords Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause; Postmenopause; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Herbal Formula; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; CAM Control; Placebo Herbal Formula  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a clinical trial investigating the effects of acupuncture (AP) and Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) on hot flushes and quality of life in postmenopausal women. METHODS: Forty postmenopausal women reporting at least 20 hot flushes per week were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. They were randomly allocated to receive traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) AP, sham AP, verum CHM, or placebo CHM for 12 weeks. Follow-up assessment was conducted 12 weeks after intervention. Primary outcome measures included hot flush frequency and severity. As a secondary outcome measure, the severity of menopausal symptoms was assessed using the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) II. RESULTS: TCM AP induced a significant decline in all outcome measures from pretreatment to posttreatment compared with sham AP (hot flush frequency, P = 0.016; hot flush severity, P = 0.013; MRS, P < 0.001). In the TCM AP group, a larger decrease in MRS scores persisted from pretreatment to follow-up (P = 0.048). No significant differences were noted between the verum CHM group and the placebo CHM group. Compared with the verum CHM group, there was a significant decrease in MRS scores (P = 0.002) and a trend toward a stronger decrease in hot flush severity (P = 0.06) in the TCM AP group from pretreatment to posttreatment. CONCLUSIONS: TCM AP is superior to sham AP and verum CHM in reducing menopausal symptoms, whereas verum CHM shows no significant improvements when compared with placebo CHM.  
  Address Institute of Complementary Medicine KIKOM, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 901  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Plaster, R.; Vieira, W. B.; Alencar, F. A.; Nakano, E. Y.; Liebano, R. E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial. Type of Study RCT
  Year (down) 2014 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 32 Issue Pages 236-241  
  Keywords Arthritis; Osteoarthritis, Knee; RCT; Acu Versus Acu; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Pain  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: Sixty patients with knee osteoarthritis, with a pain intensity of >/=2 on the pain Numerical Rating Scale, were included. The patients were randomised into two groups: manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture. Pain intensity, degree of dysfunction (Timed Up and Go (TUG) test), maximal voluntary isometric contraction and pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after a single session of manual acupuncture or electroacupuncture treatments. RESULTS: Both groups showed a significant reduction in pain intensity (p<0.001) and time to run the TUG test after the acupuncture treatment (p=0.005 for the manual acupuncture group and p=0.002 for the electroacupuncture group). There were no differences between the groups regarding pain intensity (p=0.25), TUG test (p=0.70), maximum voluntary isometric contraction (p=0.43) or pressure pain threshold (p=0.27). CONCLUSIONS: This study found no difference between the immediate effects of a single session of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on pain, muscle strength and mobility in patients with knee osteoarthritis. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER:: RBR-9TCN2X.  
  Address Master's and Doctoral Programs in Physical Therapy, Universidade Cidade de Sao Paulo (UNICID), , Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 954  
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