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Author Kim, M. K.; Choi, T. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Lee, H.; Han, C. H. url  openurl
  Title Contralateral acupuncture versus ipsilateral acupuncture in the rehabilitation of post-stroke hemiplegic patients: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 10 Issue (up) Pages 41-  
  Keywords Hemiplegia; Stroke; Systematic Review; Meta-Analysis; AcuTrials; Cerebral Hemorrhage; Cerebral Infarction; Acupuncture;  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Contralateral acupuncture (CAT) involves inserting needles in the meridian on the side opposite the disease location and is often used in post-stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize and critically evaluate the evidence for and against the effectiveness of CAT for post-stroke rehabilitation as compared to ipsilateral acupuncture (IAT). METHODS: Seventeen databases were searched from their inceptions through June 2010. Prospective clinical trials were included if CAT was tested as the sole treatment or as an adjunct to other treatments for post-stroke rehabilitation and compared to IAT. RESULTS: Eight randomized clinical trials (RCTs) met our inclusion criteria. Four of them reported favorable effects of CAT compared to IAT for at least one outcome. A meta-analysis showed superior effects of CAT compared to IAT on recovery rate (n = 361; risk ratio (RR), 1.12; 95% confidence intervals (CIs), 1.04 to 1.22, P = 0.005). Subgroup analysis also showed favorable effects of using CAT on patients with cerebral infarction (n = 261; RR, 1.15; 95% CIs, 1.04 to 1.27, P = 0.006). Further analysis including patients with cerebral infarction and intracranial hemorrhage, however, failed to show these advantages (n = 100; RR, 1.11; 95% CIs, 0.85 to 1.46, P = 0.43). CONCLUSION: The results of our systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that there is limited evidence for CAT being superior to IAT in the treatment of cerebral infarction. The total number of RCTs included in our analysis was low, however, and the RCTs included had a high risk of bias. Future RCTs appear to be warranted.  
  Address Department of Korean Internal Medicine, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, South Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hemiplegia
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 577  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, N.; Yang, B.; Lee, T.; Kwon, S. url  openurl
  Title An economic analysis of usual care and acupuncture collaborative treatment on chronic low back pain: a Markov model decision analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 10 Issue (up) Pages 74-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; AcuTrials; Cost Effectiveness; Cost-Benefit Analysis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The collaborative treatment of acupuncture in addition to routine care as an approach for the management of low back pain (LBP) is receiving increasing recognition from both public and professional arenas. In 2010, the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Family Affairs (MOHW) of South Korea approved the practice of doctors and Oriental medical doctors (acupuncture qualified) working together in the same facility and offering collaborative treatment at the same time for the same disease. However, there is little more than anecdotal evidence on the health and economic implications of this current practice. Therefore, the objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness and costs of acupuncture in addition to routine care in the treatment of chronic LBP patients in South Korea. METHODS: The Markov model was developed to synthesise evidence on both costs and outcomes for patients with chronic LBP. We conducted the base case analysis, univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses, and also performed the value of information analysis for future researches. Model parameters were sourced from systematic review of both alternatives, simple bibliographic reviews of relevant articles published in English or Korean, and statistical analyses of the 2005 and 2007 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey (KNHNS) data. The analyses were based on the societal perspective over a five year time horizon using a 5% discount rate. RESULTS: In the base case, collaborative treatment resulted in better outcomes, but at a relatively high cost. Overall, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of a collaborative practice was 3,421,394 KRW (Korean rate Won) per QALY (Quality adjusted life year) (2,895.80 USD per QALY). Univariate sensitivity analysis of indirect non-medical costs did not affect the preference order of the strategies. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed that if the threshold was over 3,260,000 KRW per QALY (2,759.20 USD per QALY), the probability for cost-effectiveness of a collaborative practice would exceed 50%. At 20,000,000 KRW per QALY, which is recommended using per capita gross domestic product (GDP) as the threshold, the probability would be 72.3%. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our findings, acupuncture collaborative therapy for patients with chronic LBP may be cost-effective if the usual threshold is applied. Further empirical studies are required to overcome the limitations of uncertainties and improve the precision of the results.  
  Address Seoul National University, Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul, South Korea. drkim@wonkwang.ac.kr  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 578  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Landgren, K.; Kvorning, N.; Hallstrom, I. url  openurl
  Title Feeding, stooling and sleeping patterns in infants with colic--a randomized controlled trial of minimal acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 11 Issue (up) Pages 93-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Pain; Colic; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Educational; Pediatrics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim was to describe the feeding- and stooling patterns of infants with colic and evaluate the influence of minimal acupuncture. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, controlled, blind clinical study was conducted at a private acupuncture clinic in Sweden. 90 otherwise healthy 2-8 weeks old infants, born after gestational week 36, fulfilling the criteria for infantile colic and not medicated with dicyclomine, were included. 81 infants went through a structured program consisting of six visits to the clinic, twice weekly. Infants randomized to receive acupuncture were given minimal, standardized acupuncture for two seconds in LI4. Frequency and size of stooling, as well as duration of, and intervals between, feeding sessions were reported by parents in a diary. Parental assessment of sleep and comments on stooling and side effects were collected in a questionnaire. RESULTS: At baseline when the mean age was five weeks, infants in both groups were fed a median of eight times/day, 148 min/day, with considerable variations. No differences were found between groups in the frequency and duration of feeding during the intervention weeks. Furthermore there were no significant differences between the groups regarding the frequency of stooling, neither at baseline, at which point the infants of both groups had bowel movements 4.2 times/day, nor during the intervention weeks. There was an expected decrease in frequency of stooling in both groups, reaching 2.1 (p = 0.001) in the acupuncture group and 3.1 (p < 0.001) in the control group. The groups differed regarding large bowel movements which decreased linearly in the control group (p = 0.011) but not in the acupuncture group (p = 0.787). More parents in the acupuncture group than in the control group (28% and 15% respectively, p = 0.006) experienced the infant's sleep to be “better” or “much better.” No other significant differences were found. However, parents described a normalized stooling and experienced an improvement in colic in their infants more frequently in the acupuncture group than in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Infants with colic in the present study had a higher frequency of stooling than reported internationally in healthy infants. Minimal acupuncture had no major effect on feeding, stooling and sleep, although a minor effect of minimal acupuncture on stooling and sleep cannot be ruled out. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.govID NCT00860301.  
  Address Department of Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. kajsa.landgren@med.lu.se  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Colic
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 623  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, S.; Yang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Liu, T.; Gan, L.; Zheng, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy and safety assessment of acupuncture and nimodipine to treat mild cognitive impairment after cerebral infarction: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 16 Issue (up) Pages 361  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Cerebral infarction; Mild cognitive impairment; Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale; Nimodipine  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cerebral infarction frequently leads to mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Prompt management of MCI can prevent vascular dementia and improve patient outcome. This single center randomized controlled trial aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture and nimodipine to treat post-cerebral infarction MCI. METHODS: A total of 126 Chinese patients with post-cerebral infarction MCI recruited from the First Teaching Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine between April 2013 and June 2014 were randomized at 1:1: 1 ratio into nimodipine alone (30 mg/time and 3 times daily), acupuncture alone (30 min/time, 6 times/week), and nimodipine + acupuncture groups. The treatments were 3 months. Cognitive function was evaluated using Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scale at enrollment interview, at the end of 3-month therapy, and at the post-treatment 3-month follow-up. RESULTS: The per-protocol set included 39, 40, and 40 patients from nimodipine alone, acupuncture alone, and the combination group, respectively, was analyzed. Intra-group comparison revealed that MoCA score at the follow-up improved significantly by 15.8 +/- 10.9, 20.9 +/- 13.8 %, and 30.2 +/- 19.7 % compared with the baseline MoCA for nimodipine alone, acupuncture alone, and the combination group, respectively. Inter-group comparison demonstrated that the combination therapy improved MoCA score (5.5 +/- 2.2) at significantly higher extent than nimodipine alone (3.1 +/- 1.8) and acupuncture alone (4.3 +/- 2.3) at the follow-up (All P < 0.05), and significantly higher proportion of patients in acupuncture alone group (80 %) and the combination therapy group (90 %) than in nimodipine alone group (56.4 %) showed >/=12 % MoCA score improvement compared with the baseline MoCA (All P < 0.05). No adverse event was reported during the study. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture may be used as an additional therapy to conventional pharmacological treatment to further improve the clinical outcomes of patients with post-cerebral infarction MCI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered at the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ( http://www.chictr.org.cn/ , Unique Identifier: ChiCTR-IOR-15007366 ). The date of registration is November 4, 2015.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, The First Teaching Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, 300193, China. jgzheng2008@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27623621; PMCID:PMC5022140 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2155  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arvidsdotter, T.; Marklund, B.; Taft, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of an integrative treatment, therapeutic acupuncture and conventional treatment in alleviating psychological distress in primary care patients – a pragmatic randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 13 Issue (up) Pages 308-317  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Stress, Psychological; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Depression; Anxiety; Counseling; Salutogenic Counseling  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To evaluate and compare effects of an integrative treatment (IT), therapeutic acupuncture (TA), and conventional treatment (CT) in alleviating symptoms of anxiety and depression in psychologically distressed primary care patients. METHODS: An open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial comparing the three treatment regimens at four and eight weeks after treatment. The study sample consisted of 120 adults (40 per treatment arm) aged 20 to 55 years referred from four different primary health care centres in western Sweden for psychological distress. Psychological distress was evaluated at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD). Treatment sessions lasted about 60 minutes in IT and 45 minutes in TA. RESULTS: No baseline differences were found between groups on HAD depression or anxiety. HAD anxiety and depression decreased significantly more in the IT and TA groups than in the CT group both after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, but not between IT and TA. Improvements in the TA and IT groups were large and clinically significant, whereas CT effects were small and clinically non-significant. CONCLUSIONS: Both IT and TA appear to be beneficial in reducing anxiety and depression in primary care patients referred for psychological distress, whereas CT does not. These results need to be confirmed in larger, longer-term studies addressing potentially confounding design issues in the present study. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN trial number NCT01631500.  
  Address Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. tina.arvidsdotter@vgregion.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Stress, Psychological
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 37  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Man, S. C.; Hung, B. H.; Ng, R. M.; Yu, X. C.; Cheung, H.; Fung, M. P.; Li, L. S.; Leung, K. P.; Leung, K. P.; Tsang, K. W.; Ziea, E.; Wong, V. T.; Zhang, Z. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A pilot controlled trial of a combination of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation and body acupuncture for post-stroke depression Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue (up) Pages 255-  
  Keywords RCT; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Pilot Study; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our previous studies have demonstrated the treatment benefits of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS), a novel brain stimulation therapy in patients with major depression, postpartum depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of DCEAS combined with body acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). METHODS: In a single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 43 patients with PSD were randomly assigned to 12 sessions of DCEAS plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 23), or sham (non-invasive cranial electroacupuncture, n-CEA) plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 20) for 3 sessions per week over 4 weeks. Treatment outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), the Clinical Global Impression – Severity scale (CGI-S) and Barthel Index (BI), a measure used to evaluate movement ability associated with daily self-caring activity. RESULTS: DCEAS produced a significantly greater reduction of both HAMD-17 and CGI-S as early as week 1 and CGI-S at endpoint compared to n-CEA, but subjects of n-CEA group exhibited a significantly greater improvement on BI at week 4 than DCEAS. Incidence of adverse events was not different in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that DCEAS could be effective in reducing stroke patients' depressive symptoms. Superficial electrical stimulation in n-CEA group may be beneficial in improving movement disability of stroke patients. A combination of DCEAS and body acupuncture can be considered a treatment option for neuropsychiatric sequelae of stroke. TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01174394.  
  Address The School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 10 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. zhangzj@hku.hk.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 43  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 812  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Park, J.; Hahn, S.; Park, J. Y.; Park, H. J.; Lee, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for ankle sprain: systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 13 Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Sprains and Strains; Ankle Injuries; Systematic Review; Meta-Analysis; Ankle Sprain  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Ankle sprain is one of the most frequently encountered musculoskeletal injuries; however, the efficacy of acupuncture in treating ankle sprains remains uncertain. We therefore performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence regarding acupuncture for ankle sprains. METHODS: We searched 15 data sources and two trial registries up to February 2012. Randomized controlled trials of acupuncture were included if they involved patients with ankle sprains and reported outcomes of symptom improvement, including pain. A Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool was used. Risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in a random effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed based on acupuncture type, grade of sprain, and control type. Sensitivity analyses were also performed with respect to risk of bias, sample size, and outcomes reported. RESULTS: Seventeen trials involving 1820 participants were included. Trial quality was generally poor, with just three reporting adequate methods of randomization and only one a method of allocation concealment. Significantly more participants in acupuncture groups reported global symptom improvement compared with no acupuncture groups (RR of symptoms persisting with acupuncture = 0.56, 95% CI 0.42-0.77). However, this is probably an overestimate due to the heterogeneity (I2 = 51%) and high risk of bias of the included studies. Acupuncture as an add-on treatment also improved global symptoms compared with other treatments only, without significant variability (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.51-0.73, I2 = 1%). The benefit of acupuncture remained significant when the analysis was limited to two studies with a low risk of bias. Acupuncture was more effective than various controls in relieving pain, facilitating return to normal activity, and promoting quality of life, but these analyses were based on only a small number of studies. Acupuncture did not appear to be associated with adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Given methodological shortcomings and the small number of high-quality primary studies, the available evidence is insufficient to recommend acupuncture as an evidence-based treatment option. This calls for further rigorous investigations.  
  Address Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea. erc633@khu.ac.kr.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Ankle Injuries
  Disease Category Sprains and Strains OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 932  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elden, H.; Ostgaard, H. C.; Fagevik-Olsen, M.; Ladfors, L.; Hagberg, H. url  openurl
  Title Treatments of pelvic girdle pain in pregnant women: adverse effects of standard treatment, acupuncture and stabilising exercises on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/ neonate Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine [electronic resource] Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 8 Issue (up) 1 Pages 34-  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Adverse Effects; Analgesia; Delivery, Obstetric; Exercise; Pain; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; AcuTrials; CAM Control  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous publications indicate that acupuncture is efficient for the treatment of pelvic girdle pain, PGP, in pregnant women. However, the use of acupuncture for PGP is rare due to insufficient documentation of adverse effects of this treatment in this specific condition. The aim of the present work was to assess adverse effects of acupuncture on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/ neonate in comparison with women that received stabilising exercises as adjunct to standard treatment or standard treatment alone. METHODS: In all, 386 women with PGP entered this controlled, single-blind trial. They were randomly assigned to standard treatment plus acupuncture (n=125), standard treatment plus specific stabilising exercises (n=131) or to standard treatment alone (n=130) for 6 weeks. Acupuncture that may be considered strong was used and treatment was started as early as in the second trimester of pregnancy. Adverse effects were recorded during treatment and throughout the pregnancy. Influence on the fetus was measured with cardiotocography (CTG) before-during and after 43 acupuncture sessions in 43 women. A standardised computerized method to analyze the CTG reading numerically (Oxford 8000, Oxford, England) was used. After treatment, the women rated their overall experience of the treatment and listed adverse events if any in a questionnaire. Data of analgesia and oxytocin augmentation during labour, duration of labour, frequency of preterm birth, operative delivery, Apgar score, cord-blood gas/ acid base balance and birth weight were also recorded. RESULTS: There were no serious adverse events after any of the treatments. Minor adverse events were common in the acupuncture group but women rated acupuncture favourably even despite this. The computerized or visually assessed CTG analyses of antenatal recordings in connection with acupuncture were all normal. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that acupuncture administered with a stimulation that may be considered strong led to minor adverse complaints from the mothers but had no observable severe adverse influences on the pregnancy, mother, delivery or the fetus/ neonate  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 386  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Pelvic Girdle Pain
  Disease Category Adverse Effects OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 287  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, J. I.; Choi, J. Y.; Lee, D. H.; Choi, T. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 1 Pages 97-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Ear Diseases; Tinnitus; Acupuncture  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has frequently been used to treat tinnitus, and acupuncture is a particularly popular option. The objective of this review was to assess the evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for tinnitus. METHODS: Fourteen databases were searched from the dates of their creation to July 4th, 2012. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included if acupuncture was used as the sole treatment. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias. RESULTS: A total of 9 RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality was mostly poor. Five RCTs compared the effectiveness of acupuncture or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture for treating tinnitus. The results failed to show statistically significant improvements. Two RCTs compared a short one-time scalp acupuncture treatment with the use of penetrating sham acupuncture at non-acupoints in achieving subjective symptom relief on a visual analog scale; these RCTs demonstrated significant positive effects with scalp acupuncture. Two RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional drug treatments. One of these RCTs demonstrated that acupuncture had statistically significant effects on the response rate in patients with nervous tinnitus, but the other RCT did not demonstrate significant effects in patients with senile tinnitus. CONCLUSIONS: The number, size and quality of the RCTs on the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus are not sufficient for drawing definitive conclusions. Further rigorous RCTs that overcome the many limitations of the current evidence are warranted.  
  Address Medical Research Division, Korea Institiute f oriential Medicine, Daejeomn 305 811, South Korea  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 570  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Manyanga, T.; Froese, M.; Zarychanski, R.; Abou-Setta, A.; Friesen, C.; Tennenhouse, M.; Shay, B. L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pain management with acupuncture in osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 14 Issue (up) 1 Pages 312-  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Pain; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The utility of acupuncture in managing osteoarthritis symptoms is uncertain. Trial results are conflicting and previous systematic reviews may have overestimated the benefits of acupuncture. METHODS: Two reviewers independently identified randomized controlled trials (up to May 2014) from multiple electronic sources (including PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, and CENTRAL) and reference lists of relevant articles, extracted data and assessed risk of bias (Cochrane's Risk of Bias tool). Pooled data are expressed as mean differences (MD), with 95% confidence intervals (CI) (random-effects model). RESULTS: We included 12 trials (1763 participants) comparing acupuncture to sham acupuncture, no treatment or usual care. We adjudicated most trials to be unclear (64%) or high (9%) risk of bias. Acupuncture use was associated with significant reductions in pain intensity (MD -0.29, 95% CI -0.55 to -0.02, I squared 0%, 10 trials, 1699 participants), functional mobility (standardized MD -0.34, 95% CI -0.55 to -0.14, I squared 70%, 9 trials, 1543 participants), health-related quality of life (standardized MD -0.36, 95% CI -0.58 to -0.14, I squared 50%, 3 trials, 958 participants). Subgroup analysis of pain intensity by intervention duration suggested greater pain intensity reduction with intervention periods greater than 4 weeks (MD -0.38, 95% CI -0.69 to -0.06, I squared 0%, 6 trials, 1239 participants). CONCLUSIONS: The use of acupuncture is associated with significant reductions in pain intensity, improvement in functional mobility and quality of life. While the differences are not as great as shown by other reviews, current evidence supports the use of acupuncture as an alternative for traditional analgesics in patients with osteoarthritis. Systematic review registration: CRD42013005405.  
  Address Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Osteoarthritis
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 822  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quispe-Cabanillas, J. G.; Damasceno, A.; Glehn, F.; Brandao, C. O.; Damasceno, B. P.; Silveira, W. D.; Santos, L. M. url  openurl
  Title Impact of electroacupuncture on quality of life for patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis under treatment with immunomodulators: A randomized study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 1 Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Autoimmune Diseases; Multiple Sclerosis; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Electroacupuncture; Near Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease mediated by an immune response to central nervous system antigens. Modern immunomodulatory therapies, however, do not ameliorate many of the symptoms, such as pain and depression. Patients thus seek alternative treatments, such as acupuncture, although the benefits of such treatments have not been objectively evaluated. The present study was thus designed to evaluate the effect of the use of acupuncture in the alleviation of the symptoms of patients with MS. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis undergoing treatment with immunomodulators were randomly distributed into sex-stratified experimental and placebo groups in a patient- and evaluator-blind design; they received either true or sham electroacupuncture during regular visits to the doctor in the university hospital outpatient clinic. Standardized questionnaires were used to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture on the quality of life of these patients. Initial and follow-up assessment included the evaluation of clinical status (Expanded Disability Status Scale), pain (Visual Analogue Scale) and quality of life (Functional Assessment of multiple Sclerosis) to ascertain the impact of electroacupuncture on the quality of life of these patients. RESULTS: Electroacupuncture improved various aspects of quality of life, including a reduction in pain and depression. The self-report scales were more sensitive to improvement than was the more objective clinical measure. CONCLUSION: This paper provides evidence that electroacupuncture can significantly improve the quality of life of such patients. The results suggest that the routine use of a self-report scale evaluating quality of life should be included in regular clinical evaluations in order to detect changes more rapidly.Trial RegistrationRBR-58yq52.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 31  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Multiple Sclerosis
  Disease Category Autoimmune Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 967  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stener-Victorin, E.; Holm, G.; Janson, P. O.; Gustafson, D.; Waern, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and physical exercise for affective symptoms and health-related quality of life in polycystic ovary syndrome: Secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 13 Issue (up) 1 Pages 131-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; Usual Care Control, Physical; Mental Disorders; Depression; Anxiety; Depressive Disorder  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have symptoms of depression and anxiety and impaired health related quality of life (HRQoL). Here we test the post-hoc hypothesis that acupuncture and exercise improve depression and anxiety symptoms and HRQoL in PCOS women. METHODS: Seventy-two PCOS women were randomly assigned to 16 weeks of 1) acupuncture (n = 28); 2) exercise (n = 29); or 3) no intervention (control) (n = 15). Outcome measures included: change in Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S), Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA-S), Swedish Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and PCOS Questionnaire (PCOSQ) scores from baseline to after 16-week intervention, and to 16-week post-intervention follow-up. RESULTS: A reduction in MADRS-S and BSA-S from baseline to 16-weeks post-intervention follow-up was observed for the acupuncture group. The SF-36 domains role physical, energy/vitality, general health perception and the mental component of summary scores improved in the acupuncture group after intervention and at follow-up. Within the exercise group the role physical decreased after treatment, while physical functioning and general health perception scores increased at follow-up. The emotion domain in the PCOSQ improved after 16-weeks of intervention within all three groups, and at follow-up in acupuncture and exercise groups. At follow-up, improvement in the infertility domain was observed within the exercise group. CONCLUSION: There was a modest improvement in depression and anxiety scores in women treated with acupuncture, and improved HRQoL scores were noted in both intervention groups. While not a primary focus of the trial, these data suggest continued investigation of mental health outcomes in women treated for PCOS.Trial registration numberClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00484705.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 72  
  Time in Treatment 16 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1105  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yeh, B. Y.; Hsu, Y. C.; Huang, J. Y.; Shih, I. T.; Zhuo, W. J.; Tsai, Y. F.; Chang, C. J.; Yu, H. P. url  openurl
  Title Effect of electroacupuncture in postanesthetic shivering during regional anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication BMC complementary and alternative medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 1 Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Miscellaneous; Shivering; Core Body Temperature; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Sham; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Electroacupuncture; Anesthesia  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Shivering during regional anesthesia is a common complication and is related to a decrease in the patient's core body temperature. Previous studies have shown that acupuncture on specific acupoints can preserve core body temperature. The present study evaluated the effect of electroacupuncture in preventing the shivering caused by regional anesthesia. METHODS: This prospective and randomized controlled study analyzed the data from 80 patients undergoing urological surgery, who were classified as ASA I or II. Spinal anesthesia was performed in all patients using 15 mg of bupivacaine. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either placebo acupuncture (Group P, n = 40) or electroacupuncture (Group A, n = 40) for 30 min before administration of spinal anesthesia. Shivering score was recorded at 5 min intervals, with 0 representing no shivering and 4 representing the most severe shivering possible. Heart rate, blood pressure, and tympanic temperature were recorded before the intrathecal injection, and again every 5 min thereafter until 30 min. RESULTS: After spinal anesthesia, the decrease in tympanic temperature was less for Group A patients than Group P, with the difference being statistically significant. After 15 min, 13 patients in Group P attained a shivering score of 3 or more, compared with 3 patients in Group A. Significantly more patients in Group P attained a shivering score of at least 1. CONCLUSIONS: The prophylactic use of electroacupuncture might maintain core body temperature, and may effectively prevent the shivering that commonly develops during regional anesthesia.Trial registrationAustralian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000096853.  
  Address Department of Chinese Acupuncture and Traumatology, Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Shivering
  Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1377  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qin, Z.; Zang, Z.; Wu, J.; Zhou, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndromes: study protocol for a randomized, sham acupuncture-controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 16 Issue (up) 1 Pages 440  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome; Efficacy; Randomized controlled trial  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) affects many adult men worldwide. The currently available therapies offer little or no proven benefit for CP/CPPS. We designed this study to assess the efficacy of acupuncture therapy for the treatment of CP/CPPS. METHODS: This study is designed as a randomized, sham acupuncture-controlled trial. We will compare patients with CP/CPPS in an acupuncture group and a sham acupuncture group. Sixty-eight patients will be randomly allocated to receive acupuncture or sham acupuncture. The treatments will consist of 30-min sessions, three times weekly, for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure is change in the weekly mean National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) total score from baseline through the 8-week treatment period. Secondary measures include the NIH-CPSI subscale scores, the total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), patients' response rate, and patient satisfaction after treatment. We will also assess changes in the NIH-CPSI total score from baseline at the 20th and 32nd week of follow-up. DISCUSSION: This is a randomized, sham-controlled trial of acupuncture treatment for CP/CPPS. The results of this trial will provide more evidence on whether acupuncture is efficacious for treating CP/CPPS. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trials.gov NCT02588274.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100053, China. liuzhishun@aliyun.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27821109; PMCID:PMC5100285 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2114  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shiue, H.-S.; Lee, Y.-S.; Tsai, C.-N.; Chang, H.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Treatment of allergic rhinitis with acupoint herbal plaster: an oligonucleotide chip analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 16 Issue (up) 1 Pages 436  
  Keywords Acupoint herbal plaster; Allergic rhinitis; Oligonucleotide chip  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Allergic rhinitis is regarded as an imbalanced Th1/Th2 cell-mediated response. The present study used microarray analysis to compare gene expression levels between allergic rhinitis patients before and after a series of acupoint herbal plaster applications. METHODS: In this experimental pilot study, volunteers experiencing sneezing, runny nose, and congestion for more than 9 months in the year following initial diagnoses were included after diagnostic confirmation by otolaryngologists to exclude patients with sinusitis and nasal polyps. Patients with persistent allergic rhinitis each received four acupoint herbal plaster treatments applied using the moxibustion technique. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ). Peripheral blood samples were analyzed using an ImmunoCAP Phadiatop test, and patients were classified as phadiatop (Ph)-positive or -negative. Microarray results were analyzed for genes that were differentially expressed between (1) Ph-positive and -negative patients treated with herbal plaster; and (2) before and after herbal plaster treatment in the Ph-positive patient group. Unsupervised and supervised methods were used for gene-expression data analysis. RESULTS: Nineteen Ph-positive and four Ph-negative participants with persistent allergic rhinitis were included in the study. RQLQ results indicated that the 19 Ph-positive volunteers experienced improvement in six of seven categories following acupoint herbal plaster treatments, whereas the four Ph-negative participants reported improvement in only two categories. Hierarchical clustering and principle component analysis of the gene expression profiles of Ph-positive and -negative participants indicated the groups exhibited distinct physiological responses to acupoint herbal treatment. Evaluation of gene networks using MetaCore identified that the “Immune responseIL-13 signaling via JAK-STAT” and the “InflammationInterferon signaling” were down- and up-regulated, respectively, among Ph-positive subjects. CONCLUSIONS: In this preliminary study, we find that the IL-13 immune response via JAK-STAT signaling and interferon inflammation signaling were down- and upregulated, respectively, in the Ph-positive group. Further studies are required to verify these pathways in Ph-positive patients, and to determine the mechanism of such pathway dysregulation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02486159 . Registered 30 Jun 2015.  
  Address Departments of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. tcmchh55@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27814709; PMCID:PMC5097372 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2116  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, T.; Xu, C.; Pan, K.; Xiong, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic fatigue syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue (up) 1 Pages 163  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: As the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is unclear and the treatment is still a big issue. There exists a wide range of literature about acupuncture and moxibustion (AM) for CFS in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). But there are certain doubts as well in the effectiveness of its treatment due to the lack of a comprehensive and evidence-based medical proof to dispel the misgivings. Current study evaluated systematically the effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion treatments on CFS, and clarified the difference among them and Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture. METHODS: We comprehensively reviewed literature including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CBM (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database) and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) up to May 2016, for RCT clinical research on CFS treated by acupuncture and moxibustion. Traditional direct meta-analysis was adopted to analyze the difference between AM and other treatments. Analysis was performed based on the treatment in experiment and control groups. Network meta-analysis was adopted to make comprehensive comparisons between any two kinds of treatments. The primary outcome was total effective rate, while relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used as the final pooled statistics. RESULTS: A total of 31 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were enrolled in analyses. In traditional direct meta-analysis, we found that in comparison to Chinese herbal medicine, CbAM (combined acupuncture and moxibustion, which meant two or more types of acupuncture and moxibustion were adopted) had a higher total effective rate (RR (95% CI), 1.17 (1.09 ~ 1.25)). Compared with Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture, SAM (single acupuncture or single moxibustion) had a higher total effective rate, with RR (95% CI) of 1.22 (1.14 ~ 1.30), 1.51 (1.31-1.74), 5.90 (3.64-9.56). In addition, compared with SAM, CbAM had a higher total effective rate (RR (95% CI), 1.23 (1.12 ~ 1.36)). In network meta-analyses, similar results were recorded. Subsequently, we ranked all treatments from high to low effective rate and the order was CbAM, SAM, Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: In the treatment of CFS, CbAM and SAM may have better effect than other treatments. However, the included trials have relatively poor quality, hence high quality studies are needed to confirm our finding.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Gaotanyan Road 30, Shapingba District, Chongqing, 400038, China. hongyanxiong@126.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28335756; PMCID:PMC5363012 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2188  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, B.H.; Kim, K.; Nam, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A comparative study on the effects of systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture, and digital electroacupuncture to treat tinnitus: A randomized, paralleled, open-labeled exploratory trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue (up) 1 Pages 85  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Ear Diseases; Tinnitus; Hearing Disorders; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Auricular Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; CAM Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many previous studies of electroacupuncture used combined therapy of electroacupuncture and systemic manual acupuncture, so it was uncertain which treatment was effective. This study evaluated and compared the effects of systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture and distal electroacupuncture for treating patients with tinnitus. METHODS: A randomized, parallel, open-labeled exploratory trial was conducted. Subjects aged 20-75 years who had suffered from idiopathic tinnitus for > 2 weeks were recruited from May 2013 to April 2014. The subjects were divided into three groups by systemic manual acupuncture group (MA), periauricular electroacupuncture group (PE), and distal electroacupuncture group (DE). The groups were selected by random drawing. Nine acupoints (TE 17, TE21, SI19, GB2, GB8, ST36, ST37, TE3 and TE9), two periauricular acupoints (TE17 and TE21), and four distal acupoints (TE3, TE9, ST36, and ST37) were selected. The treatment sessions were performed twice weekly for a total of eight sessions over 4 weeks. Outcomes were the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) score and the loud and uncomfortable visual analogue scales (VAS). Demographic and clinical characteristics of all participants were compared between the groups upon admission using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). One-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the THI, VAS loud, and VAS uncomfortable scores. The least significant difference test was used as a post-hoc test. RESULTS: Thirty-nine subjects were eligible and their data were analyzed. No difference in THI and VAS loudness scores was observed in between groups. The VAS uncomfortable scores decreased significantly in MA and DE compared with those in PE. Within the group, all three treatments showed some effect on THI, VAS loudness scores and VAS uncomfortable scores after treatment except DE in THI. CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference between systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture and distal electroacupuncture in tinnitus. However, all three treatments had some effect on tinnitus within the group before and after treatment. Systemic manual acupuncture and distal electroacupuncture have some effect on VAS uncomfortable. TRIAL REGISTRATION: KCT0001991 by CRIS (Clinical Research Information Service), 2016-8-1, retrospectively registered.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 130-701, Republic of Korea. ophthrl@khu.ac.kr  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 42  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28143471; PMCID:PMC5282839 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2189  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dos Santos Maciel, L.Y.; Dos Santos Leite, P.M.; Neto, M.L.P.; Mendonca, A.C.R.; de Araujo, C.C.A.; da Hora Santos Souza, J.; DeSantana, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of the placebo effect between different non-penetrating acupuncture devices and real acupuncture in healthy subjects: a randomized clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2016 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 16 Issue (up) 1 Pages 518  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Healthy Subjects; Acupuncture; Placebo; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Several studies have used placebo acupuncture methods in recent years as a way for blinding therapeutic effect of acupuncture, however placebo method selection has not followed enough methodological criteria to the point of stabilishing a consensus of what should be the best method to be used. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of three different placebo acupuncture methods for blinding applied in healthy subjects. METHODS: This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Federal University of Sergipe with the number 47193015.5.0000.5546 and all individuals participating in the study signed a free and informed consent. For this study, 321 healthy volunteers were randomly divided into seven groups using the abdominal point stomach (ST) 25 and seven groups using the lumbar point bladder (Bl) 52 for stimulation. For real acupuncture procedure, three different methods of placebo acupuncture plus a mix between real acupuncture and placebo applied in the same individual, totaling fourteen groups in this study. Outcome assessments were performed before and immediately after applying the technique. Investigator who assessed variables had no knowledgement about the method was applied. Identification, weight and height were measured before puncture by using. At the end, subjects were asked if they believed they were receiving real or placebo acupuncture. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between groups for the perception about the type o stimulation (wheter real or placebo puncture). Percentage of subjects who reported to have received real acupuncture in the abdominal point was 69.56% in real group, 86.95% in group Park Sham, 82.60% in needle + foam, 91.30% in insertion and removal, 78.26% in real + Park Sham, 86.36% in real + needle and foam, 86.95% in real + insertion and removal, and for the lumbar point was 86.36% in real group, 86.95% in group Park Sham, 69.56% in needle + foam, 72% in insertion and removal, 86.95% in real + Park Sham, 81.81% in real + needle and foam and 78.26% in real + insertion and removal. CONCLUSION: All placebo acupuncture methods proposed in this study were equally effective for bliding the study participants using either abdominal or lumbar acupoints, and none of the placebo methods presented benefit compared to the other to be used in future clinical trials. ETHICS COMMITTEE: Federal University of Sergipe (UFS), number of approval: 47193015.5.0000.5546 TRIAL REGISTRATION: ensaiosclinicos.gov.br RBR-3w2p32 Registered in 28th January 2016.  
  Address Professor of the Department of Physical Therapy and Post Graduate Programs in Health Sciences and Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Sergipe, Rua Claudio Batista, s/n. Bairro Santo Antonio, CEP 49060-100, Aracaju, Sergipe, Brasil. desantana@pq.cnpq.br  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency N/A Number of Participants 321  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Healthy Subjects
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27978834; PMCID:PMC5159982 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2190  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Oka, H.; Matsudaira, K.; Takano, Y.; Kasuya, D.; Niiya, M.; Tonosu, J.; Fukushima, M.; Oshima, Y.; Fujii, T.; Tanaka, S.; Inanami, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A comparative study of three conservative treatments in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: lumbar spinal stenosis with acupuncture and physical therapy study (LAP study) Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 18 Issue (up) 1 Pages 19  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Conservative Treatment; Female; Humans; Lumbar Vertebrae/*physiopathology; Male; Patient Satisfaction; *Physical Therapy Modalities; Spinal Stenosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; Acupuncture; Conservative management; Exercise; Lumbar spinal stenosis; Medication; Zurich claudication questionnaire  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Although the efficiency of conservative management for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) has been examined, different conservative management approaches have not been compared. We have performed the first comparative trial of three types of conservative management (medication with acetaminophen, exercise, and acupuncture) in Japanese patients with LSS. METHODS: Patients with L5 root radiculopathy associated with LSS who visited our hospital for surgical treatment were enrolled between December 2011 and January 2014. In this open-label study, patients were assigned to three treatment groups (medication, exercise, acupuncture) according to the visit time. The primary outcomes were Zurich claudication questionnaire (ZCQ) scores before and after 4 weeks of treatment. Least square mean analysis was used to assess the following dependent variables in the treatment groups: changes in symptom severity and physical function scores of the ZCQ and the ZCQ score of patient's satisfaction after treatment. RESULTS: Thirty-eight, 40, and 41 patients were allocated to the medication, exercise, and acupuncture groups, respectively. No patient underwent surgical treatment during the study period. The symptom severity scores of the ZCQ improved significantly after treatment in the medication (p = 0.048), exercise (p = 0.003), and acupuncture (p = 0.04) groups. The physical function score improved significantly in the acupuncture group (p = 0.045) but not in the medication (p = 0.20) and exercise (p = 0.29) groups. The mean reduction in the ZCQ score for physical function was significantly greater for acupuncture than for exercise. The mean ZCQ score for treatment satisfaction was significantly greater for acupuncture than for medication. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture was significantly more effective than physical exercise according to the physical function score of the ZCQ and than medication according to the satisfaction score. The present study provides new important information that will aid decision making in LSS treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study was registered with the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry ( UMIN000006957 ).  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwai Orthopaedic Medical Hospital, Tokyo, Japan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29351748; PMCID:PMC5775532 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2438  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Oka, H.; Matsudaira, K.; Takano, Y.; Kasuya, D.; Niiya, M.; Tonosu, J.; Fukushima, M.; Oshima, Y.; Fujii, T.; Tanaka, S.; Inanami, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A comparative study of three conservative treatments in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: lumbar spinal stenosis with acupuncture and physical therapy study (LAP study) Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 18 Issue (up) 1 Pages 19  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Aged; Conservative Treatment; Female; Humans; Lumbar Vertebrae/*physiopathology; Male; Patient Satisfaction; *Physical Therapy Modalities; Spinal Stenosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; Acupuncture; Conservative management; Exercise; Lumbar spinal stenosis; Medication; Zurich claudication questionnaire  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Although the efficiency of conservative management for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) has been examined, different conservative management approaches have not been compared. We have performed the first comparative trial of three types of conservative management (medication with acetaminophen, exercise, and acupuncture) in Japanese patients with LSS. METHODS: Patients with L5 root radiculopathy associated with LSS who visited our hospital for surgical treatment were enrolled between December 2011 and January 2014. In this open-label study, patients were assigned to three treatment groups (medication, exercise, acupuncture) according to the visit time. The primary outcomes were Zurich claudication questionnaire (ZCQ) scores before and after 4 weeks of treatment. Least square mean analysis was used to assess the following dependent variables in the treatment groups: changes in symptom severity and physical function scores of the ZCQ and the ZCQ score of patient's satisfaction after treatment. RESULTS: Thirty-eight, 40, and 41 patients were allocated to the medication, exercise, and acupuncture groups, respectively. No patient underwent surgical treatment during the study period. The symptom severity scores of the ZCQ improved significantly after treatment in the medication (p = 0.048), exercise (p = 0.003), and acupuncture (p = 0.04) groups. The physical function score improved significantly in the acupuncture group (p = 0.045) but not in the medication (p = 0.20) and exercise (p = 0.29) groups. The mean reduction in the ZCQ score for physical function was significantly greater for acupuncture than for exercise. The mean ZCQ score for treatment satisfaction was significantly greater for acupuncture than for medication. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture was significantly more effective than physical exercise according to the physical function score of the ZCQ and than medication according to the satisfaction score. The present study provides new important information that will aid decision making in LSS treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study was registered with the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry ( UMIN000006957 ).  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwai Orthopaedic Medical Hospital, Tokyo, Japan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29351748; PMCID:PMC5775532 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2479  
Permanent link to this record
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